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Pupil Premium Willingdon Community School 2012-13 Pupil Premium is an additional sum of money paid to all schools in order to tackle disadvantage resulting from low income or family circumstance. The amount is calculated on the number of students on roll who are currently eligible for free school meals or have been eligible within the last six years (Ever 6), and children looked after in local authority care. It allows us to address inequality and provide for the students who need it most. The government allows schools to decide how the Pupil Premium is spent since we are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual students. New measures have been included in publically available performance tables that capture the achievement of students covered by the Pupil Premium.

2012-13 Students eligible for free school meals in the last 6 years (Ever 6) Students looked after in local authority care (LAC)

No. 131 6

2013-14 Students eligible for free school meals in the last 6 years (Ever 6) Students looked after in local authority care (LAC)

No. 144 6

(Figures reported for academic year 2012/13 -Sept 2012 to August 2013)

Income Pupil premium total allocation 2012/13 £623 per Ever 6 pupil

£47,608

Pupil Premium 5/12ths allocation 2013/14 at £900 per Ever 6 pupil

£56,250

Additional Pupil Premium for Summer School 2013 Total for academic year 2012/13

£4,500 £108,358

The Pupil Premium attached to the number of children looked after in local authority care was paid again this year to East Sussex Virtual School for Children in Care. There is one student who is in the care of an authority other than East Sussex; we are in receipt of this pupil premium and it is not forwarded to the virtual school. We have prioritised the use of the pupil premium as follows:    

Students who are currently eligible for free school meals or have been eligible within the last six years (Ever 6) and are underachieving Students from other vulnerable groups (students with special educational needs, those looked after in local authority care and Gypsy Roma Travellers) that are underachieving Other underachieving students All students


How did we spend our Pupil Premium? Expenditure Staffing Costs Literacy Teacher/Accelerated Progress Coach Sept 12 – Aug 13

£55,284

Targeted Youth Support

£14,000

Counsellor

£4,600

Parent Support Advisor

£2,600

Accelerated Reader subscription and materials Summer School

£957 £4,256

Total for academic year 12/13

£81,697

Carry forward of pupil premium funds into 2013/14

£26,661

We used the Pupil Premium to continue to fund the following initiatives: 

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Our Literacy Progress Teacher to provide in house targeted literacy support to small groups of students. Each group has benefitted from two hours a week of intensive tuition. In selecting students for these literacy withdrawal sessions, Ever 6 or LAC status gives students’ priority. The focus of the sessions is oral communication as well as developing their reading and writing skills. Students with similar Key Stage levels and literacy needs have been grouped together to ensure that teaching can be targeted on particular needs specific to the whole group. The subscription for the Accelerated Reader software for use by the English department. Our Accelerated Progress Coach who works alongside a caseload of predominantly Key Stage 4 students in class and through withdrawal on managing their GCSE workload. He supports in mainly English and Maths classes and withdraws students to consolidate learning and prepare for controlled assessments. Weekly contact is made with the parent(s) of all students on his caseload to keep in touch and trouble shoot. All students on the caseload are mentored and if it is required, are involved in on going aspirational work such as college visits and an employability course. The procurement of additional specialist support for well-being and students in varying degrees of crisis in the form of a Targeted Youth Support worker, a trained counsellor and a Parent Support Advisor. Summer school provision targeted at all incoming Ever 6 students. We have also subsidised individual students on a case by case basis for particular experiences or equipment that has been relevant to academic success. This has included theatre trips, textbooks,


revision books, year 8 camp and the purchase of some fishing rods for a Key Stage 3 boys’ Esteem group.

What is the impact? Literacy has continued to be our biggest focus because this is a gateway skill to much of the curriculum. GSCE Outcomes 2013    

86% of Ever 6 students made expected rates of progress between Key Stage 2 (Year 6 SATs) and Key Stage 4 (GCSEs) in English. This represents a 47 percentage point rise on the previous year. 78% of Ever 6 students made expected rates of progress between Key Stage 2 (Year 6 SATs) and Key Stage 4 (GCSEs) in maths. This represents a 35 percentage point rise on the previous year. The number of Ever 6 students achieving 5A*-C including English & maths at GCSE was 54%. This represents a 24 percentage point increase on the previous year. The attainment gap between Ever 6 students and non-Ever 6 students for 5A*-C including English & maths was 25%. This represents a narrowed attainment gap by 14 percentage points on the previous year.

Key Stage 3 Final Assessment 2013  

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In year 7, 72% of Ever6 students met, or improved upon, their indicator grades in English. The figure for the whole cohort was 84% representing a percentage point gap of 12. In year 7, 88% of Ever6 students met, or improved upon, their indicator grades in maths. The figure for the whole cohort was 79% representing a percentage point gap of -6.

In year 8, 63% of Ever6 students met, or improved upon, their indicator grades in English. The figure for the whole cohort was 69% representing a percentage point gap of 6. In year 8, 72% of Ever6 students met, or improved upon, their indicator grades in maths. The figure for the whole cohort was 77% representing a percentage point gap of 5.

In year 9, 76% of Ever6 students met, or improved upon, their indicator grades in English. The figure for the whole cohort was 78% representing a percentage point gap of 2. In year 9, 73% of Ever6 students met, or improved upon, their indicator grades in maths. The figure for the whole cohort was 86% representing a percentage point gap of 13.

How do we plan to spend our Pupil Premium in the year 2013-14? 1. One week summer school for targeted students. 2. Employ intervention teachers for after school literacy and numeracy sessions in terms 1, 2 and 3 in order to address achievement below national standards (Year 7 catch up funds to be combined with Pupil Premium).


3. Continued small group, literacy withdrawal throughout Key Stage 3; targeted at Ever 6 and LAC students, but also other students who would benefit. 4. Increased English staffing to reduce English class sizes in Key Stage 3 & 4 in order that vulnerable students can access greater teacher time. 5. Increased maths Higher Level Teaching Assistant time to provide some class size reduction in Key Stage 4. 6. Appoint an Attendance Worker to work with Ever6 poor attenders and their families with a particular focus on transition. 7. Continue to fund Literacy Progress Teachers in order to provide a greater amount of literacy intervention in Key Stage 3. 8. Continue to buy in the expertise of a trained counsellor and a Parent Support Advisor to provide continued support to young people and their families. 9. Continue to fund our Accelerated Progress Coach to work alongside a caseload of predominantly Key Stage 4 students in class and through withdrawal on managing their GCSE workload. He supports in mainly English and Maths classes and withdraws students to consolidate learning and prepare for controlled assessments. We recognise that it is high quality teaching that has the greatest impact on all students’ ability to maximise progress. The provision of outstanding teaching and learning remains the absolute focus of our provision. Incorporated into outstanding learning, we work tirelessly on ensuring that students receive excellent feedback from staff both in the form of marking and other methods within the context of their lessons so that all students are clear about what they need to do to improve their progress. It is the quality of this feedback that has been evidenced as having the most impact on students’ progress.

Pupil premium Sep_2013  

Pupil premium Sep_2013

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