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ENJOY THE

breath-taking beauty

& THE

country lifestyle

OF THE BRAZOS RIVER

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos. The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine piece of the rural Texas countryside without having to sacrifice the amenities of city living. Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, is easily accessible from Westpark Tollway and FM 1093. Laprada Landing offers tracts ranging from Âą60 - 105 acres, each with its own unhindered view of the Brazos River. With varying tree coverage, each tract has its own features that set it apart from the others with no two being exactly alike. There is ample opportunity to build and create your own sense of place.


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HWY 99

Interstate 10

Westpark Tollway

FM 1093

FM 723

Stratman Rd

Laprada Trace

(Formerly Montgomery Rd)

r ive

sR zo

Bra

359 HWY

Bois D’Arc Ln

Winner Foster Rd

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos.

Beadle Ln

The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine F othe r mrural o r e Texas infor m at i o n cwithout o n tachaving t piece of countryside to BILLamenities BLYTHE of at city (713)living. 829-3465 or sacrifice the Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, easily accessible from D. LEIGH MARTIN atis(713) 835-9839 Westpark Tollway and FM 1093.

Martha Turner

Sotheby’s International Realty


Community

LETTER FROM TH E PUBLISH ER

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Do a Google® search and you’ll find slightly varying definitions for the word “community.” Most offer two ideas: A group that lives in proximity to one another or a group that has various interests in common. Recent events have demonstrated that an alternative interpretation of the word “community” can reasonably be expanded to include the following definition: A concerned, compassionate, caring group disregarding differential barriers to provide for and strengthen others, particularly in times of need and regardless of proximity or economic condition or status. This, perhaps, is a better definition of the word community for our area.

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In response to the virtually unprecedented flooding caused by hurricane Harvey, Fulshear-area residents joined with the thousands of others from across the state, and even across the country, to help their flood-ravaged neighbors clear out, clean up, and rebuild. We should be proud of the overwhelming response received from Fulshear-area residents – thinking not as individuals but as a community.

- THANK YOU TO ALL WHO SERVED. In this issue of Fulshear Magazine, we continue to showcase some incredibly interesting, and possibly surprising, aspects of our community. Our area’s history is highlighted with articles about local Karankawa Indians, and how Vernon Frost and his family built a cattle empire that also attracted famous actors to our area. You’ll meet Irene Stern and find out why the local community center bears her name. You’ll meet some great folks, including our Fire Chief, Herc Meier and his wife, Vickie, as well as vendors at the Fulshear Farmers Market. Read on and you will discover a great local writers group and how Texana is planning their newest campus – right here in Fulshear. Stay with us and you’ll learn what it was like to graduate from the first class of Fulshear’s Citizens Police Academy. Why stop there though, there’s still much more inside – so read on! We are certainly proud of the features, articles, and essays you’ll find in this issue. On behalf of George Lane and the entire staff at Fulshear Magazine, we hope you enjoy the read as much as we have enjoyed creating it.

See you this winter! Daniel McJunkin

PUBLISHER - FULSHEAR MAGAZINE

Photo by Rhonda Renee Photography


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On the Cover

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Photo Credit: iStock.com/LoriSkelton

Letter from the Publisher

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Fulshear Farmers’ Market Features

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Irene Stern

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Gave Her All to Fulshear

Crafting Fulshear’s Finest Homes

DANIEL M c JUNKIN Publisher

KATIE MECHAM Art Director

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Fairmont Homes - Building the Future of Fulshear

Fulshear Bred & Fulshear Proud

MAGAZINE STAFF

JENNI M c JUNKIN Media Director

JACLYN RITTER

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Herc Meier Continues to Serve & Protect

Editor

SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND Associate Editor

DON M c COY

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Chamber Consultant

There’s Just Something About Old Fulshear

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PRODUCTION STAFF

Chapter & Verse

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My 9 Week Story The Fulshear Citizens Police Academy

Fulshear’s Community of Writers

Should’ve Been a Cowboy

Accounting

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Elaine Everett’s Lighting

A People Lost to Time

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The Karankawa Indians

Building Better Lives, One Brick at a Time

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Fall Recipe

Laprada Landing

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A New Style of Country Living

Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce Directory

JOSEPH SONNIER IT Consultant

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DANIEL M c JUNKIN JACLYN RITTER KRISTY SMITH SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Texana’s New Fulshear Campus

Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp

Bookkeeping

TRACY MILLER

The Story of a Ranch on Bessie’s Creek

Shining Light on Fulshear

BONNIE M c FERREN

LAURA CHILES JEFF HEGER KATIE MECHAM RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY JACLYN RITTER

71 FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC GEORGE LANE & DANIEL M c JUNKIN Principals

WWW.FULSHEAR.COM

FULSHEAR MAGAZINE 281-973-0633

4017 Penn Lane, Fulshear, TX 77441

© Copyright 2017 - Fulshear Media Partners, LLC All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Photo by Katie Mecham

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FULS H EAR FARMERS’ MARKET FEATURES

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Farmers’ Market FULSHEAR

FEATURES

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY


ALFRED & GINGER TANAGHO

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Cross T Brand Beef and Lamb by Waypoint Farm winter forage, and more,” notes Ginger. Together they keep the farm up and running. “Having said all that, all of our success is only made possible though the blessings of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” The goal at the farm is to produce happy, healthy, stressfree animals. Anyone who has had the pleasure of visiting their farm sees that they not only meet their goal, but surpass it. The duo is well known for spoiling their animals with love and attention from birth to processing.

Like many in the Houston area, the Tanagho’s both worked in the oil and gas industry. They worked long, stressful days in the office, and weekends were never as relaxing as they hoped they would be, or more often just didn’t exist. “In 1992, we planned a corporate exit to a simpler life,” says Ginger. “We wanted to get closer to the natural rhythm of the seasons, rather than the hectic day to day of business life.” Alfred and Ginger made it their goal to unplug and start fresh by the year 2000. They planned to spend a few years living on a boat and sailing around south-east Asia. “However, we got older, our deadline moved out, business travel increased, and we just got tired of all the hustle and bustle.” It was during their time working in Normandy, France that they both discovered their new life. “The sights and smells of the farms across Normandy spoke to us and sparked the fire to finally make a change,” says Ginger. In 2007, after 18 years in the oil and gas industry that sprawled out over five different continents, Alfred and Ginger left the corporate world, purchased some land in Texas, and went in search of that simpler life they had been longing for. Waypoint Farm, located just outside of Hallettsville, is comprised of 140 working acres. The Tanagho’s raise Akaushi beef and Dorper lamb. They purchased their foundation herd and flock from Texas breeders in 2013, and since then have not introduced any additional livestock. Their animals are all born and raised right there on the farm. Many are surprised to know that Alfred and Ginger have no extra helping hands around Waypoint Farm. They do it all themselves. “We both know how to run and maintain all of the equipment, how to cut, rake, and bale hay, assist in birthing lambs and calves when necessary, conduct parasite egg checks, tag, vaccinate, rotate pastures, plant

“Did you know that you can label meat “all natural” even though you use growth hormones when raising them?” Ginger points out. “It stands to reason that garbage in, equals garbage out. So, we choose to keep it simple. We feed the livestock what they are designed to eat. Our animals are raised on improved pastures, meaning they have high quality forage to graze year-round.” For the last two years, many Fulshear residents have been turning to Alfred and Ginger for all their beef and lamb needs, having experienced the difference in taste and quality themselves firsthand. Waypoint Farm is unique. “We don’t like to follow the norms,” says Ginger. “We try logical approaches, rather than letting marketing hype dictate our protocol. If we follow advertising, or the ‘everyone does it that way’ mentality, then we would have every chemical and supplement poured into us and our animals, rather than letting nature work the way it was intended. We think God pretty much nailed it, and we, as a society, try to come in and correct His plan too many times.” Waypoint Farm has discovered the secret formula to producing a top-notch product. However, it does not come without a lot of research, hard work, and love. While working long and hard days on a farm may not sound like the perfect retirement plan to some, for Alfred and Ginger, it was just what the doctor ordered. They have found the simple life they longed for. A life enjoying the beauty that is Nature.

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etirement looks different for everyone. Some envision a house on the beach, or days spent laying around the pool. Others hope to spend their days playing golf. For Alfred and Ginger Tanagho, it meant leaving their glamorous life of traveling the world, and settling on a farm in Texas. In fact, it could be argued that they now run one of the best beef and lamb farms in the state!

Ginger feels that four specific things set their meat apart from the meat you buy at the grocery store: the breed of animal, forage management, the age of processing, and their lifestyle. However, the big thing that puts Waypoint Farm in the forefront of the business is the fact that they produce 100% grass-fed AND finished beef and lamb that is third party certified Animal Welfare Approved by A Greener World (AGW). This organization is an independent, nonprofit farm certification program that monitors not only their animal husbandry practices but also their meat processor’s slaughter practices. Unlike most farm certifications, both the farm and their meat processor are audited by AGW annually to maintain the coveted program status. Consumer Reports and the Wall Street Journal gave the AWA label a top rating for food labels.


BRENDA BAYLETS-SALINAS

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Apple Dumplings and Such

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from my mother and grandmothers. It is because of them I truly developed a passion and love for food. I thoroughly enjoy trying different cuisines and modifying my recipes.”

Brenda and her four siblings were responsible for a set of chores each day. One of her favorite chores was preparing and serving dinner. “I learned to bake

This strong country upbringing sparked the creative side in Brenda. As she grew older, many of the things that were once chores became her hobbies. Blue Hydrangea Soap is the name of Brenda’s soap business that was established in 2006. She takes a lot of pride in her product. “My favorite soap that I make is my goats milk spearmint soap.” Brenda adds, “It cures for four to six weeks before completion. This makes all the difference.”

renda Baylets-Salinas grew up in Pennsylvania near her grandparents farm, surrounded by aunts, uncles, and cousins. Farm life was hard work, but no day was the same, and that made it exciting. “My mother and grandmother were into what I like to call the ‘country living’ activities,” says Brenda. “We did canning, made our own butter, bread, jams, and jellies, and braided our own rugs. These were the kinds of things we did growing up, and to this day I still like to keep my hands in a lot of these activities.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Baked goods photos by Gus Salinas


It was Brenda’s love for photography that introduced her to her husband of 22 years, Gus Salinas. As a fellow photographer, they bumped into each other at the Maine Film and Television Workshops. As a born and raised Houstonian, Gus enjoys joining Brenda on her trips back home to Pennsylvania. It was a visit recently that got Brenda’s new business up and rolling. Once a year, the town of Centre Hall, Pennsylvania hosts a large fair. So large, in fact, that people drive from all over the state to camp out in tents and RV’s for the entire weeklong event. “We went every year as kids,” Brenda says. “And every year, the most popular stand with the longest line was the one serving apple and peach dumplings, with a refreshing scoop of cinnamon ice cream on top.” Brenda’s husband is a huge fan of the tasty treat. It was he who suggested that Brenda start an apple dumpling business here in the Fulshear area. “Where I grew up,” says Brenda, “dumplings are a big thing, they are a staple. I don’t see a lot of apple dumplings here, and that is why I thought Gus might be on to something. I am really excited to share my favorite childhood memory with the community.”

Apple Dumplings and Such began in early 2017, with their first appearance at the Fulshear Farmers Market on April 22. Brenda’s famous apple dumpling recipe stems from her mother’s tried and true formula. “However,” Brenda says with a smile, “I rarely follow a recipe exactly. I usually end up putting my own spin on it, which usually leads to me enhancing the spices.” Granny Smith are her apples of choice, as they tend to be tarter and hold up well when baked.

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While Brenda also fills the market table with her famous ginger cookies, apple peanut butter cookies, double chocolate muffins, and sour cream coffee cake muffins, it is the apple dumplings that take the spotlight. After all, there is an entire apple in every dumpling! For Brenda, baking is therapeutic, it is a time to reminisce about her childhood spent on the farm, running free around the county fair, and bumping elbows with her mother and grandmothers in the kitchen. Those who have tried her dumplings often become regulars at her stand. For those who have not yet had that pleasure, remember that an apple a day, no matter what form it comes in, keeps the doctor away!

In the state of Texas, the Cottage Food Law regulates what items can and cannot be sold at farmers markets. In general, the law states that any food that must be refrigerated is not acceptable, and that certain allergens must be noted clearly on food labels. Before opening, Brenda did her research and made sure that all of her baked goods adhere to this Texas law and even sought out a food handler’s permit.

JAMES & BEVERLY MCLELLAND

Ole Boy Brazos Bottom Farm

Forty years ago, Beverly’s parents chose Rosenberg for their home and farming as a hobby. James and Beverly, high school sweethearts who just celebrated their 46th wedding anniversary, watched her dad build the farm from the ground up. While they helped from time to time, their attention was primarily on their own careers. James worked for 20 years in the landscaping industry before transitioning to engineering for the following 20 years. Beverly recently retired after 40 years in the oil industry. It was in 1996 that the two moved to the farm and eventually found their true calling. Still, just as in

love as the day they met, James and Beverly happily work together to run Ole Boy Brazos Bottom Farm and pass its roots onto future generations. Located in Rosenberg, Ole Boy Brazos Bottom Farm consists of a little more than 5 acres. James also works at a larger family farm nearby, Gunderman Acres. Together, the two farms produce organic and certified organic produce that is delivered and sold throughout the entire state of Texas. Ole Boy Brazos Bottom Farm specifically produces several varieties of tomatoes, nine different types of peppers, three varieties of eggplant, bloomingdale spinach, broccoli, and green beans. “Tomatoes, however,” says James, “are the most temperamental.” James grows anywhere between 500 and 1,500 tomatoes a year. The astounding part is, he still plants primarily by hand! “Insects are a problem with any fruit or vegetable, but with tomatoes they can be particularly damaging. While I am a certified pesticide

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arming is one of the most labor intensive and underappreciated careers in America. And yet, our lives, and the future of our nation, depends on it. James and Beverly McLelland, longtime residents of Rosenberg, were surprised when, after 40 plus years in other industries, they found themselves “retiring” as farmers.


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All the produce displayed at the Fulshear Farmers’ Market every Saturday was picked that very morning or the day before. Talk about fresh!

applicator, I do not use any pesticides on my farm. Over the years, we have learned all kinds of techniques to keep away pests and ward off birds. In fact, I have made my own scarecrows, and can say with certainty that they really do work.” These are no ordinary scarecrows though. James makes some real funny, yet scary, looking characters, no crow would want to cross. “You cannot control the insects or birds, but you can sometimes fool them.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

What is the secret behind James and Beverly’s prizewinning vegetables? James would argue that it is the soil. Brazos river sandy loam, to be exact. “It is a red, highly porous soil, with a lot of humus in it.” That strong foundation makes for an even stronger crop. Ole Boy Brazos Bottom Farm has been at the Fulshear Farmers Market since day one. Even after two years in a row of devastating floods, and recently the flooding as a result of Hurricane Harvey, the McLelland’s worked past the loss of equipment and crop, and have made an appearance at the farmers market every Saturday. “The Fulshear market is a unique place,” says James. “We have met people from all over the globe. It has been a pleasure to chat with regulars and new visitors alike.” “Many we consider to be friends,” adds Beverly. “We especially love to see the children come to the market. In the spring, we give tomato plants to the kids to

encourage them to grow their own. And many of them have come to expect a sampling of our carrots when they are in season.” “I’d never thought I would be in the farming business,” says James. “In fact, I hated when my mother would make me work in the garden as a kid. Now, the job consumes me. It is what I love.” James is up at four every morning and does not leave the fields till it gets dark. “We do it for the children. We like instilling this lifestyle and the importance of good food on them.” With two sons and four grandchildren nearby, James and Beverly welcome the extra hands, so long as they see them eat their carrots! “My family all live long and healthy lives,” notes James. “My grandmother lived until she was 108 years old. We attribute our long lifespans to eating what we grow and what we know. We stay away from anything processed. Beverly and I take pride in passing this lifestyle down to our children and grandchildren. There is a real sense of pride eating and sharing the food we grow with our own hands. It’s a dirty, buggy, and hot job, but I wouldn’t do anything else!” Be sure to check them out on facebook to see what fresh veggies they will be selling each week at the farmers market. d


FROM SINGING CANARIES, T O P H I L A N T H R O P Y, T O C AT T L E R A N C H I N G

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

IRENE STERN

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Irene Stern G AV E H E R A L L T O F U L S H E A R


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WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

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he Irene Stern Community Center serves as the polling station for Fulshear residents to vote, as a venue for community meetings and events, and as a safe place for Fort Bend Senior Citizens to gather each morning to share games, crafts, and lunch. The land was donated by Irene Stern in the early 90s and, by 1995, the community center was established. Former Fulshear mayor, Viola Randle, was instrumental in the creation of the center. Before its construction, the senior citizens were meeting at the fire station, or wherever they could find a vacancy. According to Viola, one day the group asserted, “We need a place of our own!” Aware of the unused piece of land donated to the city by Irene Stern, she thought, “Why not build ourselves a place out there?” Under Viola’s administration, the city received a grant for the building, and construction began.

Just Who Was Irene Stern?

THE IRENE STERN FULSHEAR COMMUNITY CENTER

Irene Stern was born April 19, 1910 in Germany to Sally Susskind. Her father owned a successful ball-bearing business that Adolf Hitler wanted. As history has shown— what Hitler wanted, Hitler took. Irene recalled the day in 1939 when her village mayor, and a band of Gestapo, marched down the cobblestone street to her house, demanding that her family leave Germany within twenty-four hours. Irene and her family, you see, were Jewish.

And What’s That About Singing Canaries?

In New York, she met her husband, Gustav Menachem Stern who, with his brother Max, emigrated from Germany in the 1920s, bringing 5,000 singing canaries with them to the United States. They founded the Hartz Mountain Company, which sold birds through mail order and department stores. In the 30s and 40s, singing birds, it seems, were in high demand. The Stern brothers sponsored a network radio show that advertised their pet products and showcased the skills of their trained canaries. After the ravages of World War II decimated not only much of Europe’s human population, but also its animal population, Gustav was quoted as saying, “In all of Germany, I do not believe there are a thousand birds. It will take years for the trade to come back, if ever,” With no singing birds to sell, he and his brother went on to expand Hartz Mountain Company into a pet food empire. Over the years, Gustav and Irene Stern contributed to many charitable institutions. Along with Gustav’s brother Max, they founded the Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University in New York. They helped to

IRENE STERN (1910-2005) Photos of Irene Stern courtesy of ancestry.com and Irene Stern Community Center

MUSIC LINK: https://youtu.be/XOR3E4FT9S4 Master Radio Canaries Loudspeakers broadcast the sounds of trained canaries networks, started a radio program to showcase the skills of their trained canaries. Hartz Radio Canaries was broadcast in the 30s and 40s and featured vocalization of canaries superimposed over musical accompaniment.

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After first traveling to France, the Susskind’s got permission to go to the United States. Arriving at the harbor in New York, Irene found a job in what she referred to as a sweat shop—a sewing factory in a basement with no windows.


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support the World Academy in Jerusalem, which helps bring Jews to Israel from distressed areas of the world and also preserves and ensures the continuity of Israel’s spiritual culture. They helped fund the study of virology and disease prevention. As what might seem a random career move, they also became cattle ranchers right here in Fulshear, Texas.

“Everything she did when she was here, she did for Fulshear.” - JAMIE ROBERTS -

here. Her actual domicile, however, was a little less downhome and a little more uptown. Her permanent residence was a top floor Manhattan penthouse that overlooked Central Park. According to Jamie, her nextdoor neighbor was Humphrey Bogart’s love, Lauren Bacall. Irene and Jamie Roberts became friends when, as mayor, he incorporated Fulshear as a city. She told him that she wanted to be part of Fulshear and also wanted her Stella Ranch to be a part of the city. Assuming that Irene wanted inclusion in the new extra territorial jurisdiction, Roberts and the city attorney drew up a contract and presented it to her one afternoon. For thirty minutes, she read it thoroughly and quietly. Finally, she stood up, walked over to Jamie, and threw the contract in his lap. “If I’m not in the city, I’m not signing.” Needless to say, they immediately changed the contract so that the 3200 acres of Stella Ranch, that is now Cross Creek, lay not in the ETJ but, instead, inside the city proper. Quite a few years later, Irene sold her acreage near Brookshire to Hakeem Olajuwon, and she sold the land in Fulshear to Trendmaker for the Cross Creek Ranch subdivision. One day, she told Jamie, “I’ve got this parcel of land on Katy-Fulshear Road that I’d like to give to Fulshear. Thus, in the 1990s, under the mayorship of Viola Randle, the Irene Stern Community Center was established. Jamie Roberts summed up Irene Yettel Susskind Stern this way. “Everything she did when she was here,” he said, “she did for Fulshear.” d

STELLA RANCH

Stella Ranch

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

The Sterns property, Stella Ranch, covered two locations, simultaneously—one near Brookshire on FM 1489, and the other section on the present site of Cross Creek Ranch. One parcel nurtured cattle; the other grew rice. Both pieces of property were named Stella Ranch, after a boat Irene’s family owned in Germany when she was a child. The name stella derives from the Latin word for star. Interestingly, the name Stern also means star in German Yiddish. According to her good friend and Fulshear’s former mayor, Jamie Roberts, “Irene wanted to be a cowgirl rancher.” Because she always wore shorts and cowboy boots and wrestled with those cows, he added that, “You’d think she was a little country girl.” Also, according to the former mayor, Irene was used to driving her truck across her pastures and, when she visited Jamie at his house on Second Street in Fulshear, she’d just drive her pickup across his lawn. Irene would come to Fulshear every two or three months and stay for a week or two, often spending the summers

Irene Stern Community Center is located at 6920 KatyFulshear Rd. A photograph of Irene Stern and a plaque commemorating the donation by the Stern Foundation graces the foyer of the community center.


ELAINE EVERETT’S LIGHTING

9727 Spring Green Blvd #500 • Katy, TX 77494 7 1 3 - 5 5 4 - 3 9 1 5 • w ww.eelights.net • info@eelights.net

Unlike any other store in Katy, we sell light fixtures, ceiling fans, decorative hardware, accessories and plumbing. Owned and operated by residents of Katy, we have a true passion for what we do and would be honored to assist you with your project. You will be amazed by the transformation that can take place by adding the proper finishing touches to your home...and we’re here to help.


CRAFTING FULSH EAR’S FINEST H OMES

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Finest Homes CRAFTING FULSHEAR’S

FAIRMONT CUSTOM HOMES – BUILDING THE FUTURE OF FULSHEAR

It

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

is often said that if a couple can survive building a house together, they can survive anything. Building a home can be stressful. There are so many decisions to be made, and communication is key - communication between each other and communication with the builder. No one understands this better than Michael Pelletier and Robert Cox. Fulshear families who have had the pleasure of working with this dynamic duo are the first to say that their home building experience was nothing like the horror stories often told. They are very happy customers.

FAIRMONT CUSTOM HOMES ARE

DISTINCTIVE, INNOVATIVE, AND TRENDSETTING. F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

As a member of the Southern Living Custom Builder Program, Michael and Robert understand quality craftmanship and exemplify a southern flair that is a refreshing break from the expected.

MEET THE

Dynamic DUO

Michael and Robert hit it off right away with their mutual love and appreciation for quality construction. The two combined have almost 60 years of experience in the business. Michael grew up framing houses and working on various construction crews, while continuing his studies

ENDURE

QUALITY

INTEGRITY


“Robert gave me my first job out of college,” says Michael. “He graduated a year before me and was already working for a builder. He opened that first door for me. In fact, he is the reason I moved to Houston.” Michael runs the front part of the job, managing sales, marketing, estimating, and interacting with appraisers, bankers, and clients. The job is then handed over to Robert, who makes the vision come to life. While the two have their areas of expertise, they are known to cross paths more often than not. “Mike won’t tell you this, but he enjoys doing my job as well,” smiles Robert. “And he is good at it!” Michael has a passion for the creative side of the business. This becomes apparent if you are lucky enough to go on a tour of one of his homes with him. As we walked through his model home in Fulshear Run during our interview, Michael beamed with pride as he showed off the beautiful barrel ceiling in the entryway, the star-worthy laid out master closets, and the collapsible doors that allow the living room to sprawl directly into the backyard oasis. “I see a lot of opportunities in structures,” says Michael. Knowing this about him, Robert often encourages Michael to join him in the field, forcing him to get out of the office and utilize his creative juices. Robert, on the other hand, is a true craftsman who thrives on the social aspect. “My favorite parts about my job are the relationships,” says Robert. “Relationships with contractors, vendors, and the clients themselves – it doesn’t get much better.” In fact, he keeps in touch with most of their clients long after completing their homes!

Why Fulshear?

Michael started Fairmont Custom Homes in Sienna Plantation, a Johnson Development property located in Missouri City, and Avalon of Seven Meadows, located in Katy. People who owned land in Fulbrook were making frequent trips to these model homes and posing the same question each and every time: Do you build in Fulbrook? Michael was invited to join a team of approved builders in Fulbrook, an honor indeed considering the community’s reputation of being high-end and luxurious. Fulbrook possesses the relaxed country charm that his homes compliment. By 2014, Fairmont Custom Homes was approved by the developer and Michael began building his first Fulshear model home. Not long after, developer Doug Konopka asked if Fairmont would build in his new Fulshear community, Fulshear Run. “It was a no brainer!” Michael adds, “I knew exactly what house to build in Fulshear Run.” Newly finished, this model home has been viewed and toured more than 1,000 times!

No Comparison THERE IS

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Fairmont Custom Homes cannot be compared to other builders. They focus on quality over quantity, only building six to ten homes a year, with homes ranging $700,000 and up. One aspect that sets Fairmont Custom Homes apart from other companies is the fact that the company is comprised of a small and communicative team. Michael and Robert are a part of every building process, from start to finish. When there is a question, there is no need to go through three different people only to wind up with someone who may or may not know the answer to that question. Michael and Robert are reachable 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “Eight days a week!” jokes Robert. Clients are never left in the dark, waiting a week for an answer. “When Robert oversees your project, you will never feel left in the dark. His best strengths are his consistent communication with clients and attention to detail,” adds Michael. “In these types of projects, it requires a tremendous amount of planning and preparation for the project to go smoothly.” As the project manager, Robert knows that it is better to ask the questions and have multiple face-to-face meetings, than have the client show up and be surprised, or worse, disappointed. Robert is at the job site himself, assuring that no detail is missed in the construction process. Fairmont Custom Homes also understands the importance of the mechanical system or underlying structure of a home. “So few builders pay attention to these details, because you cannot touch it or feel it, and it often doesn’t increase the value or sellability of the house,” says Michael. “With this ever-changing market, we hire an energy consultant so that we continue to stay on top of, and exceed, all state-mandated requirements.” All Fairmont homes are complete with 16 SEER air conditioning, open cell foam insulation, and Anderson Windows. “These are things we do not necessarily promote, but it is just the right way to build a house.” It all starts with an idea, that leads to a blue print and, ultimately, results in a beautiful custom home. “It is hard not to get attached to each home, we are sculpting it with our own hands, but our reward is how impressed and happy the client is,” Michael concludes. News is spreading quickly around Fulshear that Michael Pelletier and Robert Cox make home building fun and rewarding. Through fine-quality, innovative floor plans, and unique extras, Michael and Robert craft homes, not houses. d

MICHAEL PELLETIER • (713) 539-0048 www.FairmontCustomHomes.com sales@FairmontCustomHomes.com

U N D E R S TA N D I N G • P R I D E • T E A M

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in college. Robert grew up helping his father in the custom granite and marble business.


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Fulshear Bred & Fulshear Proud

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Herc Meier Continues to Serve & Protect the Community That Raised Him WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY FAMILY PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE MEIER FAMILY

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ulshear is growing and changing at a rapid pace! Those who have only lived here for three or four years have still seen drastic changes take place around town. Now, imagine what it must be like watching Fulshear grow and morph over the course of 60 plus years! Fulshear-Simonton Fire Chief, Herc Meier, has witnessed exactly that. Herc drives through downtown Fulshear with a different lens than the majority of us—he sees the spot where his family’s store once stood, where he learned to drive a car, and where the interweaving roads once served as his playground.


Early Day Fulshear

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Flash back to the ‘50s and ‘60s. Fulshear was a small farm and ranch community where everyone knew everyone. Herc spent his early years in the brick house, currently being used as a realty office, at the corner of FM 359 and 2nd Street. “We would lay in the ditch by my house,” reminisces Herc. “And when a car would drive by, we would run across 359 and lay in the ditch on the other side by the white house that is still standing. We would do this for hours, and during that time only three or four cars would go by.” Many would consider it an idyllic childhood. Herc grew up camping, hunting, and fishing. “My days were spent roaming the countryside,” he says. “Nature was our babysitter.” Because everyone knew everyone, if an outsider came into town, they were automatically under a watchful eye. It was a very safe place to live. Kids were free to be kids. The world was their oyster.

“Wheels are round for a reason – to roam. We were free to explore.” Herc is a descendent of one of the founding families of Fulshear. His mother was a Walker. The Walker family were scouts for one of the original 300 families. Herc’s grandparents came to Texas and settled on a large piece of land in Fulshear, in the Brazos Bottom. In 1965, Herc watched as his brother in-law built his family a house on that very land off Bois D’Arc Lane. It was while living at this house that Herc spent his teen years, met his wife, and found his passion. Gilbert and Faffy Meier, Herc’s parents, owned a grocery store in town originally called Walker General Mercantile, which was operated by Herc’s grandfather, W.J. Son Walker. The shop originated in the early 1920s. It was located at the Southwest corner of 1st and Main. After it burned down in 1984, the family rebuilt where Italian Express currently resides, under the name of Meier’s Fulshear Farms. Herc grew up sacking groceries and cutting meat. Herc is grateful to have had the work experience, for it was at the store that he and his wife hit it off. Herc met Vickie in high school. She was the drum major for the marching band, and Herc was a jock. “One day in the hallway, Vickie walked up to me and a few of my friends, whipped out her finger, and told us just how sorry we would be for picking on her boyfriend,” remembers Herc. “She then turned around, flipping her waist-long hair in all of our faces. I remember nudging my friend right then and saying, ‘You know, that girl is going to make some guy a heck of a wife someday.’ Two years later, she came to work for us at the grocery store, and the rest is history.”

Working at the family grocery store taught Herc about responsibility and good discipline. It even sparked a lifelong romance. While he considered inheriting the family business, it simply was not feasible. Instead he went in search of a more profitable career. Herc took a job as a dispatcher for Fort Bend County Emergency Medical Services (EMS). After a year and a half behind the microphone, Herc went to school to become a paramedic, an experience he describes as being one of the hardest things he has ever done. “To be a good paramedic, you must understand the science and physiology of the

Photos from Top to Bottom: - Herc and his father Gilbert, 1958 - Herc & friends sitting aboard his father’s catering truck, 1964 - Herc as a young boy in school, 1972 - Herc making sausage at his father’s store, 1988 - Herc and his wife Vickie, 1980

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Serving the City That Raised Him


body; you must have a thorough understanding of math to calculate medicinal dosages quickly; and you must be able to set aside emotion and think clearly.” Herc worked as a local paramedic for 27 years before retiring in 2016. After his retirement, Herc committed himself full-time to his greatest passion and true calling—firefighting.

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In 1974, he became a volunteer firefighter with the Fulshear Fire Department. One year later, at the young age of 17, Herc became the fire chief, a job he has held for the last 42 years. “I took a practical approach early on,” he says. “I certainly did not know everything, but I dove in head first and learned everything I could in a short period of time. I also found the best people to fill the jobs I wasn’t confident in.” Herc remembers when, years ago, the fire trucks would run out of water and they would have to drive back into town to fill them back up. The job of a firefighter is on a much faster pace today than when he started in 1974. “We deal with much more than just fire nowadays,” says Herc. We deal with death on a regular basis. We see people at their worst times.”

Being a firefighter is a BIG responsibility. Often, they are trusted immediately, no questions asked.

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“Men and women hand us their children, their most precious gifts, without a thought, without knowing us.” Herc adds, “In that moment I cannot think about my own children, I have to put emotion aside, reference my training, and get started.” At the end of the day, no matter how rough it may have been, Herc considers himself privileged to be able to help his own neighbors. “I believe in God,” says Herc. “How could I not after what I have seen over the years?” Stories and circumstances have stuck with him - sweet reminders of why he still does what he does. One of those stories is of a woman by the name of Ms. Hollier, a Fulshear resident who lived in the famous “switch house” that was transported further down FM 359 in 2016. Ms. Hollier bought groceries one day at his parent’s store and asked 12-year-old Herc to carry them to her house for her. She tipped him $10, big money for a youngster during that time. “I knew exactly what to spend it on,” smiles Herc. “There had been a pocket knife for sale at Fulshear Farm Supply that I had been eyeing for a long time.” Fast forward to 1991, when Herc had taken a call at a local nursing home in Rosenberg while he was working as a paramedic for Fort Bend County. There sat Ms. Hollier, hunched over her bed, oxygen tubes everywhere, struggling to breathe. She had emphysema and her lungs had wasted away. It had been 40 some years since she had seen Herc, that 12-year-old boy in the grocery store, but she recognized him right away. “Oh Herc, I am so glad you are here,” she said. Herc gave Ms. Hollier a breathing treatment and escorted her into the ambulance. “During the drive to the hospital,” he remembers, “she began talking about my mother who had passed years ago, and how she was excited to see her once again. She then proceeded to tell me how glad she was that I was there to take her home. Her health improved during the drive. She was sitting up, breathing fine, and even smiling.” Upon arrival, Herc hugged her and turned her over to the hospital staff. A few hours later, Ms. Hollier passed away. “I began wondering,” adds Herc, “did God put me in that position, at that moment in time, for a reason?” Then, as a side thought, Herc muttered to himself, “I wish I still had that old pocket knife.” Photos from Top to Bottom: - Herc, Vickie, and their son Herc II, 1984 - Working dispatch at Fort Bend EMS, 1990 - Dedication of the current fire station, 1983 - Herc, Vickie, Herc II, Mary, and Teresa Meier, 2000

When asked why he continues serving the Fulshear community and Fort Bend Emergency Service District no. 4, he said, “It is because of stories like this. How can you not believe in something greater after experiencing something like this?”


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Next Generation in Fulshear Herc’s father, who spent the last few years of his life in a nursing home, came close to losing their home off Bois D’Arc Lane. Knowing how much that house and that land meant to the family, Herc did everything he could to get a loan. The day before the house fell into foreclosure, Herc visited his dad at the nursing home to share the grim news. For the first time, Gilbert told his son how proud he was of him and the effort he put into saving their family home. The next day, during what they had assumed would be a difficult day, the two received the much-needed loan. However, it was his father’s pride in him that meant the world to Herc, and something that proved to be more important than even he knew at the time.

It was in this house that Herc and Vickie raised their three children, Gilbert III, Teresa, and Mary. While only five acres remain of the original 1,000+ acres settled on by his ancestors, Herc and Vickie are proud to call it home. For a fleeting moment, Herc considered moving but shut the idea down as fast as it started. With one grandchild here and two on the way, Herc and Vickie are looking forward to welcoming another generation into the house. This year, the couple plans to do some extensive remodeling. They enjoy finding inspiration together while watching HGTV’s “Fixer Upper” with Chip and Joanna Gaines. Fresh paint, new floors, and a modern kitchen will certainly be exciting, but in no way will it tarnish the precious memories held within the walls or the fascinating stories buried within the land. Fulshear was Herc Meier’s playground as a child. Today, it is his area to serve. Herc considers himself lucky to be able to live in his childhood home, protecting the community that he loves – the community that raised him. d

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Preparing for the


MY 9 WEEK STORY

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story MY

9 WEEK

My Personal Experience with the Inaugural Class of the Fulshear Citizens

Police Academy

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WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE FULSHEAR POLICE DEPARTMENT


Citizens Police Academy programs have been up and running for years in many cities around the country. Fulshear Police Chief, Kenny Seymour, says “They were created in an effort to bridge the gap that can sometimes exist between law enforcement and the communities they serve.” This is more important today than ever.

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In the summer of 2017, the Fulshear Police Department opened its doors to the first class of cadets. Twenty-one lucky individuals underwent a nine-week program, consisting of classroom instruction and hands-on exercises, covering a wide array of topics, such as arrest procedures, use of force, and investigations. As editor of Fulshear Magazine, I knew there was a good story here. After all, this is the first ever Fulshear Citizens Police Academy class. While I could interview a few officers about the program and write about facts and figures, I felt the need to take a different approach. I entered the academy myself, experienced every class to the fullest, and returned home each evening to write down my thoughts. This is not your typical “article.” It is more of a personal journal, logging my experiences through the nine-week course. I can honestly say that, through this class, I learned a lot about our city, our police department, and even (embarrassingly enough) myself.

First Graduating Class of THE Fulshear Citizens police academy “The test of police efficiency is the absence of

Orientation

What a welcome! As we walked into the meeting room for our first day of the academy we were greeted by ten of our own Fulshear Police officers. Everyone in the room seemed excited to get started and unsure of exactly what to expect. It began with a welcome and introduction by Chief of Police, Kenny Seymour, and Captain Mike McCoy, followed by presentations from Sergeant Zieschang and Sergeant Scott. Chief Seymour made a good point, saying that while they hold the most popular and intriguing career, it is not the most sought after. Being a police officer sounds glamorous and exciting but, at the end of the day, not many will put on the uniform and take the necessary risks. Looking at the statistics presented in class, Fulshear is a very safe community. However, in no way does this mean the force’s guard is down. I found the following numbers interesting. In 2016, the Fulshear Police Department made 6,107 traffic stops. Of those stops, only 1,310 received citations. This is proof that our police officers are not out to make a citizen’s day miserable, but instead they hope that their simple warning will prevent a future accident. I walked away late tonight with a whole new understanding and appreciation for what our officers do on a daily basis. What a great first day!

crime and disorder,

not the visible evidence of police action in dealing with it.” - #9 of Sir Robert Peel’s Principals of Law Enforcement 1829 -

2 K9/NARCOTICS

This evening, Chief Kenny Seymour shared numerous stories and pictures from his years working in narcotics. While I personally found the creative ways in which individuals go about disguising drugs quite humorous, it was the evolution of Chief’s hair that garnered the most attention from the class. The 80’s and 90’s never looked so good! What a treat it was to sit down with Officer Jen Edmonds and her K9, Belle. While I have had the pleasure of meeting Belle numerous times, getting to see her in action was fascinating. Did you know that she once sniffed out a tiny half of a pill of Ecstasy that was hidden in a mint tin at the bottom of a backpack? INCREDIBLE!

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Photo by Rhonda Renee Photography


K9’s like Belle are roughly a $15,000 investment. Belle, born and trained in the Czech Republic, is built and trained for power and protection. She specializes in tracking and narcotics. Belle eats a strict raw diet, consisting of meat, vegetables, and eggs (shell and all!). No milk bones here… Belle’s favorite treats are chicken or duck necks and peppermints. While Belle is a Fulshear Police officer in her own right, she is still a dog, and dogs have a way of drawing a crowd. In a way, Belle has humanized our officers, making them seem more accessible and friendly, especially in the eyes of children.

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Belle may be a skilled K9, but her love, trust, and loyalty to Officer Edmonds is truly something to see. They are partners in every sense of the word. “When Belle’s time as a police K9 is done, she will live out the rest of her years at home with me,” said Officer Edmonds.

3 CRIME SCENE + INVESTIGATIONS

This was an information-packed class! However, one lesson in particular opened my eyes. Half way through the class, Fulshear Police Department’s Investigator, Bo Villa, described a detailed scenario where we, as officers, heard a woman’s scream coming from a house while out on patrol, followed by a man yelling. Do we have the right to enter the opened door for fear that the woman may be in danger? As a group, we walked through this scenario, making big decisions along the way. At one point, already inside the house and provided with more information, Investigator Villa posed another question to the group. What would you do next? My mind immediately ran wild with options, but at no point could I settle on just one. One option might take too much time, another might lead to danger, whereas another may disturb the crime scene. While many chose to discuss out loud, I sat quietly, really trying to think how I would handle the given situation. Five minutes later, Investigator Villa informed us that too much time had passed. An officer does not have that kind of time to make a decision. Not only does that decision, that life changing decision, have to be made promptly, but it is a decision that does not come with a do-over. Not only that, but that decision you made in a matter of seconds, will be discussed and analyzed for multiple years in civil litigations and in court. So, no pressure!

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4

TRAFFIC STOPS

Class today was full of action. We did not spend much time in our seats, rather we were outside role playing a variety of traffic stop scenarios. My small group worked with Captain McCoy and Sergeant Zieschang. One at a time, we took the role of Fulshear Police Officer. We radioed in the call, approached the vehicle, and proceeded to administer either a ticket or a warning. With that being said, each one of us found ourselves in a very different scenario. Hats off to Captain McCoy and his incredible acting skills! With each scene, he took on a different character, and never broke face. If it were not for Sergeant Zieschang walking me through each step, I surely would have embarrassed myself more than I already did. I was nervous – white and clammy even. While I knew it was pretend, I felt under pressure. I had a hard time remembering everything we were instructed to do and say. As I approached the vehicle, I was surprised to find a man who was unwilling to lower his window. Not only that, he also refused to give me his driver’s license and registration. I looked at Sergeant Zieschang, lost and unsure of what to do next. If I had the page space to write about the other funny situations that played out, you would surely be entertained; however, I still have five more weeks and I am already writing too much! What I learned today was that our officers run into everything – literally EVERYTHING.

Belle me + K9


Fulshear Police motorcycle cop, Roger Thurman, informed us that traffic stops are the most dangerous part of the job. Officers do not know what they are about to encounter when they approach the vehicle. The person behind the wheel could be angry, drunk, have just heard bad news, or worse, have a gun out in the open and a reason to use it. It is that element of surprise that heightens our awareness and maybe a little apprehension.

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If you get pulled over by the police, do them a favor - keep your hands visible at all times. And understand that it isn’t personal, it is their job. Just like us, they have a job to do. Their job is to keep us safe. We all need a reminder now and again to watch our speed and keep our eyes on the road.

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USE OF FORCE

A few years back, I was pulled over in Fulshear for speeding. Sergeant Vargas likely remembers this run in well! As soon as those lights shone in my rearview mirror, nerves set in. I was so embarrassed. How did I manage to zone out like that? When the officer approached my car, I was practically in tears. At no moment did I even think of being combative. Never once did I think to question his authority. Honestly, naive as it may be, I assumed everyone felt this way in this situation. After tonight’s class, I understand that police officers, Fulshear’s included, deal with a lot of noncompliance. Chief Seymour shared with the class the strict protocol that is used in these very circumstances. However, the big question of the night was, when is force justified?

comprehension. I found myself taking in the courtroom itself for quite some time. What an intimidating yet glorious room. Next stop…the Fort Bend County Sheriffs Office. We were welcomed by Sheriff Troy Nehls, who was kind enough to take the class on a full tour of the office and jail. While we saw and learned so much, at the end of the night, two places stood out from the rest. Sheriff Nehls prepared us as we walked through the door into the dispatch room. “This is the most stressful job in the building,” said Sheriff Nehls. The room, dark and heavy, is where everything starts and finishes. These men and women, though predominately women, speak with people at their most vulnerable moments. They answer the phone, not knowing who will be on the other end, a person who is ready to take their own life, a parent who is standing alongside their injured child, or a panicked resident who just heard someone break into their home. I commend each and every one of our dispatchers. They are patient, unassuming, and calm, all while managing five computer screens of information and reassuring the person on the other end of the line. Lastly, walking through the county jail shook me more than I expected. Having never been to a jail before, and with TV and movies as my only reference, I was surprised by just how nervous I was. Sheriff Nehls wasted no time; he showed us the ins and the outs of the facility, answering questions along the way. I learned a lot about the intake process, the strict schedules, the monitoring process, and the ways in which inmates are grouped – so much information I wish I had room to share. However, I will share with you my parting thought as we left this evening…I would not survive one day in our county jail.

There are many ways in which officers seek compliance. While, for me, the uniform speaks for itself, others need more convincing. What starts with verbalizing their needs can quickly escalate to empty hand control, which is the use of bodily force, such as pressure points or tasers to gain control of the situation. For those rare cases where the individual is still not compliant, more insistent force is required. “I am not going to use the same force being used against me,” noted Chief Seymour. “Whatever you pull out, I’ll pull out one higher. We don’t play fair.”

6

I experienced so many “firsts” today! The class had the privilege of sitting in County Court at Law Judge Christopher Morales’ courtroom. Both Judge Morales and Assistant District Attorney, Mark Hanna, discussed their roles in the county court system. Wow, there was a whole lot of jargon that sounded interesting, yet was completely beyond my

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The one thing I took away from this class was just how fine of a line police officers must walk at all times. Everyone had different opinions as to when a certain level of force was justified. Our officers have to find that “balance” in a high stress situation, make a decision, and proceed forward knowing that there is no turning back.

FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE + county jail

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7

Jail

BUILDING CLEARING

All twenty-one of us stood in the middle of the main hallway at Fulshear High School. The hallway itself is daunting, now add in the multiple exterior doors, the hundreds of interior doors, merging hallways, and an open second story. Now, fill that school with hundreds of kids and administrators. What happens when danger presents itself, danger in any form? Mass chaos ensues. It is up to our police officers to enter that school, or any type of building, and evacuate the students, find the danger, and ultimately clear and scour the building until it is deemed safe once again.

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And while some of these story lines seemed funny at the time, they would scare the daylights out of me in reality.


“Our purpose is to educate, inform, and enforce the laws to secure everyone’s safety.” - Captain McCoy -

In class today, we learned all about the techniques in which the officers go about this very situation. Police enter the building, form a tight pod to allow coverage of every direction and angle, and proceed to strategically walk through the building searching every door and hallway. Ultimately, it is a well-rehearsed dance, where each step is smooth and with purpose.

We simulated a burglary, domestic abuse, and active shooter in a school scenario. Each time, we were only given bits and pieces of information about the scene we were about to embark on, no different than our very own police officers receive from dispatch before entering the scene themselves. We learned to quickly take in the information and learn more as we became involved.

We broke into groups to practice what we had just seen demonstrated. I started confident at first, but it didn’t take long for reality to hit hard. While my group picked up the dance quickly, I was tripping and fumbling all over the place. Making the quick decision whether to storm an open room or stand firmly in the doorway took me what seemed like forever. Was it the fact that my mind was overthinking everything? All I know is that I was not able to keep up. For the first time in my life, I was the weakest link. In all my years as a student, athlete, and musician - at no time was I ever the weakest member. This hit me harder than maybe it should have, but I quickly became overwhelmingly frustrated.

Chief Seymour was quick to note that while he could not get any of us to shoot in the first scenario, by the third and fourth scenarios he couldn’t get us to stop. In fact, we all started flying through our rounds.

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Starting this class, I thought I could handle just about everything thrown at me. I thought, had hoped, that in a dangerous situation, I could be calm, collected, and think clearly. I learned today that instead I got frustrated and down on myself. And, to think, this was all just a simulation. They say next week’s class is going to be even more intense. They are turning up the heat, so to speak. We will be put in as lifelike of a situation as possible without someone actually getting hurt (though they say to wear layers because the simulation guns leave a mark).

8 ACTIVE SHOOTER

This much-anticipated week has arrived, and boy was it worth the wait! Just as they promised, this class was full of excitement. I walked into today nervous but ready to be brave. As my teammate noted, I put on my “mom hat,” used my “mom voice,” and took control of the situation.

I could certainly write an entire article about this class alone, but I don’t want to give too much away to future cadets. I just want to say that my heart rate was up, my senses were heightened, and I have never questioned my own decisions so much. All in all, it was an amazing experience, one that could not have happened without our amazing police department who made the evening safe, informative and, most importantly, fun!

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9

GRADUATION

In college, the last day of class was the best day of class. I would stack my books and notes on a shelf and gladly accept the credits toward my GPA, never looking back. For the first time ever, I am sad to see a class end. There will be no leaving this class behind; everything I learned and experienced will impact how I view police officers and their involvement with their city for a long time to come. This class humanized our officers. They truly opened themselves up to the community and made themselves vulnerable. They are real people with feelings and families. Nothing made this hit home more than week one, when Sergeant Scott shared his personal story of being shot in the head by a bank robber fleeing the scene. While he shared the facts, his inner-most thoughts and personal photos taken of his squad car and the scene around him, I could not help but keep my eyes on his young daughter positioned in the corner of the room. Watching her look at her father, it had to bring back her own feelings from that very day, in the car with her mother and sister on the way to the hospital to see her father. As a daughter and a mother myself, this hit home. Sergeant Scott put his life on the line to serve his city, but at a very big cost. All of our officers leave their houses well aware of the dangers of the job, but I can’t imagine it gets any easier. I saw myself being brave, stepping out of my comfort zone, and being vulnerable. I learned life lessons that will last a lifetime. I highly encourage you to sign up for a future Citizens Police Academy class. You will not regret it. After all, a more informed community is a safer community. d For more information, or to sign up for a future academy, please email Captain McCoy at mmccoy@fulsheartexas.gov


experience

Ride-Along

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As cadets in the Police Academy, we were given the opportunity to do a four-hour ride along with a Fulshear police officer. To better understand the job, as well as the difference in officers and in shifts, I chose to do three. Ok, also because I was just having so much gosh darn fun! My first ride along was a weekday morning shift with our K9 officer, OFFICER EDMONDS. Instantly, I was amazed by the level of multi-tasking that goes on within the police car. Officer Edmonds could watch radar, survey the streets, type on her laptop, listen to dispatch, and adhere to K9 Belle, all while keeping up with chatty me. I am in awe by how she has managed to find the perfect balance. Officer Edmonds is able to remain professional and alert, while maintaining an approachable and personable demeanor.

• OFFICER EDMONDS •

I also had the pleasure of joining SERGEANT VARGAS during one of his weekend morning shifts. Before even getting in the squad car, we spent nearly an hour working on police tactics inside the station. With the help of Officer Braly, Sergeant Vargas showed me how to approach someone without giving away my location. The duo showed me how officers storm a room correctly and incorrectly, which led to a lot of humorous demonstrations from this dynamic duo. What I noticed was how genuinely excited Sergeant Vargas was to show me the ins and outs of his job. He was knowledgeable, informative, and engaging. I could feel his excitement, and it was contagious. His love for his job is apparent to all around him.

• sergeant vargas •

Speaking with other classmates, it is interesting to hear just how different everyone’s ride-along was. While our police officers are all highly trained and professional, each brings his or her own style to the game. Therefore, even though I was greedy and signed up for three ride-alongs, instead of just one, each experience was different and worthwhile. While the class itself was informative, it was this ride-along experience that truly made the most impact. Sitting alongside our officers, experiencing the unexpected, witnessing their frustrations and everyday challenges, my appreciation for them and what they do grew exponentially. I have a whole new level of respect. In fact, I am not embarrassed to call them my idols.

• sergeant scott •

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Lastly, I had the privilege of getting to experience a Friday night shift with SERGEANT SCOTT. The difference between my night and day ride-alongs were, well, night and day! I certainly witnessed the most action during this ride. We conducted two arrests and made multiple traffic stops. However, this ride was different in another way. From that very first traffic stop fifteen minutes into my ride-along, I felt my whole-body tense up. It was the darkness. Watching Sergeant Scott walk up to that car in the dark, my senses heightened, and I grew tense. For the remaining four plus hours, I never once relaxed. I was on high alert the whole time. Full disclosure, my muscles hurt for three days after! Sergeant Scott is truly one of the best in the profession when it comes to reading people. He has this crazy ability to find trouble. With one glance on the street or through a car window, he can read the person and know if they are guilty of something. It was a real pleasure being able to witness this first hand.


There’s Just Something

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ABOUT

“Once you get here, you don’t want to leave it.”

- ED DOZIER SR

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

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hile Fulshear appears to be a town in the throes of commercial expansion—with new shopping venues, tollways, and restaurants vying for space and customers—we must not forget to hold onto the charm and history from which this town was born.

Even though we are all focused on the progressive boom that Fulshear is currently experiencing, sometimes it is good to slow down a bit, to revisit some old friends, to stop and take a look at the history that is still present. Fulshear has many wonderful old homes and structures, and Fulshear Magazine is excited to present a series of articles that will highlight a few of these homes in each issue.

So, please join us for a stroll down memory lane.


Lucretia Foster

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M AY E S

First stop on our tour is the Lucretia Foster Mayes house at the corner of Second & Wilson. Lucretia Collitanius Foster, known affectionately as “Mama Crece,” was the daughter of Randolph and Lucy Foster. Randolph was one of Stephen F. Austin’s Old 300 colonists, and his extensive land grant lay just south of Fulshear. Born February 3, 1836, Lucretia was named after the legendary Roman heroine Lucretia Collatinus, (immortalized in Shakespeare’s “The Rape of Lucrece”). At two months of age—during the Runaway Scrape— Lucretia Foster had to flee from the Mexican army and retreat with her parents to the Sabine River.

Tucker and Lucretia had several children, including Jody Wade who was killed in a shootout in downtown Fulshear, and Lucy Amanda Wade, grandmother to long-time Fulshear resident and mayor Carl Bentley. After Tucker died in 1867, she married John Mayes in 1869. John Mayes and Lucretia had three children, including Mitch Mayes who owned the historic brick building at the corner of FM 1093 and Main Street. Through several family letters, journals, and reminiscences, the story was told of Carl Bentley’s mother, Minnie Briscoe, who used to spend the night with her grandmother “Mama Crece.” She would sleep in the bedroom upstairs and at five-years-old, she would raise the window, climb out onto the big live-oak tree right outside, catch on a limb, and shimmy down.

Chain of Property Title:

Fulshear legend has it that the swing in the front yard would often catch a breeze, and some locals claimed that was Old Man Wade sitting up there in that swing, just keeping an eye on his former bride, Lucretia Collitanius Foster.

1924 • Lucretia Foster Mayes to son John G. Mayes 1939 • Lucy Briscoe to Beauford Wade 1946 • Beauford Wade, et al to Ed Helwig 1946 • Ed Helwig to Sam and Margorie Poorman 1966 • Margorie Poorman to Terry & Mary Murphree 2016 • Mary Murphree to Mike & Pam Davenport

Foster family reunion in Fulshear at the home of Lucretia Foster Mayes (shown in center) probably 1925.

Present-Day OW N E R S

Pam and Mike Davenport, recent transplants from Fulbrook, are in the process of an extensive renovation of the historic home, in which they now live. While maintaining its historical integrity, there were aspects of the structure that needed changes. “We felt it was important that the outside look the same, so that people would still recognize it as the big white wooden farmhouse,” Pam told me recently, as she gave me a tour of the home. “We didn’t want to live in a museum, but we wanted to retain its sense of history and still have a comfortable and livable home.” Most of the original wavy windows remain, the exterior’s pier-and-beam structure is essentially the same, and the stories of those who had lived there before are now tied to the Davenport’s story. “The wood floors give a sense of people who walked on these floors before us.” What they hope is that their renovation of this historic home will inspire other people to move into town and do the same.

“ There was just something about this house that we loved right off the bat, and we knew that we wanted to live here and preserve it for the town. We’re hoping it will last another 100 years.”

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She married Pennington Tucker Wade in 1854 (even though everyone it seems, including Tucker, knew she was in love with John S. Mayes). According to family lore, she had both young men courting her and, while John Mayes wanted to marry her, he did not have the “necessary” property to satisfy her parents. The Wade family, on the other hand, had extensive land holdings in this part of Texas. Tucker Wade won her hand.


OLD FULSH EAR

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Ed Dozier, Sr

The house at the corner of First and Wilson, the home of Ed N. Dozier, Sr., came to life in 1925 as a Sears Craftsman home kit at a cost of $325. According to an interview in 1987 for The Herald Coaster, Ed said, “I think it was in 1928 or ’29 when we got electric lighting. Before that we hung kerosene or gasoline lanterns on the wall.” Ed was a farmer, and his son Ed, Jr. started Dozier’s barbeque. When Jamie Roberts, first mayor of Fulshear after it became an incorporated city, was elected president of the school board, he resigned as mayor and passed the title on to Ed, Sr.. Even though Ed was away from home at the time, he came back from his fishing trip in Alaska, and his son came out of the house to greet him with, “Welcome home, Mr. Mayor.” He retained the title until later life health concerns forced him to resign. According to Ed’s grandson, Joe Dozier, First Street was not a street until sometime in the early 1990s. “It was just a dirt road, an alley actually, with a bois d’arc tree between my grandparents’ home and what is now The Salons. That was where Granddad kept his watermelons.” Joe remembers that the side porch on the south side was once screened in, because “that was where Granddad and I would listen to the baseball games and Friday night wrestling on the radio.” The house, of course, had no air conditioning, but there was an attic fan in the hallway that kept the home cool. A two-story barn behind the house held hay and a couple of calves, and an open sewer drain ran through the pasture behind the barn. Joe laughs, “That sewage ditch was where the good fishing worms were.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

The dining room held a built-in stool as a perch for the phone. The telephone number was Northfield 22957, and there were eight people on the party line. Sunday afternoons, the whole family would go to the Dozier house for lunch. “All the uncles would eat and then take a nap.” Joe shakes his head over that. “I never could understand that. Now I realize they were pretty smart.” The dining room was also where the grownups ate. “The kids always ate in the kitchen,” Joe added. “Granddad died in ’69, and I never did make it to the main dining room.”

“ When I moved here, I felt I was going back in time, where the church and neighbors were what was important. Fulshear welcomed us with open arms.” - SONYA SIMMONS -

Present-Day OW N E R S

Sonya Simmons and Danny Curtis are the present owners of the house. Even though Sonya has lived in the home for thirty-one years, it is still affectionately referred to by locals as the Dozier House. Here, they raise chickens and raccoons and have a lush garden with old Texas favorites like morning glories and moonflower vine. When Sonya moved to Fulshear, she had never been a part of a town where generations of families still lived in the same house. People worked in their yards and sat on their porches, sharing recipes and friendly gossip. “When I moved here, I felt I was going back in time, where the church and neighbors were what was important. Fulshear welcomed us with open arms.” First Street was still that dirt alleyway, with the big bois d’arc tree where she could build a treehouse for her daughter. Every morning, the Borden milkman delivered milk to her doorstep. Most of the town folk felt free to share recipes, gardening tips, and their private business with her. “Granny Dozier apparently knew everyone’s business anyway, so people felt it was okay to tell me, the newcomer, their family secrets. Their stories sort of came with the house.” For thirty-plus years, Sonya lived in the house, unchanged from its original style and structure. However, over the past few years, the house had shifted on its blocks and the kitchen’s cast iron sink had started to rust. The time had finally come to make some changes. While adding a few modern touches, she and Danny still strove to maintain the historic aspects of the house. The exterior windows are all original. They even found an old window inside the kitchen wall when they started renovations. The clawfoot tub and sink in the bathroom are original to the house. They tore off sheet rock to expose the original plank walls, which they have painted an antique white. The floors are all long-leaf red pine (also known as Heart pine). When some of the old boards began to rot, they had to search long and hard to find matching replacement pieces, as this type of pine is rare. They are also going to bring back the screened porch on the south side of the house, just the way it was when Ed Dozier lived here. d


Both Pam & Sonya say they would like to see people move into

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Downtown Fulshear,

“ Fulshear has always had this great sense of community.” - SONYA SIMMONS -

“ Yes, it’s great living downtown!” - PAM DAVENPORT -

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renovate the old historic homes, and embrace the small-town way of life.


COMING IN 2018 F OR

MORE

INF O

CA LL

•

71 3-302-0 555


CH APTER & VERSE

48

Chapter

Verse Fulshear’s

Community of Writers

WRITTEN BY KRISTY SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY ARTS FULSHEAR & LAURA CHILES

W

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

riting is a craft honed through practice and diligence. Stephen King, in his book, On Writing, suggests writing 2,000 words a day. But we don’t all possess the discipline or motivation to do so. So, if like me, you’re a writer who hasn’t yet found her motivation to write 2,000 words a day, what can you do to practice? Enter: the writers’ group. I know, the prospect of sharing your innermost thoughts or wildest story ideas with a group of strangers can seem daunting, but a well-run writers’ group should be a safe space that allows for growth through experimentation. We have that here in Fulshear with the newly formed and growing Arts Fulshear Community Writers Group.

- Getting Started -

A few years ago, freshly retired from a career with Katy ISD, Carol Bennetts reached out to her friend and former colleague, Marcia Simmons, Executive Director at Arts Fulshear, to see if a writers’ group in Fulshear would be feasible. At the time, the resources weren’t available, but Ms. Bennetts persisted, inspired by a writing boot camp she attended last fall, and late 2016, she and Ms. Simmons worked logistical magic and the Arts Fulshear Community Writers Group was born.

The Arts Fulshear Community Writers Group has been meeting monthly since January 2017. We have a core group of dedicated and talented writers who show up to each meeting ready to write and willing to learn.


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- Enthusiasm for Writing -

Mark Connor, who created the Fulshear Star online news hub, joined the group looking for writers. According to Mark, what he found was a “great group of people,” each with “their own [writing] style” and approach to different writing tasks. Herschel Waller, retired engineer turned novelist, joined looking for a support group to provide focus. He says, “The Fulshear Writers Group serves that purpose well” because he enjoys the camaraderie and support offered during our meetings, and he leaves “each time re-energized with new ideas for stories and with fresh enthusiasm for writing.” Enthusiasm and consistency are key concepts for Ms. Bennetts, as well. Part of her vision for the group involves building relationships with fellow writers to feel comfortable enough to partner up and share ideas and goals in order to “help us stay accountable as daily writers.”

- Young Storytellers -

Arts Fulshear has provided the backbone for our group to meet and to continue to grow. Recently, Arts Fulshear branched out into children’s writing with the addition of the Arts Fulshear Young Storytellers Creative Writing Workshop, led by Kristin Bonilla, a fiction writer and editor originally from Northern California who now lives in Weston Lakes. According to Ms. Bonilla, “Arts Fulshear’s Young Storytellers offers children a nurturing environment where they can explore the possibilities of writing for pure creative fun [with] storytelling exercises...designed to inspire, encourage and guide them in writing about the subjects and characters that excite them the most.”

- Join Us -

If you are a budding writer, a reluctant writer, or even a seasoned and published author, Arts Fulshear Community Writers Group wants you! Ms. Bennetts quipped, “We’ll take all the experienced writers we can get, but I see us as encouraging the beginning writer to take a chance, to have fun with his/ her writing, and to be a part of a supportive and creative group of people.” d The Arts Fulshear Community Writers Group meets monthly at First Cup Cafe; head to the Arts Fulshear Community Writers Facebook page for details.

Arts Fulshear is a non-profit organization that values the creative growth of our community and families, and believes that exposure to the arts contributes to our overall well-being. Arts Fulshear’s vision is to foster creative growth by providing access to and opportunities for participation in the arts. For more information on all of Arts Fulshear’s activities and events, visit www.artsfulshear.org.

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The group is run by its members, whose backgrounds are as varied as their writing experience, and each meeting has a unique theme presented by a different member of the group. We encourage full participation including researching the theme, reacting to writing prompts at home and during meetings, and offering feedback and support to fellow members. We’ve covered genre writing, journalistic style, and blogging, among other topics, and we recently had the pleasure of hosting Fulshear Chief of Police Kenny Seymour. Chief Seymour spoke to our group on the realities versus the fiction of crime solving (If you ever get the chance to talk with Chief Seymour about his experiences, do it; we learned so much that night!).


SH OULD’VE BEEN A COWBOY

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COWBOY SHOULD’VE BEEN A

• The Story of a Ranch on Bessie’s Creek •

where Trail Riders, Cattle Barons, and TinselTown Cowboys Came to Play

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ROBERT FROST COLLECTION

If

you take a leisurely drive from Fulshear to Simonton along Bessie’s Creek, you’ll find yourself amidst polo fields, grazing cattle, and stately old orchards. Over the years and on the banks of this creek, Pecan Acres Ranch has hosted a slew of Hollywood stars, foreign cattle barons, and all kinds of cowboys—from real ones to weekenders.

It was here, back in 1945, that Texas Oil Man Vernon Frost’s car veered off the rain-slick roadway and careened into a ditch near Bessie’s Creek. That seemingly inauspicious moment led ultimately to the purchase of Pecan Acres Ranch and a lifelong adventure in pecan farming, cattle ranching, and trail riding.


RIDIN’ MY PONY ON A

CATTLE DRIVE

53

Late one night in 1949, Vernon Frost and a few other men were having drinks at the Cork Club in Houston’s Shamrock Hotel. They were talking about how some cattlemen from Brenham rounded up their cattle each winter and drove them to the coast to feed on salt grass. Not to be outdone by those Brenham cowpokes, they talked over the possibility of whether they could get 20 or 30 men to ride from Brenham to Houston. A reply from one of them was, “Hell, I can get 50 riders!” Thus began the 90-mile Salt Grass Trail Ride that, to this day, still begins in Brenham and ends at Memorial Park in Houston. The trail ride’s arrival in town leads the parade and kicks off the start of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. According to Vernon’s memoir, their first ride was a circuitous one. “We spent the first night in Brenham and pulled out for Houston around four that morning. We rode for about two hours and ended up back in Brenham…We finally made it to Houston in about two days and rode in the parade.” Vernon also created the Texas version of Rancheros Vistadores, after a trip and horseback ride in California’s Santa Inez Valley in 1967. The “Tejas Vaqueros Ride” was held in late August each year, with their warm-up ride starting at Simonton’s Pecan Acres Ranch. To end on a high note, the trail riders enjoyed a refreshing skinny dip in the pool and lots of good food. Vernon also started the Valley Lodge Trail Riders. The group still camps out at Pecan Acres the night before starting their long trek into downtown Houston.

SHOULD’VE LEARNED TO

ROPE & RIDE

Before buying Pecan Acres from the previous owner, Vernon’s affinity and instincts for adventure and entrepreneurship led him to expand his horizons. His grandfather had brought the first Brahman bulls to Texas from India back in 1844. This early introduction to cattle played a pivotal role in Vernon’s life.

Over the years, Pecan Acres Ranch produced 7500 pecan trees and served as pasture for some of the most impressive registered Brahman cattle in the Southwest. The Frost boys knew their cattle. Brothers Milo, Pete, and Vernon hosted international Brahman sales, shows, and meals at the ranch’s covered arena. Those sales included shipments to far flung countries all over the world. Vernon later bred the Brahman with the Simmental breed to start a whole new breed called Simbrah.

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In the words of author Robert Roark, Vernon could tell you “the middle name of the heifer in the southeast corner of the north forty, and also who was her papa, mama, grandpa, and grandma…He can tell you her tastes in green salad and whether she is a candidate for romance or the butcher block.”*


SH OULD’VE BEEN A COWBOY

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JUST LIKE

G EN E & ROY

Pecan Acres was also “The Place” for celebrities—where writers, philanthropists, and cowboy stars could call the ranch their home away from home. For example, Edna Ferber spent a day at the ranch completing research before writing her classic novel, Giant, which was filmed in Marfa, Texas. In addition, Edna Gladney held fundraisers to support the Gladney Center for Adoption in Fort Worth. After Roy Rogers and Dale Evans appeared at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, they visited Pecan Acres Ranch. As they drove up to the house, a Brahman cow gave birth to twin calves, and Roy got to milk-feed one of the calves with a bottle. Actor-singer-cowboy Gene Autry often visited Pecan Acres Ranch to buy bulls and build his own breed of cattle.

- Roy Rogers and Dale Evans -

Cisco and Pancho attended the ranch’s many cattle auctions and celebrations.

I SHOULD’VE BEEN A

COWBOY

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

The orchard at Pecan Acres Ranch no longer produces pecans, and the cattle barons no longer come from far corners of the world to buy Brahman bulls. The old ways of the cowboys—both the true and the fictionalized— have given way to sprawling residential neighborhoods and verdant polo fields. Only Bessie’s Creek remains unchanged, along with star-studded memories of those who created a cowboy way of life at a ranch along its winding banks. d

CREDITS: Title photo courtesy of Andrea Wiltse. Photos courtesy of the Robert Frost Collection. “Should’ve Been a Cowboy” by Country Artist, Toby Keith; 1993. One for the Road. Robert C. Ruark. Doubleday & Company. Garden City, New York. 1949. “The Frost Legacy” by Sharon Wallingford. Texas Horse Talk. August 2003.

- Cisco & Pancho with the Frost children -

- Gene Autry with Vernon and the Frost children -


WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

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A

Shining Light ON FULSHEAR

ELAINE EVERETT’S LIGHTING ADDS THE Perfect FINISHING TOUCHES TO LOCAL HOMES

home’s value can increase by tens of thousands of dollars simply by upgrading light fixtures, fans, and other finishing touches. While the buildergrade options certainly serve their purpose, replacing them with personalized pieces not only improves the overall look, but also transforms an ordinary house into a home and becomes a unique reflection of those who live there. Elaine Everett’s Lighting is the Fulshear/Katy area’s premier place to shop when it comes to home lighting and décor.

Finding & Filling

A NEED CLOSE TO HOME Owners of Elaine Everett’s Lighting, Brent and Shawn Patrick, have been in the lighting industry for over 25 years. They both grew up in Katy but are happy to call Fulshear their new home. It was while working for Shawn’s family business that they discovered their passion for home décor and customization. Together they managed their family business and built strong relationships with customers who have been with them since they started out in 1992. Brent and Shawn have a passion for what they do. They enjoy working alongside each other in a community they love. Brent and Shawn could not help but notice that no such store existed in the Fulshear/Katy area. In 2013, they reached out to a former coworker, Josh Gilbert, to form a partnership and open Elaine Everett’s Lighting on Spring Green Blvd. Named after Brent and Shawn’s two children (pictured bottom left), and using a combination of their middle names, the boutique-like store carries light fixtures, ceiling fans, decorative hardware, high-end plumbing, mirrors, wall art, and much more. The trendy showroom is organized by style and color, making it easy for customers to quickly find what they are looking for. Shawn has the vision and design aesthetic. She is responsible for purchasing unique pieces and designing the show room floor. From top to bottom, the space is exquisite, and the atmosphere is welcoming. While they fill the space to its capacity with the latest trends, they also offer fair pricing and excellent customer service. Brent and Shawn feel honored any time someone spends their valuable time and hard-earned money in their store.

Knowledgeable

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

SERVICE & CARE The team at Elaine Everett’s Lighting are not only educated in the lighting and décor business, they genuinely love what they do and love sharing their knowledge and design skills with others. “Our showroom manager and business partner, Josh Gilbert, worked with us at the family business years ago,” says Brent. “He started in the warehouse building repairing fixtures, and worked his way up the ladder. In fact, he has a true passion and understanding of the technical aspects of the job.” Josh works hard to stay on top of new trends. He is able to skillfully refurbish, rewire, and clean antique fixtures and lamps. Brent, Shawn, and Josh have been working together for almost 13 years now and have a collective 60 years of knowledge in their industry.


Did You Know

Elaine Everett’s Lighting has their own signature scent? With hints of amaretto, cinnamon, and almond, it leaves a room smelling as good as it looks. Visit the store to find this scent in the form of candles, potpourri, linen spray, and fabric softener!

“Occasionally, we compete with the internet,” says Josh. “Sometimes a client brings in a picture of what they are looking for that they found online, and we find it for them. We can direct or re-direct the client’s selection based on their space and need. This often prevents an online purchase that may result in a mistake.” What customers will not find online, is the hands-on help and quality customer service that Elaine Everett’s Lighting provides at their store. Josh and the team walk every customer through the process of selecting the best piece for their needs, while adhering to their personal budget. In fact, their prices in the store often match, if not beat, the prices seen online. While the store began as retail only, helping those looking to replace builder-grade fixtures and hardware or individuals just looking to buy a new lamp, Brent quickly found that many of his builder relationships found and followed him to Fulshear. He built those relationships by being dependable, responsive, trustworthy, and a reliable source of information. The team’s number one priority is the customer. “We could easily have purchased a larger space and had room upon room of merchandise, but that is not what we are about,” adds Josh. “We wanted a small and personable space where our customers feel relaxed, at home, and well taken care of. It is important that we are able to put our customers first.” Brent chimes in, “Everything we sell, we install. We also offer in-home consultations. It is important to myself and the team that our customers have a great experience and find the right pieces for the style and feel of their home. We want to be that small-town shop that provides sophisticated and unique merchandise to the residents of our community. After all, our customers are also our neighbors.”

Creating an Atmosphere Brent and his team help make homes unique, while also increasing their value. It is not the structure of the house that necessarily sets it apart, but the décor and feel within that speaks for the family inside. “We are trying to create and sell an atmosphere, not a product,” says Brent. The Elaine Everett team has the knowledge and creativity to transform any house into your dream home. d

9727 Spring Green Blvd. #500 • Katy, TX 77494 (713) 554-3915 • sales@eelights.net Hours: Tues-Sat: 9-6 • Sun & Mon: Closed

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A PEOPLE LOST TO TIME

58

A PEOPLE

Lost to Time

Painting by Frank Weir, courtesy of Texas A&M University

- Cannibals or Noble Savages Beyond the Myths of the

Karankawa Indians WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND


efining and describing the Indian tribes of Texas is a broad subject to tackle. Many distinct tribes occupied various regions of this territory and at different times, spanning prehistory to the later 1800s. Because of the impact from environmental changes, diseases, explorers, and settlers, the Indian populations evolved and changed with time.

D

The region encompassing what is now Fort Bend County was occupied by the Karankawa tribe. Historical accounts sometimes contradict one another, often describing the Karankawa as grotesque cannibals and, at other times, as loving parents who deeply mourned the loss of their children. Were they pierced and tattooed? Did they have perfect teeth? Who were the Karankawa, and what did they actually look like?

“Large heads with a queer grin.” “A splendid mouth full of white teeth.” “Over six feet tall.” “The most savage human beings I ever saw.”

Europeans came diseases, which decimated up to 80% of the indigenous tribes. Entire cultures and traditions were extinct. Austin described the Karankawa women as handsome, but he also claimed that the tribe was “universal enemies to man.”

SO, WHO WERE The following tribes were the most active in Texas history: Caddo, Karankawa, Lipan-Apache, Commanche, Mescalero Apache, Coahuilitecan, and Tonkawa.

THE KARANKAWA?

?

HISTORICAL RECORDS OF

THE KARANKAWA Some of the early records of the Karankawa are those described by the explorers Hernando de Soto, around early 1540, and Cabeza de Vaca in 1535. Cabeza de Vaca and his shipwrecked companions lived as captives of the Karankawa, and his journals reflect much of their culture and way of life at that time. Because of his two years of captivity and being forced to labor alongside native women, his accounts portray an insider’s view of the tribe’s lifestyle. De Vaca noted in his journals that the Karankawa were well-built, muscular, happy and generous, with amazing physical prowess. He also wrote about how they fished for shellfish from dugout canoes and hunted deer and the occasional buffalo. He ultimately won the respect of the Karankawa as a medicine man and diplomat.

Even the Karankawa’s origins are contradicted by various scholars. Some believe them to be related to a tribe of giants from the coast of California. Some conjecture they may have been linked to a group of aborigines known as “the Abilene man,” who inhabited the Big Bend area thousands of years ago. Others claim they were related to tribes from the West Indies. What scholars do agree on is that five major groups of Indians existed in our area—the Cujane, Coapite, Coco, Copane, and Carancaguases—all who came to be known collectively as the Karankawa. Certain traits can probably be surmised. Almost all sources agree that the Karankawa were very tall, at least six feet. They were a wandering tribe that may have extended back some 3,000 years or more. Their territory covered about 400 miles of coastline, from the west end of Galveston Island to the southwest of Corpus Christi, as well as extending probably 100 miles inland.

By the late 1600s, Henri Joutel, a French historian for La Salle’s expedition to Texas, described Indians with a much different appearance and with savage behaviors. As Spain and Mexico gained ground over the territory, their influence spread to and impacted the appearance, language, and culture of the Karankawa. Some of the chiefs’ names—Prudentio Miguel, Antonito, Llano Grande—even took on a Spanish influence. By the time Stephen F. Austin and his colonists made it to the territory in the 1820s, the Indian population had changed dramatically from those aforementioned tribes discovered by previous explorers. With the early

Painting by Frank Weir, courtesy of Texas Sea Grant College Program, Texas A&M University

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A PEOPLE LOST TO TIME

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Bone Projectile Points (upper - finished, lower - unfinished)

The men wore breach cloths and the women wore grass or animal-skin skirts. Children were naked. They all smeared animal fat or mud on their bodies to protect from bug bites. During fall and winter, small groups banded together in large fishing camps along the coast to harvest fish. Based on archaeological evidence, the tribe used spears, bows and arrows, created tools and ornamental jewelry from hard shells, made simple pottery, built crude canoes from hollowed trees, and lived in small huts made of limbs bent over and tied together. Not much is known about the Karankawa’s religious beliefs. According to a French naturalist who studied the tribe in the 1800s, the Karankawa held festivals after a great victory in battle.

Copper Pin or Awl

Known as Mitote, they would build a big fire and sacrifice their enemies. The ultimate revenge was to devour an enemy’s flesh while he watched.

Tubular Shell Beads

Noah Smithwich—early Texas settler and historian— noted that cannibalism was practiced solely as a ritual and was not part of their dietary plan. According to Smithwich, eating the flesh of an enemy was considered the most complete form of vengeance.

TRUTH OF THE Shell Ornaments

KARANKAWA REVEALED The truth of who the Karankawa people were lies somewhere in the midst of the myriad eyewitness accounts, and exists more definitively in the archaeological record. The Fulshear-Simonton area has provided a wealth of such evidence, including arrowheads and spear points, human remains that were radio carbon dated to 3230 years old, grave goods, shell and bone jewelry, and even a copper pin. Back 3,000 years ago, the main sources where copper could be collected without mining were the upper Great Lakes and the Southern Appalachian Mountains. The discovery of this copper pin is especially significant, in that it suggests long-distance trade thousands of years ago.

Artifact photos from the Fort Bend Archaeological Society Report No. 7 and Houston Archaeological Society Report No. 14

In late 1824, the Karankawa attempted a peace treaty with Stephen F. Austin’s colony. In return for an end to the colonists’ attacks, the Karankawas agreed to abandon their use of the lower Brazos, lower Colorado, and lower Lavaca rivers. They were to remain west of the Guadalupe River. In September 1825, Austin accused the Karankawa of breaking the treaty and gave orders to his militia to pursue and kill any Karankawa Indians found east of the Guadalupe. By 1880, the Karankawa were no more. Much of their history remains buried beneath the shroud of time. d


ETHNOLINGUISTIC DISTRIBUTION OF NATIVE TEXAS INDIANS

? Source: Lydia L. M. Skeels, An Ethnohistorical Survey of Texas Indians, Texas Historical Survey Committee, Ofiice of the State Archeologist, Report No. 22, Austin, 1972. Copyright 1976, Board of Regents, The University of Texas System. All rights reserved.

Many thanks to the members of

In 1822, Stephen F. Austin wrote this description. “They had Panther Skin around their waist…above the waist they were naked.”

the Fort Bend Archaeological Society ADDITIONAL SOURCES: The Evolution of a State or Recollections of Old Texas Days by Noah Smithwick (1900). University of Texas Press. F. French, Historical Collections of Louisiana, Part 1 (New York, 1846), p. 111. Pierre and Jean-Baptiste Talon, “La Salle, the Mississippi, and the Gulf: Three Primary Documents,” in Alan Gallay, ed., Voices of the Old South: Eyewitness Accounts, 1628-1861 (Athens, GA, 1994), p. 32-33. “Journal of Stephen F. Austin on His First Trip to Texas, 1821,” The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Vol. 7, No. 4 (April 1904), p. 304-305. “Reminiscences of Capt. Jesse Burnam,” The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Vol. V, No. 1 (July 1901), p. 15-16. History.com. This Day in History. Nov. 6 1528. “Cabeza de Vaca Discovers Texas.” Jean Louis Berlandier, The Indians of Texas in 1830, edited by John C. Ewers, translated by Patricia Reading Leclercq (Washington, 1969), p. 147-149. Eugene Holon and Ruth Lapham Butler, eds., William Bollaert’s Texas (Chicago, 1956), p. 174. Albert S. Gatschet, The Karankawa Indians, The Coast People of Texas (Cambridge, MA, 1891). Andrew Jackson Sowell, History of Fort Bend County (Houston, 1904), p. 91. David La Vere, The Texas Indians (College Station, TX, 2004), p. 62. Texas State Historical Association. Handbook of Texas Online PHOTO CREDITS: Lone Star Junction. www.lsjunction.com/places/Indians.htm Texas State History online emaze.com Houston Archeological Society Report No. 14, 1998 Fort Bend Archeological Society Report No. 7, 1998

Cabeza de Vaca noted in his journal that a piece of cane was inserted in their lower lips, and he also described multi-colored splotches on their faces and tattoos on their bodies.

Henri Joutel wrote that they “Shaved their heads except for a patch of hair long enough to be braided on the top of their heads,” and that “Throughout life each one retained a splendid mouth full of white teeth.” (which is corroborated by the archaeological record) Fray Gaspar Jose de Solis, in a 1700 expedition to Texas missions for Spain, described their acts of cannibalism in this way. “As they jump around they approach the victim and cut a piece of flesh off of his body going to the fire and half roasting it in sight of the victim, they eat it with great relish.” Another French naturalist, Jean Louis Bernaldier, claimed that they “Wore their hair loose to the shoulders but cut in the front to level of the eyebrows, like the Mexicans.” He also wrote of their strong love and affection for their children. “When a child died the entire Tribe mourned for a year.”

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Building

BUILDING BETTER LIVES

64

Better Lives,

ONE BRICK at a Time WRITTEN BY DANIEL McJUNKIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY TEXANA CENTER

T F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

here is a lot of excitement at Texana Center since The George Foundation awarded $1 million towards the ‘Forward Together in Fulshear’ Capital Campaign to build a new campus in Fulshear. For those readers who do not know Texana Center, they provide services for people with autism, intellectual disabilities, and infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities, as well as mental health care. Texana already has a mental healthcare clinic in Brookshire only 7 miles from Fulshear so mental health services will not be provided at the Fulshear campus.

Texana’s New

FULSHEAR CAMPUS


Kate Johnson-Patagoc, Director of Specialized Services at Texana said “we purchased 14.5 acres at the intersection of FM 359 and Wallis Street at the Fulshear city limits and plan to build an additional Texana campus there in three separate phases. We plan to take advantage of the beautiful oak trees already on the property, to provide shade and a peaceful woodland setting. I am truly honored to be leading the activities on the campus and very excited about the new programming we plan to introduce. We already have a small autism program operating at Parkway Fellowship and they were kind enough to donate the use of their building until the first phase of our campus is on the ground. In the fall of 2017, we will be offering free classes to parents of children with autism at Parkway Fellowship. I can’t believe how welcoming and supportive the community has been to Texana and we are looking forward to becoming part of the Fulshear community.”

Phase II of the campus is the $5.5 million building for the Children’s Center for Autism which has been purposefully designed to best meet the needs of the children. This building will have 12 large treatment rooms, 2 therapeutic integrated preschool rooms, 2 dining areas, an educational kitchen, an indoor play/physical education area, 2 group therapy rooms, 9 small treatment rooms, 11 therapist and administration offices, and space for a large outdoor therapeutic recreation/playground. The third and final phase is the new concept ‘Center for Learning’ which will cost around $5 million. This center will have a “learning atmosphere” similar to a community college or vocational school with 10 classrooms, computer room, workshop with shipping and receiving area, adult day program area, storage areas, offices, small educational kitchen, and a large commons area. Currently, when people with intellectual disabilities or autism graduate from high school, they have nowhere to go for any further education that will help them become more independent and employable. The Center for Learning will not only offer many different learning classes but will also provide the participants with a collegial atmosphere, school pride, and socialization.” George Patterson, CEO said, “We are confident that we will be able to leverage The George Foundation’s grant award to find additional community funds so that we can complete the first phase of the campus development. The George Foundation is highly respected in the field of philanthropy, and by awarding such a significant grant, they have demonstrated their belief in our mission. Also, Kate Johnson-Patagoc is the perfect person to lead this campus as she has a

Employment skills training – Board Certified Behavior Analyst working with adult

One on one Applied Behavior Analysis Treatment for autism – Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) works with child with autism

KATE JOHNSON-PATAGOC

Director of Specialized Services

wealth of experience as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and has expanded Texana’s autism programs so much so that we are now at capacity and need more space. She is very innovative and has introduced many new programs, so I am confident that she will take our programming for adults with intellectual disabilities or autism to the next level while continuing to provide an excellent “Applied Behavioral Analysis” (ABA) therapy program for the children.” d

Texana Center plans to break ground when the final $500,000 has been raised for Phase l. For more information visit www.texanacenter.com or if you would like to donate to the campaign please contact: TRACEY SHAW at (281) 239-1311

Circle time at the Children’s Center for Autism – Bridge Class which has children (peer models) mixed in with those who are diagnosed with autism

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Phase I of the development will be a retail training center with a coffee shop that will serve as an ‘incubator’ for the entire campus. This building will allow Texana to provide training and intern positions for teens and adults with intellectual disabilities and/or autism. The building will have two classrooms to get an early start on programming. One classroom will house Texana’s already established applied behavior analysis autism program and the other will be used for classes for adults with intellectual disabilities and/or autism where new programs will be piloted for the Center for Learning (Phase III). This building will cost $1.5 million.

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FILLING: • 4 cups rhubarb (6 medium stalks, cut into 1/2-inch pieces) If frozen, run under hot water and let drain. • 2 cups (8 ounces) strawberries, hulled and halved lengthwise • 1/2 cup sugar TOPPING: • 1 cup all-purpose flour • 1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats • 1/3 cup sugar • 1/3 cup firmly packed golden-brown sugar • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon • 1/4 teaspoon salt • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted

PREPARATION Makes 8 servings

- Adapted from “Williams-Sonoma Essentials of Baking”

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. FOR THE FILLING: In a large bowl, stir together the rhubarb, strawberries, and sugar until well mixed. Pour into an ungreased 9x9 inch glass or ceramic baking dish, and set aside. 3. FOR THE TOPPING: In a large bowl, stir together the flour, rolled oats, sugars, cinnamon, and salt until well blended. Stir in the melted butter until evenly moistened crumbs form. Spoon the crumb mixture over the filling. 4. Bake the crisp until the rhubarb is tender when tested with a toothpick, the juices are bubbling, and the topping is golden brown, 35-40 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack, and let cool for 10 minutes. Serve warm with ice cream. Side note: Crisp can be cooled, covered with plastic wrap and stored at room temperature for up to 2 days. Before serving, reheat at 250 degrees 15 minutes.

Strawberry

RHUBARB WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

This recipe is my fool proof, go-to dessert in the fall. The sweetness of the strawberries, juxtaposed with the tartness of the rhubarb, makes for the perfect tasty treat the whole family is sure to love. I was first introduced to all things rhubarb during my years studying at the University of Iowa. I still stand by the fact that the Amish communities make the best strawberry rhubarb desserts. During my college years, I would make frequent trips into the country to stock up on their tarts, crisps, breads, and pies. This student was never left disappointed, or hungry for that matter. Now, one or two times a year, my family of four piles into the car for the seventeen-hour drive back to Iowa, where my mother-in-law has my favorite pie on the counter, awaiting our arrival. This recipe is a great foundation for other varieties, as well. Substitute the rhubarb for blueberries or peaches in the summer. Or, change it up even more and substitute the strawberries for blueberries and make a “bluebarb” crisp! No matter the combination, this traditional recipe is sure to please! d

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INGREDIENTS

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LAPRADA LANDING

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A NEW STYLE OF COUNTRY LIVING F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

W

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF HEGER

hat was it about the city of Fulshear that drew you in? For many, it was Fulshear’s small town feel and undeniable charm. It is here where families can acquire sizable property and experience a bit of the country, all while being a short drive away from the city and its multitude of amenities. As Houston continues to push westward and Fulshear grows, open acreage become harder to come by. Nestled along a bend in the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers that much needed escape from busy city life. This Highland Resources property, located just three miles southeast of Fulshear, is unlike anything else. With 720 acres divided into just nine tracts, buyers will

have the unique opportunity to let their imaginations run wild. The vast views of wildlife, flowers and mature trees draped in delicate Spanish moss overlooking the river, paint a picture of nature at its finest. Whether it be intended as the family ranch, or a second home away from downtown, Laprada Landing is what everyone is talking about.

LAND RICH IN HISTORY

Laprada is no ordinary piece of land, it is part of Texas’ rich history. Its unique narrative begins in 1824 when David Randon and Isaac Pennington acquired land from Stephen F. Austin, joining the prominent group of


69

“THE MORE TRANQUIL A MAN BECOMES, THE GREATER IS HIS SUCCESS, HIS INFLUENCE,

HIS POWER FOR GOOD. CALMNESS OF MIND IS ONE OF THE BEAUTIFUL JEWELS OF WISDOM.”

While they could easily sell to a residential developer who would likely strip away the property of its charm, displacing the wildlife and thinning out the trees, Highland has chosen to divide the acreage into nine tracts, ranging from 60 to 105 acres. “We have owned this property for over thirty years, so we have had a long time to think about its future,” says Charles Wolcott, President and CEO. “It was never in the cards to do a development property, it is just too pretty.” In fact,

they have incorporated protective covenants within the deed to ensure that the location remains secluded and not built up like the tightly packed communities nearby. For example, only one residence is allowed per 60 acres and every home site must be set back off the road a minimum of 300 feet. Highland is so proud of the property’s legacy, that they have taken it a step further and applied through the Fort Bend Historical Commission for a historical marker. They are pleased to say that just recently they have been accepted. The marker will be called the Randon and Pennington Grant of 1824. Charles is pleased knowing that it is no longer hearsay, it is proven historic record. “We hope that by acquiring this historical marker people see the deep history tied to the property and that they are not just buying a piece of ranch land, but a piece of Texas history.”

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Texas’ first settlers – the Old Three Hundred. Randon and his wife Nancy McNeel ran a successful plantation on the property until 1859 when they sold the land. After being passed through a few more hands over the years, Highland acquired the 2,000 acres in the late 1970’s. After thirty years of cattle ranching operations, the decision was made to market the southernmost 720 acres.

JAMES ALLEN


70

NATURE AT ITS FINEST

LAPRADA LANDING

“We are excited to be involved with this property,” shares Gloria Catalani, operations manager at Highland. “I even find myself escaping the city and relaxing amongst the vast wilderness just to get away from the day to day strife.” This comes as no surprise because the aura of Laprada Landing is truly magical. There the air smells sweeter, the grass is greener and the stars seem to shine brighter. Situated on newly named Laprada Trace, a county road that dead-ends within Laprada Landing, buyers can rest assured that there will be no through traffic. Majestic pecans, live oaks and water oaks cover the property. In the spring, the area is draped in color thanks to the beautiful Texas wildflowers. “The river is the large selling point – the gem,” says Charles. There are no land locked tracts. All nine front a large stretch of the Brazos and have buildable home sites. The land is perpetually preserved and protected from dense development as portions of this property are within floodway and floodplain delineations that were finalized by FEMA in 2014. Highland was looking for a name as unique as the property itself – something evocative of the feel of the land. Laprada is a play on words of the Spanish word la pradera, meaning meadow. The name has since been trademarked as to remain unique to the property.

PRIME LOCATION

“We want to be different than anything else in the area, but still blend in,” notes Gloria. “We are working to create understated country elegance in a unique and secluded location.” Located right around the corner from the highly sought after Fulshear area, and only 40 miles west of Houston, there will be no sacrifice of the desirable amenities city living brings. Residents will be minutes from local stores and restaurants. This kind of property is hard to find. Laprada Landing is a place you can go to escape, to breathe, to be closer with nature – and call home. A place with as rich a history as this is meant to be preserved and enjoyed. It is now time for a new generation to be part of that legacy. d

Energy Corridor

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8

ay Westpark Tollw

99

Fulshear

Sugar Land

59

Houston

For more information about LAPRADA LANDING contact

BILL BLYTHE at (713) 829-3465 or D. LEIGH MARTIN at (713) 835-9839 with MARTHA TURNER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

36

90

The Galleria

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Bra z

r ve Ri os

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Katy


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Member

DIRECTORY

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FULSHEAR AREA Chamber of Commerce


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ENCHANTMENT KIDS FINE ARTS LEARNING CENTER (281) 394-5090 - www.Enchantmentkids.com

ENCORE PRINTSTORE

(281) 398-7444 - www.encoreprintstore.com

ER KATY*

(281) 395-9900 - www.erkaty.com

EXCEL CENTER BEHAVIORAL OF WEST OAKS HOSPITAL (281) 647-0020 - www.westoakshospital.com

EXPRESS ITALIA (281) 533-0099

FAMILY HOPE

(832) 492-5136 - FamilyHopeFulshear.org

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP TIM O’BRIEN INSURANCE AGENCY (281) 375-5928 www.farmersagent.com/tobrien

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM (972) 899-6662 - www.fcer.com

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

(281) 668-3217 - www.bbt.com

75


MEMBERS

CH AMBER DIRECTORY

76 FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM KATY CINCO RANCH

FULSHEAR OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT

www.fcer.com/locations/houston-map/ katy-cinco-ranch/

FULSHEAR POLICE DEPARTMENT

(832) 913-8220

FAIRMONT CUSTOM HOMES (713) 539-0048 www.fairmontcustomhomes.com

FASTSIGNS KATY

(281) 346-2202 www.fulshearpolice.com

HOPE FOR THREE*

FULSHEAR PROFESSIONALS

FIRST FULSHEAR UMC*

(281) 346-1416 - www.firstfulshear.org

(281) 882-9453 - www.homeinstead.com/252

FULSHEAR PRESSURE WASHING

(713) 502-9877

FIF ENGINEERING LLC

(281) 989-1171 - www.yourfirstcupcafe.com

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

HOMEWOOD SUITES BY HILTON KATY

(832) 581-5812 www.fulshearpressurewashing.com

FIRST CUP CAFE

(713) 337-2241

FULSHEAR POLICE FOUNDATION

(281) 599-1111 - www.fastsigns.com/515 (346) 800-4343 - www.fifengineering.com

info@fulshearprofessionals.com

FULSHEAR READY MIX CONCRETE

(281) 533-0300 - www.fulshearreadymix.com

FULSHEAR REAL ESTATE PARTNERS L.P. (713) 302-0555

(281) 391-5500 - www.homewoodkaty.com (800) 317-0787 - www.hopeforthree.org

HOUSER ROOFING

(979) 472-9176 - www.houserroofingtx.com

HOUSTON CHRONICLE

(713) 362-5163 - www.houstonchronicle.com

HOUSTON FINANCIAL CENTER (713) 302-6744 www.houstonfinancialcenter.com

FIRST LINE DEFENDERS

FULSHEAR SAFE AND LOCK FULSHEAR SIMONTON FIRE DEPARTMENT

(281) 346-8326 - www.smilesgonewild.net

FIT SENSE, LLC

FLINT PHOTOGRAPHY

FULSHEAR STAR

HUNT LAW FIRM, PLLC

FONTANILLA ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS

FULSHEAR TREE SERVICES

INDEPENDENCE TITLE COMPANY

(832) 776-1145 http://www.firstlinedefenders.com (832) 600-4474 - www.fitsense-llc.com (281) 899-0818 - www.Flint-Photography.com

(832) 841-6733 - www.fulshearlocksmith.com

(281) 346-2800 - www.fsfd.org

(281) 665-9678 - www.fulshearstar.com (713) 302-0555 - www.fulsheartreeservices.com

(281) 712-1047 www.katy.bookkeepingexpress.com

FULSHEAR.COM

FOREVER FULSHEAR*

GALLERY FURNITURE

(713) 703-4129

FORT BEND CARES FOUNDATION

(832) 819-2005 - www.FortBendCares.org

FORT BEND COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION

(832) 377-6574 - www.fulshear.com (281) 687-1263 - www.galleryfurniture.com

GEOVEND INTERNATIONAL LLC

(281) 513-4681 - www.geovendinternational.com

GGG SUSTAINABILITY SOLUTIONS

(972) 415-3017 - www.greengrovegroup.com

(281) 342-6171 www.FortBendCountyFair.com

GLADIATOR EXCELLENCE

FORT BEND COUNTY MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

GLASS EXPRESSIONS

(281) 342-1256 www.fortbendmuseum.org/georgeranch.org

FORT BEND COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY www.fbcgop.org

FORT BEND RAINBOW ROOM (832) 451-5867 - www.fbrr.org

FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE (281) 341-4664 - www.fbcsheriff.org

FORT BEND SENIORS MEALS ON WHEELS

(713) 659-9747 - www.GladiatorExcellence.com (713) 702-2292

GLENN SMITH EXECUTIVE COACHING

(281) 841-6680 - www.glennsmithcoaching.com

GNA INSPECTIONS, PLLC

(832) 567-3293 - GNAInspections.com

GOLDEN EAGLE TAEKWONDO (832) 953-4853 www.goldeneagletaekwondo.com

GRATITUDE SOLUTIONS (281) 772-3971

HOUSTON PEDIATRIC DENTAL SPECIALISTS, PC HR IN ALIGNMENT, LLC

(281) 889-9075 - www.hrinalignment.com (832) 315-5494 - www.familylawyerkaty.com

(281) 533-9922 www.independencetitle.com

INSPERITY

(281) 312-2065 - www.insperity.com

IRON TRIBE FITNESS - CINCO RANCH (281) 303-5671 www.cinco-ranch.irontribefitness.com

ITALIAN MAID CAFE

(281) 341-1587 - www.italianmaidcafe.com

JACQUELYN NICOLE PHOTOGRAPHY (281) 794-7385 - www.jacquelynnicole.com

JDC FIRETHORNE

(281) 395-1440 - www.firethorne.info

JLA REALTY-JOE GORCZYCA (281) 814-8934

JOE JOE BEAR FOUNDATION (281) 398-4522 - www.joejoebear.org

JORDURK SOLUTIONS, LLC (888) 452-6461 - www.jordurk.com

JOYCE LONG WELLNESS INSTITUTE (281) 344-0095 - www.joycelong.biz

JUDGE CHAD BRIDGES CAMPAIGN 240TH DISTRICT COURT

GREENWAVE DRY CLEANERS

(832) 867-0471 - www.judgechadbridges.com

HALO PROFESSIONALS

(281) 660-4363 - www.judgemaggiejaramillo.com (281) 712-5013

FRONTIER TITLE COMPANY

HANA GARDEN CHINESE RESTAURANT

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON LIONS CLUB

HANSON AGGREGATES

(281) 633-7049 - www.fortbendseniors.org

FRECKLES STATIONARY & GIFTS

(281)536-4900 - www.frecklescentral.com

FRONT ROW SIGNS

(832) 222-9385 - www.frontrowsigns.net (281) 391-9181 - www.frontiertitletexas.com (281) 346-4156 www.fulshearsimontonlionsclub.org

FULSHEAR ACE HARDWARE F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

(832) 492-5136 - www.FulshearOutreach.org

HLG WEALTH MANAGEMENT

(346) 707-8168 www.greenwavedrycleaners.net

(281) 860-2535 - www.haloalarmshouston.com

(832) 437-7852 - www.hanagarden.us (281) 346-1136 - www.lehighhanson.com

HEALTHY TEETH PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

(970) 214-7876

(713) 234-1002 www.healthyteethpediatricdentist.com

FULSHEAR ATHLETIC BOOSTER CLUB

HEARTLAND PAYMENT SYSTEMS

(832) 541-1768 - www.fulshearathletics.com

FULSHEAR CITY GRILL*

(281) 346-8196 - www.yongsasianfusion.com

FULSHEAR FAMILY MEDICINE*

(281) 346-0018 - www.fulshearfamilymed.com

FULSHEAR FLORAL DESIGN

(281) 533-9468 - www.fulshearfloraldesign.com

FULSHEAR FOOT AND ANKLE

(281) 391-1212 - Fulshearfootandankle.com

FULSHEAR INSURANCE GROUP, INC.

(281) 533-9067 - www.fulshearinsurance.com

(713) 302-1852 www.Heartlandpaymentsystems.com

HEARTS AT HOME SENIOR CARE

JUDGE MAGGIE JARAMILLO 400TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT JULIE K GRAY, CPA JUICE PLUS

(713) 703-1554 www.carmenizzo.origamiowl.com

KASABE DESIGNS INC.

(281) 712-2659 - www.kasabedesigns.com

KATHIE LAUHOFF KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

(713) 562-8502 - www.kathielauhoff.com

KATY CHRISTIAN MAGAZINE (281) 777-9790 www.katychristianmagazine.com

(713) 515-2567 www.heartsathomeseniorcare.com

KATY FAMILY YMCA

HEMI HIDEOUT

KATY LIFESTYLE CHIROPRACTIC

(281) 347-HEMI - www.HemiHideout.com

HENDRIX INSURANCE

(832) 437-5528 - www.yourLTCexpert.com

HERITAGE TEXAS PROPERTIES

(281) 493-3880 - www.heritagetexas.com

(281) 392-5055 - www.ymcahouston.org/katy

(281) 347-444 - www.katychiro.com

KATY MAGAZINE, LLC

(281) 579-9840 - www.katymagazine.com

KATY MEDIA ROOMS, LLC

(281) 780-9383 - www.katymediarooms.com


MEMBERS MEMAMA’S COOKIES N’ MORE

(281)-402-1280 - www.katyplantations.com

(713) 503-8310 www.memamascookiesnmore.com

KATY TREADMILL REPAIRS

MEMBERS CHOICE CREDIT UNION

(832) 731-6785 - www.katytreadmillrepairs.com

(281) 398-9900 - www.mccu.com

KATY YARD GREETINGS

MICHAEL T. MCCANN FOUNDATION, INC - BIKE FOR MIKE

(713) 898-4358 - www.katyyardgreetings.com

KELLY FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC (281)346-8397

KENT HARRIS

(832) 578-1967 - kentjharris@gmail.com

KIDDIE ACADEMY OF RICHMOND TEXAS (832) 633-0093 www.kiddieacademy.com/richmond

camccann@me.com

MICHELLE BRAUD (225) 806-4344

MINDFUL ART*

(713) 303-4381 - www.mindful-art.com

MINT PRINT HOUSE (832) 712-0244

KINGDOM & WHEELS

MOMS CLUB FULSHEAR/SIMONTON

(832) 437-7039 - www.kingdomandwheels.com

(203) 650-6263 - www.mindful-art.com

KJT CONSULTING LLC

MOSQUITO DEFENSE SOLUTIONS

(281) 705-6895 - kjthomason@mail.com

(281) 889-8499 - www.Mosquito-Defense.com

KRENEK LAW OFFICES

MOSSWOOD PROPERTIES, LLC.*

(281) 578-7711 ww.tkthompson@kreneklaw.com

(281) 346-8032

L&N BLINDS AND SHUTTERS

(832) 277-5610 - www.n2pub.com

(832) 427-7971 - www.lnblindsandshutters.com

LAMAR CISD

(832) 223-0330 - www.lcisd.org

LANIER PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES PLLC (713) 504-3755 - www.drstaceylanier.com

LATHROP DENTAL CENTER*

(832) 437-3849 - www.lathropdentalcenter.com

LAUGHING DOG GLASSWORKS (281) 346-0099

LAVO NATURAL NAILS

(281) 346-8636 - www.lavonails.com

LAZIT INDUSTRIES (281) 334-9969

LEGACY AT FALCON POINT

(281)394-0628 - www.legacyatfalconpoint.com

LEGALSHIELD

(281) 750-5317 - www.legalshieldassociate.com

LEGALSHIELD / IDSHIELD

(281) 986-7023 - www.msmithcorp.com

LEONETTI GRAPHICS INC.

(281) 499-4959 - www.leonettigraphics.com

LIBERTY STAR MORTGAGE - a branch of

N2 PUBLISHING - WEST SIDE STORIES NANCY GARCIA KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY* (713) 503-5171 - www.nancykingrealty.com

NATURALAWN OF AMERICA*

(281) 392-2990 - houstonwest.naturalawn.com

NBD GRAPHICS INC.

(281) 547-8200 - www.nbdgraphics.net

NEWELL’S DESIGNS NEWELL CHEATHEAM

(281) 392-3034 - www.newellsdesigns.com

NO LABEL BREWING CO.

(281) 693-7545 - www.nolabelbrew.com

NORTH AMERICAN TITLE KATY (832) 524-5832

NORTH FORT BEND WATER AUTHORITY (713)-488-8253 - nfbwa.com

NOVABAY PHARMACEUTICALS (832) 244-5678 - www.NovaBay.com

NOW CFO

(713) 823- 2134 - www.nowcfo.com

OAK PARK RESORT LIFESTYLE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

SecurityNational MC NMLS 3116*

(281) 558-0004 - www.libertystarmortgage.com

(281) 398-1500 www.OakPark-Retirement.com

LJA ENGINEERING, INC.*

OCUSOFT

(713) 953-5131 - www.ljaengineering.com

(281) 239-9801 - www.ocusoft.com

LONE STAR TRANSITIONS

OFFICEMAKERS

(832) 844-2025 - www.lonestartransitions.com

(281) 574-3800 - www.officemakers.com

LOUETTA AUTOMOTIVE

OLD FOSTER COMMUNITY MUSEUM

(281) 304-2517 - www.louettaauto.com

MADAM DJ

(713) 714-7357 - www.madamdj.com

MAID SIMPLE

(281) 769-1452 - www.rosenbergmaidsimple.com

MARTIN MORTGAGE *

(281) 533-9952 www.martinmortgageonline.com

MARY KAY

(805) 558-0533 - www.marykay.com/cfairbanks

MARY KAY - LINDA DYER

(209) 484-9583 - www.marykay.com/ldyer1616

MAS SOLUTIONS LLC

(281) 494-4874 - www.masquality.com

MATHNASIUM OF FULSHEAR

(832) 437-5033 - www.mathnasium.com/fulshear

MCFRUGALS DRY CLEAN DEPOT (832) 589-2885 - www.mcfrugalsdc.com

MEDINA ORTHODONTICS

(281) 394-9300 - www.medianbraces.com

(281) 239-2178 www.fostercommunitymuseum.org

OLD REPUBLIC NATIONAL TITLE

(281) 265-9500 www.oldrepublictitle.com/houstonnational

OLSON FOR CONGRESS COMMITTEE

PAULA RUCKY PROPERTIES REMAX GRAND

(281) 793-5779 - www.paularucky.com

PAYCHEX*

(832) 914-3721 - www.paychex.com

PERCHERON TITLE AGENCY, LLC

(832) 300-6500 - www.percherontitleagency.com

PET SUPPLIES PLUS (281) 346-4535

PHOTO BOOTH ON WHEELS

(281) 202-5988 - www.photoboothonwheels.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE & AQUATIC REHAB OF FORT BEND (281) 347-8900 - www.ptcare.net

PIVOTAL STEEL BUILDINGS & ROOFING

(888) 75-STEEL - www.pivotalconstruction.net

POLISHED NAILS STUDIO

(281) 665-8716 - www.polishednailsstudio.com

PRAUPER

(346) 226-5335 - www.prauper.com

PRESTIGE PROPERTIES TEXAS (281) 238-0800

PREVALENT HEALTH

(713) 554-6100 - www.prevalenthealth.com

PROSPECT MORTGAGE

(832) 286-6371 www.prospectmortgage.com/NNavarroSung

PROSPERITY BANK

(281) 574-8674 - www.ProsperityBankUSA.com

R.G. MILLER ENGINEERS

(713) 461-9600 - www.rgmiller.com

R&M LOGISTICS, LLC

(281) 346-1142 - www.rgmiller.com

RACHEL THE REALTOR

(832) 857-4550 - www.RachelTheRealtor.org

RAMEY REALTY

(713) 503-6247 - www.mgramey1@gmail.com

RAYMOND L. WIGGINS, D.D.S., M.D. TEXAS ORAL AND FACIAL SURGERY (281) 395-1200 - www.txofs.com

RE/MAX GRAND III (832) 913-8400

RE/MAX REALTY WEST*

(281) 346-0222 - www.movewest.net

RED POTATO MARKET

(281) 533-9863 - www.redpotatomarket.com

REGAL GRAND PARKWAY

(281) 239-4205 - www.regmovies.com

REINING STRENGTH THERAPEUTIC HORSEMANSHIP (832) 451-6874 - www.reiningstrength.org

REMEDY ROOFING, INC.

(281) 391-8555 - www.remedyroofing.com

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN ZERWAS M.D. (281) 342-6969 - www.JohnZerwas.com

ONE SPORTS NATIONS

REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB OF KATY

OWEN AND SHERRI BEMENT

REPUBLIC SERVICES

(281) 346-0299

(713) 726-7510 - www.republicservices.com

PARKWAY FELLOWSHIP

(832) 222-8282 - Parkwayfellowship.com

RICHMOND STATE SUPPORTED LIVING CENTER

PATHPOINTS TO WELLNESS HEALING ARTS & RETREAT CENTER*

RICK HENDERSON - REMAX GRAND

(281) 980-0750 - www.olsonforcongress.com

(832) 974-0068 www.onesportsnation.com/katy

(713) 824-6136 www.republicanwomensclubofkaty.com

(281) 344-4335 - www.govsc.org

(832) 461-6936 www.pathpointstowellness.com

(281) 994-5717 - www.pickrick.com

PAUL LYTLE INSURANCE AGENCY

(281) 232-1801 - www.rightwaydental.com

(832) 266-0153 agents.allstate.com/paul-lytle-fulshear-tx.html

RIGHTWAY DENTAL

RIVER BEND BAPTIST CHURCH (281) 346-2279- www.riverbendbc.org

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

KATY PLANTATIONS HANDCRAFTED SHUTTERS

77


MEMBERS

CH AMBER DIRECTORY

78 RMC SOLAR SCREENS BLINDS AND SHUTTERS

TERRA POINT REALTY, LLC

TOPMARK REALTY

RONALD DUNCAN

TERRY COZART, PIANO

TOUCHSTONE CRYSTAL BY SWAROVSKI

SAENZ OF THE TIME

TEXANA CENTER*

SAFARI TEXAS

TEXAS BORDERS BAR & GRILL

TRACY BOGIEL BETTER HOMES & GARDENS - GARY GREENE*

TEXAS COUNTRY PROPERTIES*

TRACY GREMILLION KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

(281) 346-1136

(281) 723-9890 - www.isellkatytx.net

TEXAS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS

TRICIA TURNER PROPERTIES

(281) 660-7769 - www.rmcsolarscreens.com

(765) 208-1075

(713) 876-5680 - www.reverbnation.com/saenzofthetime (281) 277-7888 - www.safaritexasballroom.com

SANDEFUR CPA, P.C.*

(281) 533-0911 - www.sandefurcpa.com

SAPORE RISTORANTE ITALIANO

(281) 394-5999 - www.saporestaurant.com

SAPPHIRE CUSTOM HOMES

(832) 437-5325 - www.sapphirecustomhomes.net

SCHOBEL IRRIGATION & LANDSCAPE SERVICES, INC. (832) 250-5807

SENATOR LOIS KOLKHORST (979) 251-7888

SERVPRO OF WEST FORT BEND COUNTY* - (281) 342-5326

www.servproofwestfortbendcounty.com

SHERWOOD FARMS (713) 578-0449

SIGNARAMA-KATYFULSHEAR

(713) 471-5398 - www.signarama-katyfulshear.com

(713) 882-8558 - www.fulshearpianolessons.com (281) 239-1427 - www.texanacenter.com

(281) 394-2100 www.texasbordersbarandgrill.com

(281) 698-7787 - topmarkrealty.com (469) 826-3564 www.touchstonecrystal.com/triciawright

(281) 646-1136 - www.ilovefulsheartx.com

(281) 346-8326 www.texasorthodonticspecialists.com

(832)-563-0916 - www.har.com/TriciaG

TEXAS PREMIER SPORTING ARMS

(281) 497-1040 - www.turnerduran.com

(979) 627-7827 www.texaspremiersportingarms.com

TEXAS PRIDE DISPOSAL

TURNER DURAN ARCHITECTS, LP TWO MEN AND A TRUCK WEST HOUSTON

(281) 342-8178 - www.texaspridedisposal.com

(281) 712-4000 www.twomenandatruckwesthouston.com

THE AD SHEET

UNITED HEALTHCARE

THE ALTERNATIVE BOARD HOUSTON SW

UPCLOSE MAGAZINE LLC

(713) 409-0420 - theadsheet@gmail.com

(832) 840-8481 - www.tabhoustonsw.com

THE BUNKER ICEHOUSE*

(281) 413-6614 - www.prsinsurancesolutions.com (281)-235-0600 - UpCloseMagazine.com

USANA HEALTH SCIENCES

(281) 923-8833

(281) 610-3767 www.usana.com/webhosting/cherrylsenergythrough

THE DELANEY AT PARKWAY LAKES

VAN HOLTEN LAW FIRM*

(713) 865-0229 - www.vanholtenlaw.com

(281) 770-3250 - www.sitstayobeyacademy.com

(832) 945-1899 www.thedelaneyatparkwaylakes.com

SJR FAMILY PARTNERSHIP, LTD*

THE GLASER GROUP MCDONALD’S

(281) 468-3588

(254) 833-1488 - www.theglasergroup.net

(281) 533-0040 www.victorsmexicanrestaurant.com

SPECIAL PALS

THE GROWLER SPOT

(281) 579-7387 - www.specialpalsshelter.org

(832) 600-5856 - www.thegrowlerspot.com

SPORTS CHIROPRACTIC PERFORMANCE - SCP

THE GYM STATION WEST CINCO*

(832) 222-9727 - www.scpfit.com

(281) 394-7844 - www.gymstation.com

SQUIRREL HOLDINGS LLC*

THE KATY PLUMBING COMPANY

(713) 302-6873

(281) 646-1700 - www. katyplumbers.com

(281) 238-1400 www.andy.meyers@fortbendcountytx.gov

STANCIL PROPERTY TAX LLC

THE KELLY CLINIC

(281) 828-0675 - www.kellyclinic.net

WADLER PERCHES HUNDL KERLICK

(281) 341-5454

STATE FARM INSURANCE - JEFF GILBERT*

THE LACY TUMBLEWEED GENERAL STORE

(281) 347-6200 - www.yourareaneighbor.com

(281) 232-6033

WALLIS STATE BANK

STANFORD CONSTRUCTION SERVICES LLC

THE ORCHARD - ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE

WAUSON | PROBUS

SIT STAY OBEY ACADEMY

(281) 726-2833 - www.stanfordcontracting.com

STATE FARM INSURANCE - TODD SHIPP*

(281) 371-3000 - www.theorchardkaty.com

THE OUGHTNESS GROUP

VICTOR’S MEXICAN GRILLE* VINES OF WINE - WINESHOP AT HOME

(602) 300-2888 www.wineshopathome.com/sschlangen

W.A. “ANDY” MEYERS

(281) 391-4132 - www.wphk-law.com (713) 935-3720 - www.wallisbank.com

(281) 242-0303 - www.texbusinesslaw.com

WESTHEIMER LAKES DENTAL

(281) 769-2846 - oughtness.net

(281) 394-7581 www.westheimerlakesdental.com

THE POPCORN SHOP

WESTPARK CHURCH OF CHRIST

(832) 437-7016 - www.thepopcornshops.com

(281) 712-1492 - www.westparkcoc.org

THE SALONS OF FULSHEAR / THE LYME LEOPARD

WESTSIDE GRILL AND FIREPLACE, INC.

STEWART TITLE COMPANY*

STIEBER INSURANCE GROUP LLC*

THE SPORTS MARKETING COMPANY

STROS INC.

THE STRETCH FACTOR

(713) 464-4255 - www.toddshipp.com

STERLING OAKS REHABILITATION

(281) 347-8200 - www.sterlingoaksrehab.com

STEVE FUQUA HOMES

(281) 980-1010 - www.stevefuquahomes.com (281) 346-1333 - www.stewart.com/houston (281) 341-7141 - www.stieberinsurance.com

(832) 757-8213

(281) 533-9332

(832) 945-2220 www.thesportsmarketingcompany.com

(281) 394-2831 - www.thestretchfactor.com

(281) 392-5535 www.westsidegrillandfireplace.com

WHITE OAKS ON THE BAYOU

(832) 862-3037 - www.whiteoaksevents.com

WORDSERVE CHURCH

(281) 455-5258 - www.wordserve.org

THE SUMMIT FITNESS STUDIO

WORKFORCE RESOURCES/ FAMILY HERITAGE

(832) 978-3809 - www.thesummitfulshear.com

(713) 392-7128 - www.workforcelife.com

THE TUTORING CENTER

WORLD-WIDE TELECOM

(281) 240-4487 - www.sugarlandskeeters.com

(832) 606-0013 www.fulshear.tutoringcenter.com

SUNRISE OF CINCO RANCH

THE UPS STORE 6650

YEN TEPPANYAKI & SUSHI STEAK HOUSE

SUGAR CREEK MONTESSORI SCHOOL FULSHEAR (281) 693-7267 - www.sugarcreekmontessori.com

SUGAR LAND SKEETERS F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

(281) 346-2112 - www.terrapointrealty.com

(281) 240-0500 www.sunriseseniorliving.com/communities/sunrise-of-cincoranch/overview.aspx

SUNSET GLASS TINTING

(281) 494-7161 - www.sunsetglasstinting.com

SUNSET POOLS, INC.

(281) 396-4645 www.katy-tx-6650.theupsstorelocal.com

THE WELLPET CENTER VETERINARY HOSPITAL

(281) 394-2355 - www.thewellpetcenter.com

(281) 693-4896 - www.sunsetpoolsinc.com

THRIVE CHURCH*

SWEET TOOTH SHOPPE INC.*

TODAY’S HEARING, INC.

(281) 533-0477 - www.sweettoothshoppe.com

TEMPERATUREPRO OF FORT BEND (281) 616-5999 www.temperatureprofortbend.com

(979) 884-7483 - thrivechurch.cc

(281) 578-7500 - www.tohear.com

TODAY’S VISION KATY

(281) 828-2020 www.todaysvision.com/location/katy

(281) 346-6200 - www.world-widetelecom.com

(281) 665-3917 - yenhibachi.com

YP-DIGITAL MARKETING SOLUTIONS

(832) 633-6990 - www.marketingsolutions.yp.com


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