Page 1

YEAR

2010

FIELD NOTES REAL SCHOOL GARDENS AN ANNUAL REPORT

THRU

2011


THIS JOURNAL BELONGS TO:

PA G E

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

1

Letter from the Executive Director

3

About REAL School Gardens

4-5

Building Gardens

6-7

Training Educators

8-9

Growing Successful Students

10 - 11

Financial Statement

12

Awards and Achievements

13 - 15

Donors and Contributors

16

Partners

NOTES

R E A L S C H O O L G A R D E N S S TA F F

Jeanne McCarty, Executive Director

Nancy Payne, Garden Designer

Jeff Cross, Director of Finance and Operations

Eric Vanderbeck, Educator

Scott Feille, Program Director

Sarah Darley, Grants Manager

Matt Hackler, Director of Development

Shailin Makhani, Programming and Events Coordinator

Jennifer Fitzgerald, Director of Community Relations

Kendra Lemon, Program Assistant

Ellen Robinson, Educator

REAL SCHOOL GARDENS BOARD MEMBERS

Kelly Garrett, Chair (part year), Executive Director, Rainwater Foundation Frederick G. Thompson, Chair (part year), Principal, The Communications Collaborative, LLC Delaine Eastin, California State Superintendent of Public Instruction Emerita Jeanne McCarty, Executive Director, REAL School Gardens Robert Menzi, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation


PA G E

Letter from the Executive Director

1

take a peek at REAL learning. riends and Supporters of REAL School Gardens, Imagine these pages worn—smudged with dirt and wrinkled from the Texas heat. The corners are dog-eared, the pages thick with taped-in photos and plant specimens. Written in pencil, pen, crayon—whatever was at hand out in the research field—are notes, observations, even poetry. The markings fill the lines and spill into the margins, telling stories of nature, curiosity, and imagination, and if you listen closely, you will hear the sound of children learning coming from our gardens. As one principal recently put it, “The garden makes for the best science classroom and lab.” I couldn’t agree more. Students who have been in a REAL school garden know what a science journal is, and why it is important. They know that, despite its name, it documents more than scientific data. It holds observations of nature, reflections on experiences, and discoveries of the outside world. This is our science journal, documenting our eighth year at REAL School Gardens. Here we share observations from a year in which more than 40,000 students and 2,500 educators benefitted from real-world learning opportunities in REAL school gardens. Take a peek at our accomplishments, our milestones and the unique program we have built. After eight years and 74 school partners, we’re proud to report that over 90% of the outdoor classrooms we’ve helped to establish continue to spark learning in young minds. With the success of our model, we are looking for opportunities to bring REAL School Gardens to new locations in Texas and across the country. So, thumb through these pages and you’ll see students measuring perennial beds to bring area and perimeter to life. You’ll hear students debating the relative merits of the fungus, bacteria and invertebrates at work in their compost bins. You’ll feel their excitement as they grow their own food and make new friends. And you’ll learn about the lasting impacts of our program and why we must grow it. Go ahead—turn the page. Sincerely, Jeanne McCarty, Executive Director


PA G E

About REAL School Gardens

3

planting seeds for successful students Since 2003, REAL School Gardens has partnered with high-poverty elementary schools to create learning gardens that grow successful students. A program unlike any other in our field, we provide state-of-the-art outdoor classrooms along with a set of integrated services to help them thrive. Through a multi-year educator training program and active community engagement, we help our partner schools establish outdoor learning programs that last. “We tried creating a garden on our own, but were not successful,” one principal explained, “REAL School Gardens helps us make the garden a regular part of our curriculum.”

ROOTS:

STEM:

BLOSSOMS:

Design & Support

Educator Training

Successful Students

Because we are committed to

The hundreds of teachers

Through their experiences in

long-term sustainability, we

who we train annually tell

learning gardens, children

provide multi-year financial

us that our on-site, hands-

achieve :

support, community-driven

on instruction is practical,

garden design and installation,

enjoyable, and among the

• Greater gains in content knowledge and skills

year-round planting and

best they’ve ever received.

maintenance guidance, and

As a result, we ensure that

assistance in developing strong

teachers are equipped with

community partnerships.

the tools to provide

Our approach activates parent

engaging, real-world

involvement and community

learning opportunities for

investment on high-poverty

students as a regular part

elementary school campuses.

of their school day.

5

districts

74 schools

• A stronger connection to the natural world • A lifetime of healthy habits • Improved pro-social skills

2,600 40,000 stud

educator s

ents


PA G E

4

Building Gardens

creating spaces for hands-on learning Our learning gardens come to life with the active support of a diverse group of stakeholders, from teachers and principals to parents, neighbors and local businesses. While every REAL school garden includes standard features proven to spark learning across the curriculum, each school community helps design their learning garden so that it addresses the community’s unique needs and priorities.

Perennials

are chosen for their attract iveness to bir ds and butterflies, allowing for close study in natural h abit are planted w ats. Gardens that it h enough m ilkweed are cert ified as “Monarch Waystations, ” attract ing these butterflies on their way sou th in the fall and north in the spring.

Students literally get hands-on experience with the animals and insects that are attracted to their outdoor classrooms. These experiences take students’ understanding of life cycles, metamorphosis, and a host of other processes to a level not possible with a textbook alone.

N E W S C H O O L PA RT N E R S William Lipscomb Elementary School, Dallas ISD; Highland Meadows Elementary School, Dallas ISD; Ronald J. McNair Elementary School, Dallas ISD; Foster Elementary School, Arlington ISD; Harlean Beal Elementary School, Fort Worth ISD; Holiday Heights Elementary School, Birdville ISD


PA G E

Building Gardens

5

Experience handling and experimenting wit h rocks representing the different stages of the roc k cycle—sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic — provides students wit h a deeper understanding of geological processe s and features.

“I had no idea of how grand

this garden installation was

going to be. IT WAS SPECTACULAR,

and everyone I have talked to from

our groups really enjoyed seeing it all come together. I am hoping this will become an annual volunteer

event for us.” — Volunteer at garden installation

uga at Wata ne o is h t like pus focal Ponds y can become cam ies for nit tar Elemen g opportu t t he in d i ov pr ore abou points, learn m to ponents n e r ving com child i l p ire n o nd n also ins a g ds n n o vi P i l at. t ion and r habit et reflec i of a wate u q g durin students . writ ing journal

N E W S C H O O L PA RT N E R S Mike Moseley Elementary School, Grand Prairie ISD; Lida Hooe Elementary School, Dallas ISD; Travis Elementary School, Grand Prairie ISD; Dwight D. Eisenhower Elementary School, Grand Prairie ISD; Lorenzo de Zavala Elementary School, Grand Prairie ISD; Juan Seguin Elementary School, Grand Prairie ISD


PA G E

6

Training Educators

nurturing instruction that grows strong leaders REAL School Gardens’ research-based educator training program works because it addresses educators’ greatest needs. Our training emphasizes the importance of sensory observations, student-driven inquiry, and critical thinking skills across all subjects, with a focus on math and science. Interactive sessions in language arts, math, and science, that support the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), allow teachers to experience activities the way the students will experience them. As a result, children develop learning strategies for the long-term, helping them achieve far more than just passing scores on standardized tests.

Our partner schools receive : • A full-day, in-the-garden training for their faculties • T  wo years of targeted training for their lead outdoor educators • On-the-job training with our staff educators • Consultation and support on an as-needed basis

put rea lly e v a h L of “You T MODE A E R s G r a Teacher . e b tog ethe hould ou ining] s a r t what y [ y w b ho d e e motivat ents ar d u are so t s d ou ng an a ll of y o are doi t s k an s.” ing. Th a ll of u r o f benefitt o d at you or for wh nistrat — Admi orth ISD Fort W


PA G E

Training Educators

EVALUATING OUR IMPACT : In 2010, REAL School Gardens undertook a rigorous evaluation with PEER Associates, Inc. to measure the effectiveness of our educator training program.

That assessment indicates : • O ur training improves teacher quality and effectiveness by increasing content knowledge and fostering confidence • Our training improves teacher morale • Our learning gardens are central to school culture and community • Our learning gardens are a key tool which teachers use to improve academic achievement

S IGNS O F I M PAC T :

trained in full-day workshops 226 teachers in their learning gardens teachers trained in on-the-job garden 337 integration visits educators asserted that our training % of is directly with state 86 curriculumaligned standards

88

%

of educators indicated they would apply the training to their own lessons right away of educators reported that teaching

90% outdoors energizes them as educators Fort Worth ISD educators supported through training and online lesson delivery

2,284

“Thanks for inspiring me to ‘think outside the box’ and not just hand

out worksheets.”

- Educator, Arlington ISD

7


PA G E

8

Growing Successful Students

Nurturing Success for the whole child At the heart of our work is a commitment to creating learning gardens that grow successful students. We believe that learning gardens can nurture success for the whole child.

MIND:

BODY:

SPIRIT:

An Engaged Mind

A Healthy Body

A Connection to others

In learning gardens,

Experience being physically

In our learning gardens,

children are invited to explore,

active and growing their

children work cooperatively,

formulating their own

own food in learning gardens

take responsibility and

questions and conducting

sets children on the path

practice empathy.

their own investigations.

to making informed and responsible decisions about

A Connection to their Environment

their health and fitness.

The next generation of environmental stewards and problem solvers are growing right now amid the rain barrels, organic plants and compost bins of learning gardens.


PA G E

Growing Successful Students

smart potatoes: Project-Based Learning

and

9

giving back

In February 2011, twelve partner schools took part in “Smart Potatoes,” a semester-long project that offers students the chance to grow healthy food in their school gardens, share their harvest with those in need within their own neighborhoods and take part in some rigorous scientific investigations along the way. Throughout the spring, as the plants inched their way above the soil, students worked alongside a botanist from the Botanical Research Institute of Texas to explore the potato from a nutritional, historical, and biological perspective.

400 POUNDS o f POTATOES D ONATED TO: United Baptist Church NEED West Refugee Services of Texas, Fort Worth Arlington Charities Travis A venue Baptist Church Christlife Church Presbyterian Night Shelter Mission Arlington “What we exper ienced [during our ha rvest] was more than I coul d have ever imagined. The “W OWS” and “YEAHS” and “H OLY COWS” were off the sc a les.” — Educator Fort Worth ISD


PA G E

10

Statement of Activities and Financial Position

financial position

for the

fiscal year ended June 30, 2011

REAL School Gardens’ total revenue for the year was $1.29 million. 77.0% of this total represented public support from foundations, 12.4% cash and in-kind donations from corporations, 3.7% gifts from individual donors and 6.9% from other sources. This year we continued to seek diversification in funding sources and delivered professional development for teachers to school districts and schools on a fee basis for the first time. Related program revenue totaled $37,857. Our expenses for the year totaled $1.26 million. $957,305 (76.2%) was invested in program services, including educator training and resources; design, installation and support of learning gardens; and community engagement.

DISTR I BUTION : Of All Expenses

DISTRIBUTION: Program services 76.2% Fundraising Management and General

14.1% 9.7%

Of Program Services

Learning Garden ng Design and Buildi Educator Training Community Engagement

41.4%

30.5%

28.1%


PA G E

11

Statement of Activities and Financial Position

REVENUE

T O TA L TEM PORARI LY UNR E ST RI CTED RESTRI CTED 2011 2010

AND OTHER SUPPORT

Contributions

$1,057,823

Interest income

$145,944 $1,203,767 $1,087,934

$3,345

$0

$3,345

$2,908

Rental income

$28,501

$0

$28,501

$44,084

Other income

$56,590

$0

$56,590

$521

Net assets released from restrictions: Satisfaction of program restrictions $74,768 ($74,768) -

-

TOTAL REVENUE, GAINS AND OTHER SUPPORT

1,221,027

$

71,176

$

1,292,203 $1,135,447

$

EXPENSES

T O TA L 2 011 2011 2010

Program services

$957,305

-

$957,305

$1,010,856

Management and general

$122,099

-

$122,099

$164,141

Fundraising

$177,883

- $177,883 $136,315

TOTAL EXPENSES

1,257,287

Net assets at beginning of year

484,823

Change In net assets

(36,260)

NET ASSETS

AT

END

OF

YEAR

448,563

$

- $8,324 $71,176

79,500

$

1,257,287

1,311,312

$493,147

$669,012

$34,916

($175,865)

528,063

$

493,147

$


PA G E

12

Awards and Achievements

GROWING INTO A NATIONAL LEADER tal En vironmen to ce vi r e S g andin Association n a Outst ic r e m A orth Education, N n (NAAEE) o ti a c u d E ental for En vironm d for tional Awar a N , ce la P d y Greening, it 2 n n u mm Co d n an Beautificatio a Beautiful Keep Americ

Educational ff a r G y Ra die 1st Place, Sa Beautiful as x e T p ee K , Award I nst itution ir er s in McNa y la P L F N d ste en, Ho arning gard le s l’ oo ch S Elementary First Lady in d e r tu a fe which was g t’s Move blo e L ’s a m a b O Michelle etropolitan M of y a W d e Unit e p recipient of o T nt to improv a r g t  c a p im unity Dallas comm ath learning m d n a ce n ie sc


PA G E

Donors and Contributors

13

INVESTORS IN A STRONGER GENERATION We are grateful for the financial support of a diverse and growing community.

Leadership Supporters

Martha Hayes

Alcon Foundation

The Hersh Foundation

Organizations and Individuals

Tracy Hollis

Luke & Sarah Abraham

Cindy Johnson Bonnie & Randy Jones

Dr. David Aftandilian & Dr. Sarah Rose

Edna Kalson

Albertson’s LLC

Ruth Kinler

Alliance Data

John Langdon

Kim Andersen

Jeanne McCarty & Jason Hewitt

Anonymous

Blair & Bill McGroarty

Justin & Jordan Arnt

Susan Montgomery

Balcom Agency

Debra Morrow

Janet Barger

Whole Foods Market

Beverly & Calvin Payne

Sam Bauman

Suzy Peacock Friendship Circle

Karen Reynolds

Marlene Beatty

Kathryn Rosenthal

Gregory Blair

Sebastian Construction

Blooms Landcare

Michelle Schneider

Botanical Research Institute of Texas

The Boone Family Foundation Chesapeake Energy Corporation Chipotle Mexican Grill The Embrey Family Foundation Healthways, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Foundation The Medtronic Foundation Mercedes-Benz Financial Services NFL Players, Inc. Rainwater Charitable Foundation

Jessica & Todd Barr David & Bettye Bell Michael & Linda Bourland Arden Bucklin-Sporer Dr. Laura Carstensen Kathy Cash & Eric Vanderbeck Terry Chadsey Lance Cobb Leslie Cook Jeff Cross Sarah Darley Suzanne & Charles Davis Jane Dempster Anne & Eddie Dunlap Scott & Kelly Feille W.A. Grammer Richard Hartman

Lois Scott Dr. Jason Simus John Simus Sy & Sara Sohmer Kimberly Speairs Matthew & Jessi Rainwater Richard Rainwater Kathleen Rall Richard Rall Teton Science Schools Jean & Bill Tucker John Tucker Suzanne Tuttle Alison Wexler

Alana Branum Traci Buschner Eric Carlson Janet Chamberlain Pam Chamberlain Evelyn Chen Nancy Christiansen Ginger Ciminello Saundra Claunch Cold Springs Farm Jo Ann Collins The Colonial Country Club Charitable Fund of the Community Foundation of North Texas Communities Foundation of Texas Lori Como


PA G E

14

Donors and Contributors

Rosemary Costello

Kathleen Grady

Maree Lewis

Mr. & Mrs. James Coulter, Coulter 2006 Management Trust

Kelli Graham

Emily Lindrose

Bradley Cross

Melinda & John Gratwick

Shailin Makhani

Tanuja Gupta

Sarah Martin

Colynne Gutekunst

Dr. & Mrs. Kenneth McCarty

Darlene Hackler

Morgan & Angela McCarty

Matt Hackler

Dr. M. McDonald

Scott Hackler

Kathy McReynolds

Kevin Hageman

Robert Menzi

Melodee & Joe Halbach

Denise Merkle & Nelson Claytor

Sean Halbach

Melodie Minshew-Bourassa

Forrest Hancock

Lori Mischke

Pat & Tom Harrison

Mark & Katrina Moran

Elaina Hauk

Diana Morgan

Charles & Libby Hewitt

Helen & Mike Murphy

Kathrin & Stefan Huber

The Nancy Ruth Fund

Marlon Huezo

Eric Nelson

Johnson & Johnson Advanced Sterilization Products

Sandy Neumann

Rachel Feit & Todd Moye

Johnson Ohana Charitable Foundation

James & Karen Felps

Deborah Johnston

Matthew Norton & Amanda Stone Norton

Manuel & Gretchen Ferreiro

Adam & Caroline Jones

Alyssa Ferrer

Thelma Jones

Jennifer Fitzgerald & Wesley Wright

Vanessa Jones

Dr. Elizabeth Flowers & Dr. Darren Middleton

Amber Keller

Marylou Cross Suzan Crouch Brian Darley Merrick & Lorraine Darley Ryan Darley Ross Darrow Caroline DeCoux Maribeth DeLorenzo & Eric Winslow Janice Dickson Lisa Dillman Pat Dorraj Michelle Duckworth Nathan Dungan & Susan Hawks Delaine Eastin Ernst & Young

Andrew Fort Fort Worth Audubon Society Barbara Friedman Laurie Fry Jeanine Gailey Lisa Gansky Guadalupe Garcia Kelly Garrett Claire Gauntlett Sarah Dabney Gillespie Elizabeth Gowan Eric & Vinita Gotting

Bruce Jordahl Kelly Killian Jamie Klump Cynthia Koop Laura Krinock & Aimee Germain Sharon Krinock Keith Kujath Dusty & Beatrice Kuykendall La Bella Living James Lawrence Christina Le Kendra Lemon Griffin Lenoir

Jan Nordstrom

Betsy Noullet JoAnne Olson James Pascoe Nancy Payne & Dale Boisso Ms. & Mr. Chrystin P. Pleasants Augustus & Colleen Porter Susan Pressley Rachel Pringle Kelly Quinn Walter & Lorraine Rainwater Donna Redmon Vicki Reed Lisa Rello Lisa Richardson Pamela Rimington Ellen & Michael Robinson Jeannie Robinson Rotary Club of Fort Worth East


PA G E

Donors and Contributors

Gabrielle Rubenstein-Babcock

Gifts in Kind

The Thomas M., Helen McKee & John P. Ryan Foundation

Arborilogical Tree Service

Safeway, Inc. Amanda & Greg Sauer Dan Settle Susan Shaffer Sanu Shanmugam Cheryl Sherman Laura Sherr Darby Shestko Andrew & Sabina Stern

Blue Mesa Grill Bonnie Plants The Brickman Group Tammy Chan Chef Pointe Cafe Chik-fil-A, South Carrier Parkway, Grand Prairie City of Grand Prairie Parks and Recreation Department

Rochelle Stone

Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden

Ashley Taylor

Deloitte Consulting LLP

Team Builders Plus

Dimensions Educational Research Foundation

Beverly Thomas Frederick G. Thompson Lisa Trammell Tom Turner Amy Vaerewyck Barbara Varley David Vick Volunteer Center of North Texas Dr. Margaret Walls Michael Warren Linda Watts Watauga Elementary School Faculty & Staff Anne Wells John Whitley Jo Ann Whitman Dr. Keith Whitworth Debbie Wilson Mr. & Mrs. Larry Wright Patricia Yungclas Kenneth Yunger

15

Sunbelt Rentals, Beach Street, Fort Worth Sunbelt Rentals, Bryant Irvin Street, Fort Worth Target, Fort Worth Central Texas Christian University Water Gardens Galore Whole Foods Market, Highland Park Jessy Wright Wesley Wright Z’s Cafe

Vickie & Roy Geer GRACE Restaurant Harvest Supply Horton Tree Service Monterey Gourmet Foods NASCAR Panera Bread, University Avenue, Fort Worth Philip Combs Design, Inc. Radius Tools Redenta’s Garden Ridgemont Commercial Construction Starbucks Montgomery Plaza, Fort Worth Starbucks Houston Street, Fort Worth

a ll essed with r p im o s “I am the and with e on d g in that is be ota l’ eemingly ‘t s d n a ic t energ e nities.” hool commu c s of t n e involvem — Donor to l Gardens REAL Schoo


PA G E

16

Partners

sweat equity and a common goal Together with REAL School Gardens, volunteers invest meaningfully in their communities, non-profit organizations engage in complementary work, and community groups gain momentum for positive change.

Collin County Community College

Texas Christian University,  including Chi Upsilon Sigma National Latina Sorority, Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority, Kappa Lambda Delta Sorority, Lambda Theta Alpha Sorority, Lambda Theta Phi Latin Fraternity, Inc., Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Sigma Lambda Alpha Sorority and TCU LEAPS

Dallas Independent School District

RainScholars

Dallas Master Gardeners

Solar Wind Technologies, LLC

Arlington Independent School District Birdville Independent School District Botanical Research Institute of Texas Brookhaven Community College City of Grand Prairie

Eastfield College Upward Bound Fort Worth Independent School District Grand Prairie Independent School District Keep Grand Prairie Beautiful North Texas Food Bank

Tarrant County Master Composters University of Texas at Arlington University of Texas at Dallas, including Gamma Sigma Sigma National Service Sorority

Tarrant County Community College

Villegas Landscaping

Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Volunteer Center of North Texas


ACORNS ADVISORY BOARD NORTH TEXAS

Nancy Burleson

Walter Rainwater

Teacher, Watauga Elementary School

Rachel Feit

Community Volunteer & Board Member, Rainwater Charitable Foundation

Parent & Community Volunteer

Deborah Roszek

Andrea Harper

Community Volunteer

Principal, T.A. Sims Elementary School

Amanda Stone Norton

Tracy Hollis

Director, Teacher Learning Center, Botanical Research Institute of Texas

NSEC Facilitator, Grand Prairie Independent School District

Ruth Kinler Owner, Redenta’s Garden

Dana Tarter Director, Tarrant County Extension Office

NOTES:


h e l p us g r o w .

ting e xci w s ne

we have moved !

1700 university drive suite 260 fort worth, texas 76107 phone

: 817.348.8102

fa x

: 817.348.8680

REALschoolgardens.org

2010-2011 Annual Report  

REAL School Gardens Annual Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 2011.