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A Texas Original Keeps Getting Better Developed on land once owned by Jane Long, the Mother of Texas, Long Meadows Farms is steeped in charm and immersed in the natural beauty of pecan trees, wildflowers, creeks and even a wetlands preserve. Today, the thriving community has been rated one of the 25 most active by the Houston Business Journal, with its pools, fitness center, tennis courts and hike and bike trails. In addition, it boasts shops, restaurants and entertainment at The Market at Long Meadow Farms, and is located within two acclaimed school districts, Fort Bend ISD and Lamar Consolidated ISD.

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Nearby shopping and entertainment center

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ell, well … it’s finally here. The first issue of Richmond Magazine and I couldn’t be more proud of the writers, designers, and contributors dedicating so much of their time to make it all come together. I also want to thank Mayor Moore and her entire staff for their support, as well as our advertisers for having faith in the success and integrity of this publication.

LETTER FROM THE

Publisher

06

The City of Richmond is growing, new businesses are moving here and residential communities catering to all ages have chosen our little town as their new home. This magazine is intended to promote the Richmond lifestyle and embrace it’s unique history, qualities, attractions and citizens. I have lived in Richmond for more than 20 years and have experienced this growth first hand. When we first moved here, my wife and I chose Richmond because it was a friendly, unassuming — and quite honestly — sleepy little town with a family-friendly environment. But lately, there’s been a change in the air, and I firmly believe it’s all for the good. The historic downtown area is being revitalized, beautiful new residential communities are popping up, and larger commercial and retail businesses are opening along the I-69 corridor on the south side of Richmond. We’re also seeing improvements in our roads and infrastructure that will better serve you. This magazine is designed to keep you informed of these exciting new changes, as well as introduce you to the highly successful and hardworking leaders, business owners and attractions that are helping to make our City a destination point for all. As the publisher, I am committed to delivering interesting, entertaining and informative editorial, as well as, report on Richmond’s unique past and the City’s vision for future growth. All that said, on behalf of the entire Richmond Magazine staff, I encourage you to dive into these pages and sincerely hope that you find them an enjoyable read and helpful resource. Sincerely,

Kit Jones

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

PUBLISHER RICHMOND MAGAZINE

Photo by Kit Jones


T A

B

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CONTENTS OF

Letter from the Publisher

06

Mayor Evalyn Moore

10

Laying the Foundation for Phenominal Growth

15

The Haunting

19

At 600 Preston Street

George Park:

Randal Grichuk’s Field of Dreams

Going Above & Beyond

In the Field of Dentistry

Calvary Episcopal Preparatory

Setting a High Standard

It’s All In The Juice The Doc Is In

A Local Doctor’s Transition

Jess Stuart

A Legend of Life in Fort Bend County

A Portal to the Past

The Fort Bend County Museum Association

22

28 33 36

MARGARET HAMMOND

SHAY TIDWELL BONNIE M c FERREN Bookkeeping

TRACY MILLER Accounting

JOSEPH SONNIER

38

IT Consultant

SCOTT SCHEINFELD Printing Coordinator

42 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

50

The KUBE Houston

54

JOE DOGGETT JOAN FRANCES KIT JONES ASHLEY MANCHACA DOUG PIKE JACLYN RITTER

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

56

Furniture With A Story

58

Larry Johnson

60

A City That Inspires

62

The Next Generation of Briscoe

64

Richmond, Texas

66

A Charming Past - A Soaring Future

Director of Photography

Production Manager

Coming Together

The Visionary

Associate Editor

P R O D U C T I O N S TA F F

48

Bass Time

JACLYN RITTER

26

Texas Custom Patios

Celebrating Five Years

Art Director

Assistant Copy Editor

46

To Make A Difference

KATIE MECHAM

KIT JONES

Awesome Alligators Paving the Way

KIT JONES Publisher

Joseph Family’s Legacy

On Morton Street

M AG A Z I N E S TA F F

KIT JONES KATIE MECHAM

REAL PROPERTY LUXURY GROUP, LP GEORGE LANE Principal

W W W. R I C H M O N D T X . G O V

RICHMOND MAGAZINE

Business Directory

68

Richmond Events

70

Advertiser Directory

71

844-424-RICH (7424)

4017 Penn Lane, Richmond, TX 77406

info@richmondtxmag.com © Copyright 2015 - Real Property Luxury Group, LP All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.


MAYOR EVALYN MOORE

10

Mayor Evalyn Moore LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

PHENOMENAL GROWTH


11 WRITTEN BY JOAN FRANCES

D

riving through the city of Richmond, observing the well shaded streets to the older neighborhood of homes with impeccably landscaped yards on spacious land, one cannot help but reminisce of days gone by. A century ago, homes were separated by many acres and citizens traveled on foot, horseback or by carriage. Life seemed simpler and uncomplicated back then. No one worried about fresh water or groceries, the land supplied all they needed. As a result of large landholdings, city growth was slow and meticulous, so even with the progress Richmond has seen in the past few years, it still maintains the small, quiet, slow paced town of yesterday. Following the street to the address, the house is hidden by towering trees and dense bushes. Arriving at the front door and upon entering, the décor of the house is synonymous with the personality of the owner; classy, comfortable and welcoming. A native Texan, Mayor Evalyn Moore has been a resident of Fort Bend County most of her life. She and her husband, the late Hilmar G. Moore, have devoted their lives to community service for the city of Richmond. At 2 ½ years in office, this insightful Mayor has a very busy schedule, accomplishing significant milestones in laying the foundation for city development.

Mayor Moore is encouraged by the development of approximately 750 acres from the Wessendorff foundation consisting of Miss Janey’s homestead, and Long Acres Farms. It will soon be called Long Acres Ranch Nature Tourism Center. The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service will be managing 3 miles of river frontage. They will provide outdoor recreational activities, and will conduct educational training and research. Another 600 acres of the Wessendorff property and 310 acres of the George family land will hopefully, one day, become a premiere mixed use master planned community as well. There are plans for a new neighborhood park in the Freeman Town area, which will add more green space to preserve the “country life” atmosphere. So residents will never forget their roots, Mayor Moore and the City Commissioners have just completed the new Comprehensive Master Plan which will serve as a guide for future developments, civic enhancements, and historic preservation. Moses Lapham, who was a land surveyor 178 years ago would be proud. Richmond was named No. 1 in the 10 Best Houston Suburbs to live in ranking, No. 1 in the Most Affordable Houston Suburbs and No. 1 in the Best Houston Suburbs for Young Couples by Movoto Real Estate. They also said Richmond is safe, the residents are well employed and it’s only a quick drive from Houston. What a great reputation to have.

Between 2012 and 2013, the area experienced unprecedented growth, over 25,000 people moved into Fort Bend County. As the population and housing costs sky-rocketed in Houston, residents sought out a more economical place to live, work, and to retire. What better place than Richmond?

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REAL ESTATE, A CAREFUL, STRATEGIC GROWTH PLAN


PRESERVING RICHMOND’S PAST WHILE PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE City improvements are a top priority for Mayor Moore. One of her greatest accomplishments to date is the improvement of the Richmond water supply. She is keeping a close eye on the subsidence issue. Subsidence is the gradual sinking of an area of land. She said, “Studies by the subsidence district estimate that if nothing is done, parts of Fort Bend County will sink about five feet in the next four decades. The impact will be lessened to just two feet under recent regulations by converting 30% usage to alternate sources by 2016 and 60% of our groundwater supplies by 2025.” Richmond’s alternate source is the new Surface Water Treatment Plant. The land was donated by The George Foundation and the ground breaking ceremony was held on September

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

MAYOR EVALYN MOORE

12

SmartAsset ranked Richmond one of the top 10 places to retire in Texas, thanks in large part to this 55+ active adult community.

23, 2014. This Surface Water Treatment Plant will supply 2 million gallons of water a day to accommodate long term growth for the residents in Richmond. It will also lessen the threat of subsidence as Richmond becomes less dependent on the Gulf Coast Aquifer.

ADDING SERVICES, IMPROVING SAFETY & INVESTING IN GROWTH The city of Richmond continues to improve the quality of living for the residents. Mayor Moore said, “Our police department was named number 42 of the top 50 safest cities in Texas. This past year we welcomed a new police chief, Gary Adams. He brings over 40 years of law enforcement experience to Richmond. Our fire department has earned an ISO rating of 2. We are making plans to rebuild fire station #2. Our firefighters


also take training very seriously, working on physical fitness as well as receiving instruction in specialized programs.” OakBend Medical Center offers state of the art technology, assists the citizens and is dedicated to the community by providing multiple campuses to serve their needs. Through matching grants, Richmond continues to make investments in higher education supporting the growth and expansion of Wharton County Junior College, Richmond Campus, and the new Texas State Technical College. New road projects are in the works in partnership with the County. The City’s Economic Development Corporation has been working with new businesses, restaurants and shops ... even a new winery and microbrewery that will soon be open for business in Richmond. While all this is taking place now, the Mayor is also assessing new areas for strategic commercial annexations.

But, we do them right.” Richmond is at the threshold of a phenomenal future of growth and success, physically and financially, thanks to Mayor Moore and her City Administration. Their meticulous plans to keep the history alive and the city advancing through anticipation of the future will open the doors to progress. The land is about to be transformed into beautiful planned communities, retail commercial developments and public parks. In coming years, Richmond may not be the “best kept secret” but it will be a beautiful place to live, grow and retire, and it’s gonna be worth the wait. H

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The residents of Richmond are very lucky. The city still possesses the “small town charm”, a great place for children to grow up and live. Mayor Moore said, “Hey, this is the south ya’ll. We move a little slower, and talk a little slower, and sometimes good things take a little longer.

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Joseph Family’s Legacy on Morton Street C e n t u ry ol d fa m i ly b u s i n e s s a dd s V i n tag e S p ort i n g G o od s S tor e to Morton S t r e e t

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he Joseph family has been well respected throughout the city of Richmond for many years. Their story is a rare and fascinating one. Having had storefronts on Morton Street for over a century, they have become a large part of Richmond’s history. Their most recent addition to the city is the Vintage Sporting Goods store. It is derived from a deep passion for the sport of shooting and a respect for the superior craftsmanship of English guns. Michael Joseph, the current owner of the Joseph businesses, took a fast liking to this English sport. He appreciates the fact it is still done the same way it was done 200 years ago. There is a different type of comradery and fellowship from hunting here in the States - there is a nostalgia and tradition to it all. Just as Michael honors his family’s rich history, he enjoys being a part of a sport, really a lifestyle, that has deep roots as well.

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WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER


16 JOSEPH FAMILY’S LEGACY

A Brief History Mary Joseph, a widow and mother of 5 children, traveled to Richmond in 1900 from her home in Lebanon. To make money, Mary sold goods out of her horse and buggy – one of the first door-to-door salespeople you could say. In 1919 her eldest son Emil, following in his mother’s footsteps, opened a mercantile shop at the end of Morton Street in downtown Richmond. He sold coffee, cigars, guns and ammunition, among other things. Sadly in 1926 the neighboring store caught fire, eventually spreading to Joseph’s building and ultimately putting them out of business for a couple of years. Emil Joseph renovated the building and opened it back up in 1928. In fact, the front facade of the store still reads “E. Joseph 1928.” Emil’s son Richard practically grew up in his father’s store, which is why after serving as a Merchant Marine in WWII and graduating from college he returned home to help run the family business. In 1961 Richard added a building next to his father’s mercantile store which became the famous Joseph’s Furniture and Gifts.

Richard’s son Michael remembers fondly the time he spent helping out at both stores. “I remember putting furniture and bicycles together to display in the store on my Saturdays,” recalls Michael. “As I got older, my friends and I would deliver the furniture and appliances to people’s homes.” Michael never pictured himself as a merchant. He had a passion for flying. That passion led to a successful career as a Captain with Southwest Airlines. It was not until seven years ago when his parents asked him to return home that Michael’s mind changed. “My Dad told me that he and my mom needed my help, they could no longer run the stores on their own,” remembers Michael. Without hesitation he moved back home, cut his hours with the airline and began learning the ropes. When his father passed in 2011 he proudly inherited the retail business. Michael knew he belonged at the stores, continuing the legacy that started three generations before.

A New Generation

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

Michael and Kathryn got to work renovating the store top to bottom. New wood floors were laid and the store’s first air conditioners installed. Even with these new renovations, they chose to keep an older historic feel to honor the building and its long history. For example, the beautiful drop lights that now hang throughout the store were taken from a building at the University of Houston over 70 years ago. Old newspaper clippings and family photos line the long hallway as a reminder of the years of hard work and dedication that paved the way. Continuing in the spirit of the Joseph family and their love of Richmond, the renovated store fronts are now home to a Boutique Coffee Shop, Cigar Store with walkin humidor and member’s cigar lounge, and a Vintage Gun and Accessories Store. All of their stores have purpose and historic reasoning.

“This is a unique place, it is a destination spot,” says Kathryn Joseph proudly. There is something for everyone at the end of Morton Street!


Turning a Passion into a Business The Vintage Sporting Goods Store is the newest addition

to the Joseph business. It developed from Michael’s strong passion for the culture and the sport of shooting.

by English gunsmiths. If a stock needs to be refinished, a barrel re-blacked or a screw replaced, they take care of it to assure that it is ready for use in the field.

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All of these guns are handmade, they were not mass produced. This is largely why there are not a lot of them. Purdey, for example, would only make up to 60 or 70 guns per year. One feature that these early guns have that we miss today are the Damascus barrels. Patternwelded Damascus steel is made by arranging two or more different types of steel together, or pieces of steel and iron, to create an intricate pattern along the barrel. Using this technique guarantees that no two will ever be the same. “Someone had some sort of investment in the gun given the time and dedication they put into each and every one,” notes Kathryn Joseph. Michael refers to them as “functional artwork,” a description that is undeniable given the chance to look real closely.

Tradition and Legacy Michael in London with proper English shooting attire.

Michael found that in England people tend to treasure their heritage. They are not quick to tear things down and rebuild or modernize methods. Michael felt he could relate, and found himself traveling there more often. He developed a strong love of English style shooting. This distinguished and gentile sport has a rich history unto itself. It is conducted in the same manner as centuries past – from attire to style of guns.

“We did this for his Dad, but with his mother’s flair,” smiles Kathryn. “Michael’s parents would be proud of what we have accomplished here. We have continued the family legacy full of Richmond charm.” “My father and grandfather were very friendly and personable men who were passionate about the small town of Richmond,” notes Michael. “They were generous, both with money and time, to patrons and to the community itself. Kathryn and I try to follow in their footsteps.” One store, four generations and no end in sight, Joseph’s is truly one of a kind. H

Everything inside of this store has a purpose. Traditional shooting attire, dress shirts, tweed jackets, silk ties and wool hats, for both men and women can be found here. Whether you are a sporting enthusiast or not, there is something for everyone. A lot of the attire and accessories can be carried over to everyday life. British campaign furniture, luxurious leather bags, flasks, ash trays, cuff links and other accessories and gift items are also sold here.

The gun vault is the heart of the store. Joseph’s sells English side by side shot guns for bird shooting and some double rifles specifically made for hunting African dangerous game animals. Sixty to seventy percent of their guns are over 100 years old and all in working order. Before the guns arrive in the U.S. they are all looked over

Joseph’s Vintage Sporting Goods Store (281) 342-3819 www.josephsvintageguns.com 202 Morton Street, Richmond, Texas 77469

BRANDS SOLD AT

JOSEPH’S VINTAGE SPORTING GOODS STORE Holland & Holland • James Purdey & Sons William & Son An example of a Damascus Barrel.

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Emil Joseph sold guns and ammo in his mercantile store in the early 1900’s. Michael has chosen to honor that and turn his store into one that features guns. Not just any guns though – vintage English guns that are just as special and rare as the store itself.


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Office 281.646.1136 | Fax 281.646.1841 www.GaryGreene.com/Fulshear ©2014 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens® is a registered trademark of Meredith Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Franchise is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers.


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Photo Courtesy of the Fort Bend County Museum Association, Richmond, TX


R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

TH E H AUNTING

20

D

riving through downtown Richmond, the building stands alone, regal and imposing. Bright red bricks and intricate details invite one to study in awe this historical marvel. Walking into this edifice, one cannot help but notice the secure steel doors with heavy hinges and solid flooring. It is a well preserved building, and one of a kind‌ filled with stories conducive to the life it has lived and the people it has housed. Although it is now home to the Richmond Police Department, its past still haunts its occupants today. So what was the original purpose of this old structure at 600 Preston Street you ask? It was a jailhouse, and perfect for this time of year, this is its story.

This structure was built in 1897 by L.T. Noyes, Houston contractor and agent for Diebold Safe and Lock Company of Canton, Ohio. The jail, fully equipped with iron clad doors and secure walls also included the sheriff’s living quarters on the first floor. The stunning red brick walls and McNeal limestone accents convey a sense of strength and endurance synonymous with protecting the community. The top floor consisted of two large two story rooms on either side with double decker cell blocks for prisoners. A basement was built with additional cell blocks for segregation but regular flooding was a problem so it was refinished with cement in 1899. The center section of the building were more prison cells and the gallows. Solitary confinement chambers were on the second and third floors. The sheriff lived with his family on the premises. Food was prepared by his wife, and passed through a small metal door into the foyer to be distributed to the inmates. Children were restricted to the ground floor in rooms well secured with metal doors. When C.W. Parnell was sheriff, the first two convicts were hung from the gallows in the prison on October 28, 1898. Emanuel Morris confessed to the murder of a 6 year old blind girl and Pete Autre shot his mistress Charlotte for wanting to leave Richmond. This anticipated event made newspaper headlines with details of the hangings. The Fort Bend County jail continued to serve

the community until 1955. The building was bought by Lee Reiches for $5,295.00 and used for apartments, a museum, even a haunted house but nothing worked. In 1996 the city purchased the Preston Street jail and it was renovated to accommodate the Richmond Police Department. A new administrative annex was added to the original building connected by an atrium. Some of the cell blocks remain today, used for detention areas and evidence storage. About forty employees work in the rooms that once were home to murderers, rapists and thieves, so it’s not surprising when strange, unexplained things happen. Lieutenant Lowell D. Neinast, has been employed with the Richmond Police Department for the past 13 years. His matter-of-fact attitude is comforting as he begins his account of some of the unexplained phenomenon that has occurred in the building. The tour begins on the main floor where the family lived. Rooms are solid, sound proof and eerie. Does it seem cooler in this corner? Remnants of the original jail are prevalent. Updates and changes were made to accommodate the office space but reminders of the past are everywhere.

As the tour progressed to the basement, I sensed a cool moist breeze pass through the air. The wet walls capture definitive images of faces and the darkness causes one to feel a heavy presence in the room. Lieutenant Neinast recounted the time a psychic medium froze and was staring at the back wall. She saw an image of someone shackled and beaten, which was exactly what happened in that very spot. The air is thick with the energy of some poor soul awaiting his fate. As we traveled back upstairs where the lighting is better, a small cell remains with a large heavy door and a window with bars.


The door closed with a slam and a feeling of loneliness took over. Reports of voices and sounds of children running upstairs are common late at night. Dispatcher Christina Carr who worked the night shift for years reflected on many nights of strange behavior and unexplained sounds and voices. One night she heard a voice over the intercom say, “Get out!” The biggest impact on the tour is in the heart of the building, the gallows. Standing on the trap door, I felt very uncomfortable and it was difficult to comprehend the reality of what went on over one hundred years ago. The very presence of the gallows urges one to repent. When pictures are taken at night, energy orbs are captured all over the area, confirming once again the unexplained occurrences. The dispatch officers share their own stories; strange moving shadows at night, shuffling of papers, and voices in other parts of the building are commonly noticed. One corner of the upstairs office continually has activity with falling items, strange smells and exceptionally cool air. Ghost hunters from Houston have come and spent the night in the jail capturing pictures of orbs and measuring high energy levels in the basement and upstairs gallows.

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a valuable piece of the past and thanks to the vision of the city’s caretakers, this magnificent building is useful to the community. A constant reminder of the journey our society has taken to learn from our mistakes and profit from the good that our ancestors have accomplished. Tours of 600 Preston Street are available through texastourconnection.com. H

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History is filled with inexplicable manifestations. Through this world of the unknown, a deeper appreciation grows for what we do know. Richmond has preserved

Photo Courtesy of the Fort Bend County Museum Association, Richmond, TX


FIELD OF DREAMS

22

GEORGE PARK: Randal Grichuk’s

field of dreams WRITTEN BY KIT JONES

F

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

or millions of kids across the country, the month of March means the beginning of America’s favorite past time — baseball. With the dawn of each new season comes flock of fledgling players of all ages and each one with the dream of someday playing in the major leagues. For Randal Grichuk, that dream came true. And it all started at Lamar Little League … on the fields of George Park, right here in Richmond, Texas. Currently a rising star with the St. Louis Cardinals, Randal has fond memories playing for Lamar Little League. “It’s where it all started for me, and I was lucky to have played on a very talented team with great coaches,” said Randal, while at home during the All-Star break. Randal’s love for the game started at a very early age. It seemed all he wanted to do was play baseball. “I used to take Randal and his older sister, Michelle, to watch their dad play softball,” said Randal’s mom, Beverly Grichuk. “I would

Photo Courtesy of Taka Yanagimoto, St. Louis Cardinals


23 end up playing catch with the both of them most of the game. I think he was about two years old at the time.” Randal also spent hours on end, in the backyard, playing catch and hitting the ball with anyone willing too participate. “After we went inside, Randal would stay outside and practice by himself,” added Beverly. When he was finally old enough to tryout for T-Ball, Randal, all of 5 1/2 years old, was more than ready. Beverly recalls that it was a Saturday morning and little Randal, with bat and glove in hand, showed up at George Park with his dad, mom and big sister. When it was his turn to bat, a coach placed a ball on the Tee, and with a mighty swing a Lamar Little League legend was born. Randal hit that first ball very, very far. Then he did it again, and again and again. Uncanny for a pre-schooler, they said. From that day on, coaches saw something special in Randal Grichuk. He could pitch. He could catch. And, boy … could he hit!

A Star in the Making In 2003, Randal became the first eleven year-old to represent the Lamar Little League All-Stars, which is usually stocked with twelve year-olds that are bigger, stronger, faster and more skilled. Undaunted, Randal pitched, played outfield and helped lead that All-Star team all the way to the Little League World Series. A first for Lamar Little League. Randal led his All-Star team back to the World Series in 2004. The team went 5-1 and finished third in the world, beating Mexico’s national champion 5-0 in the consolation game. In that tournament, he batted .632 (12-for-19) with four home runs, three doubles, 11 runs batted in and 9 runs scored. Randal’s hits, homers, slugging percentage and RBIs were all tournament bests. He also tied for first in runs scored. In 2005 Randal appeared in Sports Illustrated famous “Faces In The Crowd” section. In 2007, Randal was one of 18 out of nearly 2,500 kids selected to the 16U USA Baseball National Team. “That’s when I realized that there might be a future for me in baseball,” said Randal.

Randal did more than that. He had the third highest batting average, and led the team in home runs and slugging percentage. In high school, Randal hit 17 home runs his Junior year and 21 his senior year… which led the nation. That same year he was named 24-4A District MVP, Fort Bend Area MVP, 1st Team All State Outfielder, 1st Team All-American (Baseball USA), and Baseball Coaches Association Player of The Year - District 6. And why not? On top of all his home runs, he batted .613 and hit safely in every single game.

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“I was playing with the best of the best in my age group and held my own.”


Colleges Were Calling and Pro Scouts Were Taking Notice

FIELD OF DREAMS

24

Although Randal’s legend grew, his dad, George reminded him that it could end quickly if he got too complacent. “I can’t remember a Sunday when my dad and I weren’t at the baseball field working on my game,” said Randal. “He never forced me to go, but he had a way of reminding me that I had a gift, and if playing pro ball was my dream, it was going to take more than raw talent to get there.” In 2009, fresh out of high school, and with a college scholarship offer from University of Arizona in hand, something even more magical happened. The California Angels selected Randal 24th in the first round of the Major League Baseball draft. Leading up to the draft Randal had worked out for a lot of teams and several showed interest, but being picked in the first seemed like a long shot. “I was fully prepared to play in college, but this was an opportunity of a life time. This was my dream” said Randal.

Adjusting From the Game of Baseball to the Business of Baseball As a first-round draft choice there are huge and instant expectations. “I was only seventeen when I was drafted — just a kid, really. I went from playing high school ball in May to playing minor league ball in August. Most of the guys I was playing with were in there mid-twenties,” recalls Randal. “It was pretty intimidating at first, and everyone around me was good!” Injuries hampered Randal’s progress while he battled through them, but never lost his focus and continued to press on.

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In 2013, Randal was traded to St. Louis, a move that perhaps blossomed his career. “I was shocked at first, but I knew I was going to a great organization that had a history of playing young players.”

A Change of Scenery Brings New Excitement and Anticipation To The Game

Photo Courtesy of Taka Yanagimoto, St. Louis Cardinals

After a great spring training, Randal started out with the Cardinals Triple-A team where he excelled both at the plate and in the outfield. Healthy, hitting bombs again and showing great skill in the outfield, the Cardinals didn’t wait long to call Randal up to the big leagues. On April 28, 2014 Randal finally got his chance. “I couldn’t feel my body, when I stepped up to the plate,” recalls Randal. “Never before had I felt the pressure to perform then that first major league at bat.”


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Today, you will find Randal in the Cardinals starting outfield rotation. He has helped his team clinch their division and make the playoffs. Along the way, he has electrified Cardinals fans with his towering home runs and exceptional fielding. Yet he continues to work hard at improving his game. “I play every game like it might be my last. My off-season workouts are spent improving the weaknesses in my game.”

RANDAL GRICHUK, from Lamar Little League sensation to Major League Baseball player, and it all started right here on Richmond’s very own field of dreams at George Park. H

Did you know?

Lamar Little League’s roots go back to 1954, when it was then called Fort Bend Little League but it wasn’t located in Richmond. One of the league’s biggest fans was Mayor Hilmar Moore, who had three sons that participated in the program. In 1958, the league was officially renamed to Lamar Little League, and thru financial assistance from Mamie George the first fields were constructed where the T.W. Davis YMCA stands today. In the mid 90’s, with the support of then Mayor Hilmar Moore and the George Foundation, Lamar Little League signed a long-term lease at George Park. Over time it has expanded the number fields from two to nine, in order to accommodate close to 40 teams and 900 little leaguers of all ages and abilities.

“Hard work

ALWAYS

beats talent, unless talent

WORKS hard.”

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When asked what advice he could give to aspiring major leaguers at Lamar Little League? “Having parents and family that encouraged and supported my dream, was so important,” he replied. “It seemed distant, maybe unreachable then, but along the way, someone told me that hard work always beats talent, unless talent works hard … and I firmly believe that.”


GOING ABOVE & BEYOND

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GOING

ABOVE &

BEYOND IN THE FIELD OF D E N T I S TRY WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

D

id you know that there are over ten different branches within the field of dentistry? There’s orthodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, endodontics, prostodontics, pediatric dentistry and oral surgery - just to name a few. Many of us have to muster up the courage just to go to our general

dentist every six months. The anxiety really sky rockets when something other than a routine cleaning and exam needs to be done and we are shuffled across town to a another dentist. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a dentist who has training in all of these areas and could perform them all under one roof? Dr. Zahra Cook has done exactly that with Cook Dental located on FM 359 in Richmond.

AN EARLY LOVE & PASSION Dentistry made sense, it was the perfect blend of math and science, Dr. Cook’s strongest subjects. It was a natural fit. Upon receiving her Doctorate in Dental Medicine (DMD) from the Medical University of South Carolina in 1988 she dove head first into the field. In 1992, after working as a dental associate for four years, Dr. Cook opened her own private practice in Richmond. With only one employee, two treatment rooms and a whole lot of drive, she built a strong client base. By July of 1997 she designed and built a state-of-the-art office right across the street. In 2008, to accommodate her growing practice, she expanded the building to include an orthodontic bay and additional treatment rooms to bring life to her vision.

STUDENT FOR LIFE

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Dr. Zahra Cook firmly believes that there is no end to education. It is a continual joke in her family that she has never graduated from dental school, due to the countless hours of study following her degree. All of her hard work did not go unnoticed. In 2013 Dr. Cook was awarded the Mastership Award from the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). One of the requirements for this award is completion of over 1,000 hours of continuing dental education. This award is one of the most prestigious honors awarded within the field of general dentistry. In fact, less than two percent of the 170,000 plus general dentists in the United States and Canada have received this title. “The more I learned, the more excited I got!” says Dr. Cook. “That is why I do it all.” Over the years Cook Dental has grown to include: pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, Invisalign, TMJ treatment, implant placement and restorations, dentures and full mouth rehabilitation.


“Offering different aspects of dentistry makes me a stronger dentist because I have a greater scope of understanding,” explains Dr. Cook. “For example, if someone enters the clinic complaining of migraines, I might look further into lower jaw positioning. Improper alignment can trigger muscle spasms as the person tries to compensate and adapt. A healthy mouth with an unusual number of cavities might have a deeper story; this would lead me to look into the possibility of early signs of heartburn.” To say she is thorough is an understatement.

THE IMPORTANCE O F FA M I LY &

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COMMUNITY

TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL Dr. Cook and her warm and inviting staff put a large focus on patient comfort. Every morning she and her team go over their schedule for the day. Together they look at who is coming in, discuss their medical and dental history and needs, as well as any anxiety or apprehension. This allows them to provide the best care and environment for their patients. Dr. Cook wants everyone to feel comfortable and confident under her care. This is a large reason families have been trusting her for their dental care for over twenty years. Dr. Cook's senior patients particularly appreciate her attention to detail and experience with crowns, implants, and replacement of old Mercury fillings. She is the one to go to when you want it done right the first time!

BEYOND EXPECTATIONS Dr. Zahra Cook’s patients take comfort in knowing that just about everything can be done in her office. “Who knows my patient or their mouth better than me,” she laughs. “I provide continuous care.” Cook Dental goes above and beyond general dentistry. Due to Dr. Cook’s continual education, they stay current on all developments in the field and house the latest and greatest technology. “I have been here since 1992 and I am not going anywhere,” says Dr. Cook. “I am invested in my patients and their happiness.” H

Dr. Zahra Cook is a hardworking, intelligent and successful business woman. On top of that she is also a dedicated and caring wife and mother. Zahra and her husband David have been married for 27 years. Together they have two children, Melissa and Richard. When their kids were young, Zahra and David made the decision that David would leave his current job and join her practice. “We wanted to make sure our children had as much parental involvement as possible,” says Dr. Cook. “If there was a practice, game or activity during the day, David was there, and if it was later in the day, I would be there.” The two continue to work as a team, putting their children first each and every time. Dr. Cook’s patients are sure to see her out and around town. Zahra and David are very active members within their church and the subdivision in which they live. The two also enjoy an evening spent playing games with friends. Additionally, both Zahra and David have served on the boards of various non-profit organizations.

Zahra S Cook, DMD

ADVANCED COSMETIC DENTIST 1536 FM 359, Richmond, TX 77406

(281) 342-8481 w w w. c o o k d e n t a l. c o m

The Cook family has become a large part of Richmond, and Richmond has become a large part of them!

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“I inform before I perform,” says Dr. Cook. By educating her patients up front she is allowing them to make a decision about their oral health that they will not regret down the line. Through diagrams, videos and digital photography, Dr. Cook and her team give their patients as much information as possible. “We are on the same team.” Dr. Cook continues by saying, “I want what my patients want for themselves, and together we will reach their goals.”


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SETTING A HIGH STANDARD OF

WRITTEN BY JOAN FRANCES

A HISTORY OF

expand with community support. In 1973, the school began operating as a private, non-profit corporation and was accredited in 1981 by the Texas Education Agency. In the fall of 2006, Calvary began a college preparatory program for students in grades 9-12, offering an advanced high school curriculum leading to the Distinguished Graduate Diploma. Academics are a top priority at Calvary, but the school has so much more to offer. A well-rounded curriculum prepares all students, from pre-kindergarten to high school, with opportunities to explore all avenues of learning. The faculty opens the doors to the possible and leads them down the path of success.

Calvary Episcopal Preparatory is the second oldest private parochial school in Fort Bend County. Since opening its doors in 1956, Calvary has continued to

Calvary Episcopal Preparatory is home to almost 200 students and reflects the diversity of not only Richmond Texas but Fort Bend County. The focus is simple: Regardless of the grade level, all are taught Christian Character Education with the seven pillars of character: Reverence,

T

he moment you step inside Calvary Episcopal Preparatory you can tell something special is going on here. A museum of pictures grace the walls of the office with large canvas prints of students engaged in activities depicting what this school is all about. Vocal interaction is contagious, lively chatter between teachers and students is prevalent, they are confident, polite, but most of all, they are smiling. There is a feeling of calm and support as the school day begins. This is not your average school. Come walk through with us.

HIGH QUALITY LEARNING

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SUPERIOR EDUCATION


CALVARY EPISCOPAL PREPARATORY

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Respect, Responsibility, Trustworthiness, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship. These morals are instilled in each student and practiced every day. From academics to sports, this school excels at preparing each student for a successful future. However, the one expansion of their co-curricular program that differentiates them from other schools is their commitment to sustain a premier fine arts department. Band, choir, visual arts, theatre are all an integral part woven into the academic world. Calvary exemplifies where true interdisciplinary education can grow the whole child. Themes in the classroom are carried over into the arts and themes in the arts are supported among the different forms of expression.

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM THROUGH THE FINE ARTS

Highlighting one of the department’s within the visual and performing arts is the dynamic theatre arts program which is predicated on the philosophy that all students can have a place in the theatre world. The theater program is a labor of love for Paula Smith. She has been involved in the after school curriculum for the past two years. Ms. “Cookie,” as she is called by her students, is also the Music, Theater, and Speech teacher. She brings with her to Calvary 42 years of experience in education and is highly respected among her peers. Any student in the school can be engaged in this activity. In the beginning of the school year, the students are introduced to the mechanics of being on stage, and back stage. By December they have the choice to audition for the school production in April or work back stage as a technical “ninja.” Many students struggle with stage fright but the words “I can’t” are not a part of the curriculum.

MS. COOKIE’S PHILOSOPHY

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is that every student needs to find their inner confidence and she strives to make the environment so safe that students can build their self-esteem.

This philosophy is shared by colleagues Donna Estrada and Mary Jean Duval who perpetuate the same values in Band and the Visual Arts, respectively. Last year, there were 94 ambitious members, ready to develop communication skills, creativity, and conviction to be a part of a major production at the end of the year. Ms. Cookie said, “All students should learn that they are part of an acting team with one goal in mind, to be inspired through love and commitment. This is a one-of-a-kind all-inclusive program in which any student can be a part. It is inspiring to see kindergarteners performing sideby-side with seniors. The lines of age, ability and grade level simply disappear. There is a shared learning in this environment.”

A TALENTED STAFF WILL BRING OUT THE BEST IN THE STUDENTS

Ms. Cookie is not a typical teacher but neither is the fine arts department or the rest of the faculty, for that matter at Calvary Episcopal Preparatory. After years of experience, her techniques are refined and effective. Ms. Cookie has expectations and procedures which are shared by other faculty and staff. Students and faculty


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are “Called to a Higher Standard” and Ms. Cookie gladly embraces that. One of her signature procedures is her “concert mode” which requires immediate silence and a professional performing artist stance. It is pleasurable to see and brings a smile to ones face to see 94 students, within 3 seconds, silence themselves and be 100% engaged. There is no consequence, respect is obtained by expectation and love. Ms. Cookie says, “The afternoon moves fast, kids don’t get off task when they are busy. Students are instructed to expand their horizons and to develop the art of articulation in other ways. Parents notice that students are willing to move out of their comfort zones, take risks that will help them later in life, and experience the feeling of being empowered. Students believe they can do it, they have to work for it, and the rewards are gratifying to all.” Headmaster Malcolm Smith is supportive of the undeniable progress the students make. He said, “This program fits into everything we do. The development of self-confidence is a priority for all our teachers at the school. We strive to develop the whole child which is what learning is all about. Everyone faces many challenges and our goal is to introduce our students to every aspect of communication they may encounter, from impromptu speaking to musical theater to technical scene changes. The whole staff is focused on a collaboration of team work with one major goal in mind, superior education with loving support.”

The culmination of the theatre program is the major production. The play includes all students who commit to working on the production…no one is excluded. Last year, “Alice in Wonderland” was a huge success and this year “Shrek the Musical” will be presented From April 27-30. This year Calvary has added a Saturday matinee due to past sold out productions. A full tech crew, props, costumes, set, are all created and supervised by an enthusiastic and hardworking parent volunteer committee. The “pretty committee” headed by Christine Wheeless and Christin McDonald create an onstage environment with the help of a large parent crew that rivals any school production. Calvary Episcopal Preparatory is a “family” of people devoted to education, spiritualism and morality. Their tireless efforts to continue a rich tradition of academic

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SCHEDULE A TOUR, PLEASE CONTACT:

HEADMASTER MALCOLM SMITH

CALVARY EPISCOPAL PREPARATORY 1201 Austin • Richmond, TX 77469 School: (281)342-3161 • Fax: (281)232-9449

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excellence is forthright. When you combine this effort with the school’s added focus on the fine arts, where the students eagerly participate, this results in the development of confident, educated and wellrounded individuals. This is not a conventional school, it is extensively more. With so much to offer the community, Calvary Episcopal Preparatory will continue to be at the cutting edge of progress in today’s school curriculum by offering a truly unique fine arts program in addition to exceeding the highest educational standards. H


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WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT JONES

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Robin has worked as a court reporter in Richmond for the last 25 years. Having been successful at the office, as well as on the home front as a mom of four girls, she was taken aback when in one minute her entire life crumbled around her. In April of 2012, she was diagnosed with Stage 111c colorectal cancer. She, however, did not accept the diagnosis as her fate.

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ongtime Fort Bend resident, ROBIN ROSEN, knows firsthand the power of a well-balanced and nutrient-rich diet. Her personal story of triumph motivated her; so much so that she is opening an organic, cold-pressed juice and superfood smoothie bar located in historic downtown Richmond. Trough Juice Bar, scheduled to open late October of this year, will surely become the smart choice food destination in town.


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RECIPE ROBIN’S FAVORITE

“I DIDN’T WANT TO MERELY SURVIVE ,” STRESSES ROBIN. “I WANTED TO THRIVE.” She immediately cut sugar and animal products from her diet. In her eyes, things like cookies and cake were foods that fed cancer. “Every bite I put in my mouth had to be something that nourished my body as a whole.” In addition to conventional treatment, Robin enlisted the encouragement and guidance of an alternative health minister who supported her new regimen of organic juices and raw foods. Her dusty old juicer had never seen so much use! Working her way up to multiple juices a day, Robin noticed a remarkable difference. Within two weeks, her migraines and allergies disappeared and her hair began to thicken. She was also able to continue working full time at the courthouse and keep pace with her active family. On the day of her resection surgery she arrived in the operating room with no trace of live cancer cells nor any trace of the tumor! It was her decision to take a proactive role in her own cure that led up to the good news that day. Robin knows it had a lot to do with the juice!

2 Kale leaves

Handful of Spinach ½ Cucumber

1 Bunch Cilantro ½ Green Apple

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Fresh Ginger Root

While cancer free, Robin is still rebuilding her immune system and nursing a temperamental digestive tract. She continues to fuel her body with nutrient-dense juices and avoids processed and sugary foods. A new struggle – finding a suitable place she could meet up with friends for a bite to eat. “There have to be others who are struggling with similar issues as myself and may not know about juicing and its extraordinary benefits,” insisted Robin. This is when it all clicked and Trough Juice Bar was born! The chosen name has a dual reference: First, their love and wonderment for the strength and beauty of the horses on their farm, and second, the knowledge that these energetic, majestic creatures can derive all of their nutrition from a trough filled with raw grasses. Robin used her triumph over a dire diagnosis as personal inspiration for the new shop. She and her four daughters, Jorden, Courtney, Portland and Darby, have teamed up together to introduce the city of Richmond to juicing. “My daughters have watched me thrive,” shares Robin. “They are as committed to this as I am – this is our new lifestyle.”


Unlike the heat-processed juices found in stores, cold-pressed juice offers the highest concentration of nutrients and live enzymes that each fruit or vegetable contains and is able to be quickly and easily digested. “Our drinks are colorful, delicious, and bursting with flavor,” smiles Robin. Trough Juice Bar uses nothing but the highest quality ingredients. Produce is sourced from Robin’s family farm in Brenham, as well as other local organic and hydroponic farms. “It is important to us that we support our community, the community we have lived in and loved for many years.” Robin stresses. “We do not want to lose these local farms; we want to support them and see them grow.” At the shop all produce is washed in filtered alkaline water for an optimal cleansing process that maintains the integrity of the fresh produce. While a variety of juices will certainly be the feature at Trough Juice Bar, other healthy light fare will be available. They will have grab-and-go bowls, salads, paninis, snacks, and other organic, low sugar foods.

YOU CAN FEEL CONFIDENT KNOWING THAT WHATEVER YOU CHOOSE, IT WILL BE A

HEALTHY OPTION.

Robin wants to make this more than just a place to grab your morning juice and run, but also a place for families. “We are now seeing the effects of a generation raised on GMOs and processed foods, so we want to offer a healthy option for parents,” mentions Robin. Smart food choices start at an early age. Trough Juice Bar will offer kid-sized juices and snacks that are sure to please. In fact, they have a fresh new take on a summertime classic – the snow cone! Instead of crushed ice coated with sugary syrup, Robin adds coconut milk and fresh fruit. Robin and her family are excited to open Trough Juice Bar to the community. She hopes that others can benefit from her experience and choose to take a preemptive strike against illness. By fueling the body with more organic, nutrient-rich living foods we can become better versions of ourselves. “We have experienced the miracle of juicing; now we want to share it with you!” H

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FRESH

FROM THE TROUGH

Drinks

Cold Pressed Juices Superfood Smoothies - topped w/ house-made granola Homemade Almond Milk

Light Lunches Paninis Fresh Salads Soups

Breakfast Gluten Free Muffins Parfaits Porridge

Grab n’ Go

Quinoa Pearled Barley & Kale Bowls

Sweets

Raw Macaroons Gluten Free Cookies

TROUGH JUICE BAR

107 S. THIRD STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469

(281)762-2483 OPEN TUES-SAT 7:30 AM – 4:00 PM

WWW.TROUGHJUICE.COM

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The family chose a storefront in historic downtown Richmond. “I’ve always been drawn to this part of town. My husband and I have been in Fort Bend for over 30 years and this is where we raised our kids,” Robin remembers fondly. They are excited to remodel and restore the old building and make it the next hotspot in town.


TH E DOC IS IN

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THE

DOC IS

IN

A LOCAL DOCTOR’S TRANSITION TO A RETAINER-BASED PRACTICE

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER


“I love that I have been able to help people”

After three years of being employed, Dr. Mazza purchased a private practice in Sugar Land. With two fellow colleagues, he ran a traditional family practice. However, in 2005 he questioned everything he had done up until that point.

“I became very dissatisfied with the amount of time I had to spend with my patients and I fought the system because I knew the patients wanted more time,” says Dr. Mazza. “I found myself continuously apologizing for running late.” He refers to it as a hamster wheel, a never ending chase that only continues to go faster and faster. Tired and overwhelmed, Dr. Mazza considered giving up medicine entirely and pursuing his childhood dream of attending law school. Maybe that young boy who watched countless law shows, Perry Mason in particular, was on to something. “I was looking to completely transition,” reflects Mazza. “But something inside of me just was not quite ready to give up the white coat.” At the suggestion of his colleague, Dr. Mazza considered another approach. Retainer-based medicine, another style of practice originating in the Northwest, tends to focus on quality not quantity. After a month of researching and praying, Mazza decided it was a worthwhile venture and converted the practice later that year. What is a retainer-based approach? This model limits the number of patients cared for by any one doctor allowing for more personalized and timely care. This is sometimes referred to as a retainer-based medicine or boutique medicine but the term concierge best describes the services the patients of this practice receive. Many traditional family practices operate on rapid fire, where patients are allowed one question and ten minutes max, all after spending at least an hour in the waiting room. Concierge practices make sure their patients know that their time is just as valuable as the doctor’s. While traditional family practices generally acquire anywhere from 2,000 to 2,500 patients, concierge practices generally max between 300 and 700 patients. This allows for same day or next day appointments and generally little to no time spent in the waiting room. At Dr. Mazza’s office the patient determines the length of the appointment. In fact, he requires a minimum of 30 minutes. When the patient calls in they are also asked what

their appointment is concerning. “This gives me the flexibility to research and really be the patients quarterback,” notes Mazza. This extra appointment time allows for him to better understand his patient’s history, lifestyle and specific needs. Another perk of the system, Dr. Mazza is able to be reached by his patients 24 hours a day 7 days a week. And just like an old fashioned doctor, he makes house calls! Something that sets Mazza’s practice apart from others is that he admits his own patients to the hospital. “The hospital staff is not nearly as in tune to their patients as their primary care doctor is,” shares Dr. Mazza. “When my patients are really ill, I think it makes a difference when they see their primary care physician in the hospital working alongside and being a good liaison between them and their family.” When it comes down to it, it is an old school practice that puts the patient first each and every time. Having established the type of practice that suited him, Dr. Mazza was ready to open his own private practice. When he found a building in the historic section of downtown Richmond he knew he had found his new home. He moved into the former First Community Bank building on June 22 of this year. After months of renovation, Dr. Mazza was able to incorporate some of the latest technology while still preserving the rustic and historic feel of the location. The exposed original brick and large wood doors add character and country charm. “Richmond has been so welcoming and supportive,” Mazza says. The town’s historic feel and quaint nature was what drew him to the area, but it is the wonderful people who have made the move worthwhile. Dr. Mazza also offers personal training to clients. His wife, Bridget Mazza, a certified personal trainer, and her partner Richard Scoby, work alongside Dr. Mazza and monitor patients workout regimes and overall progress. Mazza goes on to say, “Our lives and our jobs are becoming more sedentary and it is now showing up in our older generations who do not have the strength they should.” He wants this to be a place where his elderly patients feel comfortable going. Here they can focus on core strength as well as balance and gait issues in order to prevent future falls. With only one to two people working out at any given time, it is a very personalized experience.

“I love that I have been able to help people in this fashion,” says Mazza. “I have never again thought about a change of careers!” While his free time is limited, Dr. Mazza enjoys golfing and running marathons. As a father of three daughters, family time is a must in his book. Having chosen a concierge style practice, Dr. Mazza gives more of himself and his time than ever before, but admits that it is worth the sacrifice. With a small dedicated staff at his side, Dr. Frank Mazza is able to practice medicine the way he feels his patients deserve. H

T O C O N TA C T D R . M A Z Z A ' S O F F I C E G O T O : C O N C I E R G E M E D I C I N E A N D W E L L N E S S . C O M

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Dr.

Frank Mazza knew early that he wanted to be a doctor. After completing his 3-year residency at Memorial Southwest in Houston he dove right in to what he loved – helping patients achieve a happy and healthy life. After years of chasing time and playing catch up during appointments, Dr. Mazza changed his entire approach to medicine – and he has never looked back!

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JESS STUAR T

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Jess Stuart A Legacy of Life in Fort Bend County

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

WRITTEN BY JOAN FRANCES

America has an inimitable history. Stories of immigrants coming from Europe to start life again in an undiscovered, primitive area of the world. Those brave, courageous souls who traveled with very little, anxious to begin farming or ranching and carving a life for themselves and their family. Our ancestors, building a heritage to carry on from generation to generation. These are the people cities and schools are named after, a reminder to never forget the impact they have made. Blood lines that can be traced all the way back to Stephen F. Austin and the Old Three Hundred. John Foster was one of those leaders whose legacy is kept intact today through his descendants. Fort Bend has a direct link to these ancestors through the people that still live here. One resident that is the great-great-great-great-great grandson of John Foster, who was one of the original Old Three Hundred members, is Jess Stuart.


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J

ohn Foster was born in 1757 in South Carolina. He and his brothers were patriots during the Revolutionary War. In 1783, he was the first recorded settler that received grants of land from the Spanish officials for himself and his wife, Rachael Gibson at Natchez Trace, Mississippi. Sadly, Rachael died, he then married Mary Elizabeth Smith Kelsey and moved to Wilkinson County where he settled and raised a family. John’s son Randolph, at 22 years of age served in the war of 1812, and was an experienced frontiersman who explored and hunted throughout Arkansas and Spanish Texas. It was the summer of 1821 that Randolph met Stephen F. Austin and helped outline boundaries for his colony. By 1822 and at age sixty five John agreed to move to Texas with his sons Randolph and John R. They were granted, by the Mexican Government, two anda-half-leagues and three labors of land which equals to about 12,000 acres in Fort Bend County. As they began their new life in Texas, they did more than just ranch and farm, they became humanitarians for the community.

“If you don’t know where ya came from, then how do you know where you are going?” - JP Stuart -

Jess Stuart resides with his family on 128 of the original acres that belonged to John Foster over 191 years ago. Along with the land are artifacts and pictures, memories of the years it took to build a successful business through ranching and farming. Jess, along with his wife Terri, daughter Grace and son Foster continue to keep this legacy alive with the Texas Room, a small museum in their home. This room is filled with vintage Texas and Fort Bend County maps as well as old Spanish Deeds written in 1824 and signed by John, Randolph, Stephen F. Austin and Baron De Bastrop. Jess proudly displays family artifacts including a saddle used for many years by his grandfather. A small one room house on the property remains, reminiscent of the past and preserved for the future. Family means everything to them as they reflect upon the accomplishments of their ancestors.

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The Fosters were strong willed and devoted to improving life and helping their fellow man. John established a school for his family which soon was expanded to the area. Randolph served Stephen F. Austin as an Indian agent and scout. These men continued to fight for rights and to oppose tyranny. In 1837, Foster petitioned for the organization of Fort Bend County and the rest, is history. In those days traditions were born from the land they worked so arduous for and fought so hard to keep.

Jess said, “I try to live my life by that motto, because every family must have a person that they can look up to. My grandfather was a man of great love for the outdoors and he taught me a lot about life.” The tradition continues as they schedule cattle round-ups in late April or early May, then celebrate with dinner on the grounds. Everyone brings food, they visit, play games for hours and enjoy the beautiful land around them. Holidays are equally special with seasonal decorations and sounds of laughter echoing throughout the rooms. The detailed stories of their ancestors’ trials and tribulations inspire the Stuarts to continue this heritage of family and unity. In 2011 the Stuarts were presented with the Land Heritage award from the state for their ownership of the original land of John Foster for more than 150 years.


JESS STUAR T

40

Jess, just like the generations before him, is philanthropic. He graduated from Terry High School, attended Wharton County Junior College for two years then received his degree in kinesiology with a specialization in sport management from Texas A&M University. He started his career before he graduated by accidentally signing up for a gym class not knowing it was a gymnastics course at the YMCA. Jess assisted at the after school gym class held for kids, then worked his way up to sports official, welcome center attendant and facility manager. After he graduated, he worked full time as program director, senior program director, associate executive and now, executive director.

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

Jess said, “The main goal is to strengthen the foundations of the community by instilling in youth the five core values of

caring, honesty, respect, responsibility and faith.

With these values our youth will mature to be resilient and capable individuals.�

These strong morals he inherited from his ancestors. Knowing where he came from, Jess has devoted his life to the preservation of history. He is a member of the Historical Richmond Commission and the Fort Bend County Historical Commission. He is also Vice President of the Foster Museum Board. Jess founded the Brazos River Rotary Club and assists in service projects for the community. Thanks to the tireless efforts of Jess and his family, the historical society and other advocates for the preservation of history, Fort Bend County continues to keep these memories active with engaging museums and the revitalization of the Richmond Historic District. Preserving these artifacts and stories are a top priority for the community, keeping the history alive, so they may pass them on to future generations. H


A Portal to the Past

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

A POR TAL TO TH E PAST

42

THE PRAIRIE HOME

- Circa 1860s, featured at George Ranch Historical Park


THE FORT BEND COUNTY

43

MUSEUM ASSOCIATION WRITTEN BY JOAN FRANCES

W

alking into this celebrated building, the walls are filled with pictures and artifacts of antiquity. Ghosts of famous Texans seem to occupy the space. Here, in this well documented room are the historic memories of the beginning of our heritage, our birthright, over a century ago. All the blood, sweat and tears of our ancestors are documented and proudly displayed for all to see. The history of Fort Bend County is an integral part of the city of Richmond’s legacy. From the historical buildings in downtown to the beautifully preserved homes in the neighborhoods with the century old trees dotting the country side. People are proud of their culture, stories are told time and time again. Celebrating almost a half a century of serving the community, and preserving the rich history of the area is the Fort Bend County Museum.

LONG-SMITH COTTAGE

Photo courtesy of Larry Pullen

The Museum chronicles the history of Stephen F. Austin's Colony from 1822 to 1945. The campus includes the Museum, the Long Smith Cottage, the John M. Moore Home, and the McFarlane House. Visitors will journey through time and experience life on the Brazos River and the Fort Bend story through dioramas and displays.

JOHN M. MOORE HOME

Photo courtesy of Larry Pullen

The 1883 John Moore Home was built by John M. Moore (1862-1940) for his bride, Lottie Dyer. Richmond's First Baptist Church was founded in this house and noted politicians and cattlemen often visited here. Each December, the Fort Bend Museum Docents host their popular Candlelight Tour in the Moore Home. The McFarlane House was built by merchant Isaac McFarlane from 1882-1883. It has since been restored to its original beauty. Fort Bend Museum Association’s administrative offices occupy the building now. This house was a part of the 1889 Jaybird/Woodpecker clash where gun-fire took place. Jessica Avery, Education Coordinator at the Fort Bend Museum, serves tarts in the dining room of the Long-Smith Cottage

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The Long Smith Cottage, one of the oldest buildings in Richmond, is furnished to illustrate middle class life in Richmond during the 1840s and 1860s. Included are many pieces of furniture hand-made in Texas including several articles that belonged to Jane Long known as “The Mother of Texas”.


BUILDINGS AT THE

GEORGE RANCH HISTORICAL SITE

A POR TAL TO TH E PAST

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The 480-acre George Ranch Historical Park, owned by the George Foundation and operated by the Museum Association, is the site for the living history demonstrations. Through the talent of actors, history is illustrated by showing the development of the ranch at four important periods of its history: 1830s, 1860s, 1890s, and 1930s--interpreting the impact of Austin's Colony on this one family's ranch to complement its in-town exhibits and programs. This engaging rendition of the past has received state and national recognition. This is a sample of what the Museum Association has to offer. Please join us in celebrating our charming past by participating in the events scheduled through the end of the year. H

GEORGE RANCH HOME FROM THE 1930s ERA

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 6

FBM Lecture Series #3 10:00 am to Noon Mamie George Room @ the FBC Courthouse RSVP to PAT WRIGHT and we’ll save a seat for you! The Misadventures of the Good Ship Lively PAUL SPELLMAN

DAVIS HOME, CIRCA 1890s

Lives of The Old 300: Interpreting Individual Experiences of Settlers in Texas MERRITT PEELE

NOVEMBER 14

Playing in the Past 10:00 am to 1:00 pm

NOVEMBER 14

Historic Richmond Walking Tour 10:30 am to 11:30 am

DECEMBER DECEMBER 3, 4 & 5

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THE STOCK FARM FEATURES THE 1830s DOG TROT CABIN SITE

Candlelight Tours Location: 500 Houston St Richmond, TX 77469

For more information or to volunteer, Call Us at 281-342-6478 Hours: Tuesday-Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

THE DEWALT HERITAGE CENTER,

featuring the historic Dew plantation house is located at Kitty Hollow Park in Missouri City, and is open for tours on Sunday afternoons

HOME TOURS 11:00 am, 1:00 pm & 3:00 pm


AW E S O M E

AWESOME ALLIGATORS

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ALLIGATORS WRITTEN BY JOE DOGGETT

ALLIGATORS SHARE ONE THING IN COMMON WITH LARGE FISH & ALL SNAKES

THE MORE THE STORY IS TOLD,

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THE BIGGER THEY GET

Like many outdoor enthusiasts in southeast Texas, I have seen hundreds of rough-scaled, snaggle-toothed, bulbous-nosed alligators, mostly along weed-choked shorelines of sloughs and ponds and in brackish canals. Most of these ‘gators were between four and eight feet. In North America, the thin-nosed tropical crocodiles are native only to extreme south Florida. Unlike alligators, these rare saurians can thrive in straight saltwater. Despite campfire and clubhouse embellishments, American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) taping over Photo: ©iStock.com/Strannik_fox

an honest 10 feet are not common sightings. Big Boys topping 12 are downright rare. At least, this has been my observation and I believe the overall population numbers would back me up. Keep in mind that an alligator twice the height of a full-grown man might be 40 or 50 years old. The odds of such a borderline dinosaur surviving in proximity to the ever-expanding crush of civilization are slim. But the occasional mondo-giant ‘gator does exist. And these are the ones that continue to inspire lore and legend. And fact. Although the facts sometimes get a bit muddled. Several years ago, Justin Wells and several friends caught and killed a 14-foot, 8-inch, 880-pound brute from Chalk Creek in East Texas. The massive alligator reportedly was documented by officials from Safari Club International. And, in 2013, while taking part in a public alligator hunt on the Daughtrey Wildlife Management Area (near Choke Canyon Reservoir), Braxton Bielski caught an alligator measured at 14-3. The beast apparently weighed 800 pounds. It is credited by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department as the official state record.


Take your pick, but 14-foot-class ‘gators do survive in Texas. And they are trumped by the benchmarks in several southern states. Alabama reportedly documented a 15-9 that scaled 1,011 pounds. Florida has sketchy reports of a long-ago 17-5 from the Everglades, but the official record for the Sunshine State stands at 14-feet, 5/8-inch. Still, Florida being Florida, you have to believe that some awesome alligators have reached full maturity in the low-country latticework of swamps and rivers.

SOUTHERN LOUISIANA IS THE MOTHER LODE FOR

ALLIGATORS

Based on a recent survey, the Pelican State boasts more than one million alligators. But Texas can’t be far behind, with an on-going growth of alligator numbers since the reptiles were placed on the state’s protected game species list in 1985 (prior to that, they were off-limits under the 1973 Texas Endangered Species Act). But, back to Louisiana. Rumors persist of a titanic 19-2 scaling approximately one ton that was taken near Vermillion Bay; however, the story of the mega-gator originated in 1890. For all I know, it was hashed up by several Cajuns sitting around a jug of ‘shine. I’d be more inclined to accept such a report if it had been documented by, say, Raymond Ditmars, the famed turnof-the-century herpetologist at the New York Zoological Park. On the subject of Ditmars, his classic book, Reptiles of the World (1910), substantiates several species of the crocodile family in the 20-foot-plus club. They include the Indian gavial, the saltwater crocodile, and the black caiman. Keep in mind that such huge reptiles surely were more common 100 years ago. Ditmars credits the American alligator at 16 feet, with no mention of the alleged Louisiana monster; however, another well-respected book published half a century later, A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians (Roger Conant, 1958), pegs the maximum length at 19 feet, 2 inches, an obvious nod to Vermillion Bay. Well, maybe. That’s awfully big - like a 9-foot man.

The female alligator deposits 30 or 40 three-inch eggs in soft shoreline loam or sand and builds a large mound to protect them. The babies hatch in about two months. During the incubation period, the scaly, swarthy, snaggly mamma is apt to hover near, guarding the clutch, which is not exactly what the nearest berry picker or bird watcher or perch jerker needs to hear.

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Alligators are normally not as aggressive as most species of crocodiles, and unprovoked attacks on humans are rare - but they have occurred. And, frankly, they may increase as wild alligators living in or near expanding urban areas increasingly lose fear and caution. For example, regularly feeding a big alligator in a neighborhood lake is not a good idea. “Old Fred” the resident ‘gator starts associating people with food. He eases up looking for another handout and maybe gets the wrong idea if a foot is dangling off the dock. Allowing a dog to run free along a marshy or brushy bank known to harbor alligators can be a heartbreaking mistake. This especially is true early and late in the day, and during the warm-weather months when coldblooded reptiles are most active. Even during winter, a mild trend can re-juice a sluggish ‘gator. And you really cannot blame the alligator if you allow a pet to roam within its kill zone. The dumb brute is acting from natural impulse to grab a meal - same thing with a nutria or a turtle or a garfish. Experts maintain that the larger alligators tend to become loners, more territorial, while the smaller one often congregate more-or-less according to size. In other words, if you see a ‘gator of double-digit length, the odds are good that smaller ones are not in the area. The Big Boy either routs them or eats them. Of course, a sustained flood can reshuffle alligator populations. The aquatic reptiles either wander, seeking new habitat, or they get washed downstream along with trailers, SUV’s and other flotsam. The record-breaking rains of May scattered alligators all over southeast Texas, causing them to show in the most unlikely places. For example, during early June Doug Pike and I were wading waist-deep in the Quintana Beach surf for speckled trout. The tide was green and the mullet were popping and the gulls were wheeling. Everything was looking great. Well, until a displaced six-foot alligator popped up about 10 yards in front of us. H

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Regardless of top-end potential, all alligators start as runts, little more than chubby lizards (in fact, the name evolved from the Spanish, lagarto, for “lizard”). They hatch during late spring and average 9 or 10 inches in length.

Photo by Katie Mecham


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magine driving home after a long day at work. Fighting the rush hour traffic, waiting in line at the grocery store, picking up the kids from afterschool care, coming home to a clogged drain. Sound like your life? What if there was a place to escape to? Not the couch in your family room, not the study and not the bathroom. The best place to let go of the stress of the day is outside, in your own backyard, designed to be an extension of your home, a haven of peace. You can make this scenario a reality, thanks to the creative ingenuity of Rob Douglass and his team at Texas Custom Patios.

TEXAS CUSTOM PATIOS PAVING THE WAY TO SPECTACULAR OUTDOOR LIVING WRITTEN BY JOAN FRANCES

For years, Rob wondered why so many home owners in his Richmond neighborhood weren’t fully utilizing their outdoor living area. “I kept thinking to myself how nice it would be if there was a way to create an outdoor living space as functional and attractive as inside the home.” Over time this idea became an obsession. In 2004, after a 20-year career with the YMCA Rob said his final goodbyes to friends and colleagues so that he and his wife, Katherine, could make his vision become a reality. Since that time, Texas Custom Patios has evolved from the creation of simple structures to beautifully designed and sophisticated outdoor living spaces.

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THE TIME WAS RIGHT FOR LUXURIOUS OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

Initially, Texas Custom Patios contracted and built simple decks and pergolas, but the market was changing and the timing was perfect. Rob and his partners were at the threshold of a transformation. Twenty years ago, homes were built with spacious backyards and owners gave very little consideration to outdoor living amenities. With a new generation of homeowners, people were looking to do more with the property they lived on. Consumers wanted luxury outdoor living spaces, complete with fully equipped kitchens, stainless steel gas grills, directional lighting, vaulted ceilings, entertainment centers and fireplaces. Project requests were becoming more complicated and Rob and his staff were prepared to accommodate. Rob said, “We developed crews from all the skilled trades that are required to build our projects, such as framers, masons, electricians, plumbers, painters, and more. The business also expanded beyond just Fort Bend County and now has eight project developers who design, sell and manage projects all over the Greater Houston area.” The first full year in 2005 saw 44 completed projects. Now, Texas Custom Patios builds nearly 200 projects annually.


HONESTY & INTEGRITY

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So why so successful? So much is how they conduct business.

When someone is looking for improvements to their backyard, Rob and his staff renders design drawings of what the project would look like once it is completed. The client is presented with several options to choose from, as well as a time frame for completion. The proposal has a turn-key price, no hidden costs of any kind, so there are no surprises. Consumers appreciate the honesty and integrity the company has to offer. While many of their projects are large and complex, Texas Custom Patios can design and build projects for almost any reasonable budget. And the home owner works with the same project developer every step of the way.

THE KEY TO SUCCESS

Texas Custom Patios have several unique assets that stand out from all the other patio competitors. Their key to success is to design and build a structure that does not look like an add-on, it appears original to the home. No matter how old the house is, roofing, bricking, tile, siding, all are selected to blend with the structure of the house. Steven Schell, the company’s first employee and now a partner in the business said, “It is a challenge to figure out how to tie in substantial additions while maintaining the traditional style of the original home.” They achieve success time after time, as well as satisfied customers that can appreciate and enjoy their home for years. The finished product does not appear to be an add-on, it essentially increases the value of the home.

winning builder, they have also been featured in numerous publications, including Hearth & Home magazine and the Houston Business Journal - where they were named one of the fastest growing companies in the Houston area in 2013. The company is also actively involved in the Greater Houston Builders Association, Dallas Builders Association, Texas Association of Builders, and National Association of Home Builders. Additional community involvement includes memberships in the Central Fort Bend Chamber Alliance and the Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce.

INDUSTRY AWARDS: • 2015 TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF BUILDERS Star Award, Best Outdoor Living Space over $100,000 Memorial project

• 2014 TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF BUILDERS With so much to offer the community, Texas Custom Patios has expanded to offer their exclusive services in much of the greater Houston area including, Cypress, The Woodlands, Fulshear, Katy, Missouri City, Richmond, Rosenberg, Pearland, Spring, Sugar Land, Kingwood, Humble and Tomball. In January, they opened the first office in parts of the Dallas and Fort Worth area with overwhelming support and success.

RECOGNITION & COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Armed with an A+ Better Business Bureau rating, Texas Custom Patios has become the front-runner in custom patio building and remodeling. In addition to being an award-

HOUSTON AREA / FORT BEND COUNTY 12503 Exchange Dr. #506 • Stafford, TX 77477 (281) 265-1994 • hou@texascustompatios.com

Star Award, Best Outdoor Living Space over $100,000 - Royal Oaks project

• 2014 HOUSTON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION Finalist, Remodeled Outdoor Living Space - Royal Oaks & Bellaire projects

• 2013 HOUSTON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION Winner, Remodeled Outdoor Living Space - Richmond project Finalist, Remodeled Outdoor Living Space - Memorial project

So the next time the stress of the week is overwhelming, consider taking a break in your own backyard. No one does what Texas Custom Patios does. Every finished project is representative of the owners’ talent this company so proudly displays. They stand by their record, reputation, and amazing structures that will withstand the test of time. H

DALLAS / FORT WORTH AREA 8412 Sterling St, Suite 100 • Irving, TX 75063 (972) 915-2727 • dfw@texascustompatios.com

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EXPANSION & GROWTH


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COMING TOGETH ER

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Citizen Carrie showing a beautiful Brookwood plant available in the Gallery Furniture greenhouse.


COMING TOGETHER

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to Make a Difference WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

It can be said that the measure of a person is not how much they have achieved in their life, but how their achievement has improved the world they live in. This is the story of two such people, who through their mutual compassion and respect, with a combined appreciation for others, have made life better for many in need. Their friendship and kinship are a shining example in of how we can all make a difference within our community.

Yvonne Streit, founder of the Brookwood Community, knows Mack’s generosity first hand. He donated a large part of his new store to Brookwood, providing another location for its residents to sell their handmade goods and further support their community. This relationship stemmed from an appreciation and admiration of one another’s dedication to giving back. By teaming up, they are capable of making an even greater difference in the world.

J I M M c I N G VA L E Known for his fast talking commercials, fun giveaways and for his emphasis on great quality, “Made in America” furniture, Mack is not afraid of hard work.

From his humble beginnings in 1981 to building his wellestablished brand and world-class locations today, Mack has truly created something from nothing. Now, at a time in his life where he could easily take a step back to enjoy his accomplishments, Mack is just as present and dedicated to his business and to his customers as he was at the beginning. His committed work ethic is unmatched as he regularly works fourteen hour days, seven days a week. This local icon’s energy and enthusiasm is infectious and no one knows the furniture business better. Not only has Mack done an amazing job growing his business, but he has also done wonderful things to improve lives within his community. Mack shares his time, talents and resources as a mentor and motivator for business students. He regularly steps up as a lifesaver for local needy families who are in need of something – sometimes something as simple as a bed. He is widely known for his work with Texas Children’s Hospital, Texas Medical Center and his work with the very first Mobile Stroke Unit. As many will remember, Mack even reached into Fulshear recently when Gallery Furniture donated all of the furnishings for the new Fulshear Police Department! These causes and generous donations do not even scratch the surface of the kinds of things Mr. McIngvale does on a routine basis.

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allery Furniture opened its third location on the Grand Parkway in June of 2015. With 165,000 square feet of floor space, this is their biggest location to date. Jim McIngvale, owner and operator of the stores, has turned this location into way more than just a furniture store, it is a destination. Jim, better known simply as Mack, is wellknown around Houston for so much more than just furniture – he is known as a giver. Mack is a giver of time, knowledge and money.


COMING TOGETH ER

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“My dad taught me that it is easier to give than receive,” says Mack. “I want to be known as a giver. I am a firm believer in “capitalism with a cause.” One cause that is very near and dear to Mack is the Brookwood Community.

Yvonne’s solution started small as she began homeschooling Vicki. This soon grew into a learning group that included other local children with special needs. Over time the learning group outgrew Yvonne’s backyard and the group was graciously welcomed by a nearby Baptist church. It was not long before the church also had become too small, as word spread about Mrs. Streit and her efforts to help young people with special needs. It was a joyous day indeed when the Brookwood Community opened its doors in 1985. Today, the Brookwood Community is an internationally known example of how one dedicated person with a vision can make a difference and change lives throughout the world. Not only does Brookwood provide a loving and welcoming community for its residents, but also the opportunity to work. Whether they work in crafts making handmade unique gifts, or in the greenhouses, nursery, café or gift shop, each resident walks away with a sense of pride, knowing that they are useful and they are contributing to the world.

Mrs. Streit and Mr. McInvale at the Gallery Furniture groundbreaking.

Y VO N N E S T R E I T

“Individuals with special needs learn differently,” notes Yvonne. “They are a square peg, and society is trying to fit them in a round hole. So we built them a square hole.” Like all people, they want to have a purpose, and Brookwood gives them that purpose.

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Yvonne experienced every parent’s fear, and through it all created a loving community that not only saved her daughter’s life, but thousands of others like her through the Brookwood Community. “It all started with God, He founded Brookwood and I worked for Him,” says Yvonne Streit, founder and Executive Director Emeritus of the Brookwood Community. Today, the community’s purpose is to provide opportunity through education for adults with special needs. The Brookwood Community was born out of Yvonne’s personal tragedy. At the age of one, Yvonne’s daughter Vicki came down with the mumps. Due to unavoidable complications caused by the illness, her daughter was left with brain damage. Yvonne’s life instantly turned upside down. Her focus turned to finding a loving and safe environment where Vicki could learn necessary life skills. When she could not find it, Yvonne began working tirelessly to create it.

The Gallery Furniture groundbreaking with Mrs. Streit and Mr. McInvale.

S H A R I N G S I M I L A R G OA L S Years ago, Jim McIngvale was invited out to Brookwood to do a walk through and voice any retail ideas that could help them grow their cause. After just a few visits,


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Mack became a huge Brookwood fan. “I am amazed by the energy Yvonne has, and the passion she has for each and every resident,” says Mack. While they may seem like an unlikely pair, Mrs. Streit and Mr. McIngvale have one big thing in common – their dedication to providing jobs for those who need them. “When you go to Brookwood and see how giving someone a job can improve their self-esteem and view of self-worth, you know that that is what it is all about,” shares Mack. “I believe that work is life’s greatest therapy. It saved my beautiful daughter Elizabeth’s life.” Elizabeth was told due to her severe obsessive compulsive disorder she would never graduate high school. She worked hard to prove every doubter wrong and went on to earn a PHD in social work. “When she became a social worker it gave meaning to her life.” Mack goes on to say, “People need meaning in their lives and meaning comes through work.”

money earned goes right back to the community. In fact, Gallery Furniture even covers all of their utilities. “Mack does these wonderful things behind the scenes and does not get enough credit for them,” says Yvonne. “He is a true community leader with integrity and forth rightness.” Yvonne Streit has helped the world see that individuals with special needs have special gifts. They, like anyone else, have the right to feel like a citizen, one who has purpose and gives back. Jim McIngvale is proud to know her. “She is fighting for these people,” he says. “When society tells them they can’t, Yvonne is there telling them they can!” The Brookwood Community has changed the world and has become the premier facility for adults with special needs. Through his platform, Mack has helped spread the word and share the community’s vision. He still remains one of Brookwood’s biggest fans. H

THE BROOKWOOD COMMUNITY 1752 FM 1489 - Brookshire, TX 77423

281-375-2100

The Brookwood store inside Gallery Furniture.

Monday - Friday, 8:30 am - 5 pm www.brookwoodcommunity.org

“I believe in Brookwood because they value work like I do,” Mack shares. “Of course I want to make money, but I also want to make a difference.” When it came time to design the new Grand Parkway Gallery Furniture, Mack was quick to sit down with Yvonne and share with her a unique plan to help introduce people to the great products and people that make the Brookwood community so special. Subsequently, Mack generously donated 12,000 square feet of space to the Brookwood Community where residents can create and sell the goods they produce. One hundred percent of the

7227 West Grand Parkway South Richmond, TX 77407

(281) 810-9746

Hours: 10:00am - 10:00pm www.galleryfurniture.com

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COMING TOGETHER


TH E KUBE H OUSTON

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CELEBRATING

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FIVE

Y E A RS OF MEMORABLE

TELEVISION

WRITTEN BY JOAN FRANCES

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hink back, way back. It’s 1956 in Richmond Texas. Supper is over and mom is in the kitchen just finishing the dishes. Dad is turning on the black and white Zenith television set standing on the floor in the living room. As it warms up, he adjusts the rabbit ear antenna for almost close-to-perfect reception. Three channels of entertainment are available for the pleasure of the family, ABC, CBS and NBC. Dad yells, “Hurry up, I Love Lucy will be on soon.” Mom and the kids hurry in, not to miss a single second of the comedy. The lights dim, and its show time! Those were the days television was a novelty and it took so little for people to be entertained. Clean, upbeat and happy ending stories were the rave. It’s comforting to know there is still television for the whole family, and it’s called the KUBE.

BRANDING A NEW STATION Five years ago, a progressive and innovative group of broadcasters, TITAN Broadcast Management, and J.D. Huey, President and General Manager, walked into the office of what was a Hispanic station, KAZH and took over. They had 2 weeks to convert from Hispanic to “general market”. Starting from scratch, the company scheduled new programming, staffing and set out to build a new brand. On that day in September 2010, KUBE TV, Channel


57 was born. Working with programming vendors, KUBE introduced a line up that mirrored childhood memories. Audiences were receptive to this new station in Houston, airing old favorites like I Love Lucy, Andy Griffith, Magnum PI, Twilight Zone, Hawaii 5-0, just to mention a few. When asked what the most favorite part of his job is, J.D. replied, “It’s never a job nor work when you love what you do. Most favorite? The thrill and the challenge to build something from ground up. It’s like watching your child grow”. Today the station is owned by NRJ TV, a Texas company and still managed by TITAN.

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BUILDING A REPUTATION Since that inaugural year, KUBE TV has spun into a contemporary entertainment station known for its local programming as the only station in Houston that broadcast local High School Football, known as TNS… Thursday Night Showdown. Every season, high school fans may catch selected Fort Bend County Football rivals. And what about Entertainment? Who doesn’t Love Raymond? Everybody Loves Raymond. A good laugh with Jerry Seinfeld, King of Queens and more. But not forgetting their roots, they still deliver the rich and pure programming they started with, soon MeTV (Memorable Entertainment Television) was introduced to Houston and surrounding communities. MeTV can be seen on Comcast, Channel 311 and Over the Air (antenna), as the tradition continues, those favorite sit coms that take us back to the good times are still here.

MISSION STATEMENT Their mission is simple: Today viewers know where they can tune-in for family orientated, clean entertainment, 7 days a week. KUBE TV can be seen on Comcast, U-Verse, DISH and Direct TV, or a reliable set of rabbit ears and presto, you are in business. Moms, dads, grandparents, kids of all ages, have turned to the KUBE and its sister station MeTV. Television has for decades played a significant role in practically everyone’s lives. Viewers have many choices to choose from, so at the end of long and stress filled days, it’s nice to come home and know that we have a friend with The KUBE and MeTV to turn to.

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So the next time you reminisce about the good ol’ days and wish life could be less complicated, turn on the KUBE or MeTV, take a step back, pop you some popcorn, slip on your favorite house shoes and get comfortable. Walk down memory lane into a time when choices were simpler and entertainment was easy to watch. Turn on your favorite sit com and put the day’s traffic behind you. Then gradually drift into a slumber with a smile on your face. H


BASS TIME

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Bass Time WRITTEN BY DOUG PIKE

THE ROD

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tip bounced and the line came tight, angling to the left along the reed-rimmed shoreline. Rickey and I watched Liz Coulter lower the rod, reeling to keep pace, and, then, finally, stricking hard to the open side of the johnboat.

A two-pound largemouth bass promptly jumped, showing an open mouth, flared gills and the flapping plastic worm pinned in the corner of the jaw. The hooked bass fell back, pulled hard, then jumped again. Rickey Morris nudged the stern-mounted electric trolling motor, maneuvering to deeper water. “Good job,” he said. “You did that exactly right.” “It’s about time,” Liz laughed. “I didn’t do so well on the first two strikes. Or ‘taps,’ or whatever you call them.”

We were fishing a small lake near Morris’ home south of Houston. The bass plodded close and I reached with thumb and curled index for the classic “lip grab.” I held the chunky green and gold fish aloft.

“CONGRATULATIONS; YOUR FIRST BASS.” We snapped several photos then released the fish. It flashed away, diving into the clear green. Coulter is an avid saltwater angler, but that recent foray was her first for largemouth bass. She was wielding a 6 1/2-foot two-handed rod and a free-spool casting reel,


The lure of choice was a crawfish-type soft plastic rigged snagless “Texas style” on a 4/0 worm hook below a 1/4-ounce bullet-type slip sinker. The same setup, with various modifications, has been used a jillion times in the lakes and ponds of southeast Texas, and it remains a killer for summer bass. It also is an excellent choice for the newcomer. First, with the hook point turned back into the soft plastic lure body, the offering is virtually snagless amid “hard” cover such as logs, stickups. and reeds. The weighted “worm” is relatively easy to cast; the compact lead bullet sinker provides a positive payload for tentative lobs. Conversely, other effective bass lures demand a higher skill level for smooth deliveries. Air resistant payloads such as tandembladed spinnerbaits and balsa thin-minnow floating/diving plugs are among the worst. For example, during the same session, I attempted to wham a thin-minnow plug into the gusting southeast wind and, well, the backlash easily was among the top 10 in my 50-year fishing career. Maybe the top five. The spool was absolutely buried amid exploded monofilament. One look and I started snipping with line clippers. It was brutal, especially with semi-pro credentials riding on the effort. Also an advantage, the pace is slow with a bottombumping weighted plastic. You don’t wear yourself out with chunk-and-wind. And, on the sluggish days of summer, allowing the bait to dawdle in a “fishy” spot gives lurking bass plenty of opportunity to seize the moment. Finally, bass absolutely love soft-plastic baits. The strikes usually are confident and fish tend to hang onto (even

attempt to swallow) the lure. The hit typically transmits as a “tap” or “bump” then the line comes tight as the fish moves off with the chewy plastic in its mouth. This deliberate tempo gives the angler time to react.

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The single drawback at the beginner level for fishing bottom-bumping Texas-rigged plastics is the violent hook-set required to set the barb. Remember, the hook point is pressed back into the soft body of the lure to keep it from snagging as it bounces and flutters over the bottom contours. Also, the line in deeper water encounters more water resistance as the angler raises the rod on the strike. Liz missed the first two fish simply by not hitting back hard enough. The bass were there but she failed to reach them with a soft reaction. No question, bass are more difficult to hook on Texas-rigged worms than on fast-moving plugs with exposed trebles. On the latter, the solid contact is automatic. But the tuned angler willing to pay attention can make the adjustments. During our two-hour lateafternoon session, Coulter caught six bass to three pounds. Her skill level increased markedly as she understood the drill. I caught four bass. Of course, I was in the center seat and forfeiting most of the “ice cream” water. Well, that sounds good. Rickey caught two but he was driving the boat and, way back in the stern, fishing seriously used water. Needless to say, in a desperate game of catchup, I was giving him few uncontested shoreline shots. Come to think of it, even with solid contact on the hookset, I jumped off a “solid 5.” So did, well, never mind about her. But, regardless of experience and on large water or small, the angler using a snagless soft plastic has taken a major step forward in catching summer bass. H

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and handled the casting tackle with growing confidence as Morris eased the 12-foot aluminum boat along the shoreline.


FURNITURE WITH A STORY

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FURNITURE with aStory WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT JONES

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rt tells a story. Alan Macik’s work is no different. Many may not see a kitchen table and consider it art, but I challenge you to take a look at one of Alan’s creations and not be in awe. He has the talent and creativity needed to turn old structures and fallen trees into a well-crafted masterpiece. These are timeless furnishings that last a lifetime.

“I’ve always done wood working,” says Alan. It started with taking architecture in school. Out of high school Alan took a job with a custom home builder in town. He remembers helping him build the Methodist church in Fulshear. Years later, in 2011, Alan and the builder’s two sons helped remodel the church. “It was kind of neat tearing apart the walls I put up decades earlier and seeing where I had written my name as a teenager,” chuckles Alan. But his heart was with furniture making. For years he made pieces for friends and family. In fact, one time he sold his own dining room table right out from underneath dinner! In late 2008 Alan had an epiphany, “Let’s not buy our lumber, let’s harvest our own lumber.” By the end of the year he had purchased his own sawmill. Alan now does it all, from cutting the trees, sawing, milling and even drying the lumber with a solar kiln he built himself. RUSTIC KUTS FURNITURE opened in downtown Rosenberg in 2009. Between then and now they have been in three different locations within one square block of town, each

location bigger than the last. Up until this last year Alan worked on his own from his garage. Alan recently hired a man by the name of Jamie Nickerson, an artist by trade. “We think a lot alike,” notes Alan. “We are able to bounce ideas off of each other and end up with an even better finished product.” Just some of the things offered at RUSTIC KUTS FURNITURE include dining room tables, coffee tables, sofa tables, end tables, mantles and mirrors. They even sell western art, bedding, hides, accessories for the kitchen and bath, as well as an array of other rustic furniture for further furnishing the home. In addition, Alan crafts beautiful crosses that look great on the wall or simply displayed on a surface. He is proud to mention that the store is comprised of pieces made from local products. Pecan is highly used throughout his work because it is readily available in Ft. Bend County. Alan also likes to use long leaf pine, mesquite and hackberry. While the latter is often considered a poor type of wood, Alan has found select pieces that look amazing when cut and positioned the right way.


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Both Jamie and Alan take pride in the quality of their work. “To me, what we do is not a job, it’s fun,” notes Alan. That love and passion becomes apparent to anyone who enters the store. Alan’s eyes simply light up when he shares the story behind each piece. One customer had an old tree that had been on his family’s property for years and had recently died. “We took that sentimental tree and gave it a new life as a piece of furniture,” says Alan. Everything is screwed and glued – absolutely no nails! They even leave the character of the wood, like knots and divots. Over the years Alan has learned neat tricks that help accentuate the wood’s natural uniqueness. Just one of those tricks is his use of epoxy to create a water like look within a natural crack in the wood. With up to 16 hours of labor dedicated to one table alone, it is of no surprise that each and every piece is of top notch quality. Want something in particular? Alan welcomes you to the store to see his work and brainstorm the open possibilities from there.

THE FURNITURE FOUND AT RUSTIC KUTS FURNITURE IS UNLIKE ANYTHING YOU CAN PURCHASE AT A BIG BOX STORE – IT IS UNIQUE. “You cannot duplicate these,” says Alan’s wife Sandra. “You can make something similar, but it will never be the same.” It is all about the source, the grains, colors and bits of character. Each tree has a different origin with a different story. “If you buy a piece here we can guarantee that no one else is going to have it!” RUSTIC KUTS FURNITURE is Alan’s showroom. “I’m just an old guy who loves what he’s doing.” Alan and Sandra have been known to donate pieces of furniture to local charities and fundraisers that are meaningful to them, namely the leukemia foundation. They give back to the community the same way the city of Rosenberg and surrounding areas have given so much to them over the years. Custom, quality furniture is hard to come by nowadays. If you want that one-of-a-kind piece that stands out, RUSTIC KUTS FURNITURE is the place to go. Alan’s passion for what he does is evident in his work. Art is not reserved only for a stretch of wall, it can fill a room in the form of highly crafted, solid wood furniture. H

828 3RD ST, ROSENBERG, TX • (281) 232-6033 W W W . R U S T I C K U T S . COM

A N A D D E D B O N U S - There is a boutique located within Rustic Kuts Furniture! Make sure you save time to browse the chic western inspired clothing and accessories when you visit.


Larry Johnson

60 LARRY JOH NSON

THE VISI NARY B E H I N D R I C H M O N D ’ S H A RV E S T G R E E N

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

W R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

hen Larry Johnson envisioned Houston’s first master-planned community with an on-site farm and ready-to-grow backyard vegetable gardens, some might say he was simply going back to his roots. Johnson grew up in the small, west Texas town of Kress between Lubbock and Amarillo where football only took a back seat to farming and ranching. He enjoyed the farm and the gridiron, pursuing both at Texas Tech where he earned his Bachelor of Science in agriculture economics while playing football for the Red Raiders. Still, Johnson realized other interests were worth exploring. After attending law school at the University of Texas, he and a few friends made the move to Houston with an eye on a career in real estate – and he never looked back.

Today, as president and CEO of The Johnson Development Corp., Larry Johnson leads a team responsible for a collection of some of the

nation’s finest master-planned communities, several of which rank among the nation’s top sellers for new homes. The company’s most recent endeavor is Harvest Green, the Fort Bend master-planned community at the Grand Parkway and West Airport Boulevard. The 1,300-acre master-planned community in Richmond will be Houston’s first where residents can enjoy fresh produce from an onsite farm co-op amidst new homes, walkable trail systems, greenbelts, lakes and waterways. Harvest Green residents will participate in chef-instructed culinary classes, farm-to-table dinners and various social gatherings as planned by an on-site Lifestyle Director. Each new home in Harvest Green also will include the option of a ready-to-grow backyard vegetable garden as installed by Enchanted Nurseries & Landscapes of Richmond. Participating homeowners also will receive a voucher good for seeds for fresh herbs and vegetables at Enchanted Gardens.


“Our sense was the national interest in healthy communities would be well received here in Houston among avid gardeners, those who may have thought about backyard gardening in the past and those who simply appreciate the concept of a neighborhood farm,” Johnson says.

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BASED ON EARLY RETURNS, THEIR FORESIGHT WAS SPOT ON.

For Larry Johnson and the rest of the Johnson Development team, creating unique lifestyle experiences such as those planned for Harvest Green is nothing new. Since 1975, Johnson Development has set the standard – and continues to raise the bar – for innovation in masterplanned communities. In 2001, Sienna Plantation became one of the nation’s first communities to open an on-site waterpark in lieu of smaller neighborhood pools. Johnson Development communities were among the nation’s first to operate their own Community Services Foundations to supplement and compliment the functions of existing homeowners’ associations. Plus, every Johnson Development community is staffed with a full-time “director of recreation and fun” who is responsible for programming and resident-only events.

“Every one of our communities has a personality and makes a statement about a lifestyle,” Johnson explains. He adds master-planned communities once focused on families now must present homes and amenities that attract the broadest spectrum of potential buyers. In response to changing family units, communities now offer housing types and price points ranging from family housing on

various lot sizes to townhomes and lifestyle patio homes for young professionals, single parents and downsizing emptynesters.

For Johnson, a community is not about the houses, it’s about the people inside of these houses. He wants to see people out and enjoying the community as much as possible. “When you start with a raw piece of land, it’s like looking at a blank sheet of paper,” he says. “There’s not a better feeling in the world than going into our communities and seeing kids swimming, families on walking trails, residents enjoying our dog parks and other amenities we’ve created. I want to be able to go back 10 years, 15 years from now and drive through our communities and be proud that they’re nice and well maintained.” When he’s away from the office and not driving through one of the company’s communities, there’s a good chance you’ll find Johnson working at his Hill Country ranch or relaxing with his family. While Johnson may be the top executive at The Johnson Development Corp., he is the first to deflect accolades to his team, emphasizing each person as an integral part in the company’s success. In a sense, he’s as genuine as the west Texas farmland where he was raised.

“I’m the same guy I’ve always been. I enjoy people and I still enjoy what I do.” H FIND OUT MORE AT HARVESTGREENTX.COM

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Recently, a bumper crop of close to 300 homebuyers filled Richmond’s Pecan Grove Country Club to meet Harvest Green’s builders and learn more about new homes in the community. In addition to new homes by a collection of Houston’s finest home builders, Harvest Green will welcome a new elementary school for the 2017-18 school year, the community’s third on-site campus joining Bowie Middle School and Travis High School, both of which received several Distinction Designations in the Texas Education Agency’s 2014 ratings.


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Inspires A City that

Inspiration

LOCAL AD AGENCY TAKES

FROM HISTORIC DOWNTOWN RICHMOND

F

or many, our careers determine where we call home. If you could choose where you lived and worked, where would you go? Inside of a high-rise along the busiest street of a bustling city? Or maybe a quaint office nestled inside of a charming town? For Kit Jones, president and owner of WheelWright Marketing Communications, it was the latter. With clients spread all over the United States, he is one of the lucky few who had the opportunity to choose where to anchor his company. For Kit, there was no other option – it had to be Richmond, Texas!

Why Richmond?

“I chose Richmond for my business because I fell in love with the small town feel, the community and its people,” shares Kit Jones. WheelWright Marketing Communications is located in the historic part of downtown Richmond, at the corner of U.S. 90A and Sixth Street. Many are surprised to find the agency’s name on a sign out front of a beautifully manicured and maintained historic home. Kit’s office looks nothing like what you would expect for an ad agency. Built in the early 1930’s, this stunning home boasts a two hundred plus year old live oak tree in the front yard, one of the oldest in the city of Richmond. Kit renovated the home beautifully by accentuating the original light fixtures and hardwood floors. Furnished with fun finds from antique shops in and around Richmond, it is decorated to the period of the time.

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

“I wanted an agency that offered a highly personalized client-agency experience, in an environment that felt more like a home than an office,” says Kit. “When this house became available I knew it was right – it is so easy to be creative here!”


Kit’s office is a welcoming one. It is set up to inspire and encourage creativity. WheelWright clients get to experience the benefits of this first hand.

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An Agency Like No Other

WheelWright Marketing Communications is a full service business to business advertising agency – but at a highly personalized level. You can expect hands-on account management, a wealth of marketing and public relations knowledge and a dedicated creative team. Together they work to elevate your brand and corporate image. “My first job out of college was with a fairly large ad agency in Chicago, and I have never left the business,” notes Kit. “I guess you could say I started big and ended up small, by design. It is important that I limit my client base so that I can take care of their marketing needs on a more personal level.” A lot of the agency’s business has come from referrals. This is largely why the company continues to increase its billings with each passing year.

Wheelwright has produced award-winning marketing materials for its clients.

“Love what you do, be proud of your work and have fun while you’re doing it!” - KIT JONES

By remaining smaller, Kit and his team are able to truly research their clients and understand them from the ground up. In fact, they immerse themselves into the businesses they take on. Learning the ins and outs of a company allows them to better promote and brand specifically for that company.

Striving to be the Best in the Business

“I’ve never wanted to do anything else but run and ad agency – it is in my blood.” Kit goes on to say, “I have purposely shaped this business to remain small so that I can stay close to my clients and remain hands on.” Creativity is key for this kind of profession. This is largely why Kit chose the city of Richmond to be his home base. The city is like no other, it harnesses life and inspiration in every nook and cranny. Current WheelWright clients look forward to visiting Kit’s office because it offers a sense of calm to their otherwise hectic lifestyles. “I’ve always been naturally creative, whether through my writing, drawing, or musical abilities,” Kit shares. “I’m thankful that I’ve been able to make a living through creative expression.” Kit Jones through WheelWright Marketing Communications has found the perfect equation for a successful business: a dedicated staff, all of whom enjoy their craft, and an office that welcomes, comforts and inspires those inside. “That’s been the key to doing good work for our clients,” Kit says while wrapping up the interview. “This office, this town and the culture we’ve created here make it all come together.” H

The agency places high emphasis on getting its clients featured in key industry publications.

JUST SOME OF THE SERVICES WHEELWRIGHT MARKETING OFFERS: Strategic Analysis, Planning & Budgeting Brand Development Logo Design Corporate Identity Programs Web Design and Development PR & Editorial Development Services Copywriting & Script Writing Marketing Collateral Design and Production Ad Design and Media Placement Booth & Signage Design Direct Mail Campaigns Photography Video Production Video Animation

713.269.2333 310 S. SIXTH STREET, RICHMOND, TX 77469

WWW.WHEEL-WRIGHT.COM

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“Bottom line is that we aim to over-deliver,” says Kit. “That is why you won’t find business hours listed on the door. Many of our clients frequently travel abroad, so we make ourselves available 24/7. We know that their needs do not fit perfectly into a typical day.”


TH E NEXT GENERATION OF BRISCOE

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Briscoe

The Next Generation of

It all started

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

on a flight to Las Vegas when Bill and Jorden Briscoe Mahler, father and son owners of Briscoe Manor, had a conversation about the future of the Briscoe property on 723 in Richmond. That drawing on a paper napkin turned into a successful and unparalleled wedding and event venue nestled with large pecan trees that create the perfect backdrop and serene atmosphere. As Briscoe Manor approaches their 10th anniversary since creating their first happily ever after, Jorden reflects back on the beginning. “It was definitely a lot of hard work in the beginning with some ‘figure it out as we go’ mentality, but seeing our staff grow from just two people working every angle of the venue to our now 9 full time on-site staff; it is humbling, to say the least.”

“We are Texas

all the way, but not in a cheesy, overused way.” Jorden explains that Briscoe Manor offers a subtle yet elegant rustic setting. The heritage behind the Briscoe family and land is rich and those involved with Briscoe Manor exude that ideal and make it their priority to keep that history alive. Jorden feels that the majority of the brides that choose Briscoe Manor as the place to have their wedding hold the same type of southern Christian family values, far from the bridezillas that you see on TV.

One thing you should know

is that Briscoe Manor is more than just weddings. They have a space for corporate uses that gives a simple meeting or corporate gala an elegance and privacy that just cannot be matched in

Photo by Carlino’s Photography

WRITTEN BY ASHLEY MANCHACA

the area. They have the ability to allow their client 100% private access to the 50 acre estate. They provide security for every event. “We also have a large paved private parking lot that a lot of other venues just aren’t putting at the top of their priority list; they are forcing people to pay for valet for their car to sit who knows where during the events.” Jorden’s wheels are always turning to provide new ideas to keep Briscoe Manor fresh in the already hot wedding industry, especially with the rise of new event venues. He is always trying to put money back into the business. For 2015, they added Ella’s Décor Barn which is an area for booked brides to design and rent items that the Briscoe Manor staff have noticed were popular amongst their current brides. In a world of Pinterest and DIY, this creative barn allows a bride the look and feel she is going for without having to buy numerous inventory items that she has no need for after the wedding. Jorden details the purpose in explaining, “It is all about trying to make it convenient for the bride.” Additions like this are what creates that edge that Briscoe Manor has above all other local event venues.

Briscoe Manor’s legacy

is something that is important and on the forefront of Jorden’s mind. When asked, he states, “For our legacy, I hope it’s one that created good jobs for our employees that they felt like they could take pride in and feel as though they are a part of something bigger than themselves. As for our Brides and Grooms, we treat people the way we want to be treated and that is largely proportionate to our success. Looking back, the families that choose Briscoe Manor for more than just one of their children …that’s when you know you’re doing it right.” H


Jorden’s

R U N D O W N H H H H H

I’ve always been drawn to politics, maybe one day it will call me…Republican of course. Just a thought…Growing up, I thought my grandpa was one of the smartest people I’ve ever known… and he was, even with a sixth grade education. Being loud is not something I am. I’m a quiet person so people usually think I’m just that or that I’m being rude…I think I ‘m just quiet. Shhh. Smoking meat on my BBQ smoker is my new favorite hobby right after hunting. Children will bring out your parents in you real quick…it’s true.

H

Always…be nice. I don’t care who you are, it doesn’t impress me. Treat everyone the same.

H

Amy Briscoe Mahler was my grandma and probably the sweetest lady I have ever known… and if you don’t think so…then you simply never met her.

H H H H H H H H

Photo by Carlino’s Photography

Easton and Ella are our twins and just turned 2 years old recently. They are hard work, but fun for sure!

Photo by Evoke Photography

My desk is a mess, yet I know where everything is. Next year makes the 5th Anniversary with my wife, Stephanie. We met as neighbors in college back in 2002 at Texas State. My degree is actually in Criminal Justice, but somehow I managed to find myself owning a wedding venue…interesting. Briscoe Manor is the best wedding venue in the Houston area…I like to think and I like to also think that we are the bar setter for all of the others to follow.

Weddings • Corporate Special Events

If I could wear a cap every day, I would.

(281) 238-4700

October 2016 will mark our 10yr Anniversary here at Briscoe Manor, crazy how time flies.

5801 FM 723 Richmond, TX 77406

My Dad, Bill has played a much larger part of my life then he probably realizes. He’s a great dad and grandpa, we’re lucky to have him.

info@briscoem a n or . com www.briscoem a n or . com


R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

RICH MOND, TEXAS

66

WRITTEN BY KIT JONES

T

aking a stroll down Morton Street, the center of Richmond’s historic district, is like stepping into the past. Just a stone’s throw from the banks of the Brazos, the century-old buildings are well preserved, and its quaint storefronts remind you of a time gone by. Most importantly, it’s rich with good oldfashioned Texas hospitality. Walk into any one of the shops, businesses or restaurants and you will be greeted ... warmly and with a smile.


Equally exciting is what’s taking place a short distance from downtown. There’s a new energy … driven by developers and businesses that have chosen Richmond to be their new home. Being located so close to I-69, and just 30 minutes from Houston, this small town and all of its charm has caught the eye of commercial developers, retailers, and home builders. Yes, life is good in Richmond, Texas - a town with a charming history and a soaring future.

PRESERVING THE PAST

What makes Richmond so unique is how it’s so historically bound to Texas’s birth. Founded in 1837, Richmond is the seat of Fort Bend County. Evidence of the first Texas pioneers is everywhere. George Ranch Historical Park, complete with historic buildings and period reenactments, has become a popular destination point for seekers of Texas history. The Ranch is part of the George Foundation, established by A.P. and Mamie George, and has played an integral role in Richmond’s growth. Other historical landmarks — such as the recently renovated Fort Bend County Court House, Moore House, Jane Long’s cottage, Morton Cemetery, and the Police Department that used to be the jailhouse — offer a unique insight to early Texas history for kids and adults alike.

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

With a new City Commission, a new Home Rule Charter, and the adoption of a Comprehensive Master Plan, Richmond is building upon its rich history and promoting the geographic and economic benefits of making Richmond a home to new businesses and residential communities. Infrastructure Improvements Will Make Richmond More Accessible • TxDOT’s expansion of I-69 will create access to more than 500 acres of undeveloped land. • The County is looking at options to expand road access to Richmond from the north side and subsequently create opportunities for more development and business growth along this new route. • The construction of a new surface water treatment plant brings new sources of water to the area. Making Higher Learning More Convenient • Texas State Technical College is building a new campus along I-69.

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DEVELOPERS, RETAILERS AND HOME BUILDERS ATTRACTED TO RICHMOND’S QUALITY OF LIVING STANDARD

With all of the infrastructure expansion going on near Richmond, City officials are finding it easier to attract new developers and businesses, but are careful to make sure it fits Richmond’s future growth objectives. Aiding this effort are several new tracts of land recently released for commercial development through the George and Henderson-Wessendorff Foundations. • The new RiverPoint Center has added both living and shopping opportunities, plus Rudy’s BBQ as one of its newest tenants. • Williams Crossing will soon feature a new Marriott Hotel, office building and even more restaurant options. • The George Foundation’s recent selection of the Midway Companies - to develop its 300-acre site at I-69/ FM-762 - brings one of the region’s top developers to Richmond. • Several boutique companies are expanding and relocating to the Richmond Historic District.

STAYING IN TUNE WITH ITS PAST AND EMBRACING THE FUTURE

Continued development, combined with addition of new businesses and residential communities, will help promote and grow Richmond’s historic district. Plans are in place for more building renovation and adding new historic attractions. Upscale boutiques and shops continue to occupy the old buildings along Morton Street and are reenergizing the area. After all, it is Richmond’s past that is driving our future. So, the next time you’re in the area, take a moment to visit. You’ll find Richmond warm, welcoming and on the cusp of tremendous growth! H

• Wharton County Community College is adding on to its campus.

Existing Businesses are Booming and Expanding • The Oak Bend Medical Group continues to respond to the County’s growth by building new specialty hospitals and providing more services. • The Del Webb Sweetgrass Adult Living Community continues to attract “active adults” and is one of the fastest growing subdivisions in the County.

Population: 11, 863 Mayor: EVALYN W. MOORE Commissioner: GLENN GILMORE Commissioner: JESSE TORRES City Manager: TERRI VELA Director-Economic Development: ROB TOBIAS

www.richmondtx.gov

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• A recent Lamar CISD bond issue is creating new schools and making improvements to existing campuses.


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Business Directory

ASSOCIATIONS & ORGANIZATIONS AMERICAN RED CROSS 2610 BF TERRY BLVD. ROSENBERG, TX 77471 (281) 342-9480

PROSPERITY BANK – RICHMOND 2035 FM 350, SUITE D RICHMOND, TX 77469-1112 (281) 341-1833 WWW.PROSPERITYBANKTX.COM

ATTACK POVERTY 1305 CLAY STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 762-2068

VALUE BANK TEXAS – RICHMOND 9710 S. MASON ROAD RICHMOND, TX 77407 (281) 202-0400 WWW.VALUEBANKTEXAS.COM

ROSENBERG RICHMOND HELPING HANDS, INC 902 COLLINS RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 232-4904

WELLS FARGO – RICHMOND 700 JACKSON ST. RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 232-3301 WWW.WELLSFARGO.COM

THE BROOKWOOD COMMUNITY 1752 FM 1489 BROOKSHIRE, TX 77423 (281) 375-2100

WELLS FARGO – RICHMOND 8003 W. GRAND PARKWAY S. RICHMOND, TX 77407 (281) 239-3370 WWW.WELLSFARGO.COM

THE GEORGE FOUNDATION 215 MORTON STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-6109 YMCA, T.W. DAVIS 911 THOMPSON HIGHWAY RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 341-0791 WWW.YMCAHOUSTON.ORG/TW-DAVIS AUTO REPAIR CHRISTIAN BROTHERS AUTOMOTIVE – WATERSIDE 8132 W. GRAND PARKWAY SOUTH RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 232-5555 WWW.CBAC.COM FORT BEND TOYOTA 20465 SOUTHWEST FREEWAY RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 341-5900 WWW.FORTBENDTOYOTA.COM GROUP 1 AUTOMOTIVE 20465 SOUTHWEST FREEWAY RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 685-5504 WWW.STERLINGMCCALL.COM INTEGRITY TIRE & AUTO 921 HWY 90A EAST RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 633-8473 WWW.INTEGRITY-TIRE.COM BAKERIES SASSY CAKES BAKERY 110 CRABB RIVER RD. RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 937-7146 BANKS NEWFIRST NATIONAL BANK 2214 AVE H ROSENBERG, TX 77471 (832) 344-2100 WWW.NEWFIRST.COM

BUILDERS/HOME SERVICES CAMPBELL GARRETT DISTINCTIVE HOMES, LP 207 MORTON STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (832) 236-6180 WWW.CAMPBELLGARRETT.COM JOHNSON DEVELOPMENT CORP. 6450 CROSS CREEK BEND LANE FULSHEAR, TX 77441 (281) 344-9882 WWW.JOHNSONDEVELOPMENT.COM TEXAS CUSTOM PATIOS 12503 EXCHANGE DR #506 STAFFORD, TX 77477 (281) 265-1994 WWW.TEXASCUSTOMPATIOS.COM TREND DEVELOPMENT LONG MEADOW FARMS (832) 363-2000 WWW.LONGMEADOWFARMS.NET COUNTRY CLUBS PECAN GROVE PLANTATION COUNTRY CLUB 3000 PLANTATION DRIVE RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 342-9940 WWW.PECANGROVECC.COM FORT BEND COUNTRY CLUB 2627 FM 762 RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-3756 WWW.FORTBENDCC.COM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CENTRAL FORT BEND CHAMBER 4120 AVENUE H ROSENBERG, TX 77471 (281) 342-5464 WWW.CFBCA.ORG

DENTISTS

MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS

COOK DENTAL 1536 FM 359 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 342-8481 WWW.COOKDENTAL.COM

WHEELWRIGHT MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 310 S SIXTH STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (713) 269-2333 WWW.WHEEL-WRIGHT.COM

TAMARA S, OSINA, DDS 1320 THOMPSON ROAD RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-5022 WWW.OSINADDS.COM FURNITURE GALLERY FURNITURE 7301 GRAND PARKWAY RICHMOND, TX 77407 (713) 694-5570 WWW.GALLERYFURNITURE.COM

MEDICAL CLINICS ACCESS HEALTH 400 AUSTIN STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-4530 WWW.MYACCESSHEALTH.ORG CONCIERGE MEDICINE & WELLNESS 208 MORTON ST. RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 207-0770

RUSTIC KUTS FURNITURE & WESTERN DÉCOR 828 3RD STREET ROSENBERG, TX 77471 (281) 232-6033 WWW.RUSTICKUTS.COM

WWW.CONCIERGEMEDICINEANDWELLNESS.COM

STAR FURNITURE COMPANY 19660 SOUTHWEST FREEWAY SUGAR LAND, TX 77479 (281) 342-7827 WWW.STARFURNITURE.COM

LORDEX SPINE INSTITUTE AND CHIROPRACTIC 1000 AUSTIN, STE C RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281)239-6502 WWW.LORDEXCHIRO.COM

GARDENING/TREE SERVICES

MEMORIAL HERMANN - JOINT CENTER 23900 KATY FWY KATY, TX 77494 (713) 272-1888

ENCHANTED FOREST 10611 FM 2759 RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 937-9449 WWW.MYENCHANTED.COM FRANK’S NURSERY 302 FM 359 RICHMOND, TX 77406-2406 (281) 342-3211 WWW.FRANKS-NURSERY.COM FULSHEAR TREE SERVICE (844) 473-TREE (8733) WWW.FULSHEARTREESERVICE.COM HOSPITALS HOUSTON METHODIST - SUGAR LAND 16655 SOUTHWEST FREEWAY SUGAR LAND, TX 77479 (281) 274-7000 WWW.HOUSTONMETHODIST.ORG OAKBEND MEDICAL CENTER 1705 JACKSON RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 341-4812 WWW.OAKBENDMEDCENTER.ORG WESTPARK SPRINGS 6902 S. PEEK ROAD RICHMOND, TX 77407 (832) 535-2770 WWW.WESTPARKSPRINGS.COM

EPIC FAMILY CARE, PLLC 7417 WEST GRAND PARKWAY S, STE #150 RICHMOND, TX 77407 (281) 885-8877 WWW.EPICFAMILYCARE.COM

WWW.JOINTPAIN.MEMORIALHERMANN.ORG

REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL BETTER HOMES & GARDENS REAL ESTATE GARY GREENE 30525 FIRST STREET, SUITE A FULSHEAR, TX 77441 (281) 646-1136 WWW.GARYGREENE.COM/FULSHEAR LENORE SMITH REALTY GROUP, INC. 2122 THOMPSON CROSSING DR. RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 341-9147 WWW.LSMITHTEAM.REMAXTEXAS.COM SUPERIOR FARM & RANCH REALTY LLC (800) 275-3892 (361) 243-1040 (CELL) WWW.SUPERIORFARMANDRANCH.COM TEXAS AG REALTY / THE BILICEK COMPANY 1202 WEST TWIN CIRCLE DRIVE RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 615-8117 WWW.TEXASAGREALTY.COM

To Have Your Business Listed • Call Richmond Magazine • 844-424-7424


CLANCY’S PUBLIC HOUSE 503 FM 359, STE 118 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (832) 847-4390 WWW.CLANCYSPUBHOUSE.COM FAJITA PETE’S 741 HWY 90A EAST RICHMOND, TX 77406 (832) 868-5802 WWW.FAJITAPETES.COM FREDDY’S FROZEN CUSTARD & STEAKBURGERS 20450 SOUTHWEST FWY RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 239-6900 WWW.FREDDYSUSA.COM ITALIAN MAID CAFÉ 300 MORTON STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 232-6129 JOSEPH’S COFFEE & FINE CIGARS 202 MORTON STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-3819 WWW.JOSEPHSCOFFEEANDCIGARS.COM LA COCINA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 515 FM 359, SUITE 100 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 238-0872 WWW.LACOCINARESTAURANT.COM

M&M’S SOUTHERN CREOLE KITCHEN 1101 JACKSON STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (832) 945-2440 WWW.MMSOUTHERNCREOLEKITCHEN.COM

SANDY MCGEE’S 314 MORTON ST RICHMOND, TX 77469

 (281) 342-5881 WWW.SANDYMCGEES.COM S & S STEAK & SPIRITS 815 PLANTATION #100 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (832) 847-4143 WWW.STEAKSANDSPIRITS.COM SWINGING DOOR 3714 FM 359 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 342-4758 WWW.SWINGINGDOOR.COM TROUGH JUICE BAR 107 SOUTH 3RD STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 762-2483 WWW.TROUGHJUICE.COM RETAIL JOSEPH’S VINTAGE SPORTING GOODS STORE 202 MORTON STREET RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-3819 WWW.JOSEPHSVINTAGEGUNS.COM

STEINHAUSER’S 6401 FM 359 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (832) 595-9500 WWW.STEINHAUSERS.COM

STEWART TITLE – RICHMOND 2116 THOMPSONS HWY, STE. E-1 RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 341-0404 VETERINARIANS

SCHOOLS CALVARY EPISCOPAL PREPARATORY 1201 AUSTIN RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-3161 SPECIAL EVENTS /WEDDING PLANNING BRISCOE MANOR 5801 FM 723 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 238-4700 TITLE/INSURANCE COMPANIES ADMIRAL TITLE, LLC 1848 FM 359, STE. A RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 239-0077 FULSHEAR’S INSURANCE GROUP, INC. 30417 5TH STREET FULSHEAR, TX 77441 (855) 533-9067 WWW.FULSHEARINSURANCE.COM

FOSTER CREEK VETERINARY 4716 FARM TO MARKET 359 RICHMOND, TX 77406

 (832) 363-1227 WWW.FCVETHOSPITAL.COM GREATWOOD VETERINARY HOSPITAL 401 CRABB RIVER RD. RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-3727 WWW.GREATWOODVET.COM ROSE-RICH VETERINARY CLINIC 2203 THOMPSON RD. RICHMOND, TX 77469 (281) 342-3727 WWW.ROSERICHVET.COM WINERY BRAMAN WINERY 3333 FM 359 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 762-1375

STARTEX TITLE COMPANY – 359 503 FM 359, #140 RICHMOND, TX 77406 (281) 762-3333 WWW.STARTEXTITLE.COM

To Have Your Business Listed • Call Richmond Magazine • 844-424-7424

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RESTAURANTS


RICH MOND EVENTS

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ICONIC BRIDGE Defines New Identity For

RICHMOND

W

elcoming, Charming, Historic and Emerging are Richmond’s brand attributes…..the qualities which resonate in defining Richmond Texas. The City of Richmond is now rolling out the new Brand as the city has embraced a new logo, slogan and colors to visually describe the charming city with five miles of river frontage and a famous railroad bridge. The city recognizes the importance of a ‘Brand’ since Richmond has hit its’ growth phase, with the opportunity to strategically develop thousands of acres of land granted them through various foundations as well as other purchases. Founded in 1837, Richmond is the seat of Fort Bend County. Evidence of its history and the first Texas pioneers is everywhere. From the George Ranch Historical Park, a popular destination for seekers of Texas history, to the recently renovated County Courthouse, Moore House, Jane Long’s cottage, Morton Cemetery (final resting place of some of Texas’ courageous founders) and the historical Jailhouse (now housing the Richmond Police Dept), there is unique insight to early Texas history around every corner for all to enjoy and explore. Richmond is building on this rich history and promoting the geographic and economic benefits of growing new businesses and residential communities.

R IC HMO ND M AG A ZI NE

This continued development will also help promote and grow Richmond’s downtown historic district, creating an identity which takes us back to a charming past relevant for Richmond Texas. It is Richmond’s past which is driving the future….A Charming Past. A Soaring Future!

What’s Up In

RICHMOND! UPCOMING EVENTS November 06 • Churrascos Food Truck - Fire Station corner of 2nd and Jackson 13 • Cousins Maine Street Lobster Food Truck 14 • FB Museum - Playing In The Past - Children 10 am - 1 pm 14 • FB Museum- Historic Richmond Walking Tour 10:30 am - 11:30 am

December 03-05 • Candlelight Tours - Moore Home 05 • Miracle On Morton Street in Historic Downtown Richmond • 10 am - 7 pm 11 • Cousins Maine Street Lobster Food Truck

Richmond Texas TO EXPERIENCE FIRST M U S I C F E S T I VA L

Richmond’s Wessendorff Park has been seeing more activity in this newest park, now that the HRA (Historical Richmond Association) has been hosting Movie In The Park nights and a Music In The Park night! But the city will soon experience its’ first music festival, called Concert on the Creek a Fall Friday night of Live Music and Great Food! Morton Street Music owner, Rob Quarles, himself a musician, has desired to produce a music festival in historic downtown Richmond for several years. Morton Street Music, LLC was created exclusively to produce and promote live seasonal outdoor concerts, and eventually an annual all day music festival in Richmond, Texas! The first of these events will be on Friday October 30th from 6-11pm at Wessendorff Park, located on Preston St., just north of City Hall and the railroad tracks, between 4th and 6th Streets. The event is FREE to the public and will offer a variety of musical genres. Concert on the Creek will feature 6 bands/ artists across this 5 hour evening and 4 food trucks. Go to www.concertonthecreek.com to view the bands and the food trucks you will find.


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ADVERTISER Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate Briscoe Manor Calvary Episcopal Preparatory Concierge Medicine & Wellness Cook Dental Fulshear Tree Service Fulshear’s Insurance Group, Inc Gallery Furniture Houston Methodist - Sugarland Houston Methodist - Oncology Partners Joseph’s Coffee & Fine Cigars Joseph’s Vintage Sporting Goods Store Memorial Hermann NewFirst National Bank OakBend Medical Center Rustic Kuts Steinhauser’s Superior Farm & Ranch Realty LLC Tamara S. Osina DDS Texas Custom Patios The Brookwood Community The Johnson Development Corp. Trend Development Trough Juice Bar WheelWright

PG 18 41 28 36 26 45 IBC 07 09 69 02 15 BC 01 IFC 58 03 05 72 32 50 14 04 33 62

THANKS FOR SUPPORTING OUR EFFORTS TO HIGHLIGHT THE INCREDIBLE COMMUNITY OF

RICHMOND, TEXAS

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OUR STAFF WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE ADVERTISERS IN OUR INNAGURAL ISSUE OF


TAKE THE FIRST STEP

IN ELIMINATING

JOINT

PAIN

Contact a Memorial Hermann Joint Center. And start living pain free. Staying active is key to staying healthy. That’s why Joint Center specialists use the most advanced treatments to get you moving again. From new prescription options, to minimally invasive surgical interventions, our affiliated body of experts is ready to help you find the best path to the life you want to live.

Call 713.272.1888 or visit jointpain.memorialhermann.org for more information or to make an appointment.

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Richmond Magazine  

Volume 01 - Number 01

Richmond Magazine  

Volume 01 - Number 01