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Cross creek rancH

The life you want. Right now.

ADVENTURE

ISLAND WATERPARK

OVER 15 Miles of

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ON-SITE ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL

With sparkling lakes, gorgeous natural splendor and incredible amenities, including playgrounds, an on-site elementary school, a fitness center, dog park and Italian café, there’s no question everything you want out of life is right here, right now. Discover the life you’re looking for today in Cross Creek Ranch.

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In FULSHEAR at FM1463 and FM1093


ENJOY THE

breath-taking beauty

& THE

country lifestyle

OF THE BRAZOS RIVER

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos. The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine piece of the rural Texas countryside without having to sacrifice the amenities of city living. Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, is easily accessible from Westpark Tollway and FM 1093. Laprada Landing offers tracts ranging from Âą60 - 105 acres, each with its own unhindered view of the Brazos River. With varying tree coverage, each tract has its own features that set it apart from the others with no two being exactly alike. There is ample opportunity to build and create your own sense of place.


N

HWY 99

Interstate 10

Westpark Tollway

FM 1093

FM 723

Stratman Rd

Laprada Trace

(Formerly Montgomery Rd)

r ive

sR zo

Bra

359 HWY

Bois D’Arc Ln

Winner Foster Rd

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos.

Beadle Ln

The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine F othe r mrural o r e Texas infor m at i o n cwithout o n tachaving t piece of countryside to BILLamenities BLYTHE of at city (713)living. 829-3465 or sacrifice the Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, easily accessible from D. LEIGH MARTIN atis(713) 835-9839 Westpark Tollway and FM 1093.

Martha Turner

Sotheby’s International Realty


THE FULSHEAR AREA IS TRULY

06 LETTER FROM TH E PUBLISH ER

a remarkable place AND IT IS THE people THAT MAKE IT SO exceptional.

FULSHEAR A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

LETTER FROM THE

Publisher

M

As you read this, you and your neighbors are witnessing the transformation of our community – and what a transformation it is. Brand new state-of-the-art schools are preparing to welcome students this fall while excellent shopping opportunities seem to appear almost daily. Churches and community-service-centered organizations have taken their places and have cooperatively organized themselves into volunteer forces to help residents in need. To say the very least, what we are witnessing is remarkable. Recently, Fulshear completed its annual electoral changing of the guard, which brought the community a new Mayor and two new council persons to serve on the Fulshear City Council. These individuals will work with others on the council to direct the city for the next two years. The newly-adopted Home Rule Charter is set to bring Fulshear into the forefront of Fort Bend County municipalities. Truly, Fulshear city government is evolving to match the community’s expectations as well as the need to become a more sophisticated infrastructure management organization. Growth, mobility, and commute times are surely on everyone’s mind as our readers are witnessing the effects of the expansion of FM 1093 and the extension of the Westpark Tollway. It is said that rooftops attract businesses and we all surely see this with the continuation of development of communities and retail businesses near the central Fulshear area, as well as to our North, along FM 1463. We have received many kind comments from our readers about what Fulshear Magazine means to them. We have been honored to hear that a number of readers have collected every issue and many keep their collection displayed proudly on their coffee tables. We are grateful for that trust. Knowing the importance of chronicling the stages of Fulshear’s growth is what keeps us going as we strive to present Fulshear’s best. Thank you for your feedback. Our advertisers are our stalwart advocates and they truly make the publishing and distribution of Fulshear Magazine possible. If you’re reading this, you can thank them for paying the bills. As you support these businesses, you’re supporting access for your community to receive Fulshear Magazine. Fulshear’s transformation is certainly continuing and we are pleased to be a part of it. As the changes take hold to make way for the new, we will continue to do our part to celebrate the best of the Fulshear area by presenting our historic past, while anticipating our hopeful future.

See you this winter!

Daniel McJunkin

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

PUBLISHER - FULSHEAR MAGAZINE

Photo by Katie Mecham


FULSHEAR M

On the Cover

FC

Letter from the Publisher

06

It’s All In The Wood

12

Photo by Katie Mecham

Early Days In Fulshear

The Harris Family

Laprada Landing

A New Style of Country Living

A Place of Healing

A Young Woman’s Second Chance at Life

16 22 26

38

A Time to Recover Open Hands

42 46

Would You Like a Job Outside...

54

Reading, ‘Riting, & ‘Rithmetic

59

The Brookwood Community

63

Homemade Chocolate

67

My Husband Would Own My Shoes,

68

The Community That Continues To Give Back HobNob Biscuits

But I Wouldn’t Own His Left Boot

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MAGAZINE STAFF DANIEL M c JUNKIN Publisher

KATIE MECHAM Art Director

Media Director

JACLYN RITTER SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND Associate Editor Chamber Consultant

PRODUCTION STAFF SHAY TIDWELL BONNIE M c FERREN Bookkeeping

51

A History of Fulshear’s Early School Days

I

Production Manager

Growth and Improvement Making $500,000 Per Year?

Z

DON M c COY

Still Wild, Still Untamed

Restoring Faith After the Flood

A

Associate Editor

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The Brazos River

G

JENNI M c JUNKIN

Get Your Motor Runnin’

With the West Ender’s Car Club

A

Supporting Fulshear’s Finest

70

Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce Directory

74

TRACY MILLER Accounting

JOSEPH SONNIER IT Consultant

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS TERRY CROCKETT CJ McDANIEL DANIEL M c JUNKIN JACLYN RITTER SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND KAREN VAN HOLTEN

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS FIONA CUNNIGHAM LISA FRANKS JEFF HEGER KATIE MECHAM RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY JACLYN RITTER ANDREA WILTSE

FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC GEORGE LANE & DANIEL M c JUNKIN Principals

WWW.FULSHEAR.COM

FULSHEAR MAGAZINE 281-973-0633

4017 Penn Lane, Fulshear, TX 77441 © Copyright 2016 - Fulshear Media Partners, LLC All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Photo by Jaclyn Ritter

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IT’S ALL IN TH E WOOD

12

IT’S ALL IN THE

WOOD WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

TREES

– truly some of Mother Nature’s greatest works of art. While some art forms last a lifetime preserved in a pristine gallery, others are exposed to the elements. JAMES PHILLIPS prolongs these once proud and stoic trees by turning them into lasting statues. A self-taught tree and wood carver, James uses chainsaws, chisels and his imagination to find the delicate sculpture within the sturdy trunk and its branches. What began as an unexpected return to his artistic roots soon became a full-time career that would have him in high demand all around the state of Texas – even right here in Fulshear!

APPRECIATION OF THE ARTS James developed an early appreciation of the arts. “My mother signed herself up for drawing classes at the Museum of Art in Houston and dragged me along with her,” he says with a smile. He also credits his high school teachers for harnessing and developing his artistic ability and not stunting his creativity. This early hobby turned into a passion over the coming years.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Upon completing his education, James was derailed temporarily from his passion. He had to make a living and support his family, so he took up a job selling industrial parts and supplies in and around the city of Houston. Thirty rewarding years went by, but little did James know that a particular summer day in 2005 would derail him once again. Or, maybe that day was what set him back on track. While cutting down a dead tree in his front yard, James found himself inspired. That creative lens resurfaced and, suddenly, he was not looking at just a dead tree but at a sculpture just waiting to be discovered within. What emerged from the stump hours later was truly an unexpected masterpiece – an ornate sculpture of a pelican. The fire was lit, and he became addicted.


“IF THE CLIENT DOESN’T K N O W W H AT T H E Y WA N T SCULPTED, I JUST TELL THEM IT WILL END UP BEING EITHER A FISH OR A NAKED WOMAN THEN.”

13

For over a year, James was without a gallery. It was thanks to island resident, Donna Liebbert, that James saw the light at the end of the tunnel. Galveston lost thousands of trees to Ike, and Donna was determined to save them. Showing resiliency in a time of destruction was the city’s plan. That is where James stepped in. He began carving the fallen trees. In fact, the first one he did was a Dalmatian dog in front of city hall. One of his most popular pieces stands proudly in front of the King Vidor house at the corner of 17th and Winnie. Named after a Hollywood producer who directed “The Wizard of Oz,” James appropriately sculpted the Tin Man and Toto. In no time at all, James had carved over 25 sculptures around the island at both businesses and private properties. They were such a big hit that the Galveston Historical Foundation’s Visitor Center set up a tree sculpture tour, complete with pamphlets and tour buses! By this time, James was unable to keep up with his full time job and was proud to turn his passion into his career.

FINDING SUPPORT IN GALVESTON James spent evenings and weekends indulging in his new found hobby. In 2006, James was accepted to display his work in Galveston at the Simply Art Gallery located at 25th Street and the Strand. Word spread of his talent and pieces began flying off the shelves. That is, until September of 2008 when Hurricane Ike descended upon the city of Galveston, wiping out the gallery.

JAMES

PHILLIPS

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WOOD CARVER


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F I N D I N G H I S WAY T O F U L S H E A R

IT’S ALL IN TH E WOOD

Fulbrook developer, Doug Konopka, was one of the many admirers of James’ work. So much so, that in 2010 he contacted James personally to see about carving two beautiful 100 year old pecan trees that stood in the median islands of Fulbrook. Keeping with the community’s nature centered feel, it only made sense to preserve the dying trees rather than cut them down. James truly outdid himself by sculpting one into a beautifully perched owl and the other into an eagle with his wings stretched wide and ready to take flight – a process that took him two long weeks. Sadly, both have since collapsed due to too much moisture. However, James has since made several more trips to the Fulshear area to work his magic for inspired residents. A beautiful horse sculpture can be found in downtown Fulshear on 2nd street. Others pieces in and around town include herons, a jack rabbit and owls, just to name a few. While these pieces are on private property, if you keep your eyes on the lookout while driving around town you are sure to see some.

Photo by Jaclyn Ritter

Photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

IT’S ALL IN THE WOOD What is it about this particular form of art that James Phillips is drawn to? “It doesn’t matter what shape you whittle it into, the wood is always gorgeous – all of the grains, different colors and variations.” James continues by saying, “I can’t really describe it, there is just something about the wood!” And another perk for him is that “there are no rules.” James jokes that he cannot make a picture frame because of the preciseness that it requires; he favors the giving nature of sculpture.

“ E V E R Y P I E C E I H AV E D O N E H A S A S T O R Y , B E C A U S E E I T H E R THE TREE ITSELF OR THE SUBJECT MATTER HAS AN EMOTIONAL MEANING TO T H E C L I E N T . W H E N I A M T O O O L D T O L I F T T H I S S AW , I A M G O I N G T O WRITE A BOOK AND FILL IT WITH THESE STORIES.” With hundreds of sculptures sprawled all over the United States, James insists each one is better than the last. “You know what piece I love the most… it’s the one I am going to do next.” d

WANT TO FIND OUT MORE?

Check out James’ website at

www.inshoresculpture.com

For more information on the

or contact JAMES directly at (832) 243-8473 or

Galveston Tree Sculpture Tour,

René Wiley Studio-Gallery, renewileyart.com

the Galveston Island Visitor’s Center or www.galveston.com/treesculpturetour

jdp@inshoresculpture.com


EARLY DAYS IN FULSH EAR

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Early Days In Fulshear

THE HARRIS FAMILY WRITTEN BY TERRY CROCKETT

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

efore Weston Lakes, Fulbrook, and the towns of Fulshear and Simonton were here, hundreds of families and individuals were making their way to Texas and more specifically to Fort Bend County. This article chronicles the life of a 15-year-old boy who travelled with family friends on a thousand-mile journey from North Carolina to Texas. He would find his future and build his fortune in our equally-young state. This is the story of the man that would be known in Fort Bend County as Dr. Robert Locke Harris. There are few others whose lives have had such an impact to this area and whose legacy continues through his family.

HARRIS FAMILY

BEGINNINGS

Robert Locke Harris was born in Charlotte, North Carolina on December 14th, 1838. His parents were Dr. Thomas Harris and Elizabeth C. Locke Harris. Robert was the third of five children that were born to this family. His siblings included his older sisters Mary Dorothea and Catherine Olivia, his younger brother Thomas, who died at age three, and his youngest sister, Elizabeth Eugenia.

Robert’s father, Dr. Thomas Harris, was born in North Carolina. He graduated from Transylvania University Medical School in Lexington, Kentucky in 1828 and returned to Charlotte to practice medicine. Shortly thereafter in 1831 he married Elizabeth C. Locke. Robert’s mother, Elizabeth, had also been born in North Carolina. Her ancestors were some of the first Colonial families who came to this country under British rule and had fought for independence from England. Elizabeth’s father was Robert Locke who lived from 1775 to 1818. Dr. Thomas Harris and Elizabeth Locke Harris’ sixteen-year marriage would end tragically with Elizabeth’s sudden and very unexpected death in 1844. In 1846, Dr. Thomas Harris married Mary Byers, the daughter of James Byers of Iredell County North Carolina. Soon, another son, also named Thomas, was born to the family. Just two years into their marriage, in 1848, tragedy struck the family again with the death of Dr. Thomas Harris himself. This left his widow, Mary, to raise five children under the age of 15. It is believed that this overwhelming task may have left her no choice but to ask for help from family and friends. Sadly, it appears that the extra help was not enough and she was forced to foster out her stepchildren.


There are not many family records of the years between 1854 and 1860. However, the 1860 US Census reported Robert Locke Harris, age 23, living with the E.A. Stocking family in Houston – most likely during a break from school. We know that he was, at that time, attending Tulane University Medical School in New Orleans. He graduated from Tulane in 1861.

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THE CIVIL WAR

COMES TO TEXAS The 1850 U.S. Census shows Robert Locke Harris, age 13, living with the Joseph and Jane J.A. Simonton family in Iredell, North Carolina. Mrs. Simonton was the sister of Robert Locke Harris’ stepmother Mary Byers Harris Stinson. It was with the Simonton family that young Robert would travel to Texas just two years later.

Family records indicate that Robert Locke Harris, at age 15, began his journey from Charlotte, North Carolina to the Pittsville, Texas area in 1852. He joined the Joseph Simonton, Irwin and Joel Huggins families as they loaded all of their belongings in covered wagons and headed toward Texas. Most were joining other family members and relatives who had already made the Pittsville and Simonton area their homes. It is easy to visualize the fifteen-year-old Robert Locke Harris participating in the driving of the wagons on this long and treacherous adventure. One of the Harris family keepsakes, brought on this trip by Robert Locke Harris, is a beautiful oil painting of himself and his two older sisters. The painting was rolled up and wrapped in burlap to fare the long trip and watched over by Robert. This family heirloom was eventually hung in Dr. R. L. Harris’ home in Pittsville. It has since been handed down through generations to where it currently resides, in the home of one of Dr. Harris’ great grandchildren in Houston.

Robert’s medical training would be tested throughout his military service as he advanced quickly during ensuing years. On October 11th 1861 he was detailed as Acting Steward in the General Hospital at Galveston. On March 10th, 1862 he was promoted to Hospital Steward by General Hebert. Shortly thereafter, on May 15th, 1862 he was appointed Acting Assistant Surgeon. One year later he was appointed to Assistant Surgeon under command of Major General John Bankhead Magruder. It was during 1863 that Dr. R.L. Harris participated in the Battle of Galveston to recover Galveston, Texas for the Confederacy.

FAMILY Painting Above: Robert Locke Harris and his two sisters. Photo on Left: Harris family on the porch of their home. Photo on Right: Harris & Huggins families on the porch of the Churchill Fulshear mansion. Back row (L to R) – Emma Horlock Harris (wife of Eugene Harris), Laura Huggins (wife of John Huggins), John Huggins (derby hat), Sallie Bright Holliday Harris, Ed Harris, Dr. Robert Locke “R.L.” Harris (hat), Eugene Augustus Harris (derby hat), Annie Bains Huggins (right front post – wife of Ed Huggins and mother of “Nooxie”), Robbie Pinkney Hunter Harris (left front post – wife of Robert Dudley Harris), Francis Harris (child front center dark dress), E.M. “Nooxie” Huggins II (child front right with sailor hat). Photo on Facing Page: Back Row (L to R)- Frances Wilson Harris, Dr. Robert Locke “R.L.” Harris, Edward Dimmitt, Sallie Bright Holliday Harris, John Huggins Harris (baby). Front Row - Titus Holliday Harris, Tennessee Margaret Harris and Hunter Pinkney Harris.

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ROBERT LOCKE HARRIS

After his graduation from Medical School, Dr. Robert Locke (“RL”) Harris went into the service of the Confederate Army where he served as a medical officer at a hospital in Houston and subsequently on board a patrol ship off the coast of Texas. According to a hand written letter from Dr. R.L. Harris, he enlisted as a Private in the 2nd Texas Regiment on the 13th day of August 1861.


FAMILY RELATIONS Harris-Huggins-Simonton One important family document that indicates Dr. Harris’ level of commitment during his service is a hand written letter he wrote, dated April 19th, 1865. This letter was written to his commander requesting a 30 day leave of absence to visit his “home in Fort Bend County Texas distance from this camp seventy-five miles.” In the letter he explains that he has been in the service for three years and 10 months and has never before requested a leave of absence. After the War ended, Dr. RL Harris came back to Pittsville, which was located approximately three miles north of the current town of Fulshear. Here, he would apply his medical knowledge in service to his community while building his family and his future in this young and growing community.

LIFE AFTER

THE WAR Dr. R.L. Harris had many friends in the Pittsville area who were willing to provide him lodging upon his return from the war. He soon began making house calls travelling atop a horse that was provided to him by a friend. There was a great need for a doctor in the area and his kindness and generosity soon became well known. Shortly after returning home, Dr. Harris was married to Francis Huggins, who had also traveled with the same group of families from North Carolina in 1852. They established their home in Pittsville, Texas. A deed filed in Fort Bend County dated January 23, 1867, documents a fourteen-acre tract of land owned by P.T. (Pennington Tucker) Wade and Lucretia Wade being sold to R.L. Harris for $450. In the deed, the property is described as being located at “the North East Corner of the Pittsville tract.” It is believed that this was the first tract of land that Dr. R.L. Harris acquired and that it eventually became the place where the family’s large Victorian style Harris home was built. The property is located near what is now the northeast corner of the intersection of FM 359 and Jordan Road, just north of downtown Fulshear. Family members have noted that only 15 to 20 years ago, one could walk back into the underbrush where the house once stood and find the brick walls of the cistern and rolled up blue tin from the roof.

THE HARRIS FAMILY

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

GROWS Dr. Robert Locke “R.L.” Harris and Francis Huggins Harris had two sons who also became doctors. One son, Dr. Eugene Augustus Harris, practiced medicine in Navasota, while the other, Dr. Robert Dudley Harris, practiced in Fulshear, Texas. It is believed that Eugene Augustus was named after the youngest sister of Dr. R.L. Harris, Eugenia and Augustus was the middle name of Francis’ father Joel Augustus Huggins. Robert Dudley was most likely named after his father Robert, and Dudley I. Huggins, a younger brother of Francis. Their first son, Dr. Eugene Augustus, married Emma Horlock in 1897 in Navasota, Texas. They had two children, daughters Francis, born in 1898, and Eloise, born in 1900.

Dr. Robert Locke “R.L.” Harris & Sallie.

Their second son, Dr. Robert Dudley Harris, married Robbie Pinkney Hunter January 8th, 1893 and as of the 1900 US Census had son Robert Locke Harris (1869-1984) and daughter Ruth D. Harris (1898- 1905). Shortly after the Census in November of 1900 another son, Eugene Augustus Harris (1900- 1974), was born.

FAMILY LOSSES &

NEW BEGINNINGS Dr. R.L. Harris’ wife, Francis Huggins Harris, passed away from Yellow Fever or Malaria on October 11, 1878 at the young age of 32. She is buried in the Fulshear Cemetery within the Huggins Family plot next to the Harris Family plot. Shortly thereafter, Dr. R.L. Harris entered into his second marriage with Emma Quinn who was killed in an accident in 1880, not long after the birth of their son Thomas. Tragically, baby Thomas also passed shortly after birth. The 1880 U.S. Federal Census reported only Dr. R.L. Harris, Eugene and Robert Dudley living in the Harris home. On November 12, 1884, Sallie Bright Holliday of Millican, Texas, became Dr. Harris’ third wife. Sallie was the granddaughter of John F. Crawford, a land grant holder in the Republic of Texas. She became the mother of nine children. However, only seven of their children survived. Their names were: Edward Dimmitt, Hunter Pinkney, Francis Wilson, Titus Holliday, Tennessee Margaret, John Huggins, and Joy Mary. Four of Dr. Harris’ sons, Eugene Augustus, Robert Dudley, Titus and John, followed in their father’s footsteps and became doctors. Two of his grandsons, Robert Locke and Hunter P. Harris Jr., and one great grandson, Hunter P. Harris III, also chose the medical profession.

HIS LAND In addition to the first recorded deed in 1867, documenting Dr. R.L. Harris’ purchase of fourteen acres near Pittsville from the Wade Family, there were many more acquisitions that followed. Between 1867 and 1880 he bought land from individuals including Churchill Fulshear, T.P. Matthews, Walter Andrus, Elizabeth Shiere, R.A. Weston, R.I. Haskins, J.V. Everett, Ned Clark and Thomas Cooper.


LAND PURCHASES

P.T. Wade - Churchill Fulshear - T.P. Mathews - Walter Andrus Elizabeth Shiere - R.A. Weston - R.I. Haskins J.V. Everett - Ned Clark - Thomas Cooper

During this time, Dr. Harris’ focus seemed to be on acquiring land along the western edge of the Fulshear League as well as the northeastern and southeastern portion of the adjoining John Randon League. It is estimated that he ultimately owned anywhere from two to three thousand acres out of the John Randon League. The southern portion of the Randon League is where the developments Fulbrook and Weston Lakes sit today. According to a land survey of the Fulshear League, completed after Churchill Fulshear’s death in 1892, Dr. R.L. Harris owned a majority of the western portion of the Churchill Fulshear League, totaling over 1,000 acres and giving him an estimated total land holding of at least 4,000 acres. The family is quick to share many fond memories of the “Harris Ranch” where the farming was very rich and many families earned their livelihoods. Dr. R.L. Harris was considered one of the largest and most successful planters of the Brazos bottoms. It is known that on his farms sat dozens of neat cottages, occupied by laborers and their families. According to a descendant of one of these individuals, there was a dedicated train stop on the Harris Ranch due to the volume of goods that were grown and shipped out of this location. Additionally, the road we all know as James Lane today was actually the road that wagons traveled to the Brazos River to load their products onto boats.

HIS PASSING &

HIS LEGACY Dr. Robert Locke Harris was known by many. Spending the better part of fifty years in Fort Bend County, he touched countless lives in many different ways. With a strong love of the outdoors, he lived a very active and prosperous life. It was in January 1905, while out and about on his plantation, that he suffered a kick from a horse that resulted in the breaking of his arm. It is reported that the broken arm was not the most serious trauma. However, while attempting to recover from that event, his body was unable to fight off other illnesses. Having not fully recovered, the decision was made to travel to New York to seek the best medical treatment available at that time. He was accompanied to New York by his son, Dr. Eugene Harris, and his family, wife Sallie and two of their daughters. He had surgery on a Monday and two days later passed away. By the following Sunday, the family had returned to Pittsville with Dr. R.L. Harris’ body, which they placed in his home to be viewed. As reported in the Houston Post article from 1905, there were thousands of people from more than 20 towns who attended his funeral. People of all races gathered to honor the great man who had for so many years shown all people he met respect and kindness. There were those in attendance who had lived their entire lives on the Harris Plantation. Those who spoke at his funeral spent time sharing their thoughts about his unselfishness and caring nature. The Pall Bearers were Sam Gordon, G.E. Baines, William McGauhey, W.L. Nesbitt, F.R. Fields and Samuel McJunkin. It is fitting to end with excerpts from an article written about Dr. R.L. Harris’ funeral. “Floral tributes came from many

states, but none of them were more beautiful, purer or emitted a rarer fragrance than the life he lived. Fulshear, Fort Bend County and the State of Texas has suffered a loss irreparable, but mankind in general is the poorer, while eternity, embracing as it does such noble spirits, is bound to be richer and the more desirable, while the example of such a life is sure to prove a signal light upon the tower of time for the guidance of younger generations.”

The Harris family history has been well preserved and now kindly shared by his great grandchildren. My hope is that Dr. Robert Locke “R.L.” Harris’ contributions, and his legacy, continues to live on through this article. I trust the information and pictures contained in this article were a delight to you as they were to me when I first began researching his life story. This article would not have been possible without the involvement of his great granddaughter, Constance Harris Seger. d

Harris Family Home

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Dr. R.L. Harris’ first recorded land purchase from Churchill Fulshear was in 1873, where he paid $2,500 cash for 340 acres out of the western edge of the original Fulshear League. In addition to the cash purchases, Dr. Harris also took advantage of owner financing on several parcels including a 198 ½ acre purchase from R.I. Haskins in 1879 with a purchase price of $825. He paid $600 down and $225 was due at the end of twelve months, carrying a ten percent rate of interest.


LAPRADA LANDING

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A NEW STYLE OF COUNTRY LIVING

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

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WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF HEGER

hat was it about the city of Fulshear that drew you in? For many, it was Fulshear’s small town feel and undeniable charm. It is here where families can acquire sizable property and experience a bit of the country, all while being a short drive away from the city and its multitude of amenities. As Houston continues to push westward and Fulshear grows, open acreage become harder to come by. Nestled along a bend in the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers that much needed escape from busy city life. This Highland Resources property, located just three miles southeast of Fulshear, is unlike anything else. With 720 acres divided into just nine tracts, buyers will

have the unique opportunity to let their imaginations run wild. The vast views of wildlife, flowers and mature trees draped in delicate Spanish moss overlooking the river, paint a picture of nature at its finest. Whether it be intended as the family ranch, or a second home away from downtown, Laprada Landing is what everyone is talking about.

LAND RICH IN HISTORY

Laprada is no ordinary piece of land, it is part of Texas’ rich history. Its unique narrative begins in 1824 when David Randon and Isaac Pennington acquired land from Stephen F. Austin, joining the prominent group of


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“THE MORE TRANQUIL A MAN BECOMES, THE GREATER IS HIS SUCCESS, HIS INFLUENCE,

HIS POWER FOR GOOD. CALMNESS OF MIND IS ONE OF THE BEAUTIFUL JEWELS OF WISDOM.”

While they could easily sell to a residential developer who would likely strip away the property of its charm, displacing the wildlife and thinning out the trees, Highland has chosen to divide the acreage into nine tracts, ranging from 60 to 105 acres. “We have owned this property for over thirty years, so we have had a long time to think about its future,” says Charles Wolcott, President and CEO. “It was never in the cards to do a development property, it is just too pretty.” In fact,

they have incorporated protective covenants within the deed to ensure that the location remains secluded and not built up like the tightly packed communities nearby. For example, only one residence is allowed per 60 acres and every home site must be set back off the road a minimum of 300 feet. Highland is so proud of the property’s legacy, that they have taken it a step further and applied through the Fort Bend Historical Commission for a historical marker. They are pleased to say that just recently they have been accepted. The marker will be called the Randon and Pennington Grant of 1824. Charles is pleased knowing that it is no longer hearsay, it is proven historic record. “We hope that by acquiring this historical marker people see the deep history tied to the property and that they are not just buying a piece of ranch land, but a piece of Texas history.”

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Texas’ first settlers – the Old Three Hundred. Randon and his wife Nancy McNeel ran a successful plantation on the property until 1859 when they sold the land. After being passed through a few more hands over the years, Highland acquired the 2,000 acres in the late 1970’s. After thirty years of cattle ranching operations, the decision was made to market the southernmost 720 acres.

JAMES ALLEN


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NATURE AT ITS FINEST

LAPRADA LANDING

“We are excited to be involved with this property,” shares Gloria Catalani, operations manager at Highland. “I even find myself escaping the city and relaxing amongst the vast wilderness just to get away from the day to day strife.” This comes as no surprise because the aura of Laprada Landing is truly magical. There the air smells sweeter, the grass is greener and the stars seem to shine brighter. Situated on newly named Laprada Trace, a county road that dead-ends within Laprada Landing, buyers can rest assured that there will be no through traffic. Majestic pecans, live oaks and water oaks cover the property. In the spring, the area is draped in color thanks to the beautiful Texas wildflowers. “The river is the large selling point – the gem,” says Charles. There are no land locked tracts. All nine front a large stretch of the Brazos and have buildable home sites. The land is perpetually preserved and protected from dense development as portions of this property are within floodway and floodplain delineations that were finalized by FEMA in 2014. Highland was looking for a name as unique as the property itself – something evocative of the feel of the land. Laprada is a play on words of the Spanish word la pradera, meaning meadow. The name has since been trademarked as to remain unique to the property.

PRIME LOCATION

“We want to be different than anything else in the area, but still blend in,” notes Gloria. “We are working to create understated country elegance in a unique and secluded location.” Located right around the corner from the highly sought after Fulshear area, and only 40 miles west of Houston, there will be no sacrifice of the desirable amenities city living brings. Residents will be minutes from local stores and restaurants. This kind of property is hard to find. Laprada Landing is a place you can go to escape, to breathe, to be closer with nature – and call home. A place with as rich a history as this is meant to be preserved and enjoyed. It is now time for a new generation to be part of that legacy. d

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Houston

For more information about LAPRADA LANDING contact

BILL BLYTHE at (713) 829-3465 or D. LEIGH MARTIN at (713) 835-9839 with MARTHA TURNER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

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F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Katy


THE STORY OF A YOUNG WOMAN’S SECOND CHANCE AT LIFE

Photo By Rhonda Renee Photography

A PLACE OF H EALING

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A Place of Healing F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

W

hen life gets difficult we all tend to try and get away, distance ourselves from those stresses and uncertainties. We look for a place that brings comfort and allows us time to heal both mentally and physically. For local resident Sarah Hughes, her own home was that much needed oasis in between endless stays in the hospital.

Mother’s Intuition

Doctors told Fiona Cunningham that she delivered a strong and healthy baby girl. She had ten fingers and toes, a good birth weight and a healthy complexion

- only Fiona knew something was wrong. She noticed that her daughter’s lymph nodes were enlarged, and on top of that, little Sarah looked abnormally swollen. Doctors assured the new mom that all was well and sent the happy family home. Symptoms progressed, Sarah had red and swollen joints, high fevers and strange rashes. At eleven months of age Sarah was diagnosed with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA), an autoimmune disease that leaves the immune system aggressively overactive. Other symptoms began popping up, including a loss of appetite, elephant-man looking hives, anaphylaxis, and what they thought were extreme migraines that left Sarah laying inconsolable on the wood floor.


Time to Move

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Sarah’s case was proving to be more complicated than they had originally thought. It was suggested that Fiona leave their home in Michigan and transfer to Houston where they could be near top-notch medical care. When Sarah was two years old they packed their bags and headed south. Fiona desperately hoped that the move would be the answer to their prayers.

1992 - Sarah with Fiona on Georgie Porgy

While the doctors and hospitals were downtown, Fiona wanted their home to be a place of peace. Having grown up in England, surrounded by animals and riding horses practically since birth, Fiona sought out a home amongst the country roads and green acreages. That is how they fell upon Fulshear! Having a place out and away from it all proved to be exactly what Sarah needed. Young Sarah began school at Simonton Christian Academy, only to leave shortly after due to her growing health problems. After trying out a few schools closer to town they eventually accepted that Sarah would benefit more from home tutoring. “I have not had normal socialization,” notes Sarah. “All of my friends were doctors, nurses and other medical professionals.” Her short time spent in school led to brutal teasing and bullying from the other classmates. As her mom, Fiona tried to fight off the negativity and turn things around for Sarah. “School is often where you define who you are as a person, and Sarah never got that opportunity,” Fiona says. She did everything in her power to shower Sarah with love and make her feel worthy of that love. But there is no denying the importance of childhood friends.

1998 - Sarah Age 7 in her neck brace with cover on it to make it pretty

Sarah found friendship in her horse Stirling Bridge. “They have a bond like no other,” smiles Fiona. “Sarah was there when Stirling was born and was in fact the first one the horse laid eyes on.” The two of them were inseparable. There was no judgement or snide comments, just the unconditional love of an animal.

A Turn for the Worse

Still, the news of her aunt was painful. The mother daughter team leaned heavily on one another and pushed through the dark time together with more determination and drive to fight than ever. It was this tenacity that got her through what was right around the corner. By the age of 18 Sarah was diagnosed with severe dysautonomia which led to spontaneous spinal fluid leaks, produced severe migraines, dropped her blood pressure as low as 40/0 and affected the neurotransmitters in the brain that regulate the autonomic nervous system. On top of that, Sarah had been diagnosed with narcolepsy and common variable immunodeficiency. 2013 - Sarah - age 22 Miss JIA Face of Arthritis - Arthritis Foundation

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2010 - Sarah age 19 being extubated finally getting out of the woods from a bout with sepsis

Sarah’s health took a bad turn after the loss of her aunt Sarah Jane, her mother’s identical twin. The two were very close, both fighting for their lives against SJIA. This came as a painful reminder of the severity of the disease – it literally was a death sentence. Fiona noticed that the once positive and determined girl became extremely paranoid and depressed. Doctor’s kept chalking it up to post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as a result of the upsetting loss. After some digging, they learned that it was all related to folates, a form of folic acid that helps transport single carbon units between molecules. It was not that Sarah’s body had difficulty producing them, but instead that her body had created an antibody that prohibited it from even entering the brain. This was a huge discovery! Finding this particular antibody has already helped doctors diagnose it in others experiencing similar symptoms.


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Sarah’s body was unable to mask the pain and stress of chemotherapy treatments and the 20 plus different medications any longer. Now just eighty three pounds and weaker than ever, Sarah spent her days lying flat in bed. She was ultimately contained to a life indoors and hospital rooms. She had no energy and little desire for the things that once made her happy. “Stirling began to act out, he wasn’t receiving the attention he needed and he missed his Sarah.” Fiona adds, “When kids are this sick, if you take everything away from them they have nothing to live for. That is why I never told Sarah she couldn’t ride. Unfortunately I knew it was in Sarah’s and Stirling’s best interests that he find a temporary new home and to accept reality that Sarah would probably never be able to be around her beloved horse again.”

2014 - (L-R) Tucker Beau Hyatt, Sarah, Fiona, Linsey Hyatt - 1 day post stem cells

Over the years Fiona has had to endure numerous “keep her comfortable” speeches, something no mom ever wants to hear. When asked how she coped through all these years of nonstop doctor visits, hospitalizations and medications she replied, “You have to stay really positive!” Fiona continues, “I would let myself cry only when I was alone, but in front of Sarah I was strong. We found the positivity in everything.”

Hope on the Horizon Now 22 years old, Sarah’s atrophied muscles had left her weak and nearly a skeleton. Her body was shutting down. As Fiona put it, “She didn’t long for the world anymore.” On December 17th, 2013, the day started as any other, however it ended with a glimmer of hope. Sarah’s doctors’ appointments had taken longer than expected during the day and so Fiona ended up having to take Sarah with her to an evening meeting at the home of Houston philanthropists, Dr. Ahmad Taleghany and his lovely wife, Mrs. Azar Taleghany. Through a chance encounter with renowned neurologist, Dr. Jamil Lotfi, and one amazing phone call with Dr. Stanley Jones, Fiona learned about high dose autologous (one’s own) stem cell therapy, made possible by Houston-based biotechnology company, Celltex Therapeutics Corporation.

2014 - Sarah & Tucker during stem cell infusion

“Sarah had literally tried all available medical treatments in the USA and I was told that high-dose adult stem cell therapy might be a last hope,” Fiona says. “While Sarah was not a candidate for donor cells, due to her over-active immune system and the fact that she is highly allergic to anti-rejection drugs, these would be her own mesenchymal stem cells making them more likely to be accepted by her body.”

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“I was scared,” continues Fiona. “Sarah was so weak and fragile that her doctors and I thought the trip to Cancun might kill her, but we really did not have another option. Ultimately, it came down to what Sarah wanted.”

2015 - Big Ben (therapy dog) & Sarah in the blue bonnets

“I knew that this was not living,” says Sarah. “No matter the outcome, and I knew the possibilities, it was certainly worth a try.” With the go ahead from Sarah, Fiona dove in head first researching Celltex Therapeutics, their capabilities, quality control and processes before coming to the final decision. Fiona explored requesting permission from the FDA to allow Sarah to receive her stem cells in a Houston based hospital as she was too sick

2016 - Sarah & Stirling Photo By Rhonda Renee Photography


FIONA & SARAH

Photo By Rhonda Renee Photography

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Sarah was the first of two young Americans to receive high dose autologous mesenchymal stem cells. The other was Tucker Beau, a six year old boy from Houston. Despite the age difference, the two bonded over their severe SJIA and Dysautonomia. Doctors noticed that Tucker was beginning to go down Sarah’s path, and they knew that it was a grim one, so they paired them up to experience the adventure together. Tucker flew to Cancun, Mexico to undergo his first infusion in August of 2014, while Sarah and Fiona waited anxiously for the results. It was a success! This gave them the hope and energy needed to make the trip themselves a few months later. Tucker and his mom, Linsey Hyatt, traveled with Sarah and Fiona to Cancun, Mexico to undergo his second and Sarah’s first infusion in November of 2014. “The team of doctors at Celltex were amazing! Upon my arrival they had already memorized my chart,” remembers Sarah. Fiona continues by saying, “The team was very diligent and best of all – they cared and were completely prepared for a fragile and complicated patient.”

Sarah receives approximately 600 million MSCs (mesenchymal stem cells) during each IV infusion cycle. This quantity is split between three infusions over the course of eight days. Celltex Chairman and CEO David Eller expounds on the process by explaining that, “MSCs have the remarkable potential of migrating to different parts of the body, recognizing sites of injury and inflammation, and are then able to reduce inflammation and repair the damaged tissue.”

“I went into the first infusion with a positive outlook, but to be honest, I invested hope in so many previous treatments that failed, I had learned not to get my hopes up,” explains Sarah. Only this time Sarah got the outcome she wanted – a positive and noticeable difference. That one chance encounter and one late night phone call was the beginning of a new journey for Sarah and her mother – a journey of hope.

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and fragile to travel abroad. Unfortunately the time required to process such a request was longer than Sarah had left, as she was beginning to go downhill really fast. “It was Sarah’s decision to travel to Mexico for her stem cells, a decision we have never looked back on!”


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A New Life Up until this point Sarah lived a life of pain and disappointment. For 23 years Fiona lived in fear, constantly having to stand strong and fight for her daughter’s life in spite of the medical realities of Sarah’s condition and heartbreaking prognosis of premature death. After the first infusion Sarah’s life changed. She began to see improvements that would seem small to most, but to her they were worthy of celebration. For the first time Sarah felt hunger! After being artificially fed most of her life she had lost this simple sensation many of us take for granted. Can you imagine spending over twenty years without the taste of your mother’s home cooked lasagna, or your favorite chocolatey dessert? Not only did Sarah miss out on birthday cakes and holiday goodies, she actually never knew the sensation of hunger! Thanks to her Celltex stem cells, Sarah no longer needs a feeding tube or IV nutrition as she is able to eat normally and absorb nutrients on her own. This last year Sarah has continued to experience improvements. Sarah’s spinal cord leaks grew smaller and then eventually stopped all together. Her joint problems and inflammations too have disappeared. “My bad days are now better than my absolute best pre-stem cell days,” smiles Sarah. “I am able to do so much more than my doctors or I ever imagined possible.” Since undergoing Celltex stem cell therapy Sarah has not been hospitalized or immune suppressed and her doctors say she and Tucker Beau have made medical history. Sarah and Tucker have remained the closest of friends, becoming each other’s cheerleaders. They can often be found sporting matching Batman shirts, showcasing their combined fight to freedom against a disease that has taken so much of their childhoods. They continue to travel to Mexico together for their infusions, supporting one another and celebrating each other’s successes. This last year has been one of many firsts. Sarah is grateful she has been able to enjoy every holiday of 2015 at home with family instead of in a hospital room. She is also excited about her new found love of baking. Enjoying all the flavors, seasonings and spices that make up food is something she will never take for granted. Walking along a white sand beach and swimming with the dolphins were once on Sarah’s bucket list. Just months after receiving her first round of stem cells, Sarah did exactly this, her mom alongside her capturing every second on camera.

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Even better, in April of 2015 Sarah brought her horse Stirling Bridge back home. That was a special day that will not soon be forgotten. There is something that animals can bring out in us that people cannot, and that is why Sarah took solace in him throughout her early years and again today. Fiona loves seeing a strong Sarah, one who is finding her own identity and way in the world. All the years of fighting back tears, fighting diagnoses and fighting for normalcy has been worth it. While she has experienced what no mom would wish upon another, she has handled it with grace and poise. If it weren’t for Sarah’s perseverance and positivity, something so greatly instilled in her by her mother, her story would be different. While Sarah’s journey is not over, it surely is headed in the right direction. For now, Sarah is content being home in Fulshear, her place of calm - her place of healing. d

“Sarah has had the same doctors since the very beginning. They collaborated and worked together as a team to keep Sarah strong during the times it would have been so easy to give up. “If Sarah had not had the quality of care she has had here in Houston, she would have died by the age of 5,” Fiona notes. The doctors have learned a lot from Sarah, things that they can continue to study and use to help others. Sarah is in numerous medical journals and is currently being followed by CNN. Her story will go on to help thousands!”

THANK YOU We owe so much to Sarah’s amazing team of specialists here in the Houston Medical Center: Pediatric Neurologist, Dr. Ian J. Butler, Pediatric Immunologists, Drs. Susan Pacheco and Carla Davis, Pediactric Cardiologist, Dr. Mohammed Numan, Pediatric Rheumatologists, Drs. Ankur Kamdar and Maria Perez, Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Dr. Barbara Reid, Gastroenterologist, Dr. Andrew DuPont, Pediatric PharmD, Chi Peyton, Dr. Sergio Rosenzweig at the National Institute of Health in Maryland, and Drs. Stanley C. Jones and Jane Young of Celltex in Houston and Drs. Gabriel Salazar and Ana Herrera J. Camarillo of Hospital Galenia in Cancun, Mexico. Optic Immunologist: Dr. Susan Wittenberg and Pediatric Ophthalmologist, Dr. Fernando Romero.

Celltex has been initiating breakthroughs in regenerative medicine since it was founded in 2011 by CEO David Eller and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Stan Jones, using proprietary technology to isolate, grow and cryopreserve (bank) hundreds of millions of autologous mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs, for therapeutic use. Celltex is committed to leading the United States into the future of regenerative medicine through adult stem cells. Its industry leadership and visionary approach continue to drive the company to improve the quality of life of thousands of individuals, with a concerted focus to make this therapy accessible to all in the near future.

CELLTEX THERAPEUTICS

(713) 590-1000 • info@celltexbank.com


C L U B M E M B E R S MARK & LISA HAAG’S 1963 ROLLS ROYCE

GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNIN’

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Get Your Motor Runnin’ WITH THE WEST ENDER’S CAR CLUB

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

Do you remember your first car?

Many of us remember pulling out of our driveways for the first time on our own and experiencing a small taste of freedom. We compared cars in the school parking lot and dreamed of one day having a sleek sports car. In a blink of an eye we find ourselves older and often proud owners of a practical car – a van or SUV for hauling the

kids and dogs around town, or a small eco-friendly one to save on the daily commute. For some, cars grew to be so much more than just a way to get from point A to point B; they became a culture, a lifestyle. The West Enders Car Club is comprised of men and women from varying backgrounds and careers who have a passion for cars.


Forming & Organizing

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THE CLUB George Kelley, a resident of Weston Lakes and club founder, is a self-described “gearhead” who hails from Detroit. “I got my first hot rod in 1962,” shares George. “A ’31 Ford sport coupe (cabriolet) body with a later flathead Mercury engine.” Through the years, George could not help but notice the surprising number of classic cars throughout the Fulshear area. The idea of a club--whose purpose was simply to get the local car folks together to share the collector car experience, help each other with technical support and go to car shows--was born. George and his friend Jim Lovelace put a blurb in the community newsletter seeking others, like themselves, who have an interest in cars and would like to see this idea up and running. To their surprise, roughly twenty people showed up for the initial meeting, and many more indicated an interest.

C L U B F O U N D E R G E O R G E K E L L E Y WITH HIS 1 9 6 7 B U I C K G S C O N V E R T I B LE

The West Enders Car Club has come a long way since George and Jim threw the initial idea on the table. To date, the club is comprised of thirty-five active members with roughly one hundred fifty cars amongst them! And while the club originated in Weston Lakes, it is open to everyone. Current members hail from Simonton, Sealy, Katy and downtown Houston.

Current West Enders president and Valley Lodge resident, Pete Sandy, extrapolates on this by saying, “That’s what is so great about the club; it is a multi-make, multi-year car club.” Pete’s interest in cars began at a young age. “As a kid in London, I was infatuated with the Austin Healey 3000. I managed to buy one in 1968 and had it until we moved to the United States in 1993. After retirement, I just began acquiring more cars--Jaguars, MGs, corvettes and, my favorite, the Austin Healey.” The car club has helped keep Pete active and engaged post retirement from the oil industry. “It’s recreational psychology for me, getting my hands dirty and working on the mechanics of a car.”

F O R M E R C L U B P R E S I D E N T B I L L HEEDE WITH HIS 1940 FORD

“It was an American Graffiti kind of time; it was the culture.”

Former club president and Cross Creek Ranch resident, Bill Heede, can relate. “I grew up in southern California in the 50s, and that is when hot rods were big. I had a Jaguar convertible XK120 in school, and I enjoyed racing it. It was an American Graffiti kind of time; it was the culture.” A culture that Bill and other club members have enjoyed long after it was cool. C L U B M E M B E R M A R K H A A G , H I S 1 9 6 2 CORVETTE, AND HIS DOG SCOUT

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“We have always been an open-format type of club,” emphasizes George Kelley. “We welcome all types of specialty cars: vintage, sports, custom, muscle and exotics.” In fact, members do not have to have a specialty car to join the club. Appreciation is the only requirement.


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Activities & Outings West Ender club members can be seen out and about town on a regular basis. Besides their monthly meetings, they make a habit of cruising around town and grabbing a bite to eat as a group. They can be seen every Saturday morning from 8 to 9:30 on FM1093 in front of Snowflake Donuts. They enjoy coffee and donuts with friends, while showing off their cars and swapping garage stories. A favorite activity amongst the group is attending various car shows around the area. Many of the club’s members even return home with a trophy or two. West Enders Car Club has been the Participating Club Award winner for the last four years in a row at the Wallis Fine Ride car show. They are proud to acknowledge that, while they show their cars individually, they attend the shows as a group. Many members lean on one another for tips and tricks to ready and improve their cars. Chuck Heath, club vice president and owner of Fulshear Car Care, is often their go-to guy.

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C L U B P R E S I D E N T P E T E S A N D Y & H I S 1 9 6 7 AUSTIN HEALEY

“It’s recreational psychology for me, getting my hands dirty and working on the mechanics of a car.”


C L U B M E M B E R D AV E F O S H E E & H I S 1 9 4 1 W I L LY S

Educating Younger Generations While these men and women enjoy the camaraderie and support the club offers, they are actively looking to reach out into the community and educate younger generations on the art of mechanical classic cars. “Our sport and our passion could be dying if we don’t continue to have folks who can work on and appreciate these cars,” says club president Pete Sandy. “Cars of today are all software driven, while ours are mechanical.” Bill Heede adds, “It is difficult to interest the kids of today in these old cars, unless you do it through their fathers and grandfathers.” Club members hope to spread the word. They are actively trying to stock local libraries with books and magazines on classic cars and their mechanics. Members have also reached out to the local high schools to inquire about starting up auto-shop classes. Some have gone as far as offering to donate their cars to the schools for demonstration purposes.

West Enders Car Club is centered on an appreciation and passion for cars. Only by working closely with these kinds of cars can you truly appreciate the little nuances that make each car unique. While camaraderie and technical support are the primary focus, the group hopes to spread the excitement classic cars bring with younger generations. After all, the cars of today will be the antiques of tomorrow. d WA N T T O K N O W MORE ABOUT THE WEST ENDERS CAR CLUB? C O N TA C T B I L L H E E D E AT (847) 980-7246 OR WILLIAMHEEDE@AOL.COM

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George Kelley, member and founder, would like to see the club’s membership expand and draw more young people into an interest in automobiles from both a sport and technical perspective. “Many of the advances in engineering over the last one hundred years were driven by the automotive industry and competition between the manufacturers to keep up with enthusiast demands.”


THE BRAZOS RIVER

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Still Wild, Still Untamed

THE BRAZOS RIVER WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE DAVE MULLINS’COLLECTION

A place cannot stand separate from its history; neither can it stand apart from its geography. As we witnessed this past Memorial weekend, the Brazos River—the most important river that flows through Fort Bend County— has a story to tell.

Geography of the River

Named Rio de los Brazos de Dios (River of the Arms of God) by early Spanish explorers, the Brazos was, most likely, the first water stumbled upon by these thirsty explorers. Falling into the arms of God seems an appropriate response and attribute to the favor of life-giving water.

With a total length of about 840 miles, the Brazos is the longest river in Texas and the 11th longest in the United States. As it courses from its headwater source at the head of Blackwater Draw, Curry County, New Mexico to the Gulf of Mexico, the river flows diagonally northwest to southeast through the center of Texas. Initially running east towards Dallas-Fort Worth, the Brazos then turns south and passes through Waco and Baylor University campus. Eventually, it makes its way into Fort Bend County, where it then drains the broad central valley by way of numerous creeks and bayous.

Taming the River

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Over the years, there were various efforts to domesticate the river with jetties, locks and dams. By the 1890s, engineers offered the first serious flood proposals, involving jetties meant to concentrate the flow of floodwater and deepen the channel through scouring action. Unfortunately, those jetties tended to wash away. In 1905, the Rivers and Harbors Act provided funds for the US Army Corps of Engineers to build a series of locks and dams on the Brazos just south of Waco to make it navigable and less prone to flooding.

futile. Storm upon storm in the fall of that year left rivers swollen and water standing in fields. On the morning of December 5, 1913, widespread and heavy rain began to fall again. It fell hard and long across a huge swath of Central Texas. The torrential rainfall added to already swollen waters of the Brazos River. Rainwater gushed into creeks and bayous. Tributaries spilled into the Brazos. The water surged. As the river swelled, it engulfed and overwhelmed its banks. Two became one, as the Brazos actually met and joined with the Colorado River, forming one monstrous watercourse that flooded more that 3,000 square miles of land, causing the deaths of at least 177 people and inflicting massive property damage. The crest measured at 56.40’. This flood of 1913 also caused the Brazos River to change its course and empty into the Gulf of Mexico at Freeport, east of its previous western path.

Managing the River

The flood of 1913 served as catalyst for the state to begin a serious attempt to tame the Brazos. The Brazos River Authority was created by the Texas Legislature in 1929 and, according to its website, was the “first State agency in the United States created specifically for the purpose of developing and managing the water resources of an entire river basin.” The agency, along with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), operates gauges at strategic locations on the river that can anticipate the rates of flow and the volume of water that may be headed our way. Artificial lakes, or reservoirs, have been formed by constructing dams across the Brazos, which help to control the water level in the river. The dams control the amount of water that flows out of reservoirs. While there are a total of 19 major reservoirs located along the Brazos, four of these—Possum Kingdom Lake, Lake Granbury, Lake Whitney, and Lake Brazos in Waco— have a direct effect on the water level in the Brazos, as it runs through Fort Bend County.

In good seasons, the flooding river offers organic material to produce fertility out of parched land. But, there are those other seasons…

But, history tells its own tale. And Nature, no matter how well engineered, cannot be entirely subdued. Rivers will always find their own way. And this is the tale that the Brazos River will tell. d

In December 1913, a devastating confluence of events rendered the engineering efforts and flood control acts

Sources: Simontontexas.gov • Brazos River Authority • The Handbook of Texas Online • Photos: The Dave Mullins’ Collection


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DAILY STORE, TRAIN DEPOT • DOWNTOWN SIMONTON

Maurice Berkman (early citizen of Simonton, former mayor, and proprietor of the Berkman’s grocery store at the northwest corner of FM 1093 and FM 1489) remembered stories his father told about the 1913 flood.

DOWNTOWN SIMONTON

Women and children in Simonton fled to the Bowser home on Pool Hill, because the Hill was the highest elevation around. The Brazos River coursed less than a mile from Pool Hill and, yet, it almost reached the evacuees location. According to those who fled there, a flooded life offered little food but an abundance of fleas.

ROWLAND PLANTATION • SIMONTON

The Brazos River flooded the land with 10’ of water, destroying livelihoods and forcing families in Simonton and Richmond to evacuate their homes.

Life “ is like the river,

TRAIN DEPOT, SEED HOUSE, COTTON GIN DOWNTOWN SIMONTON

“A family had a farm near the river,” Berkman said. “They brought their mules and put them on the cotton platform in Simonton to keep them from drowning in the rising waters. The mules stayed on that platform for a week.”

COTTON GIN, TRAIN PLATFORM DOWNTOWN SIMONTON

“A platform,” Berkman said, “was about four feet above the train tracks and those tracks were always a little elevated. Everyone knew how high the water got because it was a few inches above the hocks on the mules’ legs.”

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sometimes it sweeps you gently along and sometimes the rapids come out of nowhere.” - Emma Smith


A TIME TO RECOVER

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WRITTEN & PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANIEL McJUNKIN

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A Time to

Recover Restoring Faith After the

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Flood

undreds of Simonton-area homes were damaged in the Memorial weekend flood that wreaked havoc, and with it, brought significant damage to the small community of Simonton. This is one story out of hundreds that could be told. It illustrates the impact of the flood event as well as how numerous churches, community groups, and volunteers came together to restore hope within a wounded community.

M A R I E ’ S S T O RY Having purchased the perfect lot in the Valley Lodge subdivision, Marie Maresh and her late husband, Henry, built their home in Simonton’s Valley Lodge Subdivision in 1972. Acting as their own builder, the couple contracted the construction themselves. According to Marie, they elevated their lot before they built their home. She said, “We hauled in a lot of dirt. This house is built up around three feet.” From the time it was built forty-four years ago, her home had never flooded.

Getting Out Describing how she learned of the impending flood, Marie recalled that, “My friend called me at around 10:30 at night, and it was pouring down rain. She said, ‘Marie, what are you doing? You pack a bag, and you get out of there right now. That river is rising.’” Marie continued, “So, I grabbed what I could get together, got into the car, and I headed for Sealy. I didn’t realize how fast (the river) was coming up, and I got out with my life without having to be hauled out of there in a raft.” Over the next two days, the Brazos River rose out of its banks to deluge the small community with as much as four feet of water.

The 2016 Memorial Day Flood impacted well over 1200 homes in Fort Bend County and effected a total of forty-six counties across Texas.

It would be more than one week before Marie would be allowed to return to the neighborhood


to see the damage to her home. When she was finally able to return, she was heartbroken at what she saw. As with so many other homeowners in Simonton, she found that most of her possessions had been damaged or destroyed, along with significant flood damage to her home. Marie said, “I’ve never seen anything like this before in my days of living out here. You can see on the trees how high the water got here. I’m just glad I got out with my life.”

Ca n c e l l e d

flood insurance In an ill-timed response to limitations that retirement finances have for meeting the obligations of home ownership, Marie had made a calculated decision in the previous year to protect her household budget by dropping her flood insurance. “I couldn’t afford it,” she explained. “The insurance company had tripled the rate after the last flood.” She added, “It was an economic decision.” Taking ownership of the issue, Marie addressed the matter headon, saying, “Anybody can make a mistake, and I made one.” Marie didn’t give herself time to lament her anticipated losses. She knew that she had an uphill climb ahead, along with important questions that needed answers. How would she find the strength to pull her belongings out of her flooded home? She had inches of mud covering her floors and mildew already climbing her walls - who would come help her to pull out the sheetrock and get rid of the mildew? As bad as things looked, Marie had faith that things would be okay. As it turned out, her prayers for help were already being answered.

Marie Maresh watches as volunteer crews remove a lifetime of belongings from her home.

Numerous volunteers helped those in need.

Relief

a n d R e c o v e ry Because of the huge outpouring of concern regarding the impact to the entire community, planning for the relief effort had begun well before flood-waters had even started to recede. Soon, many groups became involved in planning and implementing the overall recovery effort. According to Chris Saulnier, Serve Pastor at Simonton Community Church, their church acted as coordinator and clearinghouse to answer many of the requests for assistance.

Debris piled high on both sides of the street.

Chris was quick to point out the coordinated work of others, noting that Simonton Community Church worked with upwards of twenty other groups and churches to provide much-needed assistance. He estimated that there were well over two-hundred volunteers that helped in the relief effort. There were many other groups that also supported the relief effort. In total, as many as thirty-nine groups have been identified as having assisted with area relief efforts. When asked how many homes had been impacted by area flooding, Pastor Saulnier said that their records indicated that 215 homes had damage. Although many residents cleared out their own homes or hired cleanup contractors, Chris said that almost one-third of the area’s

Debris being removed from the streets of Simonton.


A TIME TO RECOVER

44

effected homes received cleanup assistance from the volunteer groups. He said that 31 such requests came from members of Simonton Community Church, while 35 came from non-members.

Marie Maresh & Marcell Hunt, Texas Baptist Men Team Leader.

A P ro c e s s o f

Teamwork Within just a few days after signing up for assistance, Marie welcomed a two-person team from the Texas Baptist Men’s group, who provided an initial assessment of the condition of her home. According to Marcell Hunt, Disaster Response Team Leader for the group, such a review ensures that those with the greatest need receive the most immediate impact. Subsequently, in tag-team fashion, volunteers from Still Creek Ranch, one of Simonton Community Church’s Covenant - Mission Partners, was dispatched to begin removing the bulk of Marie’s now-ruined lifelong possessions from the home. Within six hours, a lifetime of memories lay heaped just outside her front door. Marie, though heartbroken at the reality, was relieved that the first step had been taken. The debris pile grew even larger as two days later, Marcell returned again with a crew of eight trained volunteers from the Texas Baptist Men’s group. Utilizing a trailer-load, full of cleanup equipment and supplies that had been provided by Kingsland Baptist Church, the team began clearing the home in earnest. The group’s focus on this occasion would be to remove the cabinets, interior doors and millwork, mildewed sheetrock, insulation, and even the carpet tack strips - effectively all of the elements that make a home habitable. By the time both crew’s work was done, the walls had been stripped bare, leaving the wall studs, plumbing and wiring exposed. At this point, the home looked much more hopeful, even hospitable, but was in no way ready for Marie’s return. It was, however, ready to be rebuilt.

According to Marcell, the Texas Baptist Men’s group received forty-two written requests for assistance in Simonton, and those requests were being handled by multiple groups associated with the recovery. For their part, he said the Texas Baptist Men’s group doesn’t turn anyone down and that they always remain “until the last work order has been processed”—an objective that could take as long as four weeks to complete. Marcell explained that the Texas Baptist Men’s vision is “Anyway, Anywhere, Anytime.” He said, “We have had 20 to 25 volunteers out here on any given day,” further noting that they are divided into 8-14 person teams. As Marcell put it, “It’s a lot of work, and it takes about three to four days to finish clearing a house.” When asked about the monetary value of the service they provided to Marie Maresh, Marcell said “I’d say, if she had to pay to have it done, that she’d pay in the order of $15,000$20,000 for what we do.” As non-profit organizations, the respective groups did not bring contracts or invoices for the work they freely provided. Instead, for Marie, they brought elbow grease, hope, and kindness. The service that these groups provide is free to all who ask and is provided regardless of religious affiliation.

Time to

s t a rt o v e R Marie admits that she’s not exactly sure what her next step will be. She is sure, however, that it would be hard not to stay. She loves Simonton and can’t see herself living in any other place, saying resolutely, “This is my home.” Marie is thankful for the help that she received and believes that the volunteers working on her behalf ultimately gave their service to a much higher authority. Her faith leads her to the scripture in Matthew 25:40, which says: “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’” (NIV) Although saddened by losing so much, Marie knows that the uphill battle that she and her neighbors now face to get their lives back on track has only just begun. She said, “I never lost faith, and I’ve been in situations worse than this.” Being the recipient of such an outpouring of compassion and concern, Marie has seen her faith rewarded, giving her a new level of hope for herself and her community. Through this experience, she has built important friendships that she will never forget. d

i d e n t i f i e d g ro u p s t h at s e n t p e o p l e t o H E L P Brazos River Rotary Club • City of Fulshear, Texas & Office of Emergency Management • City of Simonton, Texas & Office of Emergency Management • City of Weston Lakes & Office of Emergency Management • Christian Aid Ministries • Cinco Ranch Rotary Club • El Campo, Texas, Men’s Group • Family Hope • FEMA/SBA • First Baptist Church, Pearland • First United Methodist Church, Fulshear • Fort Bend County Office of Emergency Management • Fort Bend County Road and Bridge Department • Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce • Fulshear-Simonton Lions Club • Grand Lakes Presbyterian Church • Houston SPCA • Katy Church of Christ • Katy Community Bible Church • Knights of Columbus, Fulshear • MET Plumbing, Katy • Parkway Fellowship • Red Potato Market • Riverbend Baptist Church • Second Baptist Church, FM 1463 Campus • Simonton Community Church • Simonton Veterinary Clinic • St. Peters Methodist Church, Katy • Still Creek Ranch • Sugar Creek Baptist Church • Texas Animal Health Commission • Texas Insurance Agency * Texas Task Force One • Texas A&M Veterinary School • The Red Cross • Thrive Church • Waggin’ Tails Pet Ranch • WordServe Church • Weston Lakes Property Owners Association •…as well as other unnamed groups


OPEN H ANDS

46

OPEN HANDS WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA WILTSE

“He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat. It ever changes with the next block.” F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

So says Shakespeare’s Beatrice of a fickle Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing. Nothing could be farther from the truth when talking about Neal Shudde, a fourth-generation hatter. Neal is a man who wears his faith with every hat that he makes, and that faith does not change with the fashions, winds, or tides. Shudde Bros. Hatters graces The Brookwood Community, a residential and educational home for adults with special needs, in Brookshire, Texas. Someone once said, “How a hat makes you feel is what a hat is all about.” And, while Hollywood usually features Texans with their wide, confident struts and 10-gallon hats, you might not sport one of your own or think about them in terms of a fashion statement. But, Neal Shudde is a man who thinks about hats a lot…

A FEW HAT “RULES” “You should never pick up a hat by the crown,” I hear him tell a customer, but his edict is issued softly and without rancor. “You should pick up a hat by the brim.” He goes on to suggest that two hands are better than one. “It’s okay to hold it in an open hand. Just don’t squeeze it.” As the customer walks away, he jokingly calls out, “I don’t want to have to send the hat police after you.”


This is the moment where Neal Shudde’s work becomes art. He takes those cracked and bent hats and smooths them, cleans them, and reshapes them. He brings them back to life and, after his meticulous ministrations, they are, in effect, as good as new. Neal, you see, is a master in the hat-making trade, and both he and his extended family have been at this business for a very long time.

In 1901, Neal’s grandfather Al moved as a child with his family to Houston. As a youngster, Al worked downtown for a hatter from Germany. The German businessman decided he did not like American life and said, “To heck with this new world; I’m going back to Europe.” After 8th grade, Al had to quit school to help support his family by working, but he took what he had learned from the old hatter, borrowed $200 from his older brother Walter and, in 1907, opened his first shop—a space so tiny that “you could walk in, but to leave, you had to back out.” Al started out as a Renovator of hats, which meant he cleaned the smudges and dirt and sweat from them, then bent the creases back in shape after countless times of wearers picking up the hat the wrong way. He kept a store downtown for selling clothes and hats, had a store in Market Square at Travis and Preston where farmers would bring in their produce, and then built a hat factory on Trinity, just off Washington Avenue. Shudde Bros. Hatters is a family business that has lasted one hundred years and has spanned four generations— including great-grandfather Otto, grandfather Al, father Weldon, and son Neal, who started working in the family business in 1969 and is the last in a line of great Texas Hatters. Over the years, the family hired many employees who worked for the company for over fifty years. One employee started as a delivery boy at the age of 14, rose to foreman of the factory, and worked there until he died at the age of 74. Even Neal’s own special needs son, Wilson, who is a resident of The Brookwood

Community, had a job at the shop. “He’d put the flag out in the morning and bring it in at the close of day.” Employees worked at the hat factory for life. “They didn’t retire,” says Neal. “My grandfather Al worked on Saturday and died on Sunday.”

47

To visit Neal Shudde at his shop in Brookwood is to understand that running a hattery is a serious and complicated business. While the shop at Brookwood now restores and cleans hats, the place is filled with the tools and paraphernalia of their days in the hat-making factory—wooden blocks to form the crown, wooden flanges for the brim, and a somewhat frightening Blocking Machine with teeth that clamp down to give a hat that 90-degree angle you want between crown and brim. “In those days, we’d block the crown, flange the brim, use lots of steam to soften it, sew in the linings and sweat bands, shape it, and crease it.”

“There has to be a little chaos in a hat shop,” Neal says. “It goes with creativity. Now, trust me on this—if you ever enter a hat shop that’s as neat as a pin…Run, ‘cause there’s nothing going on there.” The first step in the hat-buying process is, of course, deciding on a particular style. Neal always asks, “Do you want to stand out or blend in?” That style might be a Stetson Open Road—favored by all the Texas politicians of the 1960s. Some come into the shop searching for their “look.” They see themselves as Augustus McCrae in Lonesome Dove, in his incomparable hat with its unusually high crown. They might want to look like George Strait or Indiana Jones. They might fancy a homburg like the one Winston Churchill wore so well. Some even want what Hop-a-Long Cassidy had, or they are long-time Lone Ranger aficionados. One retired Houston Police Department officer came in, insisting on a bowler just like Bat Masterson’s.

From Neal, I learn that beaver fur is the best choice for a felt hat, followed by rabbit. But any type of fur, from nutria to mink, can be used to make a hat. I even learn about seasonal and geographic hat etiquette: “Straw in Summer; felt in Winter—those used to be the New York and Boston Rules, but they don’t apply down here.” Up North, he tells me, people wear fedoras for warmth. Down here in Texas, people wear what they want to wear.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

On the day I visit his shop, he is renovating a genuine Panama hat. People, he tells me, will typically one-hand them—grab them with that one hand and squeeze the crown, which cracks it. I watch as he reinforces the inside band to keep it strong. “They shouldn’t grab it that way,” he says, “but, people forget, and we don’t want to have too many rules.” Because, in the end, he realizes that a customer will rightly say, ‘I just want to grab my hat the way I want to grab it.’


see the intricate over and under of the weave. It blocks the sun, but lets the hot air escape. Neal holds it up to the light with a kind of reverence. “Just look at it. It is a work of art.”

OPEN H ANDS

48

Many a famous person has crossed the threshold of Shudde Bros. Hatters and sported their hats. Iconic cowboys like John Wayne, Tom Mix, Gene Autry, and Roy Rogers were all customers of the shop. Neal’s greatuncles Ben and John even restored Sam Houston’s hat in 1936 for the state’s centennial, and renovated hats for Lyndon Baines Johnson and John Connally. George Herbert Walker Bush and the Mercury 7 astronauts all had hats made by the Shuddes.

But, when you just need a hat, Neal will probably set you up with a Stetson or Resistol Cattleman style, with its 4-5 inch crown and 4-inch brim. The Cattleman is the most popular style now, especially around rodeo time. He’ll crease the crown and shape the brim and add your choice of hatband or ribbon.

When a customer asks, “Does this look good on me?” Neal will always answer, “What does your gut tell you? Your gut won’t lie.”

In the back of Neal’s shop, the walls are lined with photographs of famous oilmen and baseball managers, moving picture actors and singers, politicians and Texas fiddle players. Neal’s dad Weldon didn’t want to put up all the photographs on the wall. “He was a very humble guy and didn’t want it to look like we were bragging.” But, the customers loved seeing pictures of all the famous people and the hats they wore, so Weldon Shudde finally agreed to display them.

For dressy occasions, you might want a bowler, a homburg, or a fedora. For actors playing Dickens on the Strand, a top hat is the headgear of choice. But, if you’re a working rancher in Texas…well, the cattleman is the hat you’re going to want.

Dr. James “Red” Duke

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

- courtesy of abc13.com -

Now the Panama, I learn, is in a class by itself. Neal holds up the one he is restoring, the one that had been grabbed and squeezed with one hand instead of with open hands. “You just can’t beat this genuine Panama,” he says, and I clearly hear the awe in his voice. “It’s not the toughest of hats, of course. You can’t throw it around and treat it badly. And it’s harder to work on than a felt hat, because it’s more fragile.” From straw that is handwoven in Ecuador, the Panama was brought to America by men who worked on the Canal. From far away, it looks like a solid piece of material, but up close you can

One of Neal’s favorite customers was Houston’s famed trauma surgeon, medical educator, and developer of Life Flight—the inimitable Dr. James “Red” Duke. Red would use the company’s steam room, which he dubbed the Operating Room, and shape his own hat. “Get it just like he wanted it,” says Neal. “He’d put 20 years on his hat in 10 minutes.” Duke’s hat was a one-ofa-kind, light brown, bulldog shape, always felt, not straw, somewhat slouchy and broken in, yet comfortable and functional—always creased it the same way. Rain would drain off the front and the back. He’d put his spotting scope down the middle of the hat and sight his gun. “It’s a good pedestal for my scope,” Red would say. By the catch in his voice, you know that Neal still misses the late Red Duke.


Neal credits all of his skill and accomplishments to God. Humble and unpretentious, he gives the credit for his handiwork and success first to God, then to Brookwood, and only then to himself. Grandfather Al Shudde opened his shop in downtown Houston on July 1, 1907. On June 30, 2007, Neal Shudde and his extended family closed the Houston shop and moved the business to The Brookwood Community. Later, when he realized that the closing of one shop and the opening of the other was exactly one hundred years to the day, Neal felt as if God was silently confirming the decision. Perhaps, He was saying, “One hundred years in downtown Houston was my assignment for you.” Now, all proceeds and profits from the shop belong to Brookwood. Neal also knows that God will provide someone to carry on the shop when he no longer can. In fact, God has already provided him with volunteers to sew the hats and a man to help Neal with the business. Rusty Simmons bought a hat from the downtown store 20 years ago. He’d go back every three or four months just to hang around, slowly became a trusted friend, and now works with Neal at the Brookwood store. He, too, has a special affinity for the hats and for the man who makes them. As Rusty likes to say, “Neal, you see, forms a personal

Actor Woody Harrelson & Neal Shudde - photo courtesy of The Brookwood Community -

relationship with each of the hats. Sometimes, he even has a hard time letting them go.”

49

Customers who have been with Shudde Bros. Hatters their whole lives—or those who came as children with their dads to the old store downtown—now drive out to Brookshire to visit Neal. “The old hat guys come in,” he says. “And, they always ask, how did we end up here?” Neal knows exactly why they are now at Brookwood, and I’m sure Neal’s father, grandfather, and greatgrandfather would be mighty proud of where he has ended up. The funny thing is, you just never know who might show up at Shudde Bros. Hatters. The day I stopped by to talk with Neal, actor Woody Harrelson had come by to see his friend Yvonne Streit, to visit with the Brookwood citizens, and to stop by the hat shop. He had just finished shooting his new film, LBJ, and Neal had the perfect hat for him. So maybe somewhere and sometime, somebody will lean over to you and say, “Nice hat.” Yeah, you’ll think. It darn sure is. This is a Shudde Bros. hat. In the late afternoon, after most of the throngs of tourists and crowds of shoppers have left Brookwood, I watch Neal offer a renovated Stetson to a grateful customer. And, in his gentle voice, he tells the man, “In a perfect world, we’d lift it only on the sides with two hands. Or with an open hand.” In a perfect world, we’d have more Neal Shuddes: people who live life the way they handle hats—with open hands. d

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Beyond the hat business, Neal Shudde is a man on a mission to follow his faith. Years ago, he married into the Brookwood family. His mother-in-law, Yvonne Streit, started the community, and his wife, Vivian Streit Shudde, is now the Executive Director. Vivian and Neal’s son, Wilson, is a special needs citizen of Brookwood.


51

GROWTH

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

IMPROVEMENT AND

M

any are proud to call Weston Lakes home. This affluent, gated community is known for so much more than golf. While Weston Lakes was originally considered by many to be a retirement community, young families have also seen the magic within, and have chosen to raise their families here. This growing community has recently adopted a new “master plan,” one that emphasizes the need for more homes and recreational amenities. With the 200 plus additional acres acquired by the developer, the Weston Lakes community will be able to see their new vision come to life.

SLOW AND STEADY GROWTH With the city of Fulshear growing at a rapid rate, the demand for custom homes in the surrounding area has increased. Open lots in Weston Lakes are disappearing quickly. This is why community developer, Mike Surface, has bought over 200 acres on the southwestern border of Weston Lakes. This addition is positioned near the back of the community, but residents will have an easy secondary access by way of Bowser Road, a beautiful country road lined with majestic trees. The Reserve is the first of several new sections within Weston Lakes. Consisting of roughly 90 acres, the Reserve will offer a wide variety of home styles, with lot sizes ranging from one-third to one-half acres and have price tags from the $400’s to the $800’s. Surface and the development team have hand-picked a group of highly qualified custom builders in an effort to maintain the same custom feel that

WESTON

L A KES ADDING HOME SITES AND RECREATIONAL AMENITIES TO THEIR

GROWING COMMUNIT Y


GROWTH AND IMPROVEMENT

52

can be found currently throughout the many sections of Weston Lakes. Buyers will have the opportunity to select from some of the best custom builders in the area. Some of these builders are residents of Weston Lakes themselves and therefore have a better understanding of the style and feel of the community. While recent wet weather has led to a few delays, there are already fifteen completed homes with another ten under construction. “We are excited to welcome our first new residents in May!” says Surface. In two to three years, the Reserve should near completion and the development team will shift their focus to the additional 120 acres just to the north of the Reserve sections. Weston Lakes is estimated to add 400 home sites over the next five to seven years. The goal is to have the new sections blend seamlessly with the existing sections of the community. Water views, mature trees and ample green space lends to the natural feel of this desirable location.

SEEING A NEED With the average age in the community decreasing, the need for parks and recreational amenities have increased. Residents with small children will be pleased to know that new parks and playgrounds are in the works. In fact, a kid-friendly pool is among the new plans for the upcoming section. A splash pad is even in consideration, to supply a safer option for those with infants and toddlers. The new pool, park facilities, along with new tennis courts would also be more centrally located within the community than the current recreational facilities. At the southern end of the Reserve, residents will soon enjoy a five acre park with walking trails that front the picturesque Brazos River. With picnic tables located along the water, residents will be able to enjoy picnics with a view. This is sure to become a neighborhood hot spot!

A THRIVING COMMUNIT Y Weston Lakes has been a highly sought after neighborhood for quite some time. This is largely due to the development team’s attention to the needs and wants of their residents. In a short period of time, the community has grown to include many new features. The club house has also established annual events that continue to grow in numbers with each passing year.


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BRADFORD ON THE BEND

The community of Weston Lakes appeals to a wide variety of people. Thanks to the newly acquired acreage, more people will be able to call Weston Lakes home. With plans in the works for additional parks and recreational amenities, there will be truly something for everyone. The developers of Weston Lakes know that growth is a constant thing. It is ok to relish in the way things were, but it is vital to look forward and grow. d

WESTON

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A favorite among the community is the annual Easter Festival. This family event continues to grow. Kids enjoy hunting Easter eggs, a petting zoo, inflatables, face painting and more. Other events include the 4th of July neighborhood parade, summer splash events for kids and the Fall Festival.

CHECK THEM OUT

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TO LEARN MORE

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K PAR

The award winning golf course is wonderful for member play, in that it is challenging, but not so much so that it is not enjoyable. The club house is also home to the Waterside Grill, the community’s own private restaurant that hosts local musicians in the summer months. Residents are also enjoying the newly built fitness center that not only boasts top of the line free weights and cardio equipment, but also energizing group classes and skilled masseuses available for appointments.


WOULD YOU LIKE A JOB OUTSIDE

54

WOULD YOU LIKE A JOB OUTSIDE…

MAKING $500,000 PER YEAR? WRITTEN BY CJ McDANIEL

Photo by: ©iStock.com/Kati Molin

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

S

ure seems like a loaded question to me. If you asked me that when I was 22 and just out of college, my immediate response would be not just yes, but heck yes. What do I have to do? Well, let me give you a little picture, then you can answer for yourself.

First, you will likely have to work a minimum of six days a week and sometimes seven; and rarely a weekend off. Well…for $500,000, I might do that! Your day will start early and end late, depending on how your boss feels that day, or what happened for him that day. Heck, I still don’t see a problem. Early days in the week might include a few hours away from the job, depending again on your boss and his commitments, but typically, for sure you will be at the “office” from 8ish to close to dark on Tuesday and most of the day on Wednesday. Thursdays are a little different, depending on what time your boss has to be at the “office.” You may have the luxury of coming in later on Thursday; but if that is the case, for sure you will have to get to work early on Friday. Of course, if you work early on Thursday, you get to come to work late on Friday. By the way, there is no workman’s comp, insurance coverage, 401(K) or other retirement, no other benefits and no expense account. Oh, then there is the weekend. You hope you work weekends, because that is when your boss might be able to pay you a nice little bonus. Your boss really wants to work weekends as well. But, what about the work; the job description, so to speak. Well, first and foremost, you are a confidant, a friend, a listener, an advice giver, an information bearer, a psychologist, a sounding board, a

partner, a laborer and an ally…but you can also be a goat, the brunt of frustration, the reason your boss fails (or at least he may think that…depending on his nature and your relationship) and treated like a second class citizen. You have to wear a special little bib many days while schlepping about 50 pounds on your shoulder up and down hills in the sun and rain. You also work when it is cool and windy and when it is humid and hot. So, would you still do this job for just any salary? Most of these guys make about $1,000 per week. I, of course, am talking about the professional golf caddy. Many years ago in my era professional caddies were as rare as hen’s teeth…hate to give my age away, but I like to say that I am one under par. Most golf clubs had a cadre of caddies. Interesting how those two terms are so similar. Cadre is defined as “a small group of people specially trained for a particular purpose or profession.” Caddies date back to the 1600’s. Here is just a Cliff Notes overview. The word Caddie is derived from the French word ‘le cadet’, meaning ‘the boy’


or the youngest of the family. The word ‘cadet’ appears in English from about 1610 and the word ‘caddie’ or ‘cadie’ shortly after that in 1634. Caddie (caddy, cadie or cady) was used as a general-purpose porter or errand boy in Scottish towns in the 18th Century, particularly used for delivering water in the days before modern utilities. They were formed into a society in Edinburgh in 1711, with self-imposed rules and published fees much like taxi cabs. Caddies are often mentioned carrying golf clubs, but it was not until 1857 that the dictionary ascribes the use mainly to those carrying golf clubs. In the early days there were no golf bags and the clubs were carried in bundle, which can be clearly seen in paintings of the time. A lot of time has since passed. In the depression era, many men found caddying the only way to make a living from the wealthy who still managed to maintain their golf memberships. Great players such as Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson and Sam Snead all learned to play golf as a caddy. Caddy programs produced many other great golfers. There are still sections of America with exceptional caddy programs at clubs where young men and women can learn the game by caddying AND at the same time earn a college scholarship for their efforts. Since 1930, more than 9,800 deserving caddies have graduated from college as Evans Scholars. In 2015, almost 900 Evans Scholars were enrolled in colleges across the U.S. This Foundation is named for Chick Evans, who won the 1916 U.S. Open and U.S. Amateur Championship as well as numerous other events. He placed all the income earned from his golf accomplishments into an escrow account and that money became the basis for the scholarship program still in operation today.

55

Ben Crenshaw and his longtime caddy, Carl Jackson at Augusta National when Ben won his second Masters in 1995

Evans Scholars Courtesy of WGA Evans Scholars Foundation

But, back to reality...and the $500,000. Caddies disappeared in clubs with the popularity and addition of golf carts. It was not just that boys and men no longer wanted to carry around a golf bag full of clubs and balls for $10 or $20, but the fact that clubs were trying to find ways to create additional sources of income. And, golf carts became the answer. It is rare today to find any club in the southern part of the U.S. that has a caddy program. Caddies are still found and are quite popular in the Midwest (around the Chicago area) and the northeast, where most every caddy is a young man or young girl working for a fair wage and the chance to earn a scholarship to college from one of the local foundations.

I never had an appreciation for exactly what a Tour caddy does until 1971. I was working my first job in golf as an assistant professional at a little golf club outside Atlanta. I was asked to be the caddie master for the upcoming Atlanta Golf Classic at the Atlanta Country Club. Great! What an honor; I’ll do it. What does a caddie master do anyway? I found out that my job was going to be to make sure that all the caddies who came to the tournament with their bosses were taken care of. The club had an area set aside where the caddies could relax and wait for their player. It had water, chairs, even a television, all in all a decent setting; but, I also had a group of local guys who knew the golf course that would be available for professionals who did not have their own regular caddy. My job was to match these caddies to players who needed a caddy. Things went swimmingly. By Tuesday afternoon, everyone was set; and my job was done. Yea!!!

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

But, what about those guys we see on television today? Oh, those are the guys making $500,000!! Or, more. Most caddies have a strong relationship with their “boss.” Most look at it as a partnership. The professional caddy understands every element of his golfer’s game. They know the player’s psyche and know when to encourage…and when to give a little kick in the rear. But, it is an extremely time consuming job. Caddies, like their bosses, are away from home as much as 35 weeks a year. And, away means completely away…not just a day or so away; usually four to six weeks at a time.


I won’t take pages to tell you about what happened, but I did learn more about caddying than I thought I would. But, more importantly, I learned more about course management in those four days from who I know is the greatest golfer of all time than I could ever learn on my own in a lifetime. I was at the course every day at daybreak walking the course, getting pin placements for him; looking for alterations in any mowing pattern, changes in tee box alignment, etc. He instructed me exactly what he wanted. He told me how he wanted to play a different ball on each hole on the front nine and a different ball on each hole on the back nine and how to keep them in the proper order. He had already won the PGA Championship and the Byron Nelson earlier that year and he went on to finish tied with Gardner Dickenson for the Championship, but lost on the first playoff hole when Mr. Dickenson sank a double breaking snake of about 40 feet for birdie. We shot 13 under par. We…. hah! I had nothing to do with it. I gave him pin locations and that was it. I have one great story about him asking me for advice on Saturday on the final hole and one day if you see me, ask me about it and I will tell you.

WOULD YOU LIKE A JOB OUTSIDE

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Then, I was approached by one of the primary committee members telling me that Jack Nicklaus’ caddy had been asked to leave the grounds due to an altercation and he would not be allowed to return, AND Mr. Nicklaus needed a caddy. Humm, two caddies left. A young man about 17 years old who had never seen the golf course and an older caddy that I was sure could never lift Jack Nicklaus’ golf bag, never mind carry it. “I’ll find someone, I said.” But, I had no idea where to even start looking. I thought for sure by morning someone would show up and I would have this resolved. I was at the club at daybreak on Wednesday; Pro-Am day. I was advised that I had “better have a great caddy for Mr. Nicklaus.” Uh oh. No caddy. Mr. Nicklaus was scheduled to tee off at 11 AM with the tournament sponsor and other dignitaries.

Player/caddy today is a we relationship. It is a partnership. Typically, the player pays his caddy a base salary of about $1,000 per week and then a percentage of his winnings…typically about 5% unless it is a win and then sometimes as much as 10% of the winning purse. So for the top players, it is not unusual for their caddy to earn as much as $500,000. If you think about it, Jordan Spieth won a little more than $22 million in 2015. Let me see, 5% is …. and, 10% is… Holy Cow!!! What a great year his caddy had!!! But, would you be away from your family 30 plus weeks per year; walk 6 to 10 miles 5 to 6 days a week, and have no insurance or benefits? Some might, others definitely would never even try. Outside in the fresh air, strolling down the fairway, making a living watching the best golfers in the world. Wow! d

What to do???

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

I had never caddied a day in my life. But, when Mr. Nicklaus showed up at 9:30, I introduced myself and told him I would be his caddy for the Pro-Am and we would have him a caddy for Thursday (I hoped). The day actually went well. He told me exactly what he wanted and by the end of the day, he had played ok, but nothing special. I realized later he was just learning more about the golf course conditions and changes from prior years. Wednesday was finished and I took his clubs to his car. I explained to him I was trying to get him a caddy and he said to me, “why don’t you just do it, we got along well today?” WHAT!?!? SURE, I would love to!” He told me when to meet him and I became a caddy.

According to Business Insider, Jordan Spieth’s caddie made about $2.1 million in 2015, more than 221 PGA Tour golfers.


Fort Bend Ranchers’ Ball saddle up for the

October 22, 2016 • 6-11 PM • SAFARI TEXAS RANCH • 11627 FM 1464, RICHMOND, TX 77407 Fort Bend County Precinct 3 Commissioner Andy Meyers featured with Host Committee Co-Chairs: Tricia & Ed Krenek and Cheryl & Kenneth Stalinsky Photo by SUNSET PHOTOGRAPHY Kerryl Ann Frank • Furnishings courtesy of Red Potato Market

You’ll make a difference

Save the date

When great people come together for a worthy cause they can make a difference in many lives. That’s why Fort Bend County Commissioner Andy Meyers is hosting the Inaugural Fort Bend Ranchers’ Ball which will benefit Fort Bend Charities, Inc. a 501 (c)(3) charitable organization. Through your committed financial support of this great event, you’ll enable us to continue providing funding for some of Fort Bend County’s most impactful groups, each of which have a direct benefit and payback within our area.

The Fort Bend Ranchers’ Ball is scheduled for October 22nd, 2016 at Safari Texas Ranch. It will be your best opportunity to show your commitment to Fort Bend County and the families that make it great. Whether you can buy one seat, a whole table, or perhaps become a sponsor, we need your support. Your caring tax-deductible contribution will absolutely make the difference for families in Fort Bend County.

Which groups?

Become a corporate or individual sponsor of the Inaugural Fort Bend Ranchers’ Ball today. We ask that you dig deep as you consider how you may help our Fort Bend families in need. Your sponsorship is the only way we’ll have the resources to answer these needs, many in time for Christmas.

Lone Star Veterans Association

Helping in the transition from military life

Katy Christian Ministries

Serving needy families in the Katy area

Don’t wait - Reserve your sponsorship today

Simonton Christian Academy

Offering excellent education to area youth

Fort Bend County Fair Association & Katy FFA Providing educational scholarships

And More

Want to learn more?

For information about this great charitable organization, visit

fortbendcharitiesinc.org or call 281-391-3366


READING, ‘RITING, & ‘RITHMETIC

59

A HISTORY OF FULSHEAR’S EARLY SCHOOL DAYS Photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

S

tarting this fall, Fulshear (part of the Lamar Consolidated Independent School District) will not only have an elementary school, but the town will also boast a junior high and high school.

These were not our first schools, however. There was a time when school-aged children in this area learned their “3Rs” in small, one-room schoolhouses that were segregated by race and that held not a single smartboard, laptop, or iPad among them.

While much of the history of these schools is lost, and many of the former students have passed on, following are a few photographs and a list of schools that educated children in the Fulshear area before the county consolidated into its independent school district.

Fulshear School for White Students - courtesy of Ava Mounger

Poncho Bentley & Ugh Dozier with school for Mexican students behind - courtesy of Ava Mounger

FULSHEAR SCHOOLS Some evidence suggests that there was a schoolhouse at a chapel meeting ground on the Fulshear Plantation in 1855, but it was not until 1893 that the Fulshear school district was established. A small, one-room, box-shaped building was erected in 1893 for white students, and, in 1912, a two-room school was built to accommodate a larger enrollment. Located at the intersection of Second and Harris, the school enrolled 40 pupils who were grouped according to age. The main subjects were reading, arithmetic, writing, spelling, grammar, and history. Though most of its history has been lost, the school building for Mexican students was also located on Harris Street.

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Travel with me, if you will, to a time before school libraries, cafeterias, and rubber-matted playgrounds. Imagine the days when schools in our area had separate facilities for Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics; when children rode horses or walked to school in rain and cold; and when chores at home and on the farm were completed long before tackling any homework.


READING, ‘RITING, & ‘RITH METIC

60

Foster School for White Students - courtesy of Foster Museum

Foster School for White Students Pictorial History Class of 1891

In addition, there were two schools for Fulshear’s black students—a oneroom building with 30-40 students was located near the present site of Greater Zachary Church, and another sat near Pleasant Hill Church on Redbird Lane. Former Fulshear Mayor, Viola Randle, has recounted walking and riding horseback the two-mile stretch to the school on Redbird Lane while carrying her lunch in a jelly bucket. A potbellied wood stove heated the room during winter, and “the warm months were cooled by the Lord through open windows.”

FOSTER SCHOOLS Established around 1890, the schoolhouse for white children was located north of Winner-Foster Road on land that is now part of Whispering Oaks subdivision. The school was closed in 1944, and nothing remains of the building.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Jones Creek School for Black Students - Foster Museum - photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

School Lunches - photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

Jones Creek School for black students was originally located on Foster Farms off Beadle Road near Jones Creek. Around 1920, the schoolhouse was moved to its present location on FM 359, where it now serves as the Foster Museum.

Jones Creek School for Black Students - Foster Museum - photo by Rhonda Renee Photography


SIMONTON SCHOOLS One of Simonton’s schools was built in 1926. Until 1946, the building served as a school for white children, and, from 1946 until desegregation, it served as a school for African-American children. There were no indoor bathrooms until the ‘50s or ‘60s, but the school did boast a fire escape slide from the second story. While meant as an emergency escape and not as a form of recreation, one student remembers vividly, “I got nine licks for going down the slide during school.” She also recalls that the flagpole out front was decorated with crepe paper for May Day celebrations. During WWII, there was even a victory garden on school grounds for Simonton residents to share.

61

Simonton School

North of Simonton Community Church, on FM 1489, sits a privately owned building that once served as the school for Mexican students. Near Saint Matthews Baptist Church on FM 1093 sat the school for black students, which was later moved to private property on Guyler Road. Just to the east was a Teacherage, where teachers for the school district could live.

Simonton School for Mexican Students - photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

Unfortunately, only a few photographs and personal narratives have survived the intervening years. Many of the schoolhouses were dismantled and recycled into barns and outbuildings or were moved to other locations. However, we can still imagine what it might have been like for students of yesteryear. We can picture a young, pigtailed girl, swinging her bucket filled with a special homemade lunch, walking two miles to a schoolhouse warmed by a pot-bellied stove, and doing her homework by light of a kerosene lantern.

Fire Escape - photo by Rhonda Renee Photography

Simonton School Teacherage - courtesy of The Dave Mullins’ Collection

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Today, we take so much for granted in our educational system. Despite the technological advances and modern conveniences enjoyed in classrooms today, education has been elevated and enriched by bringing all of our children together. d


63

The

BROOKWOOD Community WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

T H E C O M M U N I T Y T H AT C O N T I N U E S T O G I V E B A C K

It

can be said that the measure of a person is not how much he or she has achieved in their life, but how their achievement has improved the world they live in. One such person is Yvonne Streit, founder and Executive Director Emeritus of the Brookwood Community in Brookshire. Through compassion, respect and deep rooted faith in God, the Brookwood Community was born and has improved the lives of thousands.

T H E B I RT H O F T H E B R O O K WO O D C O M M U N I T Y

Yvonne Streit, Founder & Executive Director Emeritus of the Brookwood Community in Brookshire

The Brookwood Community was born out of a tragedy. At the age of one, Yvonne’s daughter Vicki came down with the mumps. Due to unavoidable complications caused by the illness, her daughter was left with brain damage. The focus turned to finding a way to give Vicki

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Yvonne experienced every parent’s fear, saw a need and created a loving community that not only saved her daughter’s life but also thousands of others like her through the Brookwood Community. “It all started with God. He founded Brookwood, and I just work for Him,” says Yvonne. Today, the community’s purpose is to provide opportunity through education for adults with special needs.


TH E BROOKWOOD COMMUNITY

64

Never believe that a few caring people can’t change the world, for indeed that is all who ever have. –Margaret Meade -

Yvonne & Vicki beginning training for a new life.

the best life possible considering the circumstances. It became apparent early on that no such place existed. With God’s hand, Yvonne worked tirelessly to create it.

The Brookwood store inside Gallery Furniture.

H OW YO U C A N

support

T H E B R O O K WO O D

COMMUNITY DONATE MONEY (contact Travis Duncan at 281-375-2192)

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

VOLUNTEER (fill out the volunteer application on their website and submit to Jillj@brookwoodcommunity.org) TAKE A TOUR OF BROOKWOOD VISIT THE BROOKWOOD COMMUNITY CAFÉ VISIT THE BROOKWOOD COMMUNITY GIFT SHOP AND PLANT NURSERY PICK UP BROOKWOOD COMMUNITY SALAD DRESSINGS AT YOUR LOCAL HEB

It started small as she began homeschooling Vicki. This soon grew into a learning group that included other local children with special needs. Over time, the learning group outgrew Yvonne’s backyard, and the group was graciously welcomed by a nearby Baptist church. It was not long before the church also had become too small. Word spread about the efforts to help young people with special needs. It was a joyous day indeed when the Brookwood Community opened its doors in 1985. Today, the Brookwood Community is an internationally known example of how dedicated people with a vision can make a difference and change lives throughout the world. Not only does Brookwood provide a loving and welcoming community for its residents, but it also provides the opportunity to work. Whether they work in crafts making handmade unique gifts, or in the greenhouses, nursery, café, or gift shop, residents walk away with a sense of pride, knowing that they are useful and they are contributing to the world. People need purpose in life, and a sense of purpose often comes through the form of work. At the end of the workday, residents at Brookwood have a variety of activities and clubs available to them. For the athletes in the bunch, there are sports and fitness classes. Others enjoy participating in their various reading and discussion clubs, hand bells and bible study groups. On weekends, the citizens enjoy going out on the town to various performances, movies and other such events. A community favorite is the pool inspired by Schlitterbahn. It has a gradual beach-like entry with a 6mph current that provides enough resistance to help build lower body strength. Citizens of Brookwood enjoy


walking across the floating lily pads while holding on to the suspended ropes, an activity that also activates the upper body. The pool’s slide has an elevator, allowing even those bound to a wheelchair the opportunity to slide down – a first for many.

GIVING PURPOSE AND A SENSE OF BELONGING “Individuals with special needs learn differently,” notes Yvonne. “They are a square peg, and society is trying to fit them in a round hole. So we built them a square hole.” Like all people, they want to have a purpose, and Brookwood gives them that purpose.

W E N

RE

A E L

SE

65

The Brookwood Community has helped the world see that individuals with special needs have special gifts. They, like anyone else, have the right to feel like citizens, individuals with a purpose. There was a need, and Brookwood was a great solution. The Brookwood Community has changed the educational world and has become the premier facility for adults with special needs. When society tells these individuals they can’t, Brookwood is there telling them and showing them they can! d

1752 FM 1489 - Brookshire, TX 77423

281-375-2100

Monday - Friday, 8:30 am - 5 pm www.brookwoodcommunity.org

Be sure to grab a copy of Yvonne’s newly published book, Everybody’s Got a Seed to Sew. This humorous, yet touching and inspirational book tells the story of Yvonne and the creation of this magical place we call Brookwood. Books can be found at the Brookwood Community, the Richmond Gallery Furniture location, and various local churches, as well as www.brookwoodcommunity.org.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

WRITER’S NOTE: Many people know The Brookwood Community for their beautiful flowers and tasty café. I myself knew nothing more. It was not until I took a tour that I truly saw the heart of Brookwood. Seeing firsthand the time and dedication the citizens put into every ceramic piece within the gift shop, the smiles as they tell you about their craft and the sincerity within their hugs and well wishes changed not only how I saw the community – it changed me! I know it may sound cliché, but see for yourself. Take a tour and I promise you, you will never look at Brookwood the same way again.


D O N AT I N G YO U R T I M E A S A VO L U N T E E R

66 TH E BROOKWOOD COMMUNITY

In the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, “When you cease to make a contribution, you begin to die.” Truer words were never spoken. Volunteering your time will not only help the Brookwood Community, it will truly enrich your life. Fulshear resident Jo Gilbert has been volunteering as a tour guide for the last four years. “Brookwood has given me a new meaning to volunteering. I have volunteered at numerous places but never have I had this much fulfillment.” Jo goes on to say, “Brookwood has a special place in my heart.” Not only does Jo still continue to volunteer, but she also encouraged her friend Linda Huffaker to give it a try. Jo and Linda have become the dynamic duo when it comes to leading tours. Linda’s favorite part of volunteering at Brookwood is seeing how happy the citizens are and how proud they are of the items they create. “It is definitely a Godcentered community, and one that I wish could be replicated all over the world,” shares Linda. There are many opportunities to volunteer at Brookwood, whether it is working in horticulture with their thriving plant business, or with ceramics or stone casting, just to name a few. Another fun way to volunteer is at the Gift Shop and Café. Or, you can join Jo and Linda and lead tours, sharing your love of Brookwood with the public. If you have not gone on a tour of Brookwood, we highly encourage you to do so. It is an eye- opening experience. For Brookwood is so much more than just a yummy café and fun gift shop; it is also a community filled with love, acceptance, hope and happiness.

Citizen Carrie showing a beautiful Brookwood plant available in the Gallery Furniture greenhouse.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT VOLUNTEERING PLEASE CALL

(281) 375-2100


BISCUITS

67

Makes 20 biscuits Biscuit Ingredients: 9 tbsp butter 1/3 cup plus 1 tbsp light brown sugar 2 tbsp honey 1 ¼ cup old fashioned oats 1 cup minus 2 tbsp wheat flour ½ tsp baking soda ½ tsp baking powder ½ tsp salt To coat: ¾ of a cup of chocolate, chopped (milk or dark whichever you prefer) 1 tsp coconut oil INSTRUCTIONS 1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line two baking trays with baking paper. 2. In a large bowl with a wooden spoon, cream together the butter and sugar for 2-3 minutes until pale and smooth. Add the honey and beat to combine. Stir in the oats, followed by the wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.

4. Bake for 10-12 minutes until golden brown and the kitchen smells like toasty oats. Remove from the oven and leave to cool on the tray for a few minutes then transfer to a wire rack. Don’t worry if the biscuits feel slightly soft; they should firm up and become crunchy as they cool. 5. Make sure the biscuits are completely cool before spreading the chocolate. Melt the chocolate and coconut oil together in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water or in the microwave on defrost until soft. Spread a little bit of chocolate onto the top of each biscuit and use a small rubber spatula to even it out over the biscuit. Set them aside to harden on wax or parchment paper on a baking sheet. * Recipe slightly adapted from Homemade memories by Kate Doran

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY FIONA CUNNINGHAM

C

an you imagine your day without your morning coffee, afternoon snack and that sweet treat you had your eye on all day? I know I can’t! When I began throwing recipe ideas around in my head for this issue of the magazine, Sarah Hughes’ story kept coming to mind (story on page 26). I asked her if she would be willing to share one of her favorite recipes with our readers, and I am happy to say she said yes! Having been seriously ill her entire life, Sarah found eating and digesting food very painful. Her early years were spent drinking Pediasure and eating bland soft foods. As an early teen Sarah turned to intravenous total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and Lipids that were administered through a PICC line or portacath. “I had never eaten without pain and grew up thinking everyone had stomach pain when they ate.” Up until recently, Sarah’s life consisted of hospitals and bed rest. Flavor profiles and sweet verses savory meant nothing to her. It was not until 2015 that Sarah was able to eat solid food without the pain and discomfort. While it was a slow process, Sarah began discovering what kinds of foods she liked and didn’t like. She had the palette of an infant. With her new found strength and love of food she discovered a passion for baking. It is similar to exploring a once forbidden world. “I find baking to be very therapeutic and relaxing,” smiles Sarah. “I love seeing the final product.” Hobnobs are an English favorite. These biscuits, or cookies to us Americans, are sturdy and perfect for dunking in milk or tea. Sarah loves the crunchy texture of the biscuit paired with the richness of the chocolate. “It is a favorite amongst all of our friends, be they English or American!” d

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

3. Take about two teaspoons of dough and roll into a ball. Place onto one of the prepared trays and press down lightly in the middle so that it spreads to about 1½ inches wide. Repeat with the remaining dough, leaving 1 inch between each ball as they will flatten and spread as they bake.

Sarah Hughes

baking in her kitchen


F My Husband Would Own

MY SHOES, HIS LEFT BOOT But I Wouldn’t Own

WRITTEN BY Karen Van Holten, Attorney PHOTOGRAPHY BY Lisa Franks – MoeCakes Photography

ulshear is growing rapidly by leaps and bounds. With this growth, families around the country are flocking to enjoy the booming suburb with the small town heart. Many of these families are relocating from other states and some families can find understanding Texas laws challenging. Concepts such as community property laws, which are just as much part of our Texas culture and history as the Alamo, bluebonnets and Tex-Mex, can be very confusing for the Texan and non-Texan alike. To delve into all of the intricacies of the law here would require you, as the reader, to dedicate hours upon hours of time and the magazine to provide pages and pages of writings. So, let’s just touch on a few basics to wet your legal curiosity whistle.

Surprisingly, Texas law does not actually provide a definition of community property, it just states that community property is property that is not separate property of one of the spouses. Clear as Mississippi mud, right? A presumption under the law exists that any property acquired during the marriage is community property of the spouses, with a few defined exceptions. One of the most common misconceptions revolves around what happens to the community property upon the death of a spouse. If a person dies without a will, they are said to have died intestate and Texas has very specific laws regarding intestate decedents. The laws classify property into three distinct categories (1) Separate Real Property; (2) Separate Personal Property and (3) Community Property, which we are focusing on here. Well, that seems easy enough, let’s talk about my shoes. I bought a beautiful pair of leopard print wedges not too long ago and my husband bought some equally nice cowboy boots. My husband and I have been married for over six years. According to our above definition, my beautiful leopard print wedges and his nice new boots would be considered community property. However, take note, something very different would happen to my wedges and his boots upon either of our deaths if we did not direct otherwise through a valid estate plan. Without a valid estate plan, our property upon our deaths would be subject to Texas laws of intestacy. The law states that if all of the surviving children of the deceased are also children of the surviving spouse, the deceased’s share of the community property passes to the surviving spouse, HOWEVER, if there are children from outside the marriage, the community property passes to all of the surviving children in equal shares and the surviving spouse takes none of the deceased’s share of the community estate. My husband has two lovely daughters from a previous marriage. If I die first, my husband gets himself a beautiful pair of wedges, but if he dies first, I only get his right boot. His left boot would be shared equally by his two daughters. Many married couples in Texas have a false assumption that a decedent’s share of community property automatically and always passes to the surviving spouse. But as you can see, this is just not the case. However, each of us is given an opportunity to avoid the default intestacy laws by creating a valid last will and testament.

To have a better understanding, please visit an attorney and have a discussion about your family structure and desired wishes regarding the distribution of your property upon your death. After all, you are a Texan now, which means you might just want to be buried with your boots on. d This legal article is made available for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide legal advice. By reading this legal article you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship created between you and Van Holten Law Firm, PLLC. Further, this article is not legal advice. You should not act upon this information without seeking advice from a lawyer licensed in your own state or jurisdiction. This article should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state or jurisdiction. The information contained in this article may change or updated in the future. Van Holten Law Firm, PLLC is not responsible for any errors or omissions in the content of this article or for damages arising from the use of the information contained in this article under any circumstances.


SUPPOR TING FULSH EAR’S FINEST

70

SUPPORTING Fulshear’s Finest WRITTEN & PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANIEL McJUNKIN

After witnessing the special bond and trust that has developed between Fulshear Police and the growing community, Clay began seeking a way to acknowledge this relationship and give back in a meaningful way.

STARTING FROM SCRATCH

CAPTAIN MIKE M c COY AND CLAY STEWART, BOA R D P R E S I D E N T

A STRONG FOUNDATION

When retired police officer, Clay Stewart, moved to the Fulshear area in 2012, he found that his newly-chosen hometown was served by one of the best police departments he’d ever seen. As he would soon discover, many of his new neighbors agreed with his assessment.

Photo courtesy of Fulshear Police Foundation

Clay Stewart, a forty-year veteran of the Houston Police Department, is a cop’s cop. His law-enforcement career includes twenty years of service assigned to a FBI violent crimes task force. His credentials and his service sent him across multiple continents and around the world investigating crimes, internationally recovering stolen property, educating officers, and without a doubt, bringing many bad guys to justice. Throughout his dedicated service career, Clay gained a unique law enforcement perspective that only a lifetime in the field can provide. Through his experience, he understands how much a community’s appreciation and support can mean to the morale of a department’s rank and file. Clay also knows good cops when he sees them, and he found an entire department of well-trained, professional officers and administrators when he came to Fulshear.


TO CLAY, S A Y I N G “ T H A N K Y O U ” T O T H O S E S O DEDICAT E D A S T O R I S K T H E I R L I V E S F O R H I S OR HER CO M M U N I T Y ’ S S A F E T Y W O U L D R E Q U I R E

71

not just words but action.

So how, Clay wondered, can a community say thank you to professional police officers in a meaningful way? His answer was to provide them with a level of support that a traditional city budget could not afford. Clay’s idea consisted of organizing a new group that would provide for the police department’s unmet needs through involvement of the community. By working with others in the community he hoped that together they could establish the “Fulshear Police Foundation”.

A GROUP EFFORT

Clay received encouragement from his colleague, friend and Fulshear area resident, Mr. Paul Somerville. Paul turned out to be a tremendous resource. It just so happens that Paul is one of the originators of the Houston Police Foundation and serves on the group’s board of directors. Seeking Paul’s advice, Clay told him about Fulshear’s “very progressive Police Department” and how the department “was very professional.” After describing how Fulshear was growing “by leaps and bounds,” he told Paul, “I think that Fulshear is ripe for a Police Foundation.” Paul was quick to encourage Clay by saying,

“I’LL TELL YOU WHAT, IF YOU’LL START IT, ”

I’ll help back it.

It did not take long for Clay Stewart to locate other like-minded individuals to help in founding the group. Tapping into his investigative roots, he soon found himself on the phone with Don McCoy, the Executive Director of the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce. With Don’s enthusiastic input, the project began

Fulshear Police Foundation Members:

TOP ROW (L to R): Officer Bo Villa, Jorden Mahler, John McAleer, Derek Einkauf, Bill Heede, David Melanson, Ed Krenek, Randy Stacy, Officer Charlie Scott - FRONT ROW (L to R): Karen Van Holten, Clay Stewart, Collette Horton - MEMBERS NOT IN PHOTO: Paul Somerville, Don McCoy, Chuck Bucek

FULSHEAR POLICE FOUNDATION’S

Mission

To promote community involvement, provide needed equipment, training and technology, and to maintain the excellence, professionalism and safety of the Fulshear Police Department.


SUPPOR TING FULSH EAR’S FINEST

72

“The sky’s the limit for what we can do long term.”

– RANDY STACY

to take on a life of its own. Don recalls his conversation with Clay and describes their collaboration in whirlwind terms saying that they “were able to get the ball rolling fairly quickly because I’m an organizer.” Don said, “Clay had the vision and I had the skills and the contacts to execute that vision.” Don McCoy is well-known in the community as being a strong supporter of the Fulshear Police Department. After all, Don’s brother is Fulshear Police Captain Mike McCoy, who works with Fulshear Police Chief Kenny Seymour. It has been under Chief Seymour’s leadership that Captain McCoy and the many officers in the Fulshear Police Department have become involved in a number of initiatives intended to build community trust, increase communication, and create positive relationships with the public.

directors, and the rest is history.” Don proudly recalls, “From that, the Fulshear Police Foundation was born.” Randy Stacy, owner of Fulshear Insurance Agency, was among the first to come on board. Stacy recalls that it was a “no brainer” when learning about the foundation. “Count me in,” he said, only to follow that enthusiasm up with, “Why haven’t we done this earlier?” To advance the momentum of the cause, Randy joined with Don McCoy and invited many others from within the greater Fulshear area, each of whom became committed to organizing and establishing this new group. Soon, local attorney Karen Van Holten was on board. Thanks to her legal assistance, the new 501(c)(3) organization was chartered and the Fulshear Police Foundation was formed. According to Clay, the group became functional in February of 2016. Don McCoy sums up the experience, recalling “Within a month we had our website, our Facebook page, multiple charter members and money in the bank.”

GOING LIVE

FULSHEAR POLICE CHIEF KENNY SEYMOUR

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Chief Seymour was glad to hear Clay Stewart’s proposal, saying, “Clay came with this idea about putting the foundation together to bring support to the police department, its training endeavors and helping provide the equipment that may be needed that may not be budgeted for.” He continues by saying, “There were some ideas we had to iron out. I wanted it to be a totally separate entity from the police department and ensure that the board that oversees the financial aspect of this foundation has no affiliation with the police department.”

In announcing the Fulshear Police Foundation to the Fulshear City Council, Clay presented the group’s purpose and objectives. He asked the city council to consider the impacts of Fulshear’s fast growth, saying, “The influx of new residents and businesses places a heavy burden on city services and especially that of crime prevention and safety.” Recognizing the department’s accomplishments, he continued by saying, “The Fulshear Police department serves this community in an exemplary fashion. It is well respected, staffed and operated both efficiently and in a professional manner.” As with most communities, budgets never quite meet the need when it comes to providing fully for a community’s needs. Clay explained, “The vast majority of the annual Police department’s budget is dedicated to pay officer salary, and support personnel.” He went on to say, “There’s just so much of the budget pie to go around. The foundation will be financed by donations made by individuals and businesses to support local initiatives of the Fulshear Police Department.”

Chief Seymour is also glad for what the Fulshear Police Foundation could mean to his officers. “Currently, we don’t have a program in place to support an officer if, God forbid, he or she gets struck down. We felt that this was a good opportunity for us to develop an organization outside of this office to support those efforts. We’re excited about it,” adds Chief Seymour.

Will politics sway the new foundation’s efforts? Clay says, “absolutely not.” “The foundation will support the police department regardless of who the chief is.” Clay goes on to say, “When I say non-political, I mean the foundation will not publicly or privately support one political candidate or another” and that “If a foundation board member decides to run for public office, we will require that individual to resign from the board.”

As momentum for the project increased, Clay and Don quickly found strong support from many others in the community. Speaking of their early work, Don says, “Together, we recruited various like-minded community leaders that wanted to be a part of the board of

The question that most have at this point is, “Exactly what will the Fulshear Police Foundation do?” The answer to that question is somewhat multi-faceted. To

TAKING ACTION


73

Photo courtesy of Fulshear Police Foundation

FULSHEAR POLICE DOG BELLE IN HER BULLETPROOF VEST

Clay notes that “The Fulshear Police Foundation is being formed to improve the performance and capabilities within the Fulshear Police Department by funding training, equipment acquisition, and procurement of new technology, which would not be feasible under the Fulshear City budget.” Continuing that thought, Clay goes on to say, “Any items purchased by the foundation will become the property of the Police Department,” and that “Its utilization will be determined by the Police department within their regulations and guidelines.” Clay feels that the foundation can quickly fill important needs due to the fact that the foundation will not be hampered with the red tape involved in purchasing equipment. According to Clay, examples of the types of requests that the Fulshear Police Foundation hopes to fund might include “tactical vests, body cameras, marine equipment, scuba equipment, a crime scene unit vehicle, secure surveillance communication equipment, finger print kits, medical and tactical kits for patrol vehicles, computer equipment, software programs, and laptops for investigations.” Randy Stacy agrees with Clay and adds, “The sky’s the limit for what we can do long term.” He feels that there are some key things that the Fulshear Police Foundation can provide. Like Clay, he would like to see the group support the police department monetarily so that they are able to buy additional necessary equipment and other important resources. Randy says “If we can do both of these things, and do them well, it will make our

police force even better than it is now.” He smiles as he says “anything else we can do would just be gravy.”

INVOLVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Clay hopes that the community will see the importance of the Fulshear Police Foundation and he anticipates continued strong support from residents as well as businesses. He adds, “The foundation will encourage citizen involvement by promoting awareness, safety and by also hosting an annual banquet to recognize the outstanding performance of individual officers.” “The foundation will be funded by donations from individuals and companies,” Clay says. “There will be an annual membership fee for individuals and businesses, along with lifetime individual and business memberships if desired.” The group will even provide vehicle decals to acknowledge membership in this unique and special foundation. Clay concludes his thoughts by saying, “The foundation will ensure the citizens of Fulshear and surrounding areas will have a police department equipped and trained to safely carry out its mission when needed.” He adds, “When a police department has access to the funds it needs, and feels support from their community, they are capable of so much more.” Fulshear Police Foundation members believe that the Fulshear Police Department has done so much for the citizens of Fulshear, that now it is time to give back. Such a response is truly the gift that keeps on giving, because when a police department has access to the funds it needs, all while feeling support from the people it serves, it becomes stronger and more capable than ever before – allowing a grateful community to sleep a little more soundly. d

Readers can learn more about the FULSHEAR POLICE FOUNDATION by calling 832-280-8284 or by visiting WWW.FULSHEARPOLICEFOUNDATION.COM.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

begin with, the mission of the Fulshear Police Foundation is “To promote community involvement, provide needed equipment, training and technology, and to maintain the excellence, professionalism and safety of the Fulshear Police Department.” That’s a tall order for a newly-formed group, but Clay feels that they are up for the task. The group’s vision statement is “To keep Fulshear, Texas, a safe community to live, work and visit.


FULS H EAR AREA CH AMBER OF COMMERCE

74 4: YOUR REPUTATION IS LIKE YOUR SHADOW; IT FOLLOWS YOU EVERYWHERE! Work hard every day to make sure your reputation is one that you want to follow you! It will affect many areas of your life for the rest of your life.

5: NETWORKING ALWAYS TRUMPS COLD CALLING.

LESSONS from the

CHAMBER WORLD

6: STOP TALKING. This lesson is one of the hardest, but also most important to learn. You expand your professional skills by listening to successful business leaders share best practices and experiences; grow your business by listening for problems you can help other business owners solve. Basically, STOP TALKING and listen! You will accomplish much more when you do.

As the Executive Director of the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce, I’ve learned many useful business ideas from getting to know the best and brightest business leaders in our area. If you’re like me, you’re always looking for that certain nugget of truth that will help you become the best in your business. Please allow me to share these truths with you in hopes that it will make a difference in your own business.

7: PEOPLE ARE KEY IN THE REAL WORLD. Networking with the right people makes you successful. Recruiting the right people makes your job easier. Your organization is irrelevant if the people you have as part of your team are not bought into your mission, committed to delivering on the things you have promised your clients, and passionate about seeing your community grow. The best businesses ALWAYS have the best people in the right places.

1: TREAT EVERYONE YOU MEET LIKE THEY ARE YOUR MOST VALUABLE CONTACT. Never disregard

8: SHOW UP AND BE PRESENT. Just showing up is not

someone because they do not seem important. They may turn out to be the most important person you know.

2: SCRUB TOILETS WITH ENTHUSIASM. In the chamber world, we all wear many hats. In one day you may plan an event, make collections calls, unload cases of water, and then meet with a CEO. No matter what job you are doing and no matter how big or small, do that job as well as you are able and with enthusiasm; even if it is something as seemingly insignificant as scrubbing toilets. This lesson is vital to your success.

3: YOU CANNOT BE EVERYTHING TO EVERYONE. There will always be people looking for your help. Help those you can with the resources you have on hand. Direct those you cannot help to someone with the resources to help them. Most importantly, learn that sometimes you just have to say “no.” You are not always going to have the answers or resources and that is ok!

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Cold calling is necessary; it just is. Networking, however, trumps it every time. Build a network from those cold contacts you make, get to know them, find out how you can help each other, then help each other!

enough. You have to be engaged. It requires effort on your part. When you attend any networking event, you must go in with a plan. Decide who you want to meet and make it happen. Recognize who you should keep in touch with then make it a point to follow up with them. There is a reason it is called net-WORK-ing.

9: GIVE MORE CREDIT THAN YOU TAKE. I have yet to meet anyone in chamber world who does not do more than what is required of them. I have also yet to meet anyone in chamber world whose work is not saturated with the creativity, labor, and support of volunteers. In every accomplishment, recognize all the people who selflessly work alongside you and make you successful. I have never accomplished anything of worth without the support and hard work of others working to make it happen. Credit is not yours to take; it deserves to be shared.

10: SMILE AND HAVE FUN!

If you’re interested in learning more about the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce and becoming a member I encourage you to begin today by visiting our website www.FulshearAreaChamber.com or give us a call at 832-600-3221. Don McCoy | EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | 832-600-3221 | www.FulshearAreaChamber.com


* CHARTER MEMBERS

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BMW OF WEST HOUSTON

(800) 564-1349 - www.bmwwest.com

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(281) 346-0221 - www.csbec.com

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DHK DEVELOPMENT, INC.*

P A R K

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PLATINUM


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AG/CM INC.

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ALPINE ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION (281) 953-0044 - www.alpinecompany.us

AMAZING GRACE HOSPICE

(832) 437-2089 - www.amazinggracehospice.org

AMP LENDING

(281) 391-5363 - www.AskMortgagePros.com

(281) 239-3971 - www.goodcentsad.com

ANDREW VAN CHAU

KATY REAL ESTATE ENTERPRISES DBA: KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY

APPY CHICKS

(281) 220-2100 - www.katytxhomes.com

MEMORIAL HERMANN (832) 229-6662 - www.memorialhermann.org

MOVE IT SELF STORAGE

The Braman Winery & Brewery (281) 762-1375 - www.bramanbrands.com

ACTIONCOACH OF TEXAS

(713) 991-5433 - www.actoflife.org

FULSHEAR ANIMAL HOSPITAL*

(281) 533-9067 - www.FulshearInsurance.com

BRAMAN BRANDS

BRAZOS ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, PLLC

(281) 833-2200 - www.alaniz-schraeder.com

FULSHEAR INSURANCE GROUP, INC. / TEXAS INSURANCE AGENCY - FULSHEAR*

(281)232-8555 - www.bobstacos.com

ACT OF LIFE

(281) 346-1412 - www.wlakes.com

(713) 784-4500 - www.ehrainc.com (281) 346-0077 www.fulshearanimalhospital.com

BOB’S TACO STATION

Andrew.VanChau@hotmail.com (832) 271-7229 - www.appychicks.com

AQUA TEXAS

(281) 394-2933 - www.brazosoms.com

(713) 552-1333 - www.brazosmaterials.com (713) 931-1242

(281) 375-5272 - www.brookshirecare.com

BROWN & GAY ENGINEERS, INC.

(281) 558-8700 - www.browngay.com

CALDERWOOD COACHING LLC

(832) 746-7470 - www.calderwoodcoaching.com

CAMMARATA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY GROUP (832) 913-6353 - www.kids-teeth.com

CAMP BOW WOW KATY, TX

(281) 849-3647 - www.campbowwow.com/katy

CANE ISLAND OUTFITTERS LLC

832-437-3651 - caneislandoutfitters@gmail.com

CARDUNIS BAKERY AND CATERING (281) 795-3785 - www.cardunis.com

CARECOM PHARMACY & COMPOUNDING (832) 437-3397 - www.carecompharmacy.com

CARING4KATY

(409) 673-9802 - www.caring4katy.org

CENTER COURT PIZZA & BREW

(281) 665-3152 - www.centercourtpizza.com

(281)-651-0174 - aquaamerica.com

CENTERPOINT ENERGY

ARLENE HINSLEY BETTER HOMES & GARDENS GARY GREENE*

CENTRAL FORT BEND CHAMBER

(713) 207-1111 - www.CenterpointEnergy.com (281) 342-5464 - www.cfbca.org

(281) 346-0919 - www.moveitstorage.com

(281) 492-5973 - www.har.com/arlenedeclaire

NEWFIRST NATIONAL BANK*

ARNIM & SONS INC / EVO PAYMENTS INTERNATIONAL - (832) 451-9025 ARTS FULSHEAR INC*

CHAMPION RESTORATION

ASPEN UTILITY COMPANY, LLC

CHILD ADVOCATES OF FT. BEND COUNTY

ATHENS CAPITAL LENDING

CHILDREN’S LIGHTHOUSE CROSS CREEK RANCH (281 )394-9696 - www.

(832) 344-2036 - www.newfirst.com

PECAN INTERNET SERVICES (281) 272-3522 - pecaninternet.com

PRO IMAGE* - (713) 806-3016 www.proimagepromotional.com

RANDLE LAW OFFICE LTD., L.L.P.* (281) 657-2000 - www.jgradyrandlepc.com

REPUBLIC SERVICES (713) 726-7510 - www.republicservices.com

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH (713) 465-3408 - www.second.org

SEVERN TRENT SERVICES (281) 646-2364 - www.stservices.com

STATE FARM INSURANCE - TODD SHIPP*

(281) 756-7446 - www.artsfulshear.org (281) 578-1000

(281) 407-4844 - www.AthensCapitalLending.com

(281) 574-1455 - www.christclinickaty.org

BB&T

(832) 471-6144 - www.chuckbucekcpa.com

BERNADETTE PAYNE

(281) 394-7784 www.chuckwagonbbqburgers.com

(281) 392-2050 - www.autumnleaves.com (281) 668-3217 - www.bbt.com (281) 989-0724 - bpayne6@mac.com

(281) 533-0500 - www.waggintailspetranch.com

WINGNUT AERIAL VIDEO SYSTEMS W.A.V.S (417) 861-7113 - www.wingnutaerialvideo.com

CHRIST CLINIC

CHUCK BUCEK, CPA P.C.

CHUCKWAGON BBQ & BURGERS

BEST SEPTIC TANK CLEANING & TRANSPORT

CINCO TIRE & AUTO

BILL HEEDE

CINCOAUTO2

BINGLE VET KATY

CLARITY EYE CARE

BINS CLEAN

CLASSIC CHEVROLET

BLACKBURN FAMILY ORTHODONTICS

CLEAN SWEEP PROPERTY SERVICES

BOB LUTTS FULSHEAR/SIMONTON LIBRARY

CLEAR CHOICE OFFICE SOLUTIONS

(847) 980-7246 - williamheede@aol.com

WAGGIN’ TAILS PET RANCH*

(281) 533-9325 - www.cafb.org

AUTUMN LEAVES OF CINCO RANCH

TAYLOR MORRISON

(281) 901-4167 - www.testarossamotors.com

(281) 644-1407 - www.chase.com

ChildrensLighthouseFulshear.com

(281) 372-6606 - www.atomicaerial.com

(281) 342-9891 - www.bestseptictankcleaning.com

TESTAROSSA MOTORS 2

CHASE BANK

ATOMIC AERIAL

(713) 464-4255 - www.toddshipp.com (281) 780-4652 - www.taylormorrison.com

(281) 395-9000 - www.ChampionRestoration.com

(713) 468-3688 - www.binglevet.com (832) 581-5812 - www.binsclean.com (281) 769-3095 - www.blackburnortho.com (281) 346-1432 - www.fortbend.lib.tx.us

(281) 392-4900 - www.cincotireandauto.com (281) 394-9170 - www.cincoauto.com (832) 913-1092 - www.clarityeyecare.org (281) 491-9000

(281) 533-6000 - www.arayaclean.com

(888) 788-4268 - sales@clearchoiceos.com


(713) 462-3242 - cobbfendley.com

FORT BEND COMMUNITY PARTNERS RAINBOW ROOM

HR IN ALIGNMENT, LLC

FORT BEND COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION

IDEAL CONSULTING DBA SCHOOLEY MITCHELL CONSULTING

COLBURN’S PEST CONTROL SERVICE, INC.*

(832) 451-5867 - www.fbrr.org

CONNECTPLUS POWERED BY ETACTICS

(281) 342-6171 - www.FortBendCountyFair.com

CONSTABLE ROB COOK

www.fbcgop.org

(281) 392-3440 - www.colburnspestcontrol.com (713) 469-2028

FORT BEND COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY

(281) 238-1430 www.Rob.Cook@fortbendcountytx.gov

FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

CONTROL-IT SMART HOME AUTOMATION

FRANK YEVERINO

(713) 966-9306 - www.controlitav.com

CONVENE IT USA LLC

(713) 865-1621 - www.conveneitusa.com

CORRAL WESTERN STORE

(281) 341-0900 - corralwesternstore.com

COSTELLO, INC

(713)-783-7788 - www.costelloinc.com

COUNTY JUDGE BOB HEBERT (281) 341-1454

CRAFT-E CREATIONS

(281) 733-1304 - www.craft-ecreations.com

CROSS RIDGE OFFICE CONDOS

(832) 772-6866 - shbdevelopment.com/properties/crossridge-fulshear

CROSSFIT FULSHEAR

(832) 773-8558 - crossfit-fulshear.com

CRUISE PLANNERS/WATERCREST TRAVEL

(281) 533-4101 - www.watercrestcruisetravel.com

CRUISE PLANNERS - GENE CHIN

(832) 377-6220 - www.mycruisecoordinator.com

CURING CHILDREN’S CANCER FUND (713) 503-6247 - www.cccfund.org

DANIEL R SLAVINSKI, CPA (281) 342-2674

DARLING DENTAL

(832) 437-7939 - www.darlingdds.com

DAVID R. MELANSON

(979) 541-9297 - drmelanson@yahoo.com

DAVIS-GREENLAWN FUNERAL CHAPELS MISSION PARK - (281) 341-8800 www.jbduke@missionparks.com

DEANNA KRENEK RE/MAX REALTY WEST (713) 539-8063 - www.movewest.net

DEKKER’S MESQUITE GRILL

(281) 533-0909 - dekkersmesquitegrill.net

DONDULIN.COM, LP

(281) 238-4719 - www.dondulin.com

DOZIER’S GROCERY & MARKET*

(281) 346-1411 - www.doziersbbq.com

DREAM LANDSCAPE* - (281) 744-2669 www.dreamlandscapedesign.com

ECO2 OFFICE

(832) 437-3204 - www.eco2officekaty.com

EDIBLE MOMENTS

(281) 978-2253 - orders@ediblemoments.com

EDWARD JONES*

(281) 242-3307 - www.edwardjones.com

EFTEX BUSINESS SERVICES, LLC* (832) 315-1165 - www.eftexllc.com

ELITE PROMOTIONS & SOLUTIONS (845) 893-5436

ELKO CONSULTING, LP DBA IMPROVE IT! CONSULTING & TRAINING* (281) 799-0930 - www.improveitsolutions.com

EMPLOYERS ONE SOURCE GROUP (281) 492-9292 - www.eosg.com

ENCHANTMENT KIDS FINE ARTS LEARNING CENTER (281) 394-5090 - www.Enchantmentkids.com

ER KATY*

(281) 395-9900 - www.erkaty.com

FAMILY HOPE

(832) 492-5136 - FamilyHopeFulshear.org

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP TIM O’BRIEN INSURANCE AGENCY

(281) 375-5928 - www.farmersagent.com/tobrien

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM (972) 899-6662 - www.fcer.com

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM KATY CINCO RANCH - (832) 913-8220 www.fcer.com/locations/houston-map/ katy-cinco-ranch/

(281) 341-4664 - www.fbcsheriff.org

(713)545-2520 - http://fylawfirm.com

FRECKLES STATIONARY & GIFTS

(281)536-4900 - www.frecklescentral.com

FRONT ROW SIGNS

(832) 222-9385 - www.frontrowsigns.net

FRONTIER TITLE COMPANY

(281) 391-9181 - www.frontiertitletexas.com

FULSHEAR.COM

(832) 377-6574 - www.fulshear.com

FULSHEAR CITY GRILL*

(281) 346-8196 - www.yongsasianfusion.com

FULSHEAR CONSULTING

(281) 889-9075 - www.hrinalignment.com

(832) 802-3300 - www.schooleymitchell.com/thassan

INTEGRATED CHIROPRACTIC & WELLNESS (281) 346-8023 - www.ichirowellness.com

IRON TRIBE FITNESS - CINCO RANCH

(281) 303-5671 - www.cinco-ranch.irontribefitness.com

ITALIAN MAID CAFE

(281) 341-1587 - www.italianmaidcafe.com

JDC FIRETHORNE

(281) 395-1440 - www.firethorne.info

JOE JOE BEAR FOUNDATION

(281) 398-4522 - www.joejoebear.org

JOSHUA ESTES CAMPAIGN

(281) 410-8936 - www.estesforjudge.com

JOYCE LONG WELLNESS INSTITUTE (281) 344-0095 - www.joycelong.biz

JUDGE CHAD BRIDGES CAMPAIGN 240TH DISTRICT COURT

(832) 867-0471 - www.judgechadbridges.com

FULSHEAR DENTAL

JUDGE MAGGIE JARAMILLO 400TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

FULSHEAR DIRECTORY

KATHIE LAUHOFF KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

FULSHEAR FAMILY MEDICINE*

KATY CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM

FULSHEAR FLOWER SHOP* - (281) 533-9468

KATY FAMILY YMCA

FULSHEAR FOOT AND ANKLE

KATY MAGAZINE, LLC

FULSHEAR GRAPHICS*

KATY MEDIA ROOMS, LLC

FULSHEAR OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT

KATY PAIN SPECIALISTS

FULSHEAR POLICE DEPARTMENT

KATY PLANTATIONS HANDCRAFTED SHUTTERS

FULSHEAR POLICE FOUNDATION

KATY TREADMILL REPAIRS

FULSHEAR PROFESSIONALS

KELLY BELL - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY

FULSHEAR REAL ESTATE PARTNERS L.P.

KELLY FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON LIONS CLUB

KENT HARRIS

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON FIRE DEPARTMENT FULSHEAR STAR

KINA COCKROFT - BE BEAUTIFUL AT ROCK PAPER SCISSORS - (281) 346-8189 - rpshairstudio.net KJT CONSULTING LLC

(281) 665-9678 - www.fulshearstar.com

(281) 705-6895

FULSHEAR TREE SERVICES

KMJ INTERNATIONAL SECURITY SOLUTIONS LLC

(713) 302-0555 - www.fulsheartreeservices.com

(281) 543-7400

GABY’S*

KRENEK LAW OFFICES

(281) 533-0220 - www.gabysetc.net

(281) 578-7711 - www.tkthompson@kreneklaw.com

GALLERY FURNITURE

KUSTOM KARVINGS

(281) 687-1263 - www.galleryfurniture.com

(281) 616-7053 - www.facebook.com/kustomkarving

GEOVEND INTERNATIONAL LLC

LAMAR CISD

(281) 513-4681 - www.geovendinternational.com

(832) 223-0330 - www.lcisd.org

GLAMOX AQUA SIGNAL , CORP.

LANIER PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES PLLC

(281) 944-4100 - www.glamox.com

(713) 504-3755 - www.drstaceylanier.com

GLASS EXPRESSIONS

LATHROP DENTAL CENTER*

(713) 702-2292

(832) 437-3849 - www.lathropdentalcenter.com

GLENN SMITH EXECUTIVE COACHING

LAW OFFICE OF LEWIS WHITE

(281) 841-6680 - www.glennsmithcoaching.com

(713)799-9220 - www.thejusticesite.com

GNA INSPECTIONS, PLLC

LAZIT INDUSTRIES

(832) 567-3293 - GNAInspections.com

(281) 334-9969

HALO PROFESSIONALS

LEGACY AT FALCON POINT

(281) 860-2535 - www.haloalarmshouston.com

(281)394-0628 - www.legacyatfalconpoint.com

HANA GARDEN CHINESE RESTAURANT

LEGALSHIELD

(832) 437-7852 - www.hanagarden.us

(281) 750-5317 - www.legalshieldassociate.com

HANDLEBAR CYCLERY

LEGEND POOLS

(832) 437-7584 - www.handlebarcyclery.com

(281) 979-5507 - www.legendpools.com

HEALTHONE 24 HOUR EMERGENCY CARe WEST CAMPUS*

LEONETTI GRAPHICS INC.

HENDRIX INSURANCE

(281)-579-6044 - www.levinandatwood.com

(281) 851-1464 (281) 346-8371

(713) 858-4280 - www.fulsheardirectory.com (281) 346-0018 - www.fulshearfamilymed.com www.fulshearbouquets&blooms.com

(281) 391-1212 - Fulshearfootandankle.com (832) 244-2411 - www.fulshear.graphics (832) 492-5136 - www.FulshearOutreach.org

(281) 346-2202 - www.facebook.com/FulshearPolice (713) 502-9877

info@fulshearprofessionals.com (713) 302-0555

(281) 346-4156 - www.fulshearsimontonlionsclub.org (281) 346-2800 - www.fsfd.org

(281) 232-1600 - www.healthonehouston.com

(281) 660-4363 - www.judgemaggiejaramillo.com (713) 562-8502 - www.kathielauhoff.com (832) 541-7981 - www.katycam.com

(281) 392-5055 - www.ymcahouston.org/katy (281) 579-9840 - www.katymagazine.com (281) 780-9383 - www.katymediarooms.com (281) 665-8552 - www.katypain.com (281)-402-1280 - www.katyplantations.com

(832) 731-6785 - www.katytreadmillrepairs.com (713) 201-7537 - www.homesearchkatytx.com (281)346-8397

(832) 578-1967 - kentjharris@gmail.com

(281) 499-4959 - www.leonettigraphics.com

LEVIN & ATWOOD, LLP

HERITAGE TEXAS PROPERTIES

LIBERTY STAR MORTGAGE a branch of SecurityNational MC NMLS 3116*

(281) 493-3880 - www.heritagetexas.com

(281) 558-0004 - www.libertystarmortgage.com

HLG WEALTH MANAGEMENT

LIVING MAGAZINE

(832) 437-5528 - www.yourLTCexpert.com

FIRST CUP CAFE

(713) 337-2241

(972) 882-1300 - www.livingmagazine.net

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

LJA ENGINEERING, INC.*

FIRST FULSHEAR UMC*

(281) 882-9453 - www.homeinstead.com/252

(713) 953-5131 - www.ljaengineering.com

HOPE FOR THREE*

LONE STAR TRANSITIONS

FIT SENSE, LLC

(800) 317-0787 - www.hopeforthree.org

(832) 844-2025 - www.lonestartransitions.com

HOUSER ROOFING

LOUETTA AUTOMOTIVE

FONTANILLA ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS

(979) 472-9176 - www.houserroofingtx.com

(281) 304-2517 - www.louettaauto.com

HOUSTON CHRONICLE

LYBELLE INC*

FOREVER FULSHEAR*

(713) 362-5163 - www.houstonchronicle.com

(832) 592-7971 - www.lybelleinc.com

HOUSTON PEDIATRIC DENTAL SPECIALISTS, PC

MADAM DJ

FORT BEND CARES FOUNDATION

(281) 346-8326 - www.smilesgonewild.net

(281) 989-1171 - www.yourfirstcupcafe.com (281) 346-1416 - www.firstfulshear.org (832) 600-4474 - www.fitsense-llc.com (281) 712-1047 - www.katy.bookkeepingexpress.com (713) 703-4129

(832) 819-2005 - www.FortBendCares.org

(713) 714-7357 - www.madamdj.com

MMEMBER EMBER D IRECTORY DIRECTORY

COBB, FENDLEY & ASSOCIATES


MARTIN MORTGAGE *

PRIME MOVERS

TEXANA CENTER*

MARTINEZ NESTOR MARINACCI

PROSPERITY BANK

TEXAS COUNTRY PROPERTIES*

MARY KAY

R.G. MILLER ENGINEERS

TEXAS MOBILE CATERING, LLC

MAS SOLUTIONS LLC

RACHEL THE REALTOR

TEXAS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS

MAXIFICIENT INC.,

RAFTER B IPM LLC

TEXAS PRIDE DISPOSAL

MCFRUGALS DRY CLEAN DEPOT

RAMEY REALTY

THE AD SHEET

MD ANDERSON

RAYMOND L. WIGGINS, D.D.S., M.D. TEXAS ORAL AND FACIAL SURGERY

THE ALTERNATIVE BOARD - HOUSTON SW

(281) 533-9952 - www.martinmortgageonline.com

MEMBER DIRECTORY

(832) 844-0829 - www.mnmlawfirm.com (805) 558-0533 - www.marykay.com/cfairbanks (281) 494-4874 - www.masquality.com (973) 722-6744 - www.maxificient.com (832) 589-2885 - www.mcfrugalsdc.com (832) 334-3738 - www.mdanderson.org

(832) 772-6188 - www.primemovershouston.com (281) 574-8674 - www.ProsperityBankUSA.com (713) 461-9600 - www.rgmiller.com (832) 857-4550 - www.RachelTheRealtor.org (832)-474-8369 - www.rafterbipm.com (713) 503-6247 - www.mgramey1@gmail.com

MEDINA ORTHODONTICS

(281) 395-1200 - www.txofs.com

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF FORT BEND COUNTY

(281) 533-0099 - raysgrill.com

METROMARKETING

(832) 913-8400

(713) 973-7900 - www.metromkt.com

RE/MAX REALTY WEST*

MICHAEL T. McCANN FOUNDATION, INC BIKE FOR MIKE - camccann@me.com MILAGRO SALONS

(281) 346-0222 - www.movewest.net

RED POTATO MARKET

MINDFUL ART*

(832) 451-6874 - www.reiningstrength.org

MOSQUITO DEFENSE SOLUTIONS

(281) 391-8555 - www.remedyroofing.com

MOSSWOOD PROPERTIES, LLC.*

(281) 342-6969 - www.JohnZerwas.com

N2 PUBLISHING - WEST SIDE STORIES

(713) 294-9691 - www.seetimsell.com

NANCY GARCIA - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY*

(281) 344-4335 - www.govsc.org

NANCY JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

(281) 994-5717 - www.pickrick.com

NATIONS RELIABLE LENDING

(281) 232-1801 - www.rightwaydental.com

NATURALAWN OF AMERICA*

(281) 346-2279- www.riverbendbc.org

(281) 394-9300 - www.medianbraces.com (281) 207-2480 - www.mhafbc.org

(281) 778-2500 - www.milagrosalons.com (713) 303-4381 - www.mindful-art.com

(281) 889-8499 - www.Mosquito-Defense.com (281) 346-8032

(832) 277-5610 - www.n2pub.com

(713) 503-5171 - www.nancykingrealty.com (815) 546-9458 - www.nejstudio.com

(800) 675-6423 - www.freemansalemmortgageteam.com (281) 392-2990 - houstonwest.naturalawn.com

NBD GRAPHICS INC.

(281) 547-8200 - www.nbdgraphics.net

RAY’S GRILL

RE/MAX GRAND III

(281) 533-9863 - www.redpotatomarket.com

REINING STRENGTH THERAPEUTIC HORSEMANSHIP REMEDY ROOFING, INC.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN ZERWAS M.D. RHONDA POHLMAN KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY RICHMOND STATE SUPPORTED LIVING CENTER RICK HENDERSON - REMAX GRAND RIGHTWAY DENTAL

RIVER BEND BAPTIST CHURCH

RONALD M. COHEN AND ASSOCIATES ATTORNEY AT LAW - (281) 762-0492 SAFARI TEXAS

NETWORK IN ACTION

(281) 277-7888 - www.safaritexasballroom.com

NO LABEL BREWING CO.

(281) 202-0337 - www.samsclub.com

NORTH FORT BEND WATER AUTHORITY

(713) 899-8979 - sampicas.agm@gmail.com

NOVABAY PHARMACEUTICALS

(281) 533-0911 - www.sandefurcpa.com

OCUSOFT

(281) 239-4205 - www.santikos.com

OFFICEMAKERS

(281) 394-5999 - www.saporestaurant.com

OLD FOSTER COMMUNITY MUSEUM

www.sharonsensationalscents.scentsy.us

OLD REPUBLIC NATIONAL TITLE

(979) 251-7888

OLSON FOR CONGRESS COMMITTEE

(281) 772-3971 - www.sendoutcards.com

(713) 417-6152 - www.networkinaction.com (281) 693-7545 - www.nolabelbrew.com (713)-488-8253 - nfbwa.com

(832) 244-5678 - www.NovaBay.com (281) 239-9801 - www.ocusoft.com (281) 574-3800 - www.officemakers.com (281) 239-2178 - www.fostercommunitymuseum.org (281) 265-9500 - www.oldrepublictitle.com/houstonnational (281) 980-0750 - www.olsonforcongress.com

SAM’S CLUB

SAMPICA’S ANTIQUES, GIFTS & MORE SANDEFUR CPA, P.C.*

SANTIKOS PALLADIUM AVX

SAPORE RISTORANTE ITALIANO SCENTSY* - (832) 545-8121

SENATOR LOIS KOLKHORST SEND OUT CARDS

(281) 239-1427 - www.texanacenter.com (281) 346-1136

(713 )443-9013 - www.thesauerkrautfoodtruck.com (281) 346-8326 - www.texasorthodonticspecialists.com (281) 342-8178 - www.texaspridedisposal.com (713) 409-0420 - theadsheet@gmail.com (832) 840-8481 - www.tabhoustonsw.com

THE ART OF JAMES L. FOSTER

(405) 696-9333 - www.jameslfoster.com

THE BUNKER ICEHOUSE* (281) 923-8833

THE ESCAPE SPA AND WELLNESS CENTER (281) 202-4271 - www.theescapespa.net

THE GROWLER SPOT

(832) 600-5856 - www.thegrowlerspot.com

THE GYM STATION WEST CINCO*

(281) 394-7844 - www.gymstation.com

THE MELISSA MARSHALL GROUP (281) 386-9772

THE ORCHARD - ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE (281) 371-3000 - www.theorchardkaty.com

THE OUGHTNESS GROUP

(281) 769-2846 - oughtness.net

THE SALONS OF FULSHEAR / THE LYME LEOPARD (281) 533-9332

THE SPORTS MARKETING COMPANY

(832) 945-2220 - www.thesportsmarketingcompany.com

THE SUMMIT FITNESS STUDIO

(832) 978-3809 - www.thesummitfulshear.com

THE UPS STORE 6650

(281) 396-4645 - www.katy-tx-6650.theupsstorelocal.com

THE VINEYARD II, TEXAS WINE AND CRAFT BEER TASTING

(979) 232-3111 - www.thevineyard2.com

THE WELLPET CENTER VETERINARY HOSPITAL (281) 394-2355 - www.thewellpetcenter.com

THRIVE CHURCH*

(979) 884-7483 - thrivechurch.cc

TOM DUTKA AGENCY*

(281) 633-0630 - agents.allstate.com

TOMMY FOR MAYOR

(832) 594-0878 - facebook.com/tommyformayor

TOPMARK REALTY

(281) 698-7787 - topmarkrealty.com

TRACY BOGIEL BETTER HOMES & GARDENS GARY GREENE* (281) 646-1136 - www.ilovefulsheartx.com

TRACY GREMILLION - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER (281) 723-9890 - www.isellkatytx.net

TRICIA TURNER PROPERTIES / A RE/MAX EXPERIENCE (832)-563-0916 - www.har.com/TriciaG

OPERATION ENDURING BROTHERHOOD

SERVPRO OF WEST FORT BEND COUNTY* - (281) 342-5326

(281) 804-6996 - www.operationenduringbrotherhood.org

www.servproofwestfortbendcounty.com

ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT

SILPADA DESIGNS*

(281) 960-9833

(469) 826-3564 - www.silpada.com

ORIGAMI OWL

SJR FAMILY PARTNERSHIP, LTD* - (281) 468-3588 SPORTS CHIROPRACTIC PERFORMANCE - SCP

UNITED HEALTHCARE

SQUIRREL HOLDINGS LLC*

(281)-235-0600 - UpCloseMagazine.com

SUGAR LAND SKEETERS

(713) 865-0229 - www.vanholtenlaw.com

(832) 222-8282 - Parkwayfellowship.com

(281) 240-4487 - www.sugarlandskeeters.com

PATHPOINTS TO WELLNESS HEALING ARTS & RETREAT CENTER*

STATE FARM INSURANCE - JEFF GILBERT*

www.victorsmexicanrestaurant.com

STEWART TITLE COMPANY*

PAUL LYTLE INSURANCE AGENCY

(281) 346-1333 - www.stewart.com/houston

(602) 300-2888 - www.wineshopathome.com/ sschlangen

STIEBER INSURANCE GROUP LLC*

VOTE WAYNE THOMPSON

PAULA RUCKY PROPERTIES - REMAX GRAND

(281) 341-7141 - www.stieberinsurance.com

SUGAR LAND SKEETERS

W.A. “ANDY” MEYERS

PAYCHEX*

(281) 240-4487 - www.sugarlandskeeters.com

SUNRISE OF CINCO RANCH - (281) 240-0500

WALLIS STATE BANK

PENDLETON REAL ESTATE / RE/MAX CINCO RANCH

www.sunriseseniorliving.com/communities/sunrise-of-cincoranch/overview.aspx

(713) 935-3720 - www.wallisbank.com

PET SUPPLIES PLUS - (281) 346-4535 PETERSON CONSULTING SERVICES

SUNSET GLASS TINTING

(281) 533-4101 - www.watercrestcruisetravel.com

SWEET TOOTH SHOPPE INC.*

(281) 242-0303 - www.texbusinesslaw.com

(281) 202-5988 - www.photoboothonwheels.com

TANCHES GLOBAL MANAGEMENT INC.

(281) 394-7581 - www.westheimerlakesdental.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE & AQUATIC REHAB OF FORT BEND

TEMPERATUREPRO OF FORT BEND

(281) 392-5535 - www.westsidegrillandfireplace.com

PIVOTAL STEEL BUILDINGS & ROOFING

TERRA POINT REALTY, LLC

(281) 346-6200 - www.world-widetelecom.com

PRESCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS WEST

TERRELL ROOFING AND CONSTRUCTION

(281) 665-3917 - yenhibachi.com

PRESTIGE PROPERTIES TEXAS

TERRY COZART PIANO

(281) 346-1715 - www.kennethanddeloisbranch.com

(713) 703-1554 - www.carmenizzo.origamiowl.com

OWEN AND SHERRI BEMENT (281) 346-0299

PAMELA MURRAY - (832)841-0399 PARKWAY FELLOWSHIP

(832) 461-6936 - www.pathpointstowellness.com

(832) 266-0153 - agents.allstate.com/paul-lytle-fulshear-tx.html (281) 793-5779 - www.paularucky.com (832) 914-3721 - www.paychex.com (281) 734-7342 - www.pendletonre.com

(713) 819-2461

PHOTO BOOTH ON WHEELS

(281) 347-8900 - www.ptcare.net

(888) 75-STEEL - www.pivotalconstruction.net (832) 545-0645 - preschoolofperformingartswest.com (281) 238-0800

(832) 222-9727 - www.scpfit.com (713) 302-6873

(281) 347-6200 - www.yourareaneighbor.com

(281) 494-7161 - www.sunsetglasstinting.com (281) 533-0477 - www.sweettoothshoppe.com (281) 903-7103 x 102 - www.tanches.com

(281) 616-5999 - www.temperatureprofortbend.com (281) 346-2112 - www.terrapointrealty.com (832) 535-9211 - www.terrellroofingandconstruction.com (713) 882-8558 - mozartcozart@yahoo.com

TUTUS & BOWTIES EVENTS

(832) 398-4676 - www.tutusbowtiesevents.com

TYNYLABS LLC

(832) 419-7020 - www.tynylabs.com (281) 413-6614 - www.prsinsurancesolutions.com

UPCLOSE MAGAZINE LLC VAN HOLTEN LAW FIRM*

VICTOR’S MEXICAN GRILLE* - (281) 533-0040 VINES OF WINE - WINESHOP AT HOME

(713) 202-2252 - www.votewaynethompson.com (281) 238-1400 - www.andy.meyers@fortbendcountytx.gov

WATERCREST CRUISE TRAVEL WAUSON | PROBUS

WESTHEIMER LAKES DENTAL

WESTSIDE GRILL AND FIREPLACE, INC. WORLD-WIDE TELECOM

YEN TEPPANYAKI & SUSHI STEAK HOUSE YOUNGEVITY / DAVID ALLEN CAPITAL


Fulshear Magazine Volume 2 - Number 2  
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