__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

W W W . FULSHEAR . COM


Cross creek rancH

The life you want. Right now.

ADVENTURE

ISLAND WATERPARK

OVER 15 Miles of

TRAILS

ON-SITE ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL

With sparkling lakes, gorgeous natural splendor and incredible amenities, including playgrounds, an on-site elementary school, a fitness center, dog park and Italian café, there’s no question everything you want out of life is right here, right now. Discover the life you’re looking for today in Cross Creek Ranch.

CrossCreekTexas.com • Katy ISD & Lamar CISD • Homes from the $280s to Millions

In FULSHEAR at FM1463 and FM1093


F

irst, let me say to you, our readers, as well as to our advertisers, “Thank you” for having made Fulshear Magazine such a success. It is because of your encouragement and strong support that your Fulshear Magazine ‘family’ continually strives to produce quality work each and every issue. We want the magazine to be a great resource for those considering our area as their future home. For us, this is personal – as is our genuine appreciation for your support.

LETTER FROM TH E PUBLISH ER

06

This is an exciting time and it is abounding with opportunities. Nevertheless, we can all anticipate a few not-so-comfortable growing pains as we each adjust a bit in order to accommodate the ongoing development within the greater Fulshear area. In any event, we plan to continue showcasing the best and the brightest that the greater Fulshear area has to offer.

FULSHEAR A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

LETTER FROM THE

Publisher

M

Photo by Jaclyn Ritter

As you read through the pages of this issue of Fulshear Magazine, we hope you’ll take a moment to consider where we are in the timeline of our area’s growth and development. Today, Fulshear has a population that is about ten times larger than it was in the year 2000. However, that ten-fold growth pales in comparison to growth projections that indicate the city’s population should increase another ten-fold over the coming decades with its population expected to achieve well over 80,000. What a remarkable time this is. As our area grows, we are honored to stand with others in the community that promote the best of the greater Fulshear area. For example, within its first year, the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce grew to 162 members. This was no small feat. Even more impressive is the fact that in their second year they more than doubled their membership and are currently sitting at 340 active members. Indeed, such business development is a great sign for our growing area and we support it. We hope that you will enjoy reading this issue. On behalf of my business partner, Mr. George Lane, as well as the dedicated, talented and creative staff at Fulshear Magazine, I can say without a doubt that we are all proud to be a part of the growth and vision of this community. It is our honor that we are able to tell our readers about some of the amazing people, places, events, groups and businesses that make our area pretty special.

Once again, thank you for reading Fulshear Magazine. Respectfully,

Daniel McJunkin

PUBLISHER - FULSHEAR MAGAZINE


FULSHEAR M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

MAGAZINE STAFF DAN M c JUNKIN Publisher

KATIE MECHAM Art Director

JENNI M c JUNKIN Media Director

JACLYN RITTER

Photo by Katie Mecham

06

Churchill Fulshear Jr.

14

Valley Lodge Trail Ride

21

Steinhauser’s

24

More Than An Exchange

28

Alaska

32

Three Generations of Service & Quality

The Beautiful Adventure

34

Traditions in the Making

40 44

Celebrated Ground

46

The Next Generation

50

Golf Is Like Life

53

Texana

56

Behind the Badge

58

Chili Recipe

61

So, Where Do You Cross Paths

62

Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce

72

Chamber Directory

73

of Briscoe

With The Old 300?

Business Development Manager

DON M c COY

Chamber Consultant

PRODUCTION STAFF SHAY TIDWELL Production Manager

BONNIE M c FERREN Bookkeeping

TRACY MILLER Accounting IT Consultant

SCOTT SCHEINFELD Printing Coordinator

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

It Begins with A Bean Beneath Our Feet

ALLISON CLOWER

JOSEPH SONNIER

Charting Fulshear’s Future Meet Fulshear High School’s First Principal

SUSAN STRICKLAND Associate Editor

Letter from the Publisher His Land, His Family, His Home & His Legacy

Associate Editor

FC

TERRY CROCKETT BOB HAENEL ASHLEY MANCHACA CJ McDANIEL DANIEL M c JUNKIN TERRI OLIVER JACLYN RITTER TRACEY J. SHAW SUSAN STRICKLAND

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS KIM BARTHOLOMEW DANIEL M c JUNKIN KATIE MECHAM RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY JACLYN RITTER

FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC GEORGE LANE & DANIEL M c JUNKIN Principals

WWW.FULSHEAR.COM Photo by Jaclyn Ritter

On the Cover

FULSHEAR MAGAZINE 281-973-0633

4017 Penn Lane, Fulshear, TX 77441 © Copyright 2016 - Fulshear Media Partners, LLC All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

E


F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

CH URCH ILL FULSH EAR JR.

14

Churc hill FulshearJr. H I S L A N D , H I S F A M I LY , H I S H O M E A N D H I S L E G A C Y WRITTEN BY TERRY CROCKETT

Portrait of Churchill Fulshear


15

On July 7th, 1824 Churchill Fulshear Sr. officially petitioned the Mexican Government and Stephen F. Austin to allow him and his family to settle in a new colonial establishment located in what today is Fort Bend County Texas. He was on that day granted a league of land totaling 4,428 acres. The use of Sr. in the above introduction was not due to having seen it in recorded documents or deed records, but instead to distinguish between the gentleman who participated in the original Mexican Land Grant and his son Churchill Fulshear Jr. Most who know the history of the town of Fulshear are more familiar with Churchill Fulshear Jr. since there is more recorded history during the mid to late 1800’s. From the historical records point of view, Churchill Jr. had more to do with the development of the town of Fulshear due to his age and lifespan. His father Churchill Sr. passed away in 1836 before the Texas Revolution and just 12 years after receiving his Land Grant.

COMING TO TEXAS Churchill Fulshear Jr. was born July 10, 1808 in Tennessee. He came to Texas with his father, mother Betsy and older brothers Benjamin and Graves and Sister Mary. According to the filed document recording the original land grant, the location of their land was referred to as “in the East margin of the Brazos River”. It was typical for the families settling in this region to locate on or near the Brazos River. It is believed that the Fulshear family first built a cabin on or very near the Brazos River at the south end of their 4,000 plus acre property. The boundaries of the original land grant can be identified by referencing present day landmarks. The Brazos River is the southern boundary of the 4,428 acres. The northern boundary is north of downtown Fulshear running along North Fulshear Estates Road and bounded by FM 359 and just north of the Irene Stern Community Center. The western line runs south crossing FM 1093 at the entrance to the Fulbrook Creek residential development and continues to the Brazos River. The eastern line travels south past Irene Stern Community Center then follows Fulshear Katy Road as it crosses FM 1093 and continues to the Brazos River.

A GROWING FAMILY From the time period between 1824 and the taking of the 1850 US Census there is little recorded information as to the activities and whereabouts of the Churchill Fulshear

family. In 1830 Churchill Jr. married Minerva Cartwright the daughter of Jesse H. Cartwright. Together, they had 5 children: Mary, Graves, Jessie, John and Churchill (the 3rd). It is reported that Churchill Jr. and his brothers, Benjamin and Graves, joined the Republic of Texas army in 1836 and were scouts along the Brazos River bottom. In 1856 Churchill Jr’s son Graves married Lavinia Colburn and they had a son named Thomas Fulshear and a daughter named Ella Fulshear. Other writings mention Jessie and John eventually joining the confederate army in 1862 and having never married.

REAL ESTATE AND HORSE RACING One of Churchill Jr’s first real estate transactions was on May 10, 1844 when he sold 654 acres to John Randon. The property was located at the northeast corner of Churchill’s league of land. Incidentally the Randon family had also been granted the adjacent league of land. The deed between the two noted Randon paid Fulshear $4,000 for 654 acres. There were many more land sales that followed. Various accounts include that between 1850 and 1870 Churchill Fulshear Jr. operated a horse racing course located north of the town in or near what was then called the town of Pittsville. He called his track “Churchill Downs”. He was known for his love of horses which was evidenced by the fact that he built stables for them on the lower level of his home. One of his most famous horses at that time was “Get-A-Way” also known as “Old Get” by the local people. The horse was bred by Churchill and competed on numerous tracks throughout the United States and Europe.

CHURCHILL JUNIOR B U I L D S HIS MANS ION In 1850 Churchill Jr. began construction of a new home that he called Lake Hill. He chose to build the home on one of the highest points on his land. The hill is hard to miss as you travel into Fulshear on FM 1093 from the east. It fronts on the right (north) side of FM 1093 between Katy Fulshear Road and Syms Street. The home overlooked a lake just south of the home across FM 1093. The very large red brick home with white colonial columns was 3 stories high and included a bottom floor or basement. It is said that the lower level contained a kitchen, a store room and stables for Fulshear’s most expensive race horses. The second floor included a parlor, a dining room, and the master bedroom along with a few other small rooms. The third floor contained more bedrooms and a top floor that was used to look out over the land. The

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

CHURCHILL SR. R E C E IVES HIS LAND G RANT


Fulshear home was built with bricks formed using water from the nearby lake and accounts are that Churchill fired the bricks himself. Each brick was personalized with an imprint of an oak leaf.

CH URCH ILL FULSH EAR JR.

16

MANY ROOMS F O R MANY PEOPL E

Churchill Fulshear Mansion

It is interesting to note all of the names of the individuals who lived in the Fulshear home after it was completed. The home’s first occupants included Churchill Jr. 42 his wife Minerva Fulshear 40, and their 5 children. Their names were Mary A. Fulshear (age 18), Graves Fulshear (age 15), Jessie Fulshear (age 13), John Fulshear (age 7) and Churchill (age 2). Ten years later the 1860 US Census reported Churchill’s residence included himself, then age 51, M.(Minerva) K. Fulshear (age 50), Mary A. Moore (age 25), F.(Fulshear) Moore (age 6), Jesse Fulshear (age 21), John R. Fulshear (age 18), C. Fulshear (age 10), John C. Cooper (age 74), R.A. Oliver (age 33), E. Oliver (age 26), C.M. Oliver (age 6), G.W. Oliver (age 4), Martha Oliver (age 1) and B Morse (age 22). Twenty years after the home was built, the 1870 US Census revealed that John Huggins (age 22) joined Churchill Jr. as a resident along with Julius C Wimberly (age 18), Moses Johnson (age 27), Lucinda Johnson (age 20), Emma Johnson (age 4), Jane Coleman (age 15), Thomas Cuny (age 16) and Lewis Foster (age 14). By this time, Churchill Jr’s wife Minerva, daughter Mary and her son Fulshear Moore had passed away. Additionally Churchill Jr’s sons Graves, Jessie, Churchill “the 3rd” and wife Virginia were reported as all deceased due to tuberculosis and related diseases. Minerva passed away in 1862. Graves passed in 1859 and Jessie and Mary each passed in 1866.

Leaving the Stable under the Churchill Fulshear Mansion

DOWN TO FOU R By 1880, the Fulshear household was down to four occupants other than Churchill. Emma Wilson, age 39, lived in the home and her occupation according to the census was “keeping house.” Emma’s birthplace was listed as Germany. The census included Churchill’s grandson Thomas, age 22, “atnd stock” (attended stock) and two servants Ann Flake, age 50, listed as a “cook” along with Liser Gordan, age 50, shown as a “maid”.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

On the 23rd day of February 1883 Churchill Jr. deeded property out of the original Fulshear League to his grandson Thomas Fulshear. Churchill states in the deed that this transfer of property was based on his deceased wife’s will in which others were given property and now those who were given property are deceased. He stated that he and Thomas were “the only surviving parties interested in said estate of Fulshear Post Office


community property belonging to my wife at her death”. The property description included “parallel with the west line of the S.R. Walker tract to strike a pecan tree located in the fields and north of the Big Bayou said tree being about 2 feet in diameter”. The tract was further described as being “some where between Five Hundred and One Thousand acres”.

E NTER THE RAILROAD Probably the most well know land transfer occurred in 1888 when Churchill Jr. granted the San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railway Company (S.A. & A.P.) right away to run their tracks through his property. The deed that records the transfer states the railway track would be running from Wallis in Austin County to Houston in Harris County. Part of the railroads responsibility was to build and maintain the railroad depot. Additionally S.A. & A.P. Railway surveyed and platted the entire town of Fulshear in order to show the railway right of way as it related to the remainder of the “downtown” area. The railway company provided a survey/plat and attached it to the June 1888 deed. The plat included the names of all of the streets which are still used today. What is not as well known is that other negotiations and transactions occurred in order to get this deal done. The deed referenced earlier, dated June 1888, included a transfer of land unrelated to the pathway of the railway. Churchill Jr. deeded 100 acres to the railroad including 13 Blocks of land, most of which were comprised of 12 individual lots each and located in downtown Fulshear. Additionally, Churchill Jr. deeded to S.A. & A.P. Railway company six specific even numbered lots out of four Blocks located on what was then called North Front Street and is now known as FM 1093.

It may be assumed that Mifflin Kenedy the President of the S.A. & A. P. Railway Company used this type of deal making in order to finance the construction of the railroads. Shortly after the transfer of the downtown properties from Churchill Jr. to the railway company, both parties began selling the lots. On a side note, Mifflin Kenedy must have done well for himself given the fact the town of Kenedy, Texas located between San Antonio and Victoria was named after him.

GROWTH, TRAGED Y , AND REBUILDING Most notable of the lot sales from both Churchill and the railway company were six lots out of Block 2 that all front on FM 1093. They begin at the corner of FM 1093 and FM 359 and continue east one block to Wilson Street. The existing Shell station sits on four of these six lots. Churchill Jr. sold lot 5 to William Seay in 1889 for fifty dollars and lot 3 to J.H. Ferguson and Warren Miller in 1890 for seventy five dollars. Payment was made with ten dollars cash and a note for sixty five dollars. The railway sold lot 6 and 4 to James H. Quinn and W. L. Nesbit in 1891 for fifteen dollars cash and a sixty dollar note. The significance of these initial lot sales was that lot 5 was eventually sold to Henry Bullwinkle in 1897 for six hundred dollars. By 1904 Bullwinkle and a George Hunken both had ownership interest in this lot. Based on an old photograph it is known that Hunken owned a grocery store and Bullwinkle a dry goods store in Fulshear. The photograph is believed to be from between the late 1890’s and 1910 and ties the location of their original store(s) to be where the Shell gas station now sits at the intersection of FM 1093 and FM 359. Additional stores and owners from that same photograph and Block of lots were J.G. Mayes Saloon, Dr.

Fulshear Train Depot

17


CH URCH ILL FULSH EAR JR.

18

P.D. Harris Drug Store & Office and the Huggins Building. The Churchill Fulshear Jr. home on the hill can also be seen in one of the photographs. Across North Front Street (FM 1093) was the location of the train Depot. It sat on the north side of the tracks across FM 1093 from the existing Shell gas station. The City of Fulshear has located three flags and a flower garden near the site. There was a fire in 1910 that destroyed most of the buildings in downtown at that time. Following the fire, in 1911, J.G. Mays and M.K. Mayes built a two story building on the southeast corner of FM 1093 and FM 359 which was called the Mayes Building. The first businesses in this building included M. Solomon Dry Goods, M.K. Mayes General Merchandise and J.G. Mayes Saloon.

C HURCHILL JR.’S W ILL Unfortunately, Churchill Jr. did not live long enough to see the development of downtown due to his passing February 1st 1892. According to Churchill Jr’s Last Will and Testament dated August 14th, 1884 and witnessed by R. L. Harris and E. M. Huggins, Emma Wilson, his housekeeper, was to receive his “present place of residence known as Lake Hill” and the land surrounding it described at that time as “containing 500 acres more or less”. Churchill Jr’s grandson, Thomas Fulshear, was

also named as an heir and was to receive 25 head of horses and 50 head of cattle along with the remainder of Churchill’s land. On May 23rd, 1892 when the Will was probated there was a survey ordered to more accurately describe and account for the property willed to Emma Wilson and Thomas Fulshear. Wilson’s property was surveyed and actually contained 976 acres and Thomas Fulshear ended up with a total of two tracts containing 535 acres on the north portion of the original League and 503 acres out of the southern portion.

THE FULSHEAR FAM I LY CEMETERY Still located on the old Fulshear family home site is a small family cemetery with three head stones still in place. There is a 4 sided head stone with the following names: Churchill Fulshear (the 3rd), his wife N.V. (Virginia) Fulshear, Jessie C. Fulshear, Fulshear Moore (Mary’s son), Mary A. Wimberly (Churchill Jr’s daughter) and her husband W. C. Wimberly, M.K. Fulshear and Graves Fulshear. Inscribed on a separate headstone is “In Memory of Churchill Fulshear” born July 10, 1808 and died Feb 1, 1892. A third head stone has the name Amelia who is further described as the “wife of J.C. Wimberly”.

FROM THE AUTHO R I hope the information shared serves to not only document facts related to the life of Churchill Fulshear Jr., but to also help paint a picture and keep alive some of the history of the town of Fulshear which has disappeared.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

The obvious focus of the article was Churchill Fulshear Jr.’s life, however there are numerous other local families that have roots going back to the early days of Fulshear. With assistance we hope to include those family stories in upcoming issues. d

Fulshear Before the Fire


VALLEY LODGE

TRAIL RIDE

21

us back to another time, a time that helped mold our Texas heritage. The city of Fulshear cheers the Valley Lodge Trail Ride on each and every year as they head toward the excitement in downtown Houston. Jim Hubbard, the trail boss for the Valley Lodge Trail Ride, began participating in the annual event in 1955!

E N T E R TA I N S , PROMOTES &

E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER very March people put their lives on hold for the biggest event in town – The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo (HLSR). It is during this time we all feel like true Texans as we sport our cowboy boots and shiny belt buckles. We see men and women on horseback with large old fashioned chuck wagons pulling through the city. For a moment, this image takes

HISTORY AND PURPOSE OF THE TRAIL RIDES As pioneers moved west in search of the American dream, cowboys created trails to take cattle to the major market centers. Cattle drives were a major economic movement in the 19th century. While these

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

E D U C AT E S


VALLEY LODGE TRAIL RIDE

22

trails are no longer used for their initial purpose, they have become part of another American tradition. In January of 1952, four men formed the very first trail ride in attempts to increase awareness of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. The publicity that followed was more than expected. More people joined the ride with each passing year. This ride, now known as the Salt Grass Trail Ride, was the first of 13 rides sanctioned by the HLSR. The Valley Lodge Trail Ride Association (VLTRA) began in 1959 by a group of people who lived in Valley Lodge subdivision in Simonton, Texas. VLTRA is sometimes referred to as the Champagne Trail Ride because of their first class image (and the fact that the men serve the women champagne each morning along the ride). They ride from Brookshire to Houston, covering roughly 75 miles. Jim Hubbard began participating in trail rides as a teenager in 1955. “I started with Valley Lodge Trail Ride in 1994 as a rider. I then served as assistant trail boss for over 15 years, then added the role of vice president for roughly 6 years, and now I’m the trail boss,” notes Jim. “What we’re doing is promoting the rodeo, that’s our job. And Valley Lodge does a pretty darn good job!” When asked why it is so important to promote the rodeo, Jim responds by saying, “It’s for the kids, that’s the real message.” The HLSR is the largest provider of college education scholarships in Texas. In

2015 alone they gave away 12.9 million dollars toward scholarships. Since its debut in 1932, they have given roughly 375 million dollars. “We do this so Texas kids have the opportunity for a good education,” says Jim. Melissa Zerber, Jim’s assistant secretary and administrative assistant who handles all of the press and media for Valley Lodge, shares in Jim’s eagerness to promote such a good cause. “Everyone on the ride is so passionate about each other, what we’re doing, and about that ultimate goal,” adds Melissa. “By being a part of the HLSR and a rodeo committee you are part of the bigger picture, because all of our time is going toward raising awareness and scholarships.”

WHAT SETS VALLEY LODGE APART? Valley Lodge Trail Ride sets itself apart from the other rides by being a true family friendly ride. “It’s like a second family,” notes Melissa. “We are very proud of the fact that there are generations within our group – grandparents, kids and grandkids.” With strict codes of conduct and attention to safety, it is no wonder that many parents feel comfortable introducing their kids to the tradition at an early age. Having the younger generation as excited, passionate and involved as their parents is what is going to keep this tradition alive. It is important to Jim and Melissa that they continue the lineage. The younger generation is also growing up

“It’s about being bigger than we are – everyday.” -MELISSA ZERBER -

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

surrounded by a large and supportive family. “I learned how to saddle a horse and harness a team of mules when I was less than 10 years old,” shares Jim. “Most kids today don’t have that opportunity or live in that kind of culture. If we can expose youngsters to this lifestyle, maybe it’ll keep some of them on the right track and they will understand the values that we hold dear – honesty, hard work, family, community and service.” Something the group holds near and dear is their relationship with the Brookwood Community, a nonprofit residential facility and vocational program for adults with disabilities. The Saturday one week before the large opening parade in downtown Houston, the Valley Lodge Trail Ride invites the residents of Brookwood for an afternoon of fun and wagon rides at Pecan Acres Ranch located in Simonton. “We put them in the wagons wheel chairs and all, it doesn’t matter. If they want to ride in the wagon they get to,” says Jim. Friends from the HLSR’s Speakers Committee bring out the rodeo clowns and a band called The Lonestar Cowboys. They put on a fantastic show for both the riders and Brookwood residents. Then it comes time to take a ride around the ranch in the wagons. “The Brookwood Community tells us this is one of the highlights of their year,” says Jim. This is a personal favorite for both Jim and Melissa as well. They look forward to this particular yearly event because they are able to share their passion with amazing people that may not get this sort of experience any other way.


THEIR ROUTE TO HOUSTON

GIVING BACK While the Valley Lodge Trail ride has completed its trek, Jim Hubbard is far from done. For over 15 years he has also served on the Rodeo Grand Entry committee, where for 21 consecutive days Jim rides as an outrider on the last wagon during each night’s rodeo grand entry. “There is no such thing as retirement,” laughs Jim. “I don’t even know how to spell it.” The position of trail boss is a three year term. Jim’s term will wrap up at the end of 2016 where he will then become a chairman of the board. “I’ll be 75 years old in January, and the world has been good to me,” reflects Jim. “It’s time for old Jim to give something back.” While he knows that his abilities are limited, he has also spent a lifetime horseback and still feels comfortable that way. “I told the rodeo that I can do anything they ask of me on horseback - off of this horse I am not worth much.” Jim does everything he can to put on a safe and fun trail ride that promotes western tradition and good values. “It’s good for the inner man to give back.” The Valley Lodge Trail Ride is one of the oldest of 13 rides sanctioned with the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, however they are in a league of their own. They have a real story to tell. They take pride in preserving the rich history the trail rides were formed around, as well as continuing the legacy through younger generations. Jim Hubbard has been enjoying the ride for quite some time, and yet each ride is better than the last. It is because of his strong values, high expectations and attention to detail that the Valley Lodge Trail Ride continues to be a huge success. d

23

VALLEY LODGE

TRAIL RIDE

WILL BE STOPPING IN FULSHEAR BEFORE NOON ON SUNDAY,

FEBRUARY 20, 2016 THEY WELCOME YOU TO STOP BY AND SAY HI!

For more information about the VALLEY LODGE TRAIL RIDE go to: WWW.VLTRA.COM

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

With two warm up rides under their belt, the Valley Lodge Trail Ride, with over 125 riders and 10 wagons, starts their trek in Brookshire the Saturday one week before the HLSR parade in downtown Houston. Their first stop on Sunday – Dekkers in Fulshear! Since the restaurants opening in 2011, they have been one of Valley Lodge’s biggest supporters. They provide a great venue to host the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo’s Trail Ride Committee, executive officers, vice presidents and directors. At this rest stop they enjoy a delicious brunch, good company and fellowship. After lunch VLTRA heads toward Jones Creek Ranch Park, now owned by Ft. Bend County. At that point everyone returns home only to pick right back up from that same spot Wednesday morning. This year they are excited to stop for lunch at the brand new Gallery Furniture restaurant, Brick and Mortar. After camping at Great Southwest Equestrian Center, they trek on toward the Farm and Ranch Club where they meet up with the Salt Grass Trail Ride. Early Friday morning, both trail rides make the final haul up to Memorial Park where they meet up with the other rides and celebrate another year in the books. There are a lot of guest speakers, as well as an awards ceremony where awards are given to the 3 best rides (small, medium and large), the safest ride and the most spirited ride. Valley Lodge holds the award for safety for the year 2015! Bright and early Saturday morning all 13 rides saddle up and head downtown for the parade that kicks off the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Another job well done!


24

• Steinhauser’s •

Three generations of Service & Quality F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA KUYKENDALL

Family owned businesses are the backbone of our American economy. According to Business Week, about 40% of U.S. family owned businesses become second generation businesses. Surprisingly, only 13% are passed down successfully to a third generation. Steinhauser’s, a modern-day general store for those who live and love the country lifestyle, has earned the right to include themselves in this rather small percentage. What’s the secret to their success? Good ‘ol hard work driven by deep rooted passion.


• A l l i n t h e Fa m i ly •

in the grain – crawling, tunneling and burying themselves in it. For them, Steinhauser’s was an endless playground.

H. H. Steinhauser was the very best business man. He put his whole heart and soul into his seed store in Flatonia, Texas. Mr. Steinhauser was not out to make millions, he just wanted to be the best in his business. Customers were friends and his store was the hot spot in town. His son Lloyd grew up watching his dad educate customers on proper techniques and identifying the proper merchandise to raise healthy horses and livestock, as well as maintaining thriving lawns and gardens. Lloyd learned the “ins-and-outs” of the business at an early age.

As they got older, the children found themselves acquiring more and more jobs around the store. After school it was straight to the store to pick up a few hours. As David recalls, this was the routine all the way through high school. The day after graduation, David found himself back at Steinhauser’s, only this time he was a fulltime employee. “This is truly all I’ve known,” David notes. “It is not a glamorous job by any means, and you don’t get into the feed business to get rich, but it is what I really enjoy.”

25

In 1965 the Sealy Oil Mill went up for sale. H.H. Steinhauser purchased the mill, not with the intention of running it, but in helping his son start his own business. Originally a cotton seed processing business, H.H. expanded it to a retail feed store in 1969. In 1971 Lloyd was ready to take the reins and purchased the business from his father. Lloyd was proud to run Steinhauser’s. His entire childhood prepared him well for the road ahead. The journey was not always an easy one, but he and his wife Virginia’s strong work ethic and business skills pulled them through. Together, the couple passed these positive attributes on to their four children.

• S e rv i c e Pa r t n e r e d w i t h Q u a l i t y • H.H. Steinhauser insisted on carrying nothing but the finest feeds in the industry. Not only that, he also provided first class service to all of his customers. Lloyd, David and Mike Steinhauser have continued the family tradition of service and quality at all nine of their locations. In fact, if you do not see what you are looking for in store, they will do their best to find it and order it. They even have you covered for all of your bulk feed and delivery needs! “We know that we are not the only people doing what we are doing – there are other places people could go and buy our products,” says David Steinhauser. “People often choose where to shop based on quality of service over anything else, and we want to be the one customers choose.”

David and Mike Steinhauser have chosen to follow their father Lloyd and join the family business. “From a very young age I knew that this is what I wanted to do,” says David Steinhauser. “I never really considered anything else.” The love and pride the Steinhauser family has for their business shows to any and all who walk through their doors. How else can one open nine successful locations in such a short period of time?

• G r ow i n g u p i n t h e S t o r e • David Steinhauser cherishes the time he spent growing up in the store. His dad was his idol. “I can remember getting up each morning as a kid, excited to join my parents at the store for the day,” shares David. At the beginning it was all in fun. David and his siblings had no problem keeping themselves entertained while their parents were busy with customers. They enjoyed playing

• Learning from the Best • The success of the Steinhauser brand is attributed to strong family ties. While Lloyd, Mike and David run different locations, they operate as a team when overseeing the company as a whole. “My grandfather was one of the hardest working people I have ever known,” remembers David. “He truly came from nothing and in turn created a life for himself and future generations.” H.H. Steinhauser never expected instant gratification. He knew that success comes from hard work, passion and sacrifice. David says proudly, “Mike and I learned what it takes to run a successful business from our father and grandfather.” With their dedication and attention to service, Steinhauser’s will certainly continue the legacy and see a fourth generation! d

STEINHAUSER’S • Built by Quality Products & Great Customer Service • www.steinhausers.com

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Mike, Kyle, Lloyd and David Steinhauser

Steinhauser’s knowledgeable employees are able to answer questions and point you in the right direction. They provide so much more than just a product, they share experience and tried and true practices.


Exchange MORE

28 MORE TH AN AN EXCH ANGE

THAN AN

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA KUYKENDALL

T

o open ones home to others showcases the greatest form of love and ultimate welcoming. We tend to not hesitate when it comes to friends and family – but what about a stranger? Becky Shane Daves, a single mom to 16 year old Stefani, has often considered fostering a child. Fostering would allow her to introduce a child in need to a loving family, while also providing a sibling figure for her daughter Stefani. Little did Becky and Stefani know, they would soon be presented with an unpassable opportunity.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

M eeting Sonya

F U L S H E A R FA M I LY

G L A D LY opens their home

TO FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS

Over the first few weeks of a new school year, Stefani became close with a classmate by the name of Sonya. Sonya was a foreign exchange student from East Germany spending the school year in America to better understand the language and culture. It was not long before the two realized that Sonya’s host family lived right down the road from Stefani! The two became fast friends and began spending more and more time together. When January rolled around, Sonya’s host mom and Becky agreed that it would be best for Sonya to move in with the Daves family. Becky went through the process of registering through the organization and completing the background check, solidifying her family as an official host family. “It gave me an opportunity to try something out that has always been in the back of my mind,” says Becky. “She was a good fit for our home and it was a fairly easy transition.”


29

Sonya & Stefani January to June went by in a flash, and suddenly the school year was over. “I cried so hard when Sonya left,” admits Becky. In that short time they had established a lifelong bond. “She truly became part of our family.”

month is hard,” Becky recalls. “There are a lot of tears, new rules, and boundaries have to be established early on.” Once a new routine is set and school is underway things sort of just fall into place.

M eeting Samina

The students enjoy meeting new friends, experiencing new holidays and traditions and visiting local attractions all while improving their understanding of the English language. “The students go where we go, and that is how they are exposed to the true American culture,” notes Becky. “The girls particularly love going to the football games!”

Both Becky and Stefani knew they could not stop there. Sonya opened their eyes to a more enriching life. They were hooked. In no time at all they were online looking through numerous student profiles – that is until they came upon Samina’s. Another perfect match! Samina is from West Germany but will call Fulshear home during this 2015-2016 school year. Becky fondly remembers the day she picked Samina up from Hobby Airport. All the foreign exchange students from around the world stopped first in New York City. As a group they fight off jet lag by sightseeing and experiencing the Big Apple together. “By the time she got off the plane in Houston she was tired and hungry,” remembers Becky. “She was dozing in and out the entire ride home.”

Becky hopes that when her exchange students return home they have learned not only about the American culture, but also about themselves and what they are capable of. Not one student flies across the world and fits in immediately. There is a lot of fear, nerves and expectations. The household dynamic, responsibilities, food and routine is different. These students are forced to adapt, and rather quickly. It truly is an experience like no other.

When they pulled into the community, Becky remembers Samina perking up and saying, “Oh look, it is just like on TV!” Quickly she took out her IPad and pulled her parents up on Skype showing them her new home away from home for the next ten months.

“I don’t even want to think about leaving at the end of the school year,” says Samina. “I will miss everyone so much.”

An Experience Like No Other After the initial excitement and newness wears off these kids are left homesick. This is often the longest they have been away from home and their families. “The first

Why Open Their Home? “It has been a real learning experience for both Stefani and I,” Becky says. “I have become a better parent – a more patient and accepting one – and Stefani has learned how to share the bathroom! For her whole life it has been just the two of us. This has changed our lives.” Becky’s favorite thing about the experience is seeing the student’s excitement over things that seem so small

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Not even half way into her stay, Samina has already made several close friends here in Fulshear.


30 MORE TH AN AN EXCH ANGE

Foreign Exchange

FACTS supplied by Ayusa’s Regional Manager, HEATHER WELLS

How many families are currently hosting in the area? 6 families How many foreign exchange students are allowed to enroll in LCISD? LCISD is unlimited What is the time frame? Ayusa has several programs available: 6 weeks, a semester or the full academic year (10 months)

Stefani &

Samina

or ordinary to us, but is something completely new in these students’ eyes. “It is a sight you cannot forget!” adds Becky.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

“I was adopted as an infant,” Becky goes on to say. “Maybe that has something to do with my involvement in this process.” Becky sees this as a small way of honoring the two wonderful people who took her in at such a young age. “They had less background information on me than I get with these students,” she jokes. What does Stefani think about her mom becoming a host parent? While being a host family may be fairly new to the two of them, Stefani is quick to note that her mother’s attention to others and eagerness to help is nothing new. “This is who my mom is,” says Stefani. “She has always been a very caring and nurturing person.” “Many people ask if I get paid,” adds Becky. “ The answer is no, but the students are responsible for covering the cost of their cell phone service, clothes and activities or events outside of the family. The reward is in hosting, not the finanicial.”

Is there a cost to become a host family? No cost. Hosting is completely volunteer but hosts do receive a tax deduction. How do you begin the process of becoming a host family? Anyone can visit www.ayusa.org and register. You can also browse through profiles of current students waiting for a family.

“This whole experience has given me the opportunity to offer students a unique experience that will last a lifetime,” Becky smiles. She and her daughter have enjoyed experiencing this ride together. When the time comes to say goodbye to Samina there will be more tears, but also the excitement of meeting someone new just two months later. d

Ayusa is a high school exchange program sponsored by the Department of State. They match bright young leaders from around the world with families across the United States. Ayusa provides international students the opportunity to learn about America through a semester or year as a high school student in their host family’s community. American host families also experience a new culture and gain a lifelong connection between their family and a family in another country.

WANT TO LEARN MORE? Go to www.ayusa.org OR contact Heather Wells – Ayusa Regional Manager at hwells@ayusa.org or (832) 437-6333


ALASKA TH E BEAUTIFUL

32

Alaska The Beautiful Adventure

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY TERRI OLIVER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIM BARTHOLOMEW


Alaskan Adventure

S

ometimes in our citified, suburban lives we forget the utterly outrageous majesty and beauty that nature is capable of displaying. There is some sort of natural beauty and a variety of quite different terrains than what we experience in our daily lives in almost all places we travel to. Every so often, there is a place that literally takes our very breath away as our eyes feast upon and our brains marvel over the breadth and scope of God’s handiwork. Alaska is one of those places. Because it is part of the United States, occasionally we tend to forget just how exotic Alaska is. This is in part due to its extraordinary size as well as its distance from the lower forty-eight states. Alaska would stretch from the Pacific coast to the Atlantic coast if you placed it in the middle of the contiguous states and included all of the islands and outcroppings. As far as distance, Seattle is the closest U.S. city with a drive of 2,265 miles along the Alaskan Highway to Anchorage.

The beauty of Alaska lies in the abundant natural resources both in land and water features as well as aquatic and land wildlife. Of course, this is not new information as most children would learn this much in grade school; however, something that is rarely mentioned is the fact that we see colors as we have never seen them before and this is the Alaskan beauty we fall in love with. Because of its latitude, the quality of the air, and the tilt of the earth and its effect on the sun’s rays, colors are painted with shades, vibrancies, and saturations unlike any we have witnessed anywhere else. These colors spread over the big sky vistas of land and sea, glaciers and mountains and all things in between as if an artist had decided to paint the largest and most spectacular panorama of his lifetime.

A number of factors conspire to make an Alaskan cruise the most popular mode of tourist travel. With 33,000 miles of coastline and a very limited highway system, cruises provide many opportunities to experience the different explorations that Alaska offers. The cruise season begins in May and ends in September and, at the beginning of the season, is the best time to see wildlife in the landscape as the trees have not yet leafed out. However, for those that would like to do some Salmon fishing, late July into August is prime time. To traverse the coastline between Vancouver, British Columbia to Anchorage, many cruise lines offer northbound and southbound itineraries which usually include the inside passage, Ketchikan, Sitka, Icy Strait Point, Juneau, Skagway, and cruising the Hubbard Glacier area before arriving in Anchorage. Naturally, there are numerous excursions available in each port of call that offer cultural, scenic, and exploration/adventure choices to fit every traveler’s interests and activity levels. Many travelers extend their seven day cruise with land tours that most all cruise lines offer in conjunction with their cruises. They vary in length and destinations with offerings in Vancouver, Canada and the Anchorage/Denali area. One can add on at either end of the journey or both. An Alaskan cruise makes an unforgettable intergenerational trip and it is also popular for groups of friends. Who will enjoy this cruise? Anyone who enjoys magnificent scenery, appreciates learning about native cultures and history, and wants to explore a corner of our vast planet like no other… Come and be changed because meaningful travel is not just a vacation or a trip, it is an experience of the physical world that we translate into our very own life memories that we carry with us wherever we go and share with our family and friends. d


34

Future Charting

Fulshear’s WRITTEN BY DANIEL McJUNKIN, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA KUYKENDALL


Fulshear Mayor, Tommy Kuykendall answers important questions about adopting a “Home Rule Charter” for this growing city.

35

B

arring any unforeseen procedural delays, the City of Fulshear is currently set to hold an election in May 2016, in which voters will be asked to make one of the most important decisions in the life of their city to date. They will be asked to consider and decide whether it is time to change its form of government from a Type “A” General Law City to a Home Rule City.

and the Prospect of More Growth Fulshear is a city in the midst of a remarkable transition. Its population, now hovering around 8000, has already grown more than onethousand percent (ten-fold) since the year 2000. Fulshear Mayor, Tommy Kuykendall, says that Fulshear has found itself limited by what the State of Texas allows small towns to do. Adding fuel to the fire, Fulshear is expecting to grow another one-thousand percent (another ten-fold) to an anticipated population that could reach up to 80,000 residents over the next two decades. Consequently, Fulshear finds itself in a unique leadership position in a region that is anticipated to ultimately welcome as many as 200,000 residents and possibly more. Mayor Tommy Kuykendall explains that, if passed by voters, adopting a Home Rule Charter would allow Fulshear city government to better accommodate current growth as well as the future needs of the city. Agree or disagree, there will certainly be opportunities for discussion and debate among voters regarding whether to adopt a home rule charter. Such consideration and dialogue is extremely important because this could be a pivotal moment for Fulshear. Ultimately, the outcome of the currently anticipated election can be expected to have a considerable impact on the way that future Fulshear citizens manage their civic and political destiny. As the publisher of Fulshear Magazine, I thought it would be good to seek out the best resource available as to whether and why it may be time for the City of Fulshear to make such a change. My “Q&A” on the matter asks some important questions of Fulshear’s highest elected official, Mayor Tommy Kuykendall.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT BACKGROUND

What types of municipal government does the State of Texas allow? “In Texas there are two forms of municipal government – Home Rule and General Law. A city with a population greater than 5,000 and that has adopted a Home Rule Charter is a Home Rule City. General Law cities are usually smaller than 5,000 in population and operate under the Local Government Code or “General Laws” of the State of Texas. General Law cities can be classified as Type A, B, or C and may have an aldermanic or commission governing body. All cities begin under the General Law form of municipal government and, following growth beyond 5,000 residents, may choose to pursue conversion to Home Rule status through an election of the residents.”

Why does the state allow for such varied forms of municipal government and for a city to change from one form to another?

In my opinion, before a city is ready to take off its governance “training wheels,” it needs to operate under a more limited structure that is under the general laws of the state. When a General Law City forms, it initially does not have expertise in city operations, record keeping, law enforcement, or ordinance creation and enforcement. Nor does a new city have the resources to hire professional experts in all these areas to overcome this lack of expertise. Also, when you are a new, small city, the mayor has all the power and control, which offers limited opportunities for checks and balances. Unfortunately, you can find many stories where small towns get off track. However, cities that grow from a few hundred to over 5,000 gain experience, expertise, personnel, and gain resources to operate efficiently and handle all the decisions cities need to make. The state believes that a city, after exceeding 5,000 in population and successfully governing itself through that growth, is ready to have more privileges and authority to control its own destiny.”

Fulshear was founded in 1890. When and why did Fulshear officially become a city? “In 1858, the first statute was passed by the Texas legislature, allowing incorporation under the General Laws of Texas. In 1912, Texas voters passed the Home Rule Amendment giving cities with over 5,000 inhabitants the power to adopt their own charter after an election, thereby giving them the power of selfgovernment. In 1888, Fulshear embraced the San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railroad through the heart of town, which encouraged people to move to the city that centered around Churchill Fulshear’s plantation. Fulshear fluctuated in population from 1890 to the 1970s. In order for the city to provide for the health, safety, and protection of its citizens, incorporation proved to be the most viable way to accomplish that. Also, as the City of Houston began to expand its territorial boundaries westward, Fulshear saw incorporation as a way to provide protection from annexation by Houston. Fulshear residents believed they could best provide, plan, and govern themselves locally.”

When Fulshear became a city, what type of city was formed? “Fulshear is a Type “A” General Law City today. Most cities are formed as Type “B” General Law cities until their population reaches 600, at which time they are able to convert to the Type “A” structure. Fulshear chose to function under an aldermanic form of government with a Type “A” General Law City structure today.”

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Growth

“When groups of people organize into a city, they are looking to congregate together for a few fundamental reasons. First, a group of people can more effectively provide for the safety and security of their family, homes, and belongings. Second, parents can provide better educational opportunities and training for their children. Third, the group may have common religious beliefs and practices and want to attend the same church. Lastly, human nature shows a person or family finds comfort and assurance in congregating with those who are facing similar life events – birthing and raising children, dealing with family illnesses, struggling with aging parents, etc.


CH AR TING FULSH EAR’S FUTURE

36

How does a city’s type of government impact its ability to operate, develop, and grow? “Cities are formed for the purpose of managing the needs of people who live and work in close quarters. Cities provide basic services—streets, law enforcement, garbage pickup, and utilities. They also enact and enforce ordinances to protect their citizens and foster a better city environment. City government in Texas, as in most of the United States, was founded on, and continues to evolve from, the premise that local communities know best how to run their local affairs. In an effort to provide for the safety of residents and the sustainable growth of a community, a Type “A” General Law City has limitations on what actions the Mayor and City Council can take. Educating the electorate and community on those limitations will clearly show why conversion to Home Rule is essential. As a reminder, a Home Rule City may do anything authorized by its charter that is not specifically prohibited or preempted by the Texas Constitution or state or federal law. Alternatively, a General Law City, having no charter, may only exercise those powers that are specifically granted or implied by statute. Let me point out a few examples that demonstrate why moving to the Home Rule structure will provide more accountability to the voters from the Mayor and City Council. 1. Sex offender residency restrictions – A recent Texas Attorney General opinion that says General Law cities, such as Fulshear, do not have the authority to place distance restrictions on sex offenders. Home Rule cities have this authority. 2. Term limits – General Law cities (Fulshear) have no authority to place term limits on the mayor or city council positions. Home Rule cities have this authority. 3. Annexation – General Law cities (Fulshear) have no unilateral authority to annex land into their ETJ or city limits. Fulshear is fortunate that many landowners petitioned into our ETJ. However, if a neighboring Home Rule City, i.e. City of Houston, embarked on additional annexation, Fulshear would be powerless to protect itself. Home Rule cities have this authority. 4. Initiative and referendum – General Law cities (Fulshear) do not have the the authority to place initiatives (ordinances, major decisions, city direction and vision, etc.) on a ballot to require the adoption of that issue by ordinance. Also, voters in General Law cities do not have the right or privilege to organize a petition and place a referendum on the ballot if the voters disagree with the direction of the Mayor and City Council. Home Rule cities may have this authority, if provided for in their charter. 5. Recall – General Law cities (Fulshear) do not have the authority to organize a petition to recall a council member that acted contrary to the will of the community. If the Mayor and City Council pass ordinances against the will of the voters, the voters have no recourse. Home Rule cities may have this authority, if provided for in their charter.”

commission, or ten percent of the city’s qualified voters may prompt the City Council to appoint a charter commission.“

Tell me about when, how, and why Fulshear began considering adopting a “Home Rule Charter” in the first place. “When I was elected to office in 2010, the census documented Fulshear’s population as 1,134. The next year we saw an increase in development plans and an ever increasing pace in home sales. At the same time, I felt our ability to provide the best protections for our rapidly growing city was limited under the Type “A” General Law structure.”

Who writes the charter? “The city selects a panel of citizens to serve as the Home Rule Charter Commission. The Commission writes the charter for presentation to the voters. However, the Commission members are typical residents of the city and not experts in Home Rule charters. To aid them, the city provides a legal team to review the components of a charter and explain the tenants that may be considered for inclusion. The legal team also provides resource materials, sample charters, charter statistics on similar cities, and explains the pros and cons of each component. The Commission members use their familiarity of the city and future growth and needs, along with legal counsel advice, to make decisions on each item to be included in the charter. Following voting on all the charter provisions, the legal staff will formulate all the decisions into the written Home Rule Charter for review by the Commission.”

HOME RULE CHARTER COMMISSION Bill Archer, Carolyn Randle, Kent Pool, C.J. McDaniel (Chairman), Randy Stacy, Polly Royer, Ken Knapp and James Molina Not Pictured: Erma Beal, Larry Beustring, John Dowdall, Cherryl Finney, and Gene Morgan

OVERVIEW

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

In a nutshell, what does the term “Home Rule Charter” mean?

THE COMMISSION

“Charter means the document by which an entity, i.e. a city, is created and its rights and privileges are defined. It is a city’s constitution. Home Rule Charter means the citizens of a city have developed a document outlining the type of government, requirements, roles, responsibilities, and powers they believe to be best governed under as a community.”

Tell me about the city’s Home Rule Charter Commission and how it was established.

What are the “rules” for becoming a Home Rule City?

“The City developed an application process for serving on boards and commissions, including the Home Rule Charter Commission. The Mayor and City Council members are not allowed to serve on the charter commission. Applications were solicited for about two years during the planning process.

“Cities begin their governance under General Law status. But, when a city reaches a population of 5,000, it may choose to explore development of a Home Rule Charter. The Home Rule Charter process can be initiated by City Council or by the voters. City Council may appoint a Home Rule Charter

“The City Council voted at the March 17, 2015 Council meeting to appoint the 15-member Home Rule Charter Commission.”

How were members of the Home Rule Charter Commission chosen?

- Article Continues on Page 66


TRADITIONS IN TH E MAKING

40

TRADITIONS IN THE MAKING Meet Fulshear High School’s First Principal

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIEL McJUNKIN

Rendering courtesy of Lamar Consolidated Independent School District

F

or over a year we have watched from our car windows the resurrection of a special Fulshear landmark. A landmark that will play a large role in the community for many years to come. This fall Fulshear High School will open its doors, bringing a new spirit to town – Chargers spirit!

Excitement

is in the air, especially since the big reveal of the mascot and school colors. But no one is more excited than Daniel Ward – the school’s very first principal!

THE ROAD TO FULSHEAR Daniel may be new to Fulshear, but he is a seasoned professional when it comes to the ins and outs of running a school. Upon graduating from Tarleton State in Stephenville with a degree in Biology and Physical Education, Daniel went on to teach while coaching varsity football at a few surrounding schools. It was in Irving that he took his first job as assistant principal of an elementary school.


Just three years later, Daniel was offered a principal job at an elementary school nearby that was struggling. They were currently ranked 27 out of 27. With 93% of the student body being economically disadvantaged, Daniel was determined to find a new system that worked best for those specific students - a system that ultimately led to success. Under Principal Ward’s care, in just three short years, the school flew up the ranks taking the number 3 position!

Earlier this year, Daniel and his wife Paige had a difficult decision to make, stay in Taylor or make a big move to be closer to family. When the position was posted for principal of the new Fulshear High School, Daniel did not hesitate. “I just knew when I visited Fulshear and met with the district that this was the right place for me,” says Daniel. Not only are he and his wife closer to family, but they are also able to experience something few get the privilege to – opening a brand new school!

FULSHEAR HIGH SCHOOL While the school may not open its doors to students until the fall, 2016, Daniel is working tirelessly to make sure that every little detail is addressed. Drymalla Construction Company and PBK Architecture have worked seven

Lorin Pargoud, Project Executive with PBK & Principal Daniel Ward.

days a week to ensure the school is on schedule for opening day. The high school is roughly 75% complete and the focus has already shifted to the furnishings and equipment needed inside the classrooms. “It is like orchestrating and running a small city,” notes Daniel. “We have to make sure that every group has what it needs to function right away.” Nothing is overlooked, everything has to be addressed, from textbooks, copiers and scanners to sports uniforms, band instruments and choir risers. It is a large undertaking. In the school’s first year, it will host only freshman and sophomores consisting of roughly 500 students. Within the next six to seven years, the school is projected to reach near the 3,000 mark. The school, just like the town, will grow fast. That is why is important to have a top notch team of educators providing a strong backbone for the school.

“Being the principal at a brand new school allows me the opportunity to bring in the teachers that will fit your campus the best.” Daniel stresses by saying, “They have to be the very best for our kids!”

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

It came as no surprise that following that impressive feat, Daniel was sought after by many schools within and outside of the district. Subsequently, Daniel spent a few years at a middle school before taking over his first high school. Taylor High School, located in Taylor Texas, was on Academic Probation from the state for being “Unacceptable” when he stepped in. By the end of Daniel’s second year as principal the state released that probation. “By my last year in Taylor, we won the state championship for Academic Decathlon for small schools and then placed 4th in the national competition.” Daniel went on to say, “I was very proud of that accomplishment!”

41


these issues right away instead of waiting till summer school,” says Daniel. “Especially when it comes to things like math which builds on itself, we do not want the students to get further and further behind before we acknowledge it.”

TRADITIONS IN TH E MAKING

42

Daniel and his wife Paige are known to spend their date nights at a lot of school functions. They enjoy attending sporting events, band and choir concerts as well as different club activities. They are invested in the school both inside and outside of operating school hours! An important quote that Daniel lives by was said by Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. “Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.” “For me, if you are doing what is right for your students, the school and the community, stand your ground and defend your decisions and actions,” says Principal Ward. Principal Ward has already experienced an overwhelming amount of parental support here in Fulshear. “They are already anxious to begin organizing the Boosters and PTO’s (parent teacher organizations). It is great having their support so early on!”

A NEW KIND OF PRINCIPAL Principal Ward is a new kind of principal. He considers himself to be a very hands-on, open-door type. “I get my paperwork done before and after school because during the school day I want to be out with the students.” Daniel continues, “The students need to know who I am.” His favorite time to catch up with the kids is during their lunch periods because it is when they are truly themselves and their unique personalities come out. “I have even been known to sit in on science labs once and awhile. I just love science!” Something different that Daniel hopes to incorporate at Fulshear High School is the “Summer School Now” program. The program consists of ten sessions every six weeks for students who failed the previous six weeks in certain subject areas. “This allows students to address

BEYOND PURPLE AND BLACK What was high school like for Principal Ward? “I enjoyed high school!” says Daniel. “I went to Brazoswood High School in Lake Jackson where I participated in football, track, baseball and was also part of the science club.” Daniel strongly believes that every student needs to get involved in something within the school. Entering college at Tarleton State on academic scholarship, Daniel continued to play football and participate in track. “With my mom being a teacher and my dad being a chemist, I was always held to high academic standards. When I used my dyslexia as a justification for my struggles in school, my mom insisted I learn coping skills so I could no longer use it as an excuse.” Daniel and Paige instilled that same drive and attention to academics on their two children. Their oldest daughter, Morgan, is an English teacher. Madeline, their younger daughter, is a sophomore in college studying physical therapy. Education is important in the Ward family household. College sweethearts, Daniel and Paige just recently celebrated 25 years together. Despite a principals demanding schedule, Daniel finds quality family time essential. In fact, for many years Daniel has made a habit of arriving home early on Wednesdays for church and time spent with family. When free time is available, Daniel enjoys the quietness of hunting and fishing.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

BUILDING LASTING TRADITIONS “I love being a principal,” smiles Daniel. “I have to be around kids. I enjoy watching them succeed and achieve their dreams.” Daniel Ward is exactly what Fulshear High School needs. He is someone who is genuinely invested in his students – not just those who excel in sports or who are top of the class, but each and every one of them. “The best part of coming in at the very beginning is knowing that you are a part of building the legacy,” notes Daniel. “The school is new to the students and I, and I look forward to exploring it together.” d


43

Campus Rendering courtesy of Lamar Consolidated Independent School District

M E E T T H E T E A M Fulshear High School

(L to R) JUSTIN LABAY, General Project Superintendant • DANIEL KETO, Fulshear High School Superintendant • LORIN PARGOUD, Project Executive • DANIEL WARD, Principal of Fulshear High School

(L to R) JOSH HOFFMAN, Project Manager • KENNETH MUEGGE, Project Engineer • BILL BREEN, Sr. Project Manager

STARTING POPULATION: ROUGHLY 500 CONSISTING OF FRESHMAN & SOPHOMORES FIRST GRADUATING CLASS: 2020 MASCOT: CHARGERS SCHOOL COLORS: PURPLE & BLACK INTERESTING FACT: THE SCHOOL’S GRAND HALLWAY WILL SHOWCASE FULSHEAR’S HISTORY IN PICTURES

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

FAST FACTS


IT BEGINS WITH A BEAN

44

It Begins with a

BEAN has quickly grown into so much more than a

coffeehouse

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIEL McJUNKIN & JACLYN RITTER

Coffee.

It wakes us up and keeps us going all day long. But more than that, it brings people together. Whether for a first date, a study group or a time to catch up with old friends, a coffeehouse makes it happen. And no cup is more important than that first cup. That is why Jason LeBlanc and Keith Hawkins want to make sure that at First Cup CafĂŠ your first cup is your best.


Jason LeBlanc, the café’s CFO, is an entrepreneur who takes pleasure in building companies and watching them grow. It was through a complete chance encountering that he met Keith Hawkins, an expert when it comes to running a successful coffeehouse. The two of them shared a vision – a vision for a new type of coffeehouse that highlights the town and its people, in everything from specialized blends, music and décor. It was not long before they became partners. They put their heads together, taking advantage of their varying strengths and talents, and began creating their dream shop!

in other ways.” Jason continues, “We feel the most effective way to do this is to be personalized with our customers, know their names and usual order, and outdo the chains with our customer service.” The team even goes out of their way to recognize and celebrate the local teachers and civil servants by offering them freebies and discounts! The Café’s tagline says it all,

45

“Conf ident about coffee. Passionate about people.”

The café has big goals. Within the next five years Jason and Keith hope to add four more locations. They will put the policies in place, but ultimately it will be up to each store’s manager to make the store their own. What works for one store may not work for another, and that is why each location will support its community by highlighting local artists, musicians and schools.

The powerful duo opened First Cup Café on S. Fry Road directly in front of Cross Creek Ranch on July 22nd 2015. With Keith’s managerial expertise and their wives, Wanda and Missy’s communication and networking skills, they have built something that is unique to the Fulshear/Katy area.

Jason and Keith are grateful to the community for being so welcoming and supportive in their first year of business. They look forward to making more memories in Fulshear and making sure that your first cup of coffee is a good one! d

“We want to be a part of the community,” says Jason.

“There is more to that than just trying to sell you something, we want to be partners. We want to immerse ourselves in the community.” That is why customers will be able to sip on coffee from our local Ft. Bend Roasters, who have even been known to make special blends like Belle’s Blend, in honor of the Fulshear Police Department’s K9, their Cross Creek Ranch Blend and their Holiday Blend. Jason and Keith are involved with many local schools, churches and even donates food for the monthly Chamber of Commerce meetings. Recently they were involved in the Fulshear Festival of Lights and Christmas with the cops and firemen. Varying groups and organizations make use of the café’s spacious conference room. Another aspect that sets them apart is their dedication to promoting local musicians through open mic night. Be on the lookout for First Cup Café’s new “Teacher’s Lunch Box” program that will allow parents to purchase a specific teacher lunch for a day. Jason and Keith hope to have this rolled out to local schools in the near future. These coffee lovers are passionate about three things: their faith, their families and their customers. “We know we cannot compete with the big chain stores and their budgets, which is why we have to compete

First Cup Café

11525 South Fry Road #110 Fulshear, TX 77441 ONLINE AT www.yourfirstcupcafe.com 281-232-6800


46

Celebrated Ground BENEATH OUR FEET

WHO WERE THE OLD 300?

A N D W H A T D O T H E Y H AV E T O D O W I T H U S ?

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY SUSAN STRICKLAND

L

ong before we got here—before Fulshear, Simonton, Valley Lodge, Weston Lakes, Fulbrook, Cross Creek, and Cinco Ranch existed as bucolic villages and sheltered subdivisions—an adventurous tale played across the stage of our county’s history, one that has been eulogized in novels, idealized on film, and celebrated around campfires: the story of Stephen F. Austin and his Old 300 settlers. This is a saga of intrepid, industrious pioneers who braved turbulent river currents, uncompromising terrain, and ill-humored Indians to settle what we now call home. Much of what has been written and extolled is, of course, fact. Some, however, is also the stuff of legends. For those who have recently emigrated from other states or are unfamiliar with the history of this great State of Texas, following is an overview of the original Old 300 settlers, helping you sort out fact from fiction. It is also important to remember that the State of Texas was not always part of the United States. This was a foreign land that belonged to Spain and, after a 10-year skirmish known as the Mexican Revolution, became a part of Mexico in early 1821.

Photo Courtesy of the Bullock Museum - Austin


WERE THE OLD 300?

I

n 1820, a year before Mexico attained independence from European colonial power, Spain had opened up the land of Texas to Anglo-Americans. These foreigners from the United States were to be stalwart and industrious, to profess the Catholic faith, to desire to become Spanish citizens, to increase economic development, and to help deter aggressive Plains Indians. In return, Spain would offer generous, tax-free land grants. The invitation for many Americans was hard to resist. Some settlers arrived in Texas as early as 1821, and more came between 1822 and 1824. The Old 300—the original North American settlers to Texas—actually consisted of 297 individuals. Some were indeed intrepid pioneers; some not so. While many likely made hospitable neighbors, others were downright disagreeable. Included among the lot were land speculators, opportunists, slave owners, wanderers, adventurers, and fugitives from the law. The group consisted of northern Europeans, Canadians, and even native Indians. Counted among these original pioneers were devout Catholics, Protestant fundamentalists, and agnostics. Of those 297 individuals who came, nine received land grants to settle right here in our part of Texas. (See article on page 62: “So, Where Do You Cross Paths With The Old 300?”)

Stephen F. Austin with Immigrants - Center for American History, University of Texas -

WHY

T

DID THEY COME?

here were plenty of factors beyond promises of tax-free land that convinced men to uproot their families, leave behind conventional homesteads, and move to foreign lands. For example, many observers in the United States saw the Great Comet of 1811, which was conspicuous in the evening skies for many months, as a portent of future calamity. In 1811 and 1812, the New Madrid Earthquakes (in what is now southeastern Missouri) caused massive devastation to families that lived within a hundred-mile radius of its epicenter and was felt over 1,000 miles away in New

York City. Fear and property damage inspired the need to move to less volatile ground.

47

Further prompting a sense of unrest, the War of 1812, while delivering to a still young America a taste of military victory and an unquenchable thirst for expansion, also left Americans reeling from a decline in agricultural prices, bank failures, and investment woes. The banking “Panic of 1819” left thousands in debt and under threat of farm foreclosure. At the time, Spain and the United States had no reciprocal agreements for collecting debts or returning fugitives. Thus, Texas would provide a safe haven for those who had defaulted on their loans or faced property seizure or debtors’ prison. Finally, many Americans believed that the United States had given Texas away to Spain as part of the Louisiana Purchase and that, after the Mexican Revolution, the country would soon buy eastern Texas back from Mexico.

HOW

DID THEY GET HERE?

A

midst this backdrop, Moses Austin stepped onto the pages of Texas history. Born in Durham, Connecticut in 1761, he had moved to the Spanish territory of St. Louis in 1798 and acquired the Spanish entrepreneurial title of empresario. He also received a grant to develop a lead mine and import workers. The mining venture did not turn out to be profitable for Moses, and he soon found his own character forged and shaped by the earthquakes, the economic slump, and the lure of new horizons. By 1820, he had found himself “embarrassed”—his own quaint euphemism for being dead broke. In late November 1820, Moses Austin arrived in San Antonio with “a belief that an adventure to that Country would be both safe and advantageous.” In San Antonio, he met with Governor Don Antonio Maria Martinez and presented an intriguing and impressive offer to bring hundreds of families to Texas as productive contributors to the Spanish economy. However, due to years of clashes between U.S. and Spanish troops over disputable border lines and due, also, to ongoing invasions by American filibusters trying to seize land and foment revolution, Governor Martinez was neither intrigued nor impressed by the thought of anglo hordes moving into his territory. In fact, he promptly denied Austin’s request and instructed him to leave the territory immediately. If not for a man named Philip Nering, this whole Old 300 story might never have happened. Nering had to flee his home country of Holland after being accused of embezzlement. He then changed his name to Baron de Bastrop and made his way to Texas. He lived in San Antonio for 14 years, became a trusted colleague of Governor Martinez and, upon recognizing Austin from past business dealings, decided to intervene on his behalf. On January 17, 1821, after Nering’s personal endorsement of Austin’s good character, Moses Austin obtained his grant from Spain for an American colony in Texas.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

WHO


48 CELEBRATED GROUND

Fact vs. Fiction:

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

REQUIREMENT TO PROFESS THE CATHOLIC FA I T H

Despite the initial requirement for settlers to profess the Catholic faith, a priest was not actually sent to Texas until 1831. This was a bit inconvenient for young couples wanting to tie the knot. But the early Texans found a way around these pesky legal issues by receiving permission from the authorities to sign a marriage bond, with the promise that they would formalize their union when a priest finally showed up.

However, like his biblical namesake, Moses would not enter into his Promised Land. Fate intervened and, on his journey back to the States, Austin contracted pneumonia, from which he never recovered. By June 1821, he had died, but not before entreating his son Stephen to take his place as the new empresario and to accomplish that which Moses had set out to do—take 300 families to settle in Texas. Stephen F. Austin had studied law and worked for a newspaper in New Orleans, seeking an adequate income to help out the failing financial situation of his family. While the years dragged on without much financial success, Stephen’s personal letters to friends and family revealed his sense of desperation. With the request to take up the mantle of his father’s dream, the possibility of a brighter economic future eventually seemed possible. Governor Martinez agreed to honor the arrangement he had made previously, as long as the new empresario would make sure that all who immigrated to Texas were Catholic or would agree to become so, all would vow allegiance to the crown and constitution of Mexico, and all would be honest and industrious farmers and mechanics. In July 1821, the first party of colonists headed for the Sabine River and crossed over into Texas. The early settlers were allotted land based on farming and livestock needs. Each head of a family could claim 4,605 acres— one league (4,428 acres of grazing land) and one labor (177 acres of farm land). Of course, every man, no matter what he actually did for a living, listed his occupation as farmer and stock-raiser to receive the most land. Of the 75 single men out of the total, many teamed up with other single men as a “family” to acquire the 4,605 acres, versus a measly 640 acres allotted to single men. While we might envision Stephen F. Austin, himself, shepherding his followers into Texas, he actually brought only a few families with him. He kept a detailed account of his adventures, and his journey in 1821 took him and his company over 330 miles. Averaging about 13 miles a day, the trip took 26 days.

Photo Courtesy of the Bullock Museum - Austin

Others came by wagons, by schooners, and by keelboats. They came down the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, crossed the Red River, or braved the Gulf waters. The terrain they entered and settled was both beautiful and harsh; at times lush and, other times, barren. The heat of Texas summer hit the new settlers with full force, as did drenching rainstorms that seemed to come out of nowhere.


In November 1821, one group sailed from New Orleans on the schooner Lively and anchored near the mouth of the Brazos River on the Texas coast. In the early months of the following year, a small party of men left the ship and traveled inland to what is now present day Richmond and, on a bluff near a deep bend in the river, built a two-room cabin. The cabin became known as both Fort Settlement and Fort Bend.

49

Fact vs. Fiction:

DID THEY ADAPT?

B

y the end of the summer of 1824, most of the Old 300 were in Texas, and they had imported their own culture to the new land. For example, in a much less honorable side of the story, slavery was a bit of a quandary for the new settlers. At this time in history, Mexico disallowed slavery, but while their laws banned the African slave trade, Anglo-Americans were allowed to bring their family slaves with them to Texas. Mexico’s new president, Vicente Ramón Guerrero, emancipated all slaves in September of 1829, but the Austin Colony managed to secure an exemption from the law for Texas. Being of independent and self-sufficient mindsets, the settlers firmly refused to adopt other aspects of the Mexican culture—this is one of the facts that contributed, a few years later, to the many battles for Texas independence.

WHAT

DOES THIS STORY HAVE TO DO WITH US? There are many chapters in our local history, but how often do we walk our neighborhoods, drive our streets, or sit in our cafes, never realizing that we are treading venerated ground? Our little corner of Fort Bend County is growing at an exponential rate. Soon, Fulshear and Simonton as we’ve known them through recent years will be almost unrecognizable. It is crucial that we know both where we’ve been, and where we’re headed. For we, too, are settlers from another place. And because we have chosen this as our land, we are right in the middle of an ongoing story. It may have begun a long time ago—even before the exploits of Stephen F. Austin and his Old 300—but we get to share in the adventure and help write the next chapter. d

“We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time.” - T. S. Eliot (Little Gidding) 1. The Handbook of Texas, Texas State Historical Association 2. Austin’s Old Three Hundred, The First Anglo Colony in Texas, as written by their descendants 3. Old 300 Gone to Texas, Paul N. Spellman 4. The Portal to Texas History, University of North Texas Libraries

ENGAGEMENTS WITH THE NATIVE AMERICANS

In the region, there were sedentary groups, such as the Bidais and Coushattas, who wanted only to trade. Less friendly were the seasonally migrant Karankawas and Tonkawas, who foraged for game and targeted settlers’ livestock. When the settlers joined forces with the Mexican troops in 1827, the offending natives were essentially annihilated.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

HOW


TH E NEXT GENERATION OF BRISCOE

50

Briscoe

The Next Generation of

It all started

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

on a flight to Las Vegas when Bill and Jorden Briscoe Mahler, father and son owners of Briscoe Manor, had a conversation about the future of the Briscoe property on 723 in Richmond. That drawing on a paper napkin turned into a successful and unparalleled wedding and event venue nestled with large pecan trees that create the perfect backdrop and serene atmosphere. As Briscoe Manor approaches their 10th anniversary since creating their first happily ever after, Jorden reflects back on the beginning. “It was definitely a lot of hard work in the beginning with some ‘figure it out as we go’ mentality, but seeing our staff grow from just two people working every angle of the venue to our now 9 full time on-site staff; it is humbling, to say the least.”

“We are Texas

all the way, but not in a cheesy, overused way.” Jorden explains that Briscoe Manor offers a subtle yet elegant rustic setting. The heritage behind the Briscoe family and land is rich and those involved with Briscoe Manor exude that ideal and make it their priority to keep that history alive. Jorden feels that the majority of the brides that choose Briscoe Manor as the place to have their wedding hold the same type of southern Christian family values, far from the bridezillas that you see on TV.

One thing you should know

is that Briscoe Manor is more than just weddings. They have a space for corporate uses that gives a simple meeting or corporate gala an elegance and privacy that just cannot be matched in

Photo by Carlino’s Photography

WRITTEN BY ASHLEY MANCHACA

the area. They have the ability to allow their client 100% private access to the 50 acre estate. They provide security for every event. “We also have a large paved private parking lot that a lot of other venues just aren’t putting at the top of their priority list; they are forcing people to pay for valet for their car to sit who knows where during the events.” Jorden’s wheels are always turning to provide new ideas to keep Briscoe Manor fresh in the already hot wedding industry, especially with the rise of new event venues. He is always trying to put money back into the business. For 2015, they added Ella’s Décor Barn which is an area for booked brides to design and rent items that the Briscoe Manor staff have noticed were popular amongst their current brides. In a world of Pinterest and DIY, this creative barn allows a bride the look and feel she is going for without having to buy numerous inventory items that she has no need for after the wedding. Jorden details the purpose in explaining, “It is all about trying to make it convenient for the bride.” Additions like this are what creates that edge that Briscoe Manor has above all other local event venues.

Briscoe Manor’s legacy

is something that is important and on the forefront of Jorden’s mind. When asked, he states, “For our legacy, I hope it’s one that created good jobs for our employees that they felt like they could take pride in and feel as though they are a part of something bigger than themselves. As for our Brides and Grooms, we treat people the way we want to be treated and that is largely proportionate to our success. Looking back, the families that choose Briscoe Manor for more than just one of their children …that’s when you know you’re doing it right.” d


Jorden’s

R U N D O W N H H H H H

I’ve always been drawn to politics, maybe one day it will call me…Republican of course. Just a thought…Growing up, I thought my grandpa was one of the smartest people I’ve ever known… and he was, even with a sixth grade education. Being loud is not something I am. I’m a quiet person so people usually think I’m just that or that I’m being rude…I think I ‘m just quiet. Shhh. Smoking meat on my BBQ smoker is my new favorite hobby right after hunting. Children will bring out your parents in you real quick…it’s true.

H

Always…be nice. I don’t care who you are, it doesn’t impress me. Treat everyone the same.

H

Amy Briscoe Mahler was my grandma and probably the sweetest lady I have ever known… and if you don’t think so…then you simply never met her.

H H H H H H H H

Photo by Carlino’s Photography

Easton and Ella are our twins and just turned 2 years old recently. They are hard work, but fun for sure!

Photo by Evoke Photography

My desk is a mess, yet I know where everything is. Next year makes the 5th Anniversary with my wife, Stephanie. We met as neighbors in college back in 2002 at Texas State. My degree is actually in Criminal Justice, but somehow I managed to find myself owning a wedding venue…interesting. Briscoe Manor is the best wedding venue in the Houston area…I like to think. I also like to think that we are the bar setter for all of the others to follow. If I could wear a cap every day, I would. October 2016 will mark our 10yr Anniversary here at Briscoe Manor, crazy how time flies. My Dad, Bill has played a much larger part of my life then he probably realizes. He’s a great dad and grandpa, we’re lucky to have him.

(281) 238-4700 5801 FM 723 Richmond, TX 77406 info@briscoem a n or . com www.briscoem a n or . com


S

everal years ago I had the privilege of hosting a syndicated radio talk show. The show aired on Saturday mornings from Dallas. I had a former LPGA player who co-hosted with me and each week we had the chance to talk about golf news and gossip for that week and even make predictions and comments about the outcome of that week’s tournament. It’s like what has been said, those that cannot play, teach, or in our case…talk. Needless to say, we had a lot of fun sharing our golf experiences. Every week I did a commentary that I named “Take Dead Aim”, which came from something I learned from Harvey Penick in his Little Red Book.

53

I had the chance last year to actually see and look inside the original little red book. It really is a little red book, much like you might find at an old five and dime store. It is part of the golf collection that can be found at the Stark Center at the University of Texas. If you have not seen the museum and library, it is well worth the time to spend a few hours to see some incredibly fascinating and wonderful sports memorabilia. When asked to contribute to Fulshear Magazine, I was not sure what I might add and I included the opening comments as a means of introducing a little about my background. Mr. Penick, to most of us, and Harvey to most of his students, provided so many common sense lessons about golf that one cannot help applying them to how we should live our lives. So, I thought I might share some thoughts on how golf and life are so similar. What follows are some of the things I have been fortunate to learn to appreciate in my nearly 50 years of being around the golf business.

G LF WRITTEN BY

IS LIKE LIFE

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

CJ McDANIEL


“ TAK E D E AD A I M ”

GOLF IS LIKE LIFE

54

What a great philosophy; not only for golf, but for life. Rarely will one succeed unless there is laser focus on accomplishing a specific goal. If you started on a trip and did not know where you were going, you might never get anywhere. More likely you may be frustrated along the way and confused when you arrive. If you have no plan for your business or career or more importantly…your life, I can almost assure you that you will have little chance of succeeding. That laser focus is what has made golfers like Bobby Jones, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and so many other great players the best players of their generation and maybe all time.

THERE ARE SOME THINGS

BEYOND

YOUR CONTROL In life, just as in golf, no matter how much you plan, or how much you practice, there will be unexpected or unanticipated surprises. The better player accepts there will be things which prevent the initial plan from working and are out of our control. The true caliber of a person is how you adapt to those situations. Be prepared for the unexpected. Don’t focus on the negative, but use it to overcome the situation.

S TAY

IN THE MOMENT It IS important to plan. It is great to be excited about what is happening when things are working as planned, but the worst mistake one can make in golf is to start practicing the acceptance speech before ever even getting to the final hole. Every great player I have had the privilege to know has emphasized the importance of taking it one shot at a time and focusing only on that one shot. It’s the same in life; we all need a plan, but live in the moment while planning for the future.

LIFE CAN BE A GAME;

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

ENJOY IT When the game becomes too much work, it loses its major benefit… taking us out in the fresh air with great friends and enjoying time together. It is no longer fun. Some people put so much pressure on their day to day life, they forget all about the fun part. Too much pressure and not enough fun leads to burnout and will leave you and your family miserable. I learned a long time ago one of the best things in life is to laugh at yourself. Walter Hagen, one of the great golfers of the 1920’s and 30’s once said, “You’re only here for a short visit. Don’t hurry. Don’t worry. And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”

LIFE IS A

CO N UN D RUM SOMETIMES; LEARN FROM IT

It’s amazing as I have enjoyed getting older how puzzling some things can be. Golf is like that. It’s really crazy when you think about it. If you want to hit the ball high, you have to hit down on it and to hit it low, hit up on it. To make it worse, to make it go left, you have to hit it with right spin and to go right, hit with left spin. No one has ever perfected golf. Byron Nelson gave it a heck of a try in the 1940’s when he won 11 times in a row and then went on to win another 7 times that year. Eighteen wins in one year; I’d say that was a pretty good year. I had the opportunity and privilege of asking him about that streak and he told me that he felt that during that period he learned something from every victory. Golf involves continuously learning. And, it is not just about golf game itself. Over the past 20 years, golfers have become far more athletic than during my day. They have learned about core strength, conditioning, mental acuteness…all the same things that will bode well for you in life. The more we learn, the better teachers we become for our children. I must admit though that try as I might, I just don’t get all this social media stuff and how it is helping anyone. It’s the one thing I have little desire to learn.

TAK E R I S K S ,

BU T BE SMART IN D OING SO There is an old saying, “no one ever got rich without taking a chance.” I cannot guarantee the accuracy of that statement, but I can say that in golf and in life, sometimes you just have to take a risk. I can say from experience that taking a chance will not always work, but when something does not work, it is critical to learn what and why it did not work; and how to keep it from happening again.


Same in life. No one took more chances in golf than Arnold Palmer. He charged at every opportunity…. I don’t think he ever laid up on any shot and America loved him for it…he had millions of fans who became part of Arnie’s Army. Not every dare he took worked, but that daring play enabled him to become the man singularly responsible for professional golf as we know it today. Success cannot be always be achieved by playing safe and doing the conventional.

RESPECT & HONESTY ARE CRITICAL ELEMENTS OF THE GAME

Golf is the only competitive sport in the world with no one officiating over play. Yes, there are rules officials around every tournament; and occasionally they are called in to make a ruling on a specific situation. But, players keep their playing partner’s scorecard and they watch over each other as they compete. Any number of tournaments have been lost by players who called penalties on themselves….all because they have respect for the game and their integrity as a player to make sure that everyone is competing on the same level. Wouldn’t it be unbelievable if you knew that everyone you deal with in life has that same kind of integrity, and will be honest with you in every dealing you have?

F I NA L LY,

FORGIVE & FORGET Sometimes it is the other way around. We all make mistakes. The key is to make sure that we don’t get so upset that it ruins everything else; and especially our family relationships. It’s said, to err is human. Many tournaments have been lost and many rounds of golf ruined because the player just could not forget about the mistake made on a previous hole, or sometimes several holes back. It’s so much easier said than done, but forget about past mistakes and focus on what’s ahead. The quicker we can forget our mistakes and forgive ourselves for them, the quicker we can move on to better things. The same can be said about relationships with family and friends. You will never be happy if you go through life with a grudge or hard feelings about a past relationship….Love keeps no record of wrongs (1 Corinthians 13:5). I know there are other things that I could share, but there is only so much room on the paper and so much anyone wants in one reading. Hopefully, I can share more thoughts in the future. d CJ McDaniel is a resident of Fulshear and the Managing Partner of Crenshaw Golf, LLC. A former golf professional who has spent the last 20 years working with Texan Ben Crenshaw. The design firm, Coore & Crenshaw, has more than 25 world class golf courses to their credit.

Photos: ©iStock.com/OSTILL

55


TEXANA

56

WRITTEN BY TRACEY J. SHAW

H

ave you driven on FM 359 and seen the sign “Future Home of the Fulshear Campus – Texana” and wondered who are these folks and why are they coming to Fulshear?

OUR NEW HOMETOWN

Fulshear has been chosen as a site for a new campus as it is one of the fastest growing areas in our county. We have already identified that a number of adults and children on our waiting lists reside in the Katy/Fulshear area so we want to be able to offer services in their community. We are very excited about this project as we will be offering some new programs, which are not available anywhere in the area, alongside some of our established programs of excellence. We are seeing the type of community that Fulshear is becoming and we want to be part of that. We have been pleasantly surprised in how willing everyone is in wanting to work with us to make this new campus a reality.

WHAT DO WE DO? Our mission is to change lives and our dedicated employees work tirelessly to do just that. We teach an adult with an intellectual disability to cook or do their clothes washing, thus leading to more independence and pride in being able to take care of themselves. A child enters our autism program unable to communicate and through applied behavior analysis we teach them how to speak, thus reducing problems behaviors

and helping them towards a better life. A person affected by mental illness learns that recovery is possible through appropriate therapy and a lot of encouragement, thus he/she is able to hold down a job which creates a more balanced lifestyle. A toddler who is having difficulty in meeting their developmental milestones receives in-home therapy which helps to get them back on track with their peers. Our latest program is designed to support adults with autism. These are just a few example of how Texana Center helps to change lives.

GROWING TO MEET THE NEED Texana Center is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization which was established in 1999 through the merger of two preexisting organizations. This year our 850 employees served approximately 16,000 people with behavioral healthcare needs and intellectual & developmental disabilities. Texana contracts with the State of Texas to provide these services in six counties; Fort Bend being the largest and also Austin, Colorado, Matagorda, Waller and Wharton counties. We have over 45 facilities including; behavioral healthcare clinics, learning centers and group homes for adults with intellectual disabilities; day treatment and residential services for children and teens with autism; and an early childhood intervention program for infants 0 to 3 years. Texana Center also operates a Crisis Center for adults with mental illness and a behavioral stabilization team for adults and children over the age of 6 years with intellectual disabilities. Texana Center has changed enormously since its inception 16 years ago and as our service area population grows, so do we. We have a lot of work to do in the next few years but we believe that with community support we can achieve our goals and bring exceptional services for people with intellectual & developmental disabilities and autism to Fulshear. d

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

If you would like to learn more and tour Texana Center, please call Andi Wallis, Community Relations Manager at Phone 281-239-1427 or visit us at www.TexanaCenter.com


BEH IND TH E BADGE

58

WRITTEN BY BOB HAENEL

A

pproved by the Republic of Texas Legislature in the new country’s early days, the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office roots are as deep as any office in the State of Texas.

The Sheriff’s Office was created soon after Fort Bend County became an official county in the Republic in late 1837. John V. Morton, who participated in the Battle of San Jacinto, was Fort Bend County’s first Sheriff, taking office in early 1838. The initial election had five candidates and Morton , with 95 votes, won the position.

Fort Bend County has had 43 more Sheriffs since Sheriff Morton’s days, including the 44th Sheriff, Troy E. Nehls. Sheriff Nehls won election to the office in November, 2012 and took office on Jan. 1, 2013. Sheriff Nehls and his Command Staff oversee more than 775 employees who provide protection 24/7 throughout Fort Bend County. The actual jurisdiction for the Sheriff’s Office is the unincorporated area of Fort Bend County as well as small towns in the county that do not have their own police force. Those municipalities include Beasley, Simonton, Weston Lakes, Kendleton, Orchard, Pleak, Fairchilds and Thompsons. The estimated number of people under the Sheriff’s Office protection is estimated to be more than 350,000 citizens, which is more than half the county’s population.

Behind the Badge F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

F

R T

B E N D

“Despite the increasing number of citizens making their homes in Fort Bend County, we are seeing a reduction in crimes committed in Fort Bend County,” said Sheriff Troy E. Nehls. “The Sheriff’s Office is committed to forming relationships with the citizens under our jurisdiction in order to provide better service to each community, subdivision and neighborhood.” The Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office has a budget in Fiscal Year 2015-16 of $70 million.

C

U N T Y

S H E R I F F


“We spend the tax dollars provided to us as carefully as possible,” Sheriff Nehls said. “We recognize that these funds come from you, the taxpayer, and we want to make sure that our citizens get their money’s worth.” Sheriff Nehls comes from a law enforcement family. His father was a Sheriff in his home state of Wisconsin, and he has two brothers also serving in law enforcement. His twin brother, Trever, is the Fort Bend County Precinct 4 Constable, a position Sheriff Nehls held for eight years before being elected Sheriff. Sheriff Nehls has been in law enforcement for more than 20 years, beginning his career in Wisconsin. His first law enforcement position in Texas was with the Richmond Police Department. He then worked at the Sheriff’s Office before being elected Precinct 4 Constable.

“It’s an honor for me to serve as the Sheriff of Fort Bend County,” Nehls said. “We do our best every day, and we want the residents of Fort Bend County to know we are out there to protect and serve.” Sheriff Nehls served in the U.S. Army Reserve for 21 years and retired with the rank of Major. During his time in the military, he was deployed to Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan and he is the recipient of two Bronze Stars. Nehls has a master’s degree in Criminal Justice from the University of Houston – Downtown.

Family First

When a new employee joins the Sheriff’s Office staff – no matter if it’s in Detention, the Criminal Investigation Division, Patrol or other divisions – that new employee gets a personal welcome ceremony with Sheriff Nehls. “I make a point of laying out the way this career should be handled, and that is taking care of the family first,” Nehls said. “If you take care of family, the job will take care of itself.” Sheriff Nehls also urges personal and professional development among his troops. “When an opportunity arises for moving up the chain of command, I want our employees to strive to attain that next step on the ladder. That not only improves the professional lives of our employees, it also elevates the quality of our entire operation.”

New Programs

Nehls is approaching his fourth year as Sheriff, but during the past three years, he has attacked recidivism in Fort Bend County. New programs instituted since the Sheriff took office include GED preparatory classes for inmates and an H-VAC/Electrical course for male inmates all taught by instructors from Wharton County Junior College. Other classes available are keyboarding and basic computer skills, a sewing class and barber training. “Recidivism in the United States is horrible,” Nehls said. “We are doing our best to give training to our inmates with the goal of keeping them from returning to a life of crime.”

Command Staff

“Chief Deputy David Marcurele has 32 years of law enforcement experience and he guides every facet of this operation and does an excellent job of keeping the railroad on track,” Nehls said. “Chief Marcaurele uses his experience, knowledge and work ethic to lead an operation that has 775 employees. I couldn’t ask for a better hand.”

“We wouldn’t be able to meet the demands we face without good leadership across the board,” Sheriff Nehls said. “We have three majors who guide their Bureaus – Major Chad Norvell, Administration Bureau; Major James Hines, Enforcement Bureau; and Major Thomas Goodfellow, Detention Bureau. Each one of these leaders brings years of experience and knowledge to their positions.” Command Staff members include Captain Robin Frazier, Support Services; Captain Steve Holtz. Patrol; Captain James Burger, Training and Human Resources; Captain Cheryl Hillegeist, Commander of Identification, Records, Property and Evidence Division; Captain Glenn Norrell, Criminal Investigations; Captain Paul Mosley, Internal Affairs Division; Captain Jule Brownfield, Detention Division Operations; and Captain Matt Carter, Emergency Operations/Communications Division; and Chief Ozzie Bayazitoglu, Chief Deputy of the Reserve Division. “And, of course, we have 775 dedicated employees who are the people who serve and protect the citizens of Fort Bend County. They are the people who make this operation complete.” d

59


CHILI

DO I DARE TOUCH

61

SOMETHING SO

CONTROVERSIAL?

MOM’S

CHILI RECIPE

This is my personal favorite recipe. Why? Because it is my mom’s and she made it for me growing up and would regularly send me to college with tubs of it to fill my apartment freezer. I love all the chunks of meat and crisp peppers. My favorite way to eat it – oyster crackers, shredded cheddar cheese and avocado – IN THAT ORDER!

V

ery few foods are as diverse as chili. It is downright controversial! A lot about what you think of chili has to do with where you grew up – the South, Midwest, New England etc. I grew up just West of Chicago where, yes, we put beans in our chili! I then attended college in Iowa where I often found corn inside of my favorite dish! (Side note: I noticed in college that the chili always started vegetarian, the next day it contained beef and by the third day it included the kitchen sink!) Now that I have lived in Texas for a number of years and have thoroughly enjoyed the chili here, I still prefer my mom’s. Regional differences are endless when it comes to chili. Cincinnati, for example, often includes cinnamon and cocoa in their recipes, all while being piled on top of a bed of pasta. Some prefer serving their chili with rice. Purists choose to keep it simple while others like to add an abundance of vegetables, varying spices, brown sugar and even peanut butter. How do you serve your chili - in a bowl as the star? Some like it on a hamburger bun, sloppy Joe style. I have been known to enjoy it inside of flour tortillas. Another favorite is using it as a topping on your favorite ball park frank. On a cold day there is nothing better than chili! In fact, I think it is the perfect meal because it can contain every food group in one spoonful. No matter what type of chili you prefer, I think we can agree that all chili is good chili! d

Servings: A whole lot of people! Be ready to freeze some for later. 1 red pepper – chopped 2 green peppers – chopped 2 sweet onions – chopped 2 lbs. ground beef 1 lb. stew beef – cut into small pieces (optional, can do another lb. of ground beef if preferred) 3 large 28oz. cans crushed tomatoes 1 15oz can hot chili beans 1 15oz can medium chili beans 2 15oz cans black beans – rinse & drain 2 15oz cans kidney beans – rinse & drain 1 can hot chilis 2 teaspoons paprika 4 teaspoons cumin 1 tablespoon dried onion flakes 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt 1/2 cup chili powder 1 teaspoon ground red pepper 2 tablespoons masa harina flour Salt and pepper – to taste

Cook beef and onion over medium heat in a little olive oil. Drain any fat. Add the peppers, onion and all seasonings. For more “kick” add the Mexican chili powder. The longer the chili simmers, the better it will taste!

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER


62

S o, W h e r e D o Yo u

Cross Paths With The Old 300? WRITTEN BY SUSAN STRICKLAND


63

As mentioned in the previous article, Celebrated Ground Beneath Our Feet, nine members of the Old 300 settled in our immediate area. The following information gives a bit more detail about those who received land grants where you now live:

were two of the most influential land owners in this area. Because of the size of John Foster’s family, he was granted the largest tract of land of all the Old 300—12,000 acres. His league extended from FM 1093 at the southern edge of Cross Creek subdivision, which lies just east of Fulshear, to the modern day Fort Bend County Fairgrounds. While Randolph (“Uncle Ran” to family and friends) was granted land north of here, he chose to live on his father’s league. There is a marker in the Fulshear Cemetery for Randolph and his wife, Lucy Hunter. Randolph was deeply involved in the defense of Texas during the Revolution. He helped supply the army with meat and furnished food and escort for his neighbors during the Runaway Scrape. He helped Deaf Smith blow up Vince’s Bridge to keep reinforcements from reaching the Mexican army at San Jacinto and to keep the Mexican army from retreating while Sam Houston made his offensive into their camp. Randolph Foster and Stephen F. Austin serve as the subjects of a portrait that hangs in the state capitol in Austin. Foster High School, at the corner of FM 359 and FM 723 (while actually situated on the William Andrews league which adjoins the Foster League to the east) is formally named John & Randolph Foster High School. The tiny community of Foster sits just northwest of the school and boasts a restored church, a museum, and an old school that was built by John Foster. In the early 1880s, Foster Community had a post office, steam gristmill, cotton gin, two schools, and a physician. The

volume of local sugar production on the Foster plantation was so great that in the 1920s, Imperial Sugar Company built a railroad between Foster Community and the mills in Sugar Land.

CHURCHILL FULS H E A R , S r . whose name has been spelled in history books as Fulcher, Fulchire, and Fulsher—was probably from North Carolina. I say “probably” because there are texts that claim he was born in France. Some say he sailed to America during the French Revolution, that he was a wealthy mariner, and that he got sideways with the law back east in a counterfeiting charge. These are legends and hard to verify, although his son did claim in the 1880s census that his father was born in France.

What we do know is that Churchill Fulshear received a land grant from Mexico on July 16, 1824, that he lived near the Brazos River, and that noted Texas historical writer Noah Smithwick “found asylum” in the Fulshear home in 1827. We also know that Churchill died on January 18, 1831 and left to his children a well-stocked library, many livestock, wagons, and fertile land. His son, Churchill Fulshear, Jr., is the founder of the town of Fulshear. Churchill Fulshear’s league of land covers what is now present-day Fulshear and the eastern half of Fulbrook. (See article on page 14)

DAVID RANDON partnered with ISAAC M. PENNINGTON to receive title to land that now encompasses the eastern side of Fulshear, where Fulshear Downs commercial center sits.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

JOHN FOSTER and his son RANDOLPH


SO, WH ERE DO YOU CROSS PATH S

64

Half-Creek Indian, David was instrumental in the Texas drive for independence. He was appointed to organize militia companies. And, in 1835, he addressed a letter to the public, urging all able-bodied men to go to Gonzales “armed and equipped for war even to the knife.” The Battle of Gonzales was the first military engagement of the Texas Revolution. David and his wife, Nancy, owned seven slaves. Cinto Lewis, a slave who lived to be 101 and who wrote extensively about life in Texas, was the son of Randon slaves. In the census of 1860, David’s plantation was valued at $290,000. He is buried on the Dyer Moore Ranch, near the town of Orchard. His partner, Isaac Pennington, who fought for the government against the Osage and Choctow Indians in Oklahoma, identified himself as a schoolteacher—perhaps the first in Austin’s Old 300.

JOHN RANDON —brother, most likely, of David Randon, and

also half-Creek Indian—was 45 when he received his land grant, which comprises Weston Lakes and the western half of Fulbrook, on August 19, 1824. (The dividing line between Churchill Fulshear’s league and John Randon’s league appears to be just east of Bessie’s Creek and divides the Fulbrook subdivision.) The census of March 1826 listed Randon as a farmer and stock raiser. He and his wife, Susan, had 2 sons and 13 slaves. In 1832, he offered his plantation for rent—including a log house, a kitchen, stables, and 70 fenced acres. He died sometime before February 7, 1844, when his property went up for sale.

NOEL F. ROBERTS

received a grant for what is now unincorporated land between Weston Lakes and Simonton, and from the Brazos River, stretching about five miles north. Census records show that he married three times, first to Highley Carter, who died in 1817, then Morning Harper, who died before 1826, and then to Harriet Pryor. They owned four slaves. Two of Noel’s sons fought in the Texas Revolution, and one of them, William, was in the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle that finally secured Texas independence. Noel F. Roberts died in the fall of 1843, leaving a large estate.

THOMAS WESTHALL

and his wife, Sarah, came from Tennessee with their four children. He received several grants for land, one of which is now the present-day city of Simonton. He owned many slaves and was involved in numerous construction projects at Stephen F. Austin’s headquarters and capitol at San Felipe. On his land, he developed a sugar cane plantation. He died in the cholera epidemic of 1833, and his wife died the following year.

ANDREW ROBERTS received a tract of land on the Brazos

River where Valley Lodge in Simonton now exists. His league, which he received sometime before 1825, was near his brother Noel F. Roberts’ tract. When Santa Anna invaded Texas, Andrew joined General Sam Houston’s army. He was first married to a woman named Sally, and they had 4 daughters and 1 son. Sally and the son died, and he then married Cynthia Hodge, whose family was also among the original 300 settlers. Andrew and Cynthia apparently lived on his other league of land in Brazoria County.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

This corner of Fort Bend County echoes the lives that have gone before us. We are living directly on ground hard-fought and hard-won. We are living where the heroes before us have stood. So tonight, when you pull into your driveway, enjoy knowing that you and your home are a part of this ongoing story of Texas history. d


TROUGH JUICE BAR

YOU CAN FEEL

CONFIDENT

KNOWING THAT WHATEVER YOU CHOOSE, IT WILL BE A

HEALTHY OP T I O N

107 S. THIRD ST RICHMOND, TX

(281)762-2483 TUES-FRI • 7:30AM – 4PM SAT • 9AM – 3PM

LOCATED IN

“HISTORIC DOWNTOWN RICHMOND”

WWW.TROUGHJUICE.COM


“Charting Fulshear’s Future” - continued from page 36 -

CH AR TING FULSH EAR’S FUTURE

66

Following a review of the submitted applications, a group of 15 members were selected to be presented to the City Council for appointment to the Commission. Fulshear is fortunate to have a group of residents who are interested in transitioning from General Law to Home Rule. A variety of factors were taken under consideration before the recommendation was made. When the Commission members were appointed, they represented all areas of the city – new master planned developments, Old Town, and Bois D’Arc. The initial Commission was comprised of seven members from Cross Creek Ranch, seven members from Bois D’ Arc and downtown, and one from Fulbrook on Fulshear Creek. Along with having residents representing all areas of the city, we also obtained residents who are local business owners, chamber members, former City Council members, and former Planning Commission members. The broad cross-section of people brought a great balance to the discussion, while providing a historic perspective that many new residents are not aware of. It was difficult to choose from so many qualified potential candidates but, in the end, we have a commission dedicated to the best interest of the City of Fulshear.” What instructions were the members given by the Mayor? “As Mayor, I have attended numerous Commission meetings to observe their work. In sitting and listening to their discussions, it is difficult not speaking out when, as Mayor, you are normally leading the city discussions. However, I made it a point to address the Home Rule Charter Commission at their first meeting and to set a clear agenda and tone from my perspective. My statement to the Commission was that they are assembled to determine how the city will be best served in governance structure moving forward. As current Mayor of Fulshear, I have significant responsibilities and powers. I emphasized that their decisions should be made, regardless of how they think I might feel or how any other individual City Council member might feel. I charged them to make decisions for Fulshear’s future governance, regardless of who is in office.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

At the November 22, 2015 City Council meeting, the Home Rule Charter Commission presented its work to date on the Charter. City Council was provided an opportunity for input and discussion. The Commission received a few comments from City Council. Following discussion at a subsequent Commission meeting, the Commission made a few adjustments based on the City Council feedback.” When did they begin their work? “The Home Rule Charter Commission gathered and held their organizational meeting on June 25, 2015.” How have the Commission members worked to accomplish their objective? “The Home Rule Charter Commission has been extremely thoughtful and conscientious in their discussions of issues to be included in the charter. Not all of the issues received a unanimous vote, but they have made great decisions based on Fulshear residents’ needs and desires while looking at models from other successful cities as examples.”

Was the city involved in the Commission’s meetings or in how the members have done their work? “The Mayor and City Council were not allowed to sit on the Home Rule Charter Commission. However, the Charter Commission made a presentation to the Mayor and City Council on November 17, 2015. The presentation provided city leaders with the progress and decisions made to date, and allowed an opportunity for the Commission to receive their feedback.” When was the Home Rule Charter Commission’s work completed? “The Home Rule Charter Commission worked diligently to present an agreedupon Charter to the City Council. The Commission approved a final document and sent it to City Council on December 16, 2015.” Did the public provide input regarding the Home Rule Charter Commission’s work? “The Home Rule Charter Commission conducted all its meetings under the Texas Open Meetings Act, just as City Council meetings are conducted. Meeting notices and agendas were developed and advertised at least 72 hours prior to any meeting. Only those agenda items listed were able to be discussed at each meeting. The Commission meetings also provided a public comments portion at the beginning of each meeting and were open to receive written comments at any time. Following each meeting, minutes were drafted, approved, and published to the city’s website.”

Chairman C.J. McDaniel & Mayor Tommy Kuykendall

THE CHARTER What are the pro’s and con’s of adopting a “Home Rule Charter”? “This is a really tough question, depending on the viewpoint you analyze it from. While I can take pride in successfully leading the City of Fulshear under a strong Mayor form of government for the past 6 years, I take the viewpoint on what would be best for Fulshear in 5, 10, and even 20 years from now. The Home Rule Charter takes nearly a year to develop and approve and then 5 years to fully implement. This vision will allow Fulshear to be prepared in future years. Some of the pros and cons may be noted as follows:

Pros

• Elected official accountability by voters with initiative, referendum, and recall. • Stronger sex offender residency ordinances, not subject to lawsuits. • Professional organization managed with City Manager. • Removal of politics from management of employees and day to day operations

Cons

• Change is not always easy or comfortable. • Relinquishing power from a strong-Mayor to City Manager and City Council when things are going well is not easy. However, seeing the longer game makes it the right thing to do. • Those who want to keep the status quo will view all the pros listed as cons.” What are the major components or issues that are included in a Home Rule Charter? • Form of government – Mayor/Council; Manager/Council • Number of Council Members and Single-Member Districts or At-Large Positions • Powers and duties of Mayor, City Council and City Manager • How boards and commissions are appointed • Term Limit Provisions • Initiative, referendum and recall processes”


What does “At-Large” mean? “At-Large means that the position would be elected by all the eligible voters within the city limits of Fulshear at the time of the election.“ Would becoming a Home Rule City help Fulshear grow? In what way? “Fulshear has an unusually large Extra-Terratorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) due to landowners petitioning their property into our jurisdiction. Most of the property outside Fulshear resides in other cities’ jurisdictions. However, conversion to Home Rule status would allow the City of Fulshear to expand our ETJ and annex ETJ areas into our city limits to accomplish the city’s goals and objectives. To accomplish those goals, the city would be required to adopt an annexation plan three years preceding any action, so that the public and landowners were aware of the future annexations. Petitions by landowners for annexation would still be accepted if it benefitted the city and City Council approved the petition.”

IMPACT TO THE COMMUNITY How would voters’ representation be effected or protected? “The primary goal of the Home Rule Charter is to preserve and protect the fundamental concept of one-person-one-vote. Great consideration will be given to fairly draw district lines, so as not to alienate any areas or groups or dilute their voting rights. This is expected to be done after the May elction if the Home Rule Charter is adopted. It will be incumbent on Fulshear citizens to remain involved in the drawing of the district boundaries and to express their thoughts to me and to the City Council. The Charter does provide for greater voter representation through the initiative, referendum, and recall processes discussed earlier.” With voting based on one-person-one-vote, how would less-densely-populated areas be represented fairly as compared with more densely populated areas? “Currently, voter districts are based on population. Therefore, less densely populated areas will likely be grouped together with other more densely populated areas. The discussion below on how voting districts are determined further explains these concepts and the current legal challenges being made to the U.S. Supreme Court.” How would voting districts be determined? “Voting district boundaries are determined by expert consultants that have GIS databases to assess the makeup of each district – population, eligible voters, etc. Some residents believe the city can simply be divided up geographically. However, the Voting Rights Act and Department of Justice provide guidelines for establishing voter districts. Historically, voter districts have been determined based on population, and the Department of Justice has further imposed specific ethnicity requirements in some jurisdictions. With the the influx of employees and workers from abroad, I.e. residents not eligible to vote, the U.S. Supreme Court heard the Evenwell Voting Rights case on December 7, 2015. The Court will rule before July 2016, and at the heart of the argument is oneperson-one-vote. The fundamental question under consideration is whether voting districts should be drawn based upon population or upon eligible voters. In some cities, the makeup of a district could have a significant population who are not eligible to vote, whether those be children or expatriates.” Would voting districts change over time as the city grows? “Generally, voting districts are reassessed following the Population and Housing Census every 10 years. In Fulshear’s case, district lines would be drawn in 2016 and then redrawn following the 2020 census. With Fulshear’s rapid growth, this 4-year reassessment may prove timely. If Fulshear continues it’s rapid growth, the boundaries could be reassessed when a significant imbalance within the districts occur, but no more than 10 years would pass before reassessment.” How would adopting a Home Rule Charter change city departments or the services they provide? “The City Manager and City Attorney would be hired by a super-majority (2/3) approval vote of City Council. The Police Chief, City Secretary, and Chief

Financial Officer will be recommended by the City Manager and approved by a majority of the City Council. City Council will appoint the Municipal Court Judge. The Mayor will appoint members of all boards and commissions with the approval of City Council.

67

One of the major tenants accomplished through a Home Rule Charter is removing the majority of city employees from the political realm. One problem with small town politics is when city employees get politically involved and may be asked to take sides on issues. The result is seldom beneficial for the employee when election results go the other way. Fulshear has seen this happen before. In my estimation, the residents of Fulshear need a professional workforce to take care of their needs without any interference of politics. As a result, city departments would be more centrally focused on the services to the residents and businesses, and these departments would have the opportunity to serve them much more effectively.” How would the change impact local taxes? “The city property taxes would not be affected, as a general rule. Costs would occur for redrawing district boundaries, charter revisions and elections, and when citizens use the initiative, referendum, and recall provisions. However, I believe that those costs would be worth it if any of these actions need to be taken.” What are the next steps regarding adopting a Home Rule Charter? “The Charter Commission acted on December 16, 2015 and presented a completed City of Fulshear Home Rule Charter to City Council. City Council has until February 19 to call a mandatory election, which would place the Charter on the May 2016 ballot for voter consideration. In the interim, an independent legal review of the document has been authorized by City Council. There were some concerns from select City Council members, and an independent legal review was proposed as a mechanism to allay those fears, insure trust and buy-in from City Council, and insure the Charter document presented to voters had no material flaws. We received the legal review on December 28, 2015, and City Council reviewed those comments in a workshop on January 5, 2015. With no substantive City Council comments coming forth, the Home Rule Charter Commission elected not to meet again. The Charter document agreed to on December 16, 2015 will be presented to the voters with no further changes. Prior to the election, a copy of the Charter will be mailed to every registered voter within Fulshear city limits, as prescribed by State Law.”

MAKING THE CHANGE Considering that Fulshear has grown just fine with its current form of government, why change? “General Law cities are given very limited powers to shape and govern their futures. I have always viewed General Law status as beginner or “training wheel” status. When a city government initially forms, at least three things are lacking. The knowledge, experience, and expertise to govern does not exist within the City organization, but after some time and

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Currently, the City Council is made up of a Mayor and five “At-Large” council members. Under a Home Rule Charter, how would that change? “Provisions are included that would expand the number of Council members from 5 to 7. Five members would serve under single member residency districts and 2 would serve at-large. The Mayor would still be elected at-large. Provision has been made to allow the City Council by ordinance to further restrict the at-large positions and create 2 at-large super districts to give the City Council flexibility to act if the Charter were to be challenged by the Department of Justice, given the outcome of the Evenwell Voting Rights Case currently before the U. S. Supreme Court.”


CH AR TING FULSH EAR’S FUTURE

68

period of growth the city develops the ability and has expertise to handle more in-depth issues. Also, as more people move to an area, there are more needs and expectations to meet. Home Rule structure provides a better opportunity to respond to issues of the day.” Why make the decision now? Can’t the city wait until later? “Much of the territory under Fulshear’s jurisdiction already has plans for development, and our population is rising at a rapid rate. We would like the city to plan and respond in a proactive and planned manner, rather than being reactionary. We want to be able to maintain and strengthen sex offender residency restrictions for our citizens and children before an incident creates a reactionary need where we all lose. In fact, a smaller General Law City in Fort Bend County was sued the last week of 2015 for its sex offender ordinance, claiming it is unconstitutional for a General Law City to do so. This city is surrounded by Home Rule cities and could force sex offenders to their area. Why are their kids any less important than those in a neighboring city? We need to consider the benefits of transitioning to Home Rule status now.” What other area cities have made the transition to Home Rule Charter? “Most cities in Fort Bend County that have grown beyond the 5,000 population level have transitioned to a Home Rule form of government. Missouri City, Sugar Land, Stafford, Katy, Rosenberg and, most recently in 2013, Richmond.” Does the City Council decide on whether to adopt a Home Rule Charter or is it put up for a popular vote? How would the process work? “Once the Home Rule Charter Commission completes its work and sends the Charter document to City Council, City Council has an obligation and responsibility to place the Charter on the ballot, so that voters can decide whether to adopt the Home Rule Charter or remain under General Law status. We had some misunderstanding with this concept that City Council could veto the completed Charter document presented to them. Texas law provides that the completed Charter be submitted to the voters in its entirety. Parts or sections cannot be voted on separately, but must be taken as a complete document for voter consideration.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

If the voters adopt the Home Rule Charter, when would it become effective? “If the voters approve the Charter document on May 7, 2016, it would become effective immediately. However, all provisions are not able to be implemented instantaneously. The transition to five districts and two at-large positions from our five at-large positions will take until the May 2020 election cycle. Existing Council member terms cannot be shortened or eliminated.” If adopted, how long would Fulshear remain a Home Rule City? “Once a city elects to be governed under a Home Rule Charter, the city will continue under Home Rule Charter in perpetuity. Even cities that have exceeded the 5,000 population level and transitioned to Home Rule, but then later dropped below 5,000 residents, Home Rule governance would remain.”

Once a Home Rule Charter is adopted, can it be changed or amended as the city grows and evolves? “Cities have to be able to adapt to changing conditions and the Home Rule Charter allows for revisions in two ways. City Council will be mandated by the Charter to appoint a Charter Review Commission every five years to review the Charter. Also, citizens can force Charter amendments through voter-initiated Charter amendments. However, the Charter itself cannot be revised more than once every two years under current Texas law.” How might adopting the Home Rule Charter effect Fulshear’s prospects in the future? “It will improve Fulshear’s prospects in the future. Housing development, retail development, and commercial development want a strong, stable, and predictable government, in order to miminmize the risk those developers take in making their decisions to develop here. Converting to Home Rule status updates the structure of a city government that was set in the 1970s and is limited. The new structure is stable, flexible, and has checks and balances that allow for beneficial development in Fulshear.

CONCLUSION Where can people find out more about Fulshear’s work regarding the Home Rule Charter process or about Texas’ laws regarding municipal government? “The City of Fulshear website has the proposed Home Rule Charter dated December 15, 2015 and may be found at: http://www.fulsheartexas.gov/Charter_Commission___Proposed_Draft_of_ Home_Rule_Charter__as_of__121515_.pdf The Texas Municipal League (TML) provides numerous resources relating to City government and the following may provide useful information: Mayor and Council Handbook Chapter 1: http://www.tml.org/Handbook-M&C/Chapter1.pdf Alphabet Soup: Types of Texas Cities: http://www.tml.org/p/docs/typesofcities.pdf Mayor Tommy Kuykendall would welcome the opportunity to discuss the Home Rule Charter and any other City issues with you individually or with your neighborhood group to help answer your questions. Please email him at tkuykendall@fulsheartexas.gov to schedule an appointment.” Do you have any final thoughts regarding Fulshear voters’ decision whether to adopt a Home Rule Charter? “While many Home Rule cities exist in Texas, city charters are not crafted and adopted every day. Here is a list of cities in Fort Bend County that have adopted a home rule charter along with the year of their adoption: • Missouri City 1974 • Katy 1981 • Rosenberg 1985 • Sugar Land 1999 • Stafford 2004 • Richmond 2013 Therefore, the Home Rule Charter has to be tailored specifically to the City of Fulshear’s own unique circumstances. While I may not agree with every tenant of the Home Rule Charter presented, the process followed was conducted by a diverse cross-section of Fulshear residents, conducted deliberatively, and conducted independently of the political process. I would ask all Fulshear voters to read and study the Home Rule Charter presented and to vote on May 7, 2016 . The Fulshear Charter Commission has developed a Home Rule Charter for the citizens of Fulshear and with their future in mind.” d


HERE ARE SOME QUOTES FROM SOME OF OUR MEMBERS AS TO WHY THEY JOINED THE FULSHEAR AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

FULS H EAR AREA CH AMBER OF COMMERCE

72

WHY JOIN THE Fulshear Area

CHAMBER of Commerce?

M

any times we hear “Why should I join the local chamber of commerce?” Some say they are too busy and adding yet another activity to their schedule would be just too much! So again, why should you add to your hectic schedule and participate in a local chamber of commerce? Well, the number one reason is that a local chamber offers a ton of benefits that keep you, the business owner, on top of what is happening in the community regarding issues, trends, and marketplace. In addition, chambers of commerce exist to help local businesses prosper and for a modest annual fee we will do everything in our power to help you sell. Because you are a chamber member, consumers are 80% more likely to purchase your goods and services. 73% of consumers are more aware of your business. And 68% of consumers are more likely to consider your business reputable. The Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce prides itself on having the best businesses and people any chamber could hope for.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

We are a dynamic and growing chamber and we would love for your business to be a part of our family.

“I joined the Fulshear Area Chamber to learn more about doing business in Fulshear and its surrounding communities. The Chamber staff and members have been welcoming, and extremely helpful in getting my personal training business started.” - W. F. (Bill) Brothers FIT SENSE Personal Training Services “I joined the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce because I wanted our church to grow along with our growing community and serve it in as many ways as possible.” - Ben Reichel Pastor, A Mighty Fortress Lutheran “I joined the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce, when we moved our business to Weston Lakes - and it was the BEST decision I made! The FACC is in business for business, and every month, our Team is networking with the “Who’s-Who” in Ft. Bend County.” - Jack Warkenthien CEO, Next Step Solutions “I was a previous member of the Fort Bend Chamber. I joined the Fulshear Area Chamber because our company believes in giving back to the community. This was a way to serve in Fulshear.” - Anne Frye 1st Texas Home Health “We joined the Fulshear Chamber because we recognized immediately that this will set us apart from other organizations and cities. It provides great opportunity for socializing, developing relationships, staying engaged in the community and giving back in many ways.” - Tammy McCall - Realtor Relations Extraordinaire The Johnson Development Corp. “When I first started a business here in Fulshear, I knew that the Chamber of Commerce was the place to start to develop business connections, grow my business, get involved with the community, make lots of friends and have a heap of fun. I am so glad that I joined the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce!” - Karen Van Holten Van Holten Law Firm

If it is time for you to take your place with the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce and show that you are a business committed to the community, I’d appreciate the opportunity to tell you more. Call us at 832-600-3221 to get started today or visit www.FulshearAreaChamber.com Don McCoy | EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | 832-600-3221 | www.FulshearAreaChamber.com


* CHARTER MEMBERS

ALLEN BOONE HUMPHRIES ROBINSON LLP* (713) 860-6470 - www.abhr.com

BMW OF WEST HOUSTON

(800) 564-1349 - www.bmwwest.com

CITY OF FULSHEAR DEVELOPMENT CORPORORATION 4B (281) 346-1796 - www.fulsheartexas.gov

COMMERCIAL STATE BANK* FULSHEAR

BUSINESS P A R K

(281) 346-0221 - www.csbec.com

DHK DEVELOPMENT, INC.*

(713) 961-0033 - www.dhkdev.com

FULSHEAR BUSINESS PARK*

(281) 346-2794 - www.rbratcliff.com

FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC (281) 973-0633 - www.Fulshear.com

HOUSTON METHODIST WEST HOSPITAL (832) 522-0319 - www.HoustonMethodist.org

JOHNSON DEVELOPMENT CROSS CREEK RANCH*

(281) 344-9882 - www.crosscreektexas.com

LEGACY FORD

(281) 342-5611 - www.legacyfordtx.com

LYBELLE INC*

(832) 592-7971 - www.lybelleinc.com

WCA

(832) 456-1412

WESTON LAKES COUNTRY CLUB* (281) 346-1967 - westonlakes.net

GOLD

* CHARTER MEMBERS

BLESSINGTON FARMS*

(281) 793-6111 - www.blessingtonfarms.com

CITY OF FULSHEAR DEVELOPMENT CORPORORATION 4A (281) 346-1796 - www.fulsheartexas.gov

FLORA MIA

(713) 775-8028 - www.floramia.com

GREATER FORT BEND EDC

(281) 340-7902 - www.fortbendcounty.org

SONYA SIMMONS LLC

(281) 650-9753 - www.fullbrookhomes.com

THE ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE LAB OF KATY (281) 394-9494 - www.TheLabKaty.com

WELCOME WAGON INTERNATIONAL

(800) 779-3526 - www.welcomewagon.com

MEMBER DIRECTORY

PLATINUM


MEMBER DIRECTORY

SILVER A Mighty Fortress

* CHARTER MEMBERS

Cobblestone Cottage

Lutheran Church

TO D D S H I P P

BRONZE

2STEP PHOTOGRAPHY (281) 536-2292 - www.2stepphotography.com

A MIGHTY FORTRESS LUTHERAN CHURCH (281) 533-4121

AIRWHEELS AMERICA (702)524-7580 - www.AirwheelsAmerica.com

BRISCOE MANOR LLC (281) 238-4700 - www.briscoemanor.com

COBBLESTONE COTTAGE (281) 346-8347

D.R. HORTON - HOUSTON SOUTH (281) 269-6853 - www.drhorton.com

DR. DAVID S. BRIGHT ORTHODONTICS (281) 599-1155 - www.brightbraces.com

EHRA*

1ST TEXAS HOME HEALTH*

(281) 829-9314 - www.first-texas.com

3SOURCE GROUP*

(832) 278-5524 - www.3sourcegroup.com

5 STAR REAL ESTATE*

(281) 346-1412 - www.wlakes.com

AFLAC

(832) 207-5243 - www.aflac.com

AG/CM INC.

(361) 443-4572 - www.agcm.cc

AGELESS MED SPA

(281) 392-3700 - agelessmedspakaty.com

A.L. FRANCIS & ASSOCIATES

(713) 931-1242 - www.tonylfrancis.com

AL ZIENTEK, CPA, CFP

(713) 784-4500 - www.ehrainc.com

(281) 496-6152 - www.zientek.com

FULSHEAR ANIMAL HOSPITAL*

(281) 202-3250 www.allstargaminglounge.com

(281) 346-0077 www.fulshearanimalhospital.com

FULSHEAR INSURANCE GROUP, INC. / TEXAS INSURANCE AGENCY - FULSHEAR* (281) 533-9067 - www.FulshearInsurance.com

INDEPENDENCE TITLE COMPANY* (281) 533-9922 - www.independencetitle.com

KATY LIVING/GOOD CENTS ADVERTISING*

ALL STAR GAMING LOUNGE ALL-TERRA ENGINEERING

(713) 574-2371 - www.all-terra.com

ALPINE ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION (281) 953-0044 - www.alpinecompany.us

AMAZING GRACE HOSPICE

(832) 437-2089 - www.amazinggracehospice.org

AMEGY BANK

(281) 238-7007 - amegybank.com

(281) 239-3971 - www.goodcentsad.com

AMP LENDING

KATY REAL ESTATE ENTERPRISES DBA: KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY

ANDREW VAN CHAU - R / S

(281) 220-2100 - www.katytxhomes.com

MARTIN MORTGAGE* - (281) 533-9952 www.martinmortgageonline.com

MEMORIAL HERMANN (832) 229-6662 - www.memorialhermann.org

MOVE IT SELF STORAGE (281) 346-0919 - www.moveitstorage.com

NEWFIRST NATIONAL BANK* (832) 344-2036 - www.newfirst.com

PECAN INTERNET SERVICES (281) 272-3522 - pecaninternet.com

PRO IMAGE* - (713) 806-3016 www.proimagepromotional.com

RANDLE LAW OFFICE LTD., L.L.P.* (281) 657-2000 - www.jgradyrandlepc.com

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH (713) 465-3408 - www.second.org

SEVERN TRENT SERVICES (281) 646-2364 - www.stservices.com

STATE FARM INSURANCE - TODD SHIPP* (713) 464-4255 - www.toddshipp.com

TAYLOR MORRISON (281) 780-4652 - www.taylormorrison.com

TESTAROSSA MOTORS 2 (281) 901-4167 - www.testarossamotors.com

WAGGIN’ TAILS PET RANCH* (281) 533-0500 - www.waggintailspetranch.com

WINGNUT AERIAL VIDEO SYSTEMS W.A.V.S (417) 861-7113 - www.wingnutaerialvideo.com

(281) 391-5363 - www.AskMortgagePros.com Andrew.VanChau@hotmail.com

APPY CHICKS

(832) 271-7229 - www.appychicks.com

AQUA TEXAS

BOOKKEEPING EXPRESS - (281) 712-1047 www.katy.bookkeepingexpress.com

BRAMAN BRANDS

The Braman Winery & Brewery (281) 762-1375 - www.bramanbrands.com

BRAZOS ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL Surgery, PLLC (281) 394-2933 - www.brazosoms.com

BROOKSHIRE RESIDENCE AND REHABILITATION CENTER

(281) 375-5272 - www.brookshirecare.com

BROWN & GAY ENGINEERS, INC.

(281) 558-8700 - www.browngay.com

BUESCHER PERSONAL FITNESS*

(281) 794-3220 - www.buescherfitness.com

CAMMARATA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY GROUP (832) 913-6353 - www.kids-teeth.com

CAMP BOW WOW KATY, TX

(281) 849-3647 - www.campbowwow.com/katy

CANE ISLAND OUTFITTERS LLC

832-437-3651 - caneislandoutfitters@gmail.com

CAPITAL ONE

(281) 726-0001 - www.capitalone.com

CARING4KATY

(409) 673-9802 - www.caring4katy.org

CASA DE NUEZ*

(281) 533-9457 - www.casadenuez.com

CASEY POPE PROPERTIES*

(281) 346-1100 - www.caseypope.com

CATHY CRAIG PROPERTIES (832) 449-2320

CENTERPOINT ENERGY

(713) 207-1111 - www.CenterpointEnergy.com

CENTRAL FORT BEND CHAMBER (281) 342-5464 - www.cfbca.org

(281)-651-0174 - aquaamerica.com

CHAMPION RESTORATION

ARLENE HINSLEY BETTER HOMES & GARDENS GARY GREENE*

CHARLES SCHWAB & CO., INC

(281) 492-5973 - www.har.com/arlenedeclaire

ARNIM & SONS INC / EVO PAYMENTS INTERNATIONAL - (832) 451-9025 ARTS FULSHEAR INC* (281) 756-7446 - www.artsfulshear.org

ATHENS CAPITAL LENDING

(281) 407-4844 - www.AthensCapitalLending.com

AUTUMN LEAVES OF CINCO RANCH

(281) 392-2050 - www.autumnleaves.com

BB&T

(281) 668-3217 - www.bbt.com

BERNADETTE PAYNE

(281) 989-0724 - bpayne6@mac.com

BILL HEEDE - R / S

(847) 980-7246 - williamheede@aol.com

BINS CLEAN

(832) 581-5812 - www.binsclean.com

BLACKMON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES & TRANSPORT, LLC DBA BEST SEPTIC TANK CLEANING & TRANSPORT

(281) 342-9891 - www.bestseptictankcleaning.com

BOB LUTTS FULSHEAR/SIMONTON LIBRARY (281) 346-1432 - www.fortbend.lib.tx.us

BOB’S TACO STATION

(281)232-8555 - www.bobstacos.com

(281) 395-9000 - www.ChampionRestoration.com (713) 463-4815 - www.schwab.com

CHASE BANK

(281) 644-1407 - www.chase.com

CHILDREN’S LIGHTHOUSE CROSS CREEK RANCH - (281 )394-9696 www.ChildrensLighthouseFulshear.com

CHILD ADVOCATES OF FT. BEND COUNTY (281) 533-9325 - www.cafb.org

CHUCK BUCEK, CPA P.C.

(832) 471-6144 - www.chuckbucekcpa.com

CHUCKWAGON BBQ & BURGERS (281) 394-7784 www.chuckwagonbbqburgers.com

CINCO TIRE & AUTO

(281) 392-4900 - www.cincotireandauto.com

CINCOAUTO2

(281) 394-9170 - www.cincoauto.com

CLASSIC CHEVROLET (281) 491-9000

CLEAN SWEEP PROPERTY SERVICES (281) 533-6000 - www.arayaclean.com

CLEAR CHOICE OFFICE SOLUTIONS

(888) 788-4268 - sales@clearchoiceos.com

COBB, FENDLEY & ASSOCIATES (713) 462-3242 - cobbfendley.com


(281) 392-3440 - www.colburnspestcontrol.com

FORT BEND COMMUNITY PARTNERS RAINBOW ROOM

CONCIERGE CAFFE

(832) 451-5867 - www.fbrr.org

CONSTABLE ROB COOK

(281) 342-6171 - www.FortBendCountyFair.com

(713) 730-9991 - www.conciergecaffe.com

FORT BEND COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION

(281) 238-1430 www.Rob.Cook@fortbendcountytx.gov

FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

CONTROL-IT SMART HOME AUTOMATION

FRANK YEVERINO

(713) 966-9306 - www.controlitav.com

CORRAL WESTERN STORE

(281) 341-0900 - corralwesternstore.com

COSTELLO, INC

(713)-783-7788 - www.costelloinc.com

COUNTY JUDGE BOB HEBERT (281) 341-1454

COVENTRY HOMES

(281) 346-2701 - www.coventryhomes.com

CRAFT-E CREATIONS

(281) 733-1304 - www.craft-ecreations.com

CROSS RIDGE OFFICE CONDOS

(832) 772-6866 - shbdevelopment.com/properties/crossridge-fulshear

CROSSFIT FULSHEAR

(832) 773-8558 - crossfit-fulshear.com

CRUISE PLANNERS/WATERCREST TRAVEL

(281) 533-4101 - www.watercrestcruisetravel.com

CRUISE PLANNERS - GENE CHIN

(832) 377-6220 - www.mycruisecoordinator.com

DANIEL R SLAVINSKI, CPA (281) 342-2674

DARLING DENTAL

(832) 437-7939 - www.darlingdds.com

DAVID R. MELANSON - R / S

(979) 541-9297 - drmelanson@yahoo.com

DAVIS-GREENLAWN FUNERAL CHAPELS MISSION PARK - (281) 341-8800 www.jbduke@missionparks.com

DEANNA KRENEK RE/MAX REALTY WEST (713) 539-8063 - www.movewest.net

DEBORAH DAVID, REALTOR*

(281) 814-8533 - www.deborahdavid.com

DEKKER’S MESQUITE GRILL

(281) 533-0909 - dekkersmesquitegrill.net

DONDULIN.COM, LP

(281) 238-4719 - www.dondulin.com

DOZIER’S GROCERY & MARKET*

(281) 346-1411 - www.doziersbbq.com

DREAM LANDSCAPE* - (281) 744-2669 www.dreamlandscapedesign.com

DYNAMIC VISION CENTER

(281) 665-3274 - www.dynamicvc.net

E&W ENTERPRISES

(832) 405-3184 - www.networkinaction.com

ECO2 OFFICE

(832) 437-3204 - www.eco2officekaty.com

EDIBLE MOMENTS

(281) 978-2253 - orders@ediblemoments.com

EDWARD JONES*

(281) 242-3307 - www.edwardjones.com

EFTEX BUSINESS SERVICES, LLC* (832) 315-1165 - www.eftexllc.com

ELKO CONSULTING, LP DBA IMPROVE IT! CONSULTING & TRAINING* (281) 799-0930 - www.improveitsolutions.com

EMPLOYERS ONE SOURCE GROUP (281) 492-9292 - www.eosg.com

ER KATY*

(281) 395-9900 - www.erkaty.com

FAMILY HOPE

(832) 492-5136 - FamilyHopeFulshear.org

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP TIM O’BRIEN INSURANCE AGENCY

(281) 375-5928 - www.farmersagent.com/tobrien

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM (972) 899-6662 - www.fcer.com

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM KATY CINCO RANCH - (832) 913-8220

(281) 341-4664 - www.fbcsheriff.org

(713)545-2520 - http://fylawfirm.com

FRECKLES STATIONARY & GIFTS

(281)536-4900 - www.frecklescentral.com

FRONTIER TITLE COMPANY

(281) 391-9181 - www.frontiertitletexas.com

FULSHEAR.COM

(832) 377-6574 - www.fulshear.com

FULSHEAR CONSULTING Coming Soon!

FULSHEAR DIRECTORY

(713) 858-4280 - www.fulsheardirectory.com

FULSHEAR FAMILY MEDICINE*

(281) 346-0018 - www.fulshearfamilymed.com

FULSHEAR FLOWER SHOP* - (281) 533-9468 www.fulshearbouquets&blooms.com

FULSHEAR FOOT AND ANKLE

(281) 391-1212 - Fulshearfootandankle.com

FULSHEAR GRAPHICS*

(832) 244-2411 - www.fulshear.graphics

FULSHEAR OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT (832) 492-5136 - www.FulshearOutreach.org

FULSHEAR POLICE DEPARTMENT

(281) 346-2202 - www.facebook.com/FulshearPolice

FULSHEAR PROFESSIONALS

info@fulshearprofessionals.com

FULSHEAR REAL ESTATE PARTNERS L.P. (713) 302-0555

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON LIONS CLUB

(281) 346-4156 - www.fulshearsimontonlionsclub.org

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON FIRE DEPARTMENT (281) 346-2800 - www.fsfd.org

FULSHEAR TREE SERVICES

(713) 302-0555 - www.fulsheartreeservices.com

GABY’S*

(281) 533-0220 - www.gabysetc.net

GALLERY FURNITURE

(281) 687-1263 - www.galleryfurniture.com

GEOVEND INTERNATIONAL LLC

(281) 513-4681 - www.geovendinternational.com

GLAMOX AQUA SIGNAL , CORP. (281) 944-4100 - www.glamox.com

GLENN SMITH EXECUTIVE COACHING

(281) 841-6680 - www.glennsmithcoaching.com

GNA INSPECTIONS, PLLC

(832) 567-3293 - GNAInspections.com

HALO PROFESSIONALS

(281) 860-2535 - www.haloalarmshouston.com

HANDLEBAR CYCLERY

(832) 437-7584 - www.handlebarcyclery.com

HEALTHONE 24 HOUR EMERGENCY CARe WEST CAMPUS* (281) 232-1600 - www.healthonehouston.com

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

(281) 882-9453 - www.homeinstead.com/252

HOPE FOR THREE*

(800) 317-0787 - www.hopeforthree.org

HOUSER ROOFING

(979) 472-9176 - www.houserroofingtx.com

HOUSTON CHRONICLE

(713) 362-5163 - www.houstonchronicle.com

HOUSTON PEDIATRIC DENTAL SPECIALISTS, PC (281) 346-8326 - www.smilesgonewild.net

IMAGINE REALTY INTERNATIONAL

(832) 444-2363 - www.imaginerealtyinternational.com

INTEGRATED CHIROPRACTIC & WELLNESS (281) 346-8023 - www.ichirowellness.com

ITALIAN MAID CAFE

(281) 341-1587 - www.italianmaidcafe.com

www.fcer.com/locations/houston-map/ katy-cinco-ranch/

JDC FIRETHORNE

FIRST CUP CAFE

JOE JOE BEAR FOUNDATION

(281) 989-1171 - www.yourfirstcupcafe.com

(281) 398-4522 - www.joejoebear.org

FIRST FULSHEAR UMC*

JOHN PHAM KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY

(281) 346-1416 - www.firstfulshear.org

(832) 477-1089 - www.johnpham@kw.com

FIT SENSE, LLC

JOYCE LONG WELLNESS INSTITUTE

(832) 600-4474 - www.fitsense-llc.com

(281) 344-0095 - www.joycelong.biz

FOREVER FULSHEAR*

KATHIE LAUHOFF KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

(713) 703-4129

(713) 562-8502 - www.kathielauhoff.com

FORT BEND CARES FOUNDATION

KATY CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM

(832) 819-2005 - www.FortBendCares.org

(832) 541-7981 - www.katycam.com

FORT BEND COFFEE ROASTERS

KATY FAMILY YMCA

(281) 732-4716 - www.fortbendcoffee.com

(281) 395-1440 - www.firethorne.info

(281) 392-5055 - www.ymcahouston.org/katy

KATY MAGAZINE, LLC

(281) 579-9840 - www.katymagazine.com

KATY MEDIA ROOMS, LLC

(281) 780-9383 - www.katymediarooms.com

KATY PAIN SPECIALISTS

(281) 665-8552 - www.katypain.com

KATY PLANTATIONS HANDCRAFTED SHUTTERS (281)-402-1280 - www.katyplantations.com

KELLY BELL - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY (713) 201-7537 - www.homesearchkatytx.com

KELLY FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC (281)346-8397

KEN BRANCH AND ASSOCIATES

( 281) 346-1715 - www.kennethanddeloisbranch.com

KENT HARRIS

(832) 578-1967 - kentjharris@gmail.com

KINA COCKROFT - BE BEAUTIFUL AT ROCK PAPER SCISSORS - (281) 346-8189 - rpshairstudio.net KJT CONSULTING LLC (281) 705-6895

KRENEK LAW OFFICES

(281) 578-7711 - www.tkthompson@kreneklaw.com

KMJ INTERNATIONAL SECURITY SOLUTIONS LLC (281) 543-7400

KUSTOM KARVINGS

(281) 616-7053 - www.facebook.com/kustomkarving

LAMAR CISD

(832) 223-0330 - www.lcisd.org

LAW OFFICE OF LEWIS WHITE

(713)799-9220 - www.thejusticesite.com

LANIER PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES LLC (713) 504-3755 - www.drstaceylanier.com

LATHROP DENTAL CENTER*

(832) 437-3849 - www.lathropdentalcenter.com

LAZIT INDUSTRIES (281) 334-9969

LEGACY AT FALCON POINT

(281)394-0628 - www.legacyatfalconpoint.com

LEGALSHIELD

(281) 750-5317 - www.legalshieldassociate.com

LEGEND POOLS

(281) 979-5507 - www.legendpools.com

LEONETTI GRAPHICS INC.

(281) 499-4959 - www.leonettigraphics.com

LEVIN & ATWOOD, LLP

(281)-579-6044 - www.levinandatwood.com

LIBERTY STAR MORTGAGE a branch of SecurityNational MC NMLS 3116*

(281) 558-0004 - www.libertystarmortgage.com

LISA ANGELL, LMT* - (713) 530-1763 LIVING MAGAZINE

(972) 882-1300 - www.livingmagazine.net

LJA ENGINEERING, INC.*

(713) 953-5131 - www.ljaengineering.com

LOUETTA AUTOMOTIVE

(281) 304-2517 - www.louettaauto.com

MADAM DJ

(713) 714-7357 - www.madamdj.com

MAPP CONSTRUCTION

(281) 582-3696 - www.mappconstruction.com

MARTINEZ NESTOR MARINACCI

(832) 844-0829 - www.mnmlawfirm.com

MARY KAY

(805) 558-0533 - www.marykay.com/cfairbanks

MAS SOLUTIONS LLC

(281) 494-4874 - www.masquality.com

MCFRUGALS DRY CLEAN DEPOT

(832) 589-2885 - www.mcfrugalsdc.com

MD ANDERSON

(832) 334-3738 - www.mdanderson.org

MEDINA ORTHODONTICS

(281) 394-9300 - www.medianbraces.com

MELISSA MARSHALL KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER (281) 386-9772 - www.navigatemymove.com

METROMARKETING

(713) 973-7900 - www.metromkt.com

MICHAEL T. McCANN FOUNDATION, INC BIKE FOR MIKE - camccann@me.com MILAGRO SALONS (281) 778-2500 - www.milagrosalons.com

MIMOSA ROSE*

(281) 392-8594 - www.mimosarose.com

MINDFUL ART*

(713) 303-4381 - www.mindful-art.com

MKM PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN*

(281) 750-2551 - mkmphotographydesign.zenfolio.com

MOSQUITO DEFENSE SOLUTIONS

(281) 889-8499 - www.Mosquito-Defense.com

NANCY JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

(815) 546-9458 - www.nejstudio.com

MMEMBER EMBER D IRECTORY DIRECTORY

COLBURN’S PEST CONTROL SERVICE, INC.*


MEMBER DIRECTORY

NANCY GARCIA - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY*

SAMPICA’S ANTIQUES, GIFTS & MORE

GARY GREENE*

NATIONS RELIABLE LENDING

SAM’S CLUB

NATURALAWN OF AMERICA*

SANDEFUR CPA, P.C.*

TRACY GREMILLION - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

NBD GRAPHICS INC.

SANTIKOS PALLADIUM AVX

NO LABEL BREWING CO.

SCENTSY* - (832) 545-8121

NORTH FORT BEND WATER AUTHORITY

SENATOR LOIS KOLKHORST

OCUSOFT

SEND OUT CARDS

OLD FOSTER COMMUNITY MUSEUM

SERVPRO OF WEST FORT BEND COUNTY* - (281) 342-5326

(713) 503-5171 - www.nancykingrealty.com

(800) 675-6423 - www.freemansalemmortgageteam.com (281) 392-2990 - houstonwest.naturalawn.com (281) 547-8200 - www.nbdgraphics.net (281) 693-7545 - www.nolabelbrew.com (713)-488-8253 - nfbwa.com

(281) 239-9801 - www.ocusoft.com (281) 239-2178 - www.fostercommunitymuseum.org

(713) 899-8979 - sampicas.agm@gmail.com (281) 202-0337 - www.samsclub.com (281) 533-0911 - www.sandefurcpa.com (281) 239-4205 - www.santikos.com www.sharonsensationalscents.scentsy.us (979) 251-7888

(281) 772-3971 - www.sendoutcards.com

(281) 646-1136 - www.ilovefulsheartx.com

(281) 723-9890 - www.isellkatytx.net

TRICIA TURNER PROPERTIES / A RE/MAX EXPERIENCE (832)-563-0916 - www.har.com/TriciaG

TYNYLABS LLC

(832) 419-7020 - www.tynylabs.com

UPCLOSE MAGAZINE LLC

(281)-235-0600 - UpCloseMagazine.Com

VAN HOLTEN LAW FIRM*

(713) 865-0229 - www.vanholtenlaw.com

VICTOR’S MEXICAN GRILLE* - (281) 533-0040 www.victorsmexicanrestaurant.com

OMNI ONLINE SOLUTIONS

www.servproofwestfortbendcounty.com

OPERATION ENDURING BROTHERHOOD

(281) 341-5577 - www.showalterlaw.com

(602) 300-2888 - www.wineshopathome.com/ sschlangen

SILPADA DESIGNS*

(469) 826-3564 - www.silpada.com

VISION INSPIRED EYE CARE

ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT

SJR FAMILY PARTNERSHIP, LTD* - (281) 468-3588 SQUIRREL HOLDINGS LLC*

VOTE WAYNE THOMPSON

PAMELA MURRAY - (832)841-0399 PARKWAY FELLOWSHIP

SUGAR LAND SKEETERS

(281) 238-1400 - www.andy.meyers@ fortbendcountytx.gov

STATE FARM INSURANCE - JEFF GILBERT*

WEST FORT BEND BUZZ

PATHPOINTS TO WELLNESS HEALING ARTS & RETREAT CENTER*

(281) 347-6200 - www.yourareaneighbor.com

STEWART TITLE COMPANY*

WATERCREST CRUISE TRAVEL

PAUL LYTLE INSURANCE AGENCY

STIEBER INSURANCE GROUP LLC*

WESTERN VIEW REAL ESTATE / KW PREMIER

PAULA RUCKY PROPERTIES - REMAX GRAND

TEMPERATUREPRO OF FORT BEND

WESTHEIMER LAKES DENTAL

PAYCHEX*

TERRA POINT REALTY, LLC

YAHLEI BARRIOS*

PENDLETON REAL ESTATE / RE/MAX CINCO RANCH

TERRELL ROOFING AND CONSTRUCTION

YONG’S ASIAN FUSION*

PET SUPPLIES PLUS - (281) 346-4535 PHOTO BOOTH ON WHEELS

TERRY COZART PIANO

(281) 202-5988 - www.photoboothonwheels.com

TEXANA CENTER*

PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE & AQUATIC REHAB OF FORT BEND

(281) 239-1427 - www.texanacenter.com

TEXAS COUNTRY PROPERTIES*

(281) 347-8900 - www.ptcare.net

(281) 346-1136

PRESCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS WEST

TEXAS MOBILE CATERING, LLC

(832) 545-0645 - preschoolofperformingartswest.com

(713 )443-9013 - www.thesauerkrautfoodtruck.com

PRESTIGE PROPERTIES TEXAS

TEXAS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS

(281) 238-0800

(281) 346-8326 - www.texasorthodonticspecialists.com

PRIME MOVERS

TEXAS PRIDE DISPOSAL

(832) 772-6188 - www.primemovershouston.com

(281) 342-8178 - www.texaspridedisposal.com

PROSPERITY BANK

THE AD SHEET

(281) 574-8674 - www.ProsperityBankUSA.com

(713) 409-0420 - theadsheet@gmail.com

R.G. MILLER ENGINEERS

THE ART OF JAMES L. FOSTER

(713) 461-9600 - www.rgmiller.com

(405) 696-9333 - www.jameslfoster.com

RAFTER B IPM LLC

THE BUNKER ICEHOUSE*

(832)-474-8369 - www.rafterbipm.com

(281) 923-8833

RAMEY REALTY

THE ESCAPE SPA AND WELLNESS CENTER

(713) 503-6247 - www.mgramey1@gmail.com

(281) 202-4271 - www.theescapespa.net

RAYMOND L. WIGGINS, D.D.S., M.D. TEXAS ORAL AND FACIAL SURGERY

THE GROWLER SPOT

(713) 825-8868 - www.omnionlinesolutions.com (281) 804-6996 - www.operationenduringbrotherhood.org (281) 960-9833

ORIGAMI OWL

(713) 703-1554 - www.carmenizzo.origamiowl.com

(832) 222-8282 - Parkwayfellowship.com

(832) 461-6936 - www.pathpointstowellness.com

(832) 266-0153 - agents.allstate.com/paul-lytle-fulshear-tx.html (281) 793-5779 - www.paularucky.com (832) 914-3721 - www.paychex.com (281) 734-7342 - www.pendletonre.com

(281) 395-1200 - www.txofs.com

RAY’S GRILL

(281) 533-0099 - raysgrill.com

RE/MAX REALTY WEST*

(281) 346-0222 - www.movewest.net

REAL LIVING KARAPASHA REALTY* (281) 346-8032

RED POTATO MARKET

(281) 533-9863 - www.redpotatomarket.com

REMEDY ROOFING, INC.

(281) 391-8555 - www.remedyroofing.com

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN ZERWAS M.D. (281) 342-6969 - ww.JohnZerwas.com

RHONDA POHLMAN KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY (713) 294-9691 - www.seetimsell.com

RICHMOND STATE SUPPORTED LIVING CENTER (281) 344-4335 - www.govsc.org

ROTARY CLUB OF BRAZOS RIVER

(713) 931-1242 - alfrancisassociates@gmail.com

SHOWALTER LAW FIRM

(713) 302-6873

(281) 240-4487 - www.sugarlandskeeters.com

(281) 346-1333 - www.stewart.com/houston (281) 341-7141 - www.stieberinsurance.com (281) 616-5999 - www.temperatureprofortbend.com (281) 346-2112 - www.terrapointrealty.com (832) 535-9211 - www.terrellroofingandconstruction.com (713) 882-8558 - mozartcozart@yahoo.com

(832) 600-5856 - www.thegrowlerspot.com

THE GYM STATION WEST CINCO*

(281) 394-7844 - www.gymstation.com

THE MELISSA MARSHALL GROUP (281) 386-9772

THE OUGHTNESS GROUP

(281) 769-2846 - oughtness.net

THE ORCHARD - ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE (281) 371-3000 - www.theorchardkaty.com

THE SALONS OF FULSHEAR / THE LYME LEOPARD (281) 533-9332

THE SPORTS MARKETING COMPANY

(832) 945-2220 - www.thesportsmarketingcompany.com

THE SWEET TOOTH SHOPPE INC.*

(281) 533-0477 - www.sweettoothshoppe.com

THRIVE CHURCH*

(979) 884-7483 - thrivechurch.cc

TOM DUTKA AGENCY*

(281) 633-0630 - agents.allstate.com

TOM STINSON ALLSTATE

(281) 232-6033

(832) 913-3888 agents.allstate.com/tom-stinson-katy-tx.html

SAENZ OF THE TIME - (713) 876-5680

TOPMARK REALTY

RUSTIC KUTS FURNITURE & WESTERN DECOR www.facebook.com/pages/Saenz-of-The-Time/ 1418420968395669

(281) 698-7787 - topmarkrealty.com

SAFARI TEXAS

(832) 398-4676 - www.tutusbowtiesevents.com

(281) 277-7888 - www.safaritexasballroom.com

TUTUS & BOWTIES EVENTS

TRACY BOGIEL BETTER HOMES & GARDENS

VINES OF WINE - WINESHOP AT HOME

(281) 394-2877 - visioninspiredeyecare.com (713) 202-2252 - www.votewaynethompson.com

W.A. “ANDY” MEYERS

(850) 212-5524 - www.westfortbendbuzz.com (281) 533-4101 - www.watercrestcruisetravel.com (832) 857-4550 - www.westernview.kwrealty.com (281) 394-7581 - www.westheimerlakesdental.com (832) 628-7866 - www.liveinfulshear.com (281) 346-8196 - www.yongsasianfusion.com


BREAKING

NEW GROUND IN HEALTH CARE. AND IN KATY.

We’ve grown to meet our community’s growing need for exceptional care. In January, we officially opened the doors of our new east patient tower and second medical plaza. Here, you’ll find pre- and post-procedure units, intermediate care and intensive care units, NICU and OB Special Care suites. The expansion also includes additional surgery suites in the west patient tower. In addition to increasing the size of our Emergency Center, we are expanding our catheterization labs and diagnostic imaging areas. And you can expect all of our advanced offerings to maintain the highest quality and safety standards, because a community as special as ours deserves the very best. memorialhermann.org

A D VA N C E Y O U R C A R E E R W I T H U S . C A L L 1. 8 6 6 . 4 41. 4 5 6 7.

Profile for Real Property Marketing Group, Ltd.

Fulshear Magazine  

Volume 02 - Number 01

Fulshear Magazine  

Volume 02 - Number 01