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contributors’ bios ELLY HAILS Currently calling Grand Cayman home, the UK native and devoted interior design student, can either be found planning her impending nuptials or sharing her inspired finds on her blog www.caribbeanlivingblog.com. On page 28 Elly shows how to ‘big up’ a small space. MICHAEL JOSEPH Born and raised in the Cayman Islands, Michael is proficient in three languages, is CIREBA’s Agent of the Year for 2011, and recently became a father. Learn more about his view on Cayman’s real estate market on page 72. TIM PECK With over 30 years’ experience under his belt, Tim, also Chairman of OBMI, has been responsible for a plethora of luxury retreats around the globe. Specialising in resort design, the BVI resident since 1980, is continually inspired by his surroundings. Turn to page 46 to discover more about Tim and OMBI. NIGEL ROUSE As a director within KPMG Advisory Caribbean Ltd, based in The Bahamas, Nigel is Head of their Transaction Services practice, providing financial due diligence services across the Caribbean. Pleased to have returned to his homeland in 2010, he previously worked within KPMG London’s Private Equity Group. Check out his thoughts for the year ahead on page 70. ROBERT TOWELL, RIBA Resident of the Cayman Islands since 1997, where he founded Robert Towell Architect Ltd., and is Principle Chartered Architect, Robert has over 20 years experience designing multi-family housing, commercial developments, mixed-use projects and renovations. In his downtime he enjoys music, sampling world cuisine and time with his family. Learn more about him and his firm on page 31.

www.reallifecaribbean.com Vol 7, issue #1 Winter 2012

PUBLISHER

mc2 Ltd Melanie Roddam

Senior Account Executive Kennedy Carroll - kennedy@reallife.ky

melanie@reallife.ky

DESIGN

EDITORIAL

Senior Designer Mike Johnston - mike@reallife.ky

Editor Kyle Fulton - kyle@reallife.ky Writer Juliet Austin - juliet@reallife.ky

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Maria Carter Wendy Helfenbaum Scott Rose Natalia Taylor

SALES & MARKETING

Sales Director Melanie Roddam - melanie@reallife.ky Senior Account Executive Kimberley Bentley - kimberley@reallife.ky

WEBSITE

Website Administrator Andrew Forster - andrew@reallife.ky DISTRIBUTION CONTACT

Kyle Fulton - kyle@reallife.ky

The views expressed within this publication do not reflect those of mc2 Ltd, REALlife magazine or their employees. mc2 Ltd. and REALlife magazine accept no responsibility for the views contained herein. Published quarterly. © 2012 mc2 Ltd.

t. 345.946.1220 f. 345.946.1221 www.mc2.com.ky ADVERTISE WITH US For details of our extremely cost effective rates, or if you are interested in contributing editorial, please contact our sales team. Email: ads@reallife.ky • Tel: 1 345.943.REAL Skype: reallifecaribbean


hello W

ell, it has been another wonderful and richly-rewarding year which welcomed us into some of the Caribbean's most spectacular homes and introduced us to artists, characters and other tropical treasures that we enjoyed sharing with you. We also celebrated our sixth year in the business, welcomed new members to the team and regretfully said goodbye to others. We look forward to an event-filled 2012. All the best for the year ahead from everyone at RL.

Andrew Forster, Aida Cortes, Juliet Austin, Kennedy Carroll, Kyle Fulton, Melanie Roddam, Mike Johnston. Missing: Kimberley Bentley. Clothing by Island Company. www.islandcompany.com Photography by Heather Holt. www.heatherholt.com


contents 32

40

House of the Rising Sun

Villa Aquamare

Original Retreats

Vintage meets visionary at Sunrise House in Mustique.

A labour of love in BVI.

Upscale Caribbean getaways with a novel twist.

18

14

30

Industry News

Editor’s Obsession

38 Must-Haves Bookshelves

28

Small Spaces Bright ideas for square foot-challenged spaces.

PROFILES Robert Towell – 31 Tim Peck – 46 Mike Joseph – 72


60

66

Three private island resorts that offer world-class service, bountiful natural beauty and, perhaps most importantly, far-above-the-fray privacy.

Cuban artist David Rodriguez.

Treasure Islands

Reality and fantasy collide

74 Feature Property: Sunset Point Epic by design: Grand Cayman’s own sumptuous stately home.

49

55

Rum – the spirit with spirit

Jakes Resort

From light and sweet to dark and stormy, raise your glass to spiritual perfection in the form of fine Caribbean rum.

52 Wonder Wall New York design powerhouse, Studio E, gets plastered with indulgent gilded panels and genuine Venetian plaster finishes.

The inimitable Sally Henzell brings barefoot bohemia back at Jakes Resort in Jamaica.

58

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H O U R S in DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

70 Real Report: A look back at 2011 and how we in the region can prepare for a the year ahead.

A truly exotic destination.

73

Real Estate Section

80 Directory and Useful Numbers


14 | INDUSTRY NEWS

PASSMAN DEBUTS SIGNATURE COINS IN ARETHUSA COLLECTION USA and Caribbean PASSMAN, an island-based design house, has launched the Arethusa collection, a line of signature coins that pay homage to the magical sea nymph, as its namesake. The collection features Arethusa’s image carved in sterling silver, set with 18K gold, diamonds, yellow sapphires and black coral accents on the front and PASSMAN’S signature anchor on the back. The Arethusa collection is for sale exclusively at PASSMAN’S boutiques in the United States and the Caribbean. A Caribbean-based brand, the sea has been a driving source of inspiration for the PASSMAN brand since its inception more than 35 years ago. Creator, Bernard Passman, is known his work that contrasted precious materials traditionally used in fine jewellery with materials of a more “raw” nature. Although Black Coral was the first of these “raw” discoveries, the company has since gone on to include a variety of precious gems, metals and woods in PASSMAN compositions. Today, PASSMAN’s Creative Director, Omar Torres, channels those harmonies in both the Arethusa and Luna collections. He has created a new generation of classic yet modern fine jewellery in 18K gold, Palo Santo (a hardwood) and a dash of moonlight, which is the luminescent Tagua. PASSMAN has stores in Grand Cayman, St. Thomas, Maui, Ketchikan, Alaska and Las Vegas. For more information call Studio PR, 212.696.1321

STAFFORD FLOORING INTRODUCES STARGLASS GROUT TO THE CARIBBEAN

ALL-INCLUSIVE FITNESS AND WELLNESS RETREATS ANNOUNCED FOR 2012 AT NISBET PLANTATION BEACH CLUB

Cayman Islands Stafford Flooring has introduced StarGlass Grout to its product selection. A groundbreaking, one-of-akind product, specially designed for use with glass and metal tile, StarGlass Grout combines a reflective, round glass bead aggregate with patented Urethane Grout Technology binder to create a translucent grout that will bring elegance and beauty to your glass or metal tile installation. There are 15 stunning colors from which to choose, ranging from pristine Diamond to shimmering Copper.

Nevis New Year’s resolutions to become healthy in 2012 can now be a luxurious reality, by treating yourself to a vacation at Nisbet Plantation Beach Club on Nevis. Instead of indulging in high-calorie drinks and dishes while lounging around, on this Caribbean vacation you will improve your overall health and wellness during the week-long all-inclusive Purescapes Fitness and Wellness retreats offered in January, February and March.

Composed of post-consumer recycled glass, the product emits little to no VOC’s, eliminates jobsite waste, is long lasting and easy-to-use, as well as providing unmatched stain resistance, color consistency, crack resistant flexibility, mold/mildew protection and UV stability. With such guaranteed features and benefits StarGlass Grout is sure to minimise life cycle costs and provide a translucent, three-dimensional, reflective appearance that you can enjoy for years to come. For more information visit www.staffordflooring.com

COMPETITION WINNER

After the retreat, guests can maintain the lifestyle change by applying the tools they learned to stay in shape. These include, amongst others, nutrition classes for sustainable weight loss and stress-relief techniques to enhance overall well-being, with trained instructors and nutritionists to tailor each personalised programme to ensure participants continued success. Dates for 2012 will be: January 21–28, February 18–25 and March 23–30. Package rates are available for the week-long all-inclusive retreat and include spacious cottage-style accommodations, all meals and non-alcoholic beverages, group activities, personalised plan and consultation, airport transfers and taxes. For reservations call 310.579.2202 or visit www.nisbetplantation.com/wellness-retreat

BUTTERFIELD ANNOUNCES THE WINNER OF THE 2011 BUTTERFIELD EDUCATION GRANT Cayman Islands Butterfield was proud to announce Sir John A. Cumber Primary School as the recipient of the inaugural Butterfield Annual Education Grant. The Grant awards one primary or secondary school each year with US$20,000 towards new development in curriculum or facilities. Sir John A. Cumber Year Six students prepared a submission for the purchase of smart boards for the school. The multimedia proposal was creative, unique and demonstrated the school’s desire to continue striving for academic excellence in the Cayman Islands.

REAL LIFE CARIBBEAN AND CURTAIN BLUFF ANTIGUA ANNOUNCE THEIR COMPETITION WINNER Antigua The winner of the three nights, all-inclusive package for two at Curtain Bluff in Antigua is the lucky Suzanne Polkosnik of Canada. Curtain Bluff is constantly ranked among the finest resorts in the world, offering extraordinary facilities in laid-back luxury. For more information visit www.curtainbluff.com

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To learn more about the application process and criteria visit www.butterfieldgroup.com

CARIBBEAN LUXURY LIFESTYLE, PROPERTY AND DESIGN MAGAZINE


INDUSTRY NEWS | 15

REAL LIFE CARIBBEAN ATTENDS THE 8TH ANNUAL BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Bahamas REAL LIFE Caribbean is proud to have, once again, been part of the Bahamas International Film Festival (BIFF). Proving to be one of the most successful festivals to date, the eighth annual event took place over four action-packed days, with a total of 69 films from 34 different countries screened.

Top: Zoe Kravitz, recipient of the BIFF Rising Star Award, and Heather Graham, recipient of the BIFF Career Achieivment Tribute Award. Bottom: BIFF Founder, Leslie Vanderpool, with REAL LIFE Sales Executive Kennedy Carroll.

Mixing glamour with culture the festival was host to three of Hollywood’s hottest actors: Heather Graham, Zoe Kravitz and Amber Heard. Heather Graham, star of such films as “Austin Powers”, “Boogie Nights” and “The Hangover” was on hand to receive BIFF’s Career Achievement Tribute Award, while Zoe Kravitz, daughter of Lenny Kravitz and Lisa Bonet, and star of the latest “X-Men” film, was honoured with the festival’s Rising Star tribute. Meanwhile, actress Amber Heard dazzled on BIFF’s red carpet and introduced the Festival’s opening night film “The Rum Diary”, in which she starred opposite Johnny Depp.

BIFF remains committed to providing the local community and international festival-goers with a diverse presentation of films from The Bahamas and around the world. In addition to showcasing films, BIFF provides unique cultural experiences, educational programmes, and forums for exploring the past, present and future of cinema – all with the goal of raising the level of filmmaking, participation and education throughout The Bahamas. For a list of award-winners or further event information visit www.bintlfilmfest.com

Sea Grape House: recipient of the 2011 Governor’s Award

GOVERNOR’S AWARD 2011 WINNER Cayman Islands The Cayman Society of Architects, Surveyors and Engineers (CASE) and the Cayman Contractors Association (CCA), in conjunction with His Excellency Governor Duncan Taylor, CBE were proud to announce the recipient of the 2011 Governor’s Award for Design and Construction Excellence in the Cayman Islands. The Governor selected Sea Grape House – a residential project by John Doak Architecture, as this year’s winner. The design team, including Doak himself, was presented with the award at a ceremony held at the Governor’s House on November 30th. In attendance were the Governor and his wife, the Honourable Minister Mike Adam, members of CASE, the CCA, other leading representatives from the construction and design industry, along with the award sponsors Cayman National, AL Thompson’s Home Depot, CL Flowers and Sons, mc2 design group, REAL LIFE Caribbean, National Concrete, Cox Lumber Co., and Cayman First. For more information visit www.governorsaward.ky

ISLAND COMPANIES LTD CELEBRATES THE REOPENING OF MANSION Cayman Islands Following extensive renovations over the summer to incorporate the new Pandora Store, The Mansion at Camana Bay has re-opened. The renewed store maintains its authentic ‘Cayman’ feel created with help from National Trust historians and historical architecture and interior design experts. The Mansion features a wealth of exciting new and exclusive offerings. Bikers, rock stars and anyone with a flair for drama will love the unconventional and eyecatching glam-rock jewellery designs from the award-winning designer Stephen Webster. Those who embrace harmony and

tranquility, on the other hand, can find bliss with the Shamballa beads inspired by the ancient traditions of yoga and meditation. World travellers or those with far flung families can keep track of the time wherever they are with Vogard watches: by simply rotating the bezel the time in a number of locations around the world will appear. In addition to these new brands, The Mansion will still play host to original favourites such as Ulysse Nardin and Jaquet Droz timepieces, jewellery from Hearts On Fire, Tacori, FRED and many more. For more information call the Store Manager on 345.640.5337

ISLAND AIR EVENING OF LUXURY 2012 Cayman Islands The annual Island Air Evening of Luxury collaboration between Island Air, Cessna, The Residences at The Ritz-Carlton Grand Cayman, Camana Bay, Fidelity, Island Companies, REAL LIFE Caribbean and Tortuga Rum Company – is set to take place in February 2012 in Grand Cayman. At the invitation only event, guests have the opportunity to learn more about the jets whilst viewing the latest and greatest planes, cars, boats, fine jewellery, watches and other luxury items while sipping fine champagne, wines or cocktails and enjoying delicious hors d’oeuvres. At this year’s event, REAL LIFE Caribbean is teaming up with Design Studio and Stafford Flooring to create a luxurious lounge area for guests. For more information email julieb@islandair.ky, call 345.949.5252 or visit www.islandair.ky

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16 | INDUSTRY NEWS

THE NASSAU FLORIST CELEBRATES 60 YEARS IN BUSINESS

HARRIS CIVIL ENGINEERS AND VICTOR INTERNATIONAL COMMITTED TO ENVIRONMENTAL EXCELLENCE

Bahamas Established in 1951, The Nassau Florist is celebrating 60 years of business in The Bahamas. Headed by Scottish-born Jim Whitehead and a team of creative designers, they proudly boast many decades’ experience in floral designs, original wedding designs and yacht floras. Over the years they have grown to become the largest floral store on island.

British Virgin Islands Harris Civil Engineers has been working with Victor International to provide civil design services for Oil Nut Bay, a community on the eastern tip of Virgin Gorda, BVI. Harris Civil Engineers provided planning services, roadway design, utility design, storm water conveyance and treatment design along with construction administration services.

Mr. Whitehead, a Bahamas resident for over 40 years, and his design team continue to produce beautiful, unique floral arrangements for several hotels, residences and private consultants in The Bahamas, and are long-standing member of the Association of Bridal Consultants. In their 60th anniversary year, they were given the honour of providing the florals and décor for His Royal Highness Prince Edward at The Governor General’s Youth Award, The Miss Universe and Miss Teen USA Pageants as well as many other prominent clients and events.

St Lucia Caribbean Botanical Designs is expanding their offerings to include environmental services and consulting to the Caribbean via their new consulting company, Ibis Environmental Associates. The sustainable landscape design company has been serving the Caribbean and Outer Banks for over 12 years and saw a need for this service. Formed to offer a wider range of services to their clients, and to ensure that all the projects undertaken will be as sustainable as possible, Ibis Environmental Associates is there from start to finish.

Oil Nut Bay is emerging as one of the most exclusive living opportunities in the Caribbean, nestled in a 300-acre community with unparalleled natural beauty and high-end amenities. They are committed to environmental excellence, eco-progressive policies and foundations in order to maintain harmony with the environment. Victor International has chosen to build only 88 units, maintaining its commitment and history of low-density developments and environmental integrity. Other eco-friendly initiatives include on-site desalination plant and the use of electric cars only on-site. Harris Civil Engineers has provided an eco-friendly pond design that included shallow areas for migratory birds, upland areas for the planning of mangrove trees and storage for treating storm water run-off before it could discharge into the pristine sea.

For more information visit www.ibisenv.com or email info@ibisenv.com

For more information call 407.629.4777 or visit www.harriscivilengineers.com

For more information call 242.393.2223 or email thenassauflorist@gmail.com

CARIBBEAN BOTANICAL DESIGNS TO EXPAND WITH ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

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INDUSTRY NEWS | 17

NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER FOR RUSSIA AND CIS STATES APPOINTED AT IRG. Cayman Islands Angelika Martiuk, a resident of the Cayman Islands since 1992, was born in the USSR and studied at both Kiev University of National Culture & Art and The National University of Kiev, has recently been appointed as the New Business Development Manager for Russia and the CIS States. She has extensive knowledge of the Cayman Islands, is fluent in Russian, Ukrainian and English and is married to a local finance industry specialist. Jeremy Hurst of IRG states,” We believe that Cayman offers real opportunities to quality investors from Russia, whose spending power is substantial. Our international partner Knight Frank has offices in Moscow, St Petersburg and Kiev, which we plan to visit in 2012 to ensure their staff and clients are fully aware of what the Cayman Islands have to offer.” For more information visit www.irg.ky or call 345.623.1111

CAMANA BAY CELEBRATES CAYMAN CULINARY MONTH Cayman Islands As the Cayman Islands prepares for Culinary Month — an annual celebration that falls between January and February — Camana Bay is set to host three exciting epicurean events that will showcase the Town’s acclaimed restaurants as well as a variety of outstanding international talent and the very best of the dynamic local food scene. Festivities kick off on Saturday 14 January 2012 with The Ultimate Dinner Party. This star-studded event features five unique experiences in one unforgettable night: a book signing; a cocktail party; dinner at Abacus, Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink or Ortanique; a dessert party; and a live music concert. In addition to Camana Bay’s renowned chefs, the impressive talent line-up of chefs and wine experts includes Andrea Robinson, Anthony Bourdain, April Bloomfield, Chris Hanmer, Francois Payard, Paul Rogalski, Ray Isle and Richard Blais. Two weeks later on Saturday 28 January 2012, Camana Bay will host the annual Taste of Cayman Food & Wine Festival for the fourth time. One of the Caribbean’s largest culinary events, Taste of Cayman is a cornucopia of sights, sounds, smells and tastes with over thirty of the island’s finest restaurants offering a sample of their signature dishes and drinks. Camana Bay’s Culinary Month activities end on Saturday 4 February 2012 with the inaugural Slow Food Day, which aims to bring the whole island together in a celebration of eating locally and sourcing sustainably. The day begins at The Grounds in Lower Valley with a special farmers market tasting where local chefs will be paired with local farmers to create dishes inspired by local ingredients. In the evening, Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink in Camana Bay will host a farm-to-table dinner featuring celebrity guest chef Jonathan Waxman.

Saturday 14 January 2012 The Ultimate Dinner Party Saturday 28 January 2012 Taste of Cayman Food & Wine Festival Saturday 4 February 2012 Slow Food Day Tickets available at: www.camanabaycookout.com

For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.camanabaycookout.com

FRENCHMAN’S REEF MARRIOTT RESORT IN USVI OPENS AFTER $48M RENOVATION US Virgin Islands After a six month, US$48 million renovation, Marriott Hotels & Resort’s iconic property, Frenchman’s Reef Marriott Resort in the USVI, has officially re-opened its doors. The event was marked with a celebration on November 10, 2011, and attended by island officials, Marriott executives, VIP guests and community members. The multi-million dollar renovation completely transformed the property inside and out, giving the resort’s main tower a new, fresh exterior. Inside, the resort underwent a full redesign of all guest rooms, the state-of-the art spa, fitness centre, full service salon, restaurants – including menu concepts, lounge areas, as well as a complete redesign of the infinity pool with kids zone and the addition of an adults only pool. The resort’s 302 newly renovated guest rooms offer magnificent views of Charlotte Amalie Harbour and easy access to Morning Star Beach. Similarly, the re-designed Aqua Terra Oceanfront Grill and Aqua Terra Lounge, just two of the resort’s nine restaurant and lounge offerings, also provide spectacular vistas of the Harbour through its impressive floor to ceiling windows. For more information visit www.frenchmansreefmarriott.com

FIDELITY IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE 9TH ANNUAL CAYMAN BUSINESS OUTLOOK EVENT Cayman Islands January 19th 2012 marks the date of the ninth consecutive Cayman Business Outlook (CBO). This highly anticipated annual conference seeks to educate, inform and provoke the local community, including politicians and other business leaders, with insights on issues that affect both the world and Cayman. Themed, “Future World: How Politics, Economics and Technology Will Shape Our Lives”, CBO will focus on the significant changes that have occurred in recent years and how these will shape the future of the world we live in. This year’s CBO features two Geopolitical speakers and authors: Dr. George Friedman and Giddeon Rachman. These gentlemen will present contrasting views on how the United States, China and Europe will impact global stability in the years to come. Social Media analyst, Anthony Williams, is also a featured speaker who will give valuable insight on how Social Media has changed the landscape of the twenty first century. Bringing an economic perspective, Alex Tabarrok, author of the blog, “Marginal Revolution”, will discuss how the economy reacts to these world changes. For the first time in CBO’s history, each speaker will host a Q&A segment after their presentations, giving audience members the opportunity to interact during the forum. For more information visit www.caymanbusinessoutlook.com

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sun Vintage meets visionary at Sunrise House in Mustique. Words by Juliet Austin Photography courtesy of The Mustique Company

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xuding an easy classicism redolent of the colonial Caribbean, Sunrise House descends the steep curve of Mustique’s undulating hillside in tiers from its dramatic seat in the Heavens to the secluded sandiness of Simplicity Beach below. Formerly a pocket of decadence for pop stars, aristocrats, socialites and royalty, Mustique’s tranquil easterly coast seems a lifetime away from the shenanigans of its carousing past, ruled over by its uncrowned monarch, the late Lord Glenconner. Here, cradled in the palm of nature like some fantastical open-air auditorium, the sun illuminates a sea of wild, endless aquamarine, the “ever-fixed mark” that is, paradoxically, both scene-stealing backdrop and star of this sumptuous tropical getaway. Inspired by unrivalled, sweeping vistas and Mustique’s reputation for guarding privacy at a premium, the owners sought the expertise of US-based architects, Jay Dalgliesh and Mark Bittle of Dalgliesh Gilpin Paxton. Sensitive to the nuances of site, landscape and regional vernacular, lessons learned renovating Les Jolies Eaux – formerly Princess Margaret’s celebrated sanctum designed by Oliver Messel – translated into the scheme for Sunrise House. “From the top looking out to the ocean and then to the palm shaded shore >

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20 | HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN

below, the architectural challenge was immediately apparent: to design a complex that would create an exciting process of moving effortlessly from the high drama and expansive views enjoyed above to the intimate beach, where one feels as if one has drifted onto a deserted island, albeit with every desirable luxury,” Dalgliesh expounds. With five ensuite bedrooms, including that of the achingly pretty beach cottage, the villa possesses all the inherent comforts of the Great Houses of the plantocracy era yet was built as recently as 2004. With integrated high tech features, floodlit tennis courts, a professionally designed gym and media and games rooms, it presents every luxury and convenience along with ample opportunity to just lie back and examine one’s navel. “Each area has been designed to allow intimacy, personal space or entertaining without compromising the luxury of remaining barefoot,” the owner explains. Cooled by Atlantic breezes and anchored cleverly in context through use of local stone, its vintage-meetsvisionary exterior honours the past while interlacing fresh design elements. “Stone outcrops were native to the site and dictated that the plinth of buildings should grow from them,” says Dalgliesh. Stucco walls echo the rising sun


ZEN | 21 CAYMAN’S BLACKREIGNING MAGIC MAN

becoming lighter as they climb, and weathered, wooden rooflines interface seamlessly with both the softness of the native landscape and the villa’s own exotic fruit and flower gardens. “Thus, the spaces nestle into the topography rather than perch upon it as a totally enclosed behemoth,” adds Dalgliesh. What is more, with sheltered rooflines extending to dramatic tiered terraces, outdoor areas become “open air pavilions,” drawing guest to the very edges of paradise with vertiginous views of endless blue. While subtle level changes deliver powerful panoramas at every turn, the ingeniously conceived infinity pool cascades

from on high, creating spellbinding liquid illusions; magical portals into a tropical wonderland. “The pool is the organic heart of the design,” states Dalgliesh. “Not only does it provide the enjoyment of water at the uppermost spaces of the complex, but it reaches out to the sea below, providing an unbroken link and a sense of the nearness of this much larger body of water.” Reflecting a mirage of Caribbean skies – from palest sunrise to moonlit indigo nights – the recurring water motif plays to upper level living spaces from every vantage, emphasising the transparent connection between indoor and outdoor spaces. Fulfilling the same role below, a plunge pool >

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22 | HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN

...the sophisticated scheme retains human scale and sensibility, emanating old world charm and easy intimacy.  RL


REIGNING ZEN | 23

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HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN | 25

oasis perches tantalisingly just above the beach, becoming part of an idyllic Caribbean tableau complete with powder white sand and swooning palm trees. Inside, characterised by British award-winning interior designer, Michael Reeves’, signature neutral chic ‘handwriting’, interiors exude comfort and elegance. Fresh contemporary detailing combines with antiques and bespoke, handmade furniture, resulting in a visually stunning, cool-as-linen ambience with an undeniably legendary quality. Despite a façade of faded grandeur, the sophisticated scheme retains human scale and sensibility, emanating old world charm and easy intimacy. Says Reeves: “Neutral and ‘nature’ colours… allow the beauty of the outside to blend with the interiors but always to remain the focus.” Calming stone flooring inside and out symbiotically emphasises the energetic flow between interior and exterior, while above, timber tray ceilings with a dragged paint finish work join with muted neutrals in taupe, aqua, soft grays and vanilla, to absorb the sun’s glare, lending rooms a tranquil luminosity. Grasscloth in subtle hues, botanical prints and uplit decorative mirrors in lacquer, silver-gilt leaf and metal – including an intriguing Queen Anne style mirror made in Senegal from auto parts – accent walls, while vast windows, softened by billowing white curtains frame views of the everchanging sea, its inky horizon forming vibrant organic canvases of irresistible azure. In the Great Room, steel-framed, floor-standing mirrors recessed in four alcoves deliver movement to the symmetry driven scheme, reflecting light and allowing artful, panoramic glimpses of the room’s every facet. Oversized linen slip-covered sofas and a massive buttoned leather ottoman offer comfy seating while, “the huge, rustic console table, laden with lamps, clam shells and vases, looks like it has evolved over time rather than having that ‘just decorated’ feel,” states Reeves. And always, no matter where you are or what the time of day, there is… the sea. In its tacit assertion that sea and sky shine in the limelight, Sunrise House distinguishes itself. With subtle lines and soulful forms, the property ingeniously becomes part of the organic whole; a homogeneous and magical theatre-in-the-round where, sheltered by nature’s bounty, worries wash away as the sun rises on a new day in paradise.

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ROBERTTOWELL Founder and Principle Chartered Architect of Robert Towell Architect Ltd. in the Cayman Islands, Robert (RIBA) shares his firm’s diverse portfolio of projects, his thoughts on the ever-changing industry and a few of his favourite things.

6. Bugatti Veron

3. Design Tool: Music inspires me in every aspect of design. It sets the mood and helps the creative imagination. 4. Appliance: Without hesitation, my Rancilio Silvia Espresso machine with matching coffee grinder. 5. Artist: My 13 year-old daughter’s artwork and her mastery of colour.

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6. Car: Bugatti Veyron in black and red. 7. Hotel: W Hotel – one of my design favourites. 8. Food & drink: Ron Zacapa (30 yr old) Guatemalan Rum with a Filet Mignon. 9. Book: “Chinamerica” by Handel Jones.

Ron pa Zaca

10. Holiday: My son’s fourth birthday in Nosara, Costa Rica and summers at the family cottage in Northern Ontario.

yr old

1. ‘Turning Tor so’ Santiago Ca latrava

2. Furniture: The Barcelona chair designed by Mies Van Der Rohe in 1929. A classic yet modern piece of furniture.

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RL: What are the biggest challenges you face as an architect in the Caribbean? RT: As global warming continues, Architects and Engineers find themselves having to design buildings that can withstand the everchanging weather conditions. While many Caribbean countries have advantages (such as higher ground), those on low-lying islands have found it imperative to elevate their buildings to minimise damages. Increased hurricane activity and fuel costs have resulted in an increase in regional building costs, which in turn affect an Architect’s designs as well as create major challenges with regard to client budgets.

1. Architect: Spanish modernist, Santiago Calatrava, who combines artistry with engineering.

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RL: What are you working on at present? RT: The firm currently has a variety of private single-family custom homes, which should commence construction in early 2012. Recently, with Davenport Development Ltd., we designed and unveiled some modern canal and beachfront homes that have received positive reviews and offer unique options for the discriminating buyer. We are also working on a new Butterfield Bank branch in town, a couple of proposed restaurants, a beach resort club and we just completed the new Penha Perfume and MAC cosmetics retail stores. In

RL: What is your proudest achievement? RT: From a family perspective, I have a very supportive wife and wonderful children. From a personal perspective, the establishment of my business that has contributed more than 20 years of industry experience, professional advice and guidance to a varied range of design projects in the Cayman Islands and abroad. Most of all, I am happy to be able to balance my work and island lifestyle.

ROB E R T ’S T OP TE N

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RL: Describe your design aesthetic and how it has evolved. RT: One of my earliest projects was a large custom designed house for a prominent art collector. The home had a modern-style flat roof, the rooms were filled with original 21st century artwork, and the home was constructed using a fiberglass exterior panel envelope resembling oversized limestone blocks. The property was adjacent to some of the largest and oldest homes in Toronto and its design aesthetic certainly made a statement. While I appreciate many styles, I really have a passion for modern and contemporary design. I realise that while not everyone shares this view, I enjoy that there are so many ways to express architectural beauty.

addition, we have a number of renovation projects with owners who have chosen to upgrade their properties rather than move.

4. Rancilo Silvia Espresso machine

RL: Why did you choose to become an architect? RT: As a young boy my parents guided me towards architecture or engineering because I was really good at creating and designing projects. When I graduated from Ryerson University’s Architecture Programme, I was hired by a small highly design-driven practice in Toronto where I had the fortune of working on many impressive, unique and varied projects, which was fundamental in establishing a solid foundation for my later years as a Chartered Architect.

Name four people (alive or deceased) you would invite to a dinner party and why.

Athlete: Wayne Gretzky – great to watch and a good guy. Actor: Robin Williams because he is just insane. Politician: Bill Clinton because he was a cool president. Family: Either deceased parent would be great. To learn more, visit: www.RobertTowell.com

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VILLA AQUAMARE A labour of love in BVI Words by Wendy Helfenbaum

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estled between mountain and sea at Mahoe Bay, a breathtakingly beautiful stretch of beach on Virgin Gorda's western coast, sits Villa Aquamare. The luxurious villa enclave rises up, built testimony to the power of a dream and the strength of friendship. Offering spectacular views overlooking the Sir Francis Drake Channel, the villa’s story reads like a choose-yourown-adventure book, full of promise and challenges. Thankfully, for the well travelled partners whose dream of owning a lush beachfront holiday home in a tranquil spot that was easily accessible and not overrun with cruise ships, oversized jets or busloads of tourists, the perfect location soon presented itself. Just a forty-minute plane ride from their homeland, Puerto Rico, Virgin Gorda, the third largest of the British Virgin Islands, measures eight and a half square miles, and features white sand beaches, verdant mountains and quiet coves. Named by Christopher Columbus in 1493 for the way the oddly shaped island resembled a ‘fat virgin’, the partners, Guillermo Paz, Pedro Collazo, Juan Herrans and Sergio Gomes, soon determined it was the perfect place to kick back and cut

loose; an idyllic environment for their elegant vacation home that was both sophisticated and private. Having found the ideal country in which to unpack and unwind, surrounded by nature’s unspoiled beauty, the owners got stuck into making their dream a reality. However, building on Virgin Gorda soon proved to be no picnic at the beach. “There were many restrictions on construction laws that had to be applied; it took fifteen months to get building permits,” explains co-owner Guillermo Paz. “A lot of things needed to happen, even before we decided what type of house to build.” And when faced with the astronomical cost to prepare one home’s infrastructures – building water catchment systems, roadwork, cisterns and a power plant – the friends realised it made more sense to build three homes rather than the one they initially planned for. “All we knew,” Paz recounts, “was that it needed to be a place where the only thing you had to do was indulge.” “We wanted five bedrooms per villa, ample living space, plus tall ceilings, shingles and cut stones, because we wanted to respect the natural vernacular of the islands,” explains Paz. >


"...all the design elements embrace the site and champion its unique character.” Enter architect Liselott Johnsson. Married to one of Herrans’ high school friends, she had trained in Sweden, was living in the US and was inspired by French philosopher Gaston Bachelard’s book, which encourages architects to base their work on the sensual experiences it will provoke. To maximise unobstructed views of the expansive cobalt sea, Johnsson cleverly designed each of the three 8,000-square foot villas to sit on different elevations; linking the buildings to the site through the movement of the landscape. “There’s a spiralling movement from the mountains down to the ocean, which finalises in the horizon. I integrated this notion of a spiral into my design ideas for the villas.” Soaring thirty-foot high vaulted Spanish cedar ceilings and floorto-ceiling windows flood the interior with natural light to create a delightfully open environment that lends itself to festive gathering with friends.

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With five bedrooms under each cedar shingled-roof, every villa comes complete with a sumptuous one thousand-square-foot master bedroom, hammocks that sway enticingly on the balcony and invigorating outdoor marble shower rooms. To emphasise the grand theatrical vibe of the common areas while preserving privacy, balconies were designed five feet above the ground. “Being in between the mountains and the ocean is spiritual: the mountains are expressed in the sky, and the ocean is expressed in this horizontal eternity; we wanted to create the sensation that when you were on the deck, you were hovering between the mountain and the ocean,” Johnsson explains. Durable, classic travertine marble flooring, coupled with customised terrace railings and stairs in dense Brazilian ipe – known for its ability to withstand tropical weather – create interiors that are at once stylish and naturally-inspired. Echoed arbor

elements at the entrances and in showers, reflect the owners' predeliction for rustic materials, which is further played out in the beautiful stone-encased shower room, built with locally-quarried limestone. As Johnsson elaborates, “We tried to build as much as possible on the island, and to use as many local materials as we could.” A classmate of Paz’s from the University of Puerto Rico Architecture School, Jean-Pierre Santoni of Basico Home, conceived much of the interior design scheme. Creating most of the furniture for the villas, including the dining tables and credenzas, living room coffee tables, bedroom nightstands, and bathroom vanities, Santoni achieved an airy feeling of casual comfort and breezy elegance with strategically placed hammocks, teak loungers and club chairs, in keeping with the owners’ laidback philosophy. “Everything is comfortable, so that if you’re in a bathing suit, you can lounge >


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VILLA AQUAMARE | 37

anywhere,” he explains. A soft palette of light beiges and whites conveys a look of refinement, using the furniture as a blank canvas, and allowing nature to take centre stage. “We did simple slipcovered headboards, then used John Robshaw hand-printed batik fabrics, so each room’s pillows and bedding are different, yet have a unified look.” Spacious living areas flow seamlessly from one to another, incorporating the sleek gourmet kitchen – complete with stained mahogany cabinetry, granite countertops and stainless steel accessories – with the marble infinity pool terrace, located just a few steps from the ivory-sand beach. Eclectic décor elements such as the Thai bronze rain drums used as tables on the terrace add a stylish bohemian flair. While developing the beach park and surrounding gardens, James Craig, landscape architect with Craig Collins International, effortlessly blended the man-made villas with the surrounding forested hills and the ocean’s coral reef by way of local plant species. “Eightyfive per cent of the flora we used is native to Virgin Gorda and the Upper

Leeward Islands,” explains Craig. “Mature mahogany trees, preserved during construction, provide contextual scale and a backdrop to the buildings, so that all the design elements embrace the site and champion its unique character.”

In the ornamental gardens, Craig showcased draught-resistant native fauna such as leeas and banana trees, while strategically placing 10-foot-tall coconut palms for added privacy between villas. Flowering accent plants are a feast for the senses, as are the villas’ kitchen gardens packed with basil, mint, ginger and thyme. Although Aquamare began as four friends desiring a shared holiday home, the project soon evolved into a thriving business. The owners continue regularly to use the property – each September, Paz celebrates his birthday with a festive extravaganza – but since its completion in March 2008, they have built the enclave into an exclusive villa rental company. As Paz says, “The magic of Aquamare is that it feels like a home, not like a rental.” Rising from a foundation built on friendship and love, Villa Aquamare fulfils its original promise as a haven for four lifelong friends who sought a tranquil, tropical haven from their busy lives. Forever yielding unforeseeable treasures and pleasures, the villa is their voice of calm in the warm Caribbean waters.

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retreats

Upscale Caribbean getaways with a novel twist Words by Maria Carter

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he West Indies’ variety of resorts is as vast as the Atlantic Ocean is deep – offering everything from cottages fronting crystal-clear rivers to upscale treehouses nestled in the rainforest. The Tropics boast some of the world’s most relaxing retreats, all luxurious in their own right, but each bringing something distinctly unique to their clients’ holiday experience. Here, three stunning resorts shower guests with palate-tempting menus, adventurous excursions and eco-friendly accommodations that vibe perfectly with unspoiled indigenous flora and fauna.

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Jade Mountain, St. Lucia Embark on epicurean indulgence

The brainchild of architect-owner Nick Troubetzkoy, Jade Mountain employs ingenious techniques like the lack of a westerly fourth wall in accommodations, and infinity edged en-suite elevated pools, providing 270-degree panoramic vistas of the surrounding ocean and Piton mountains to visually blend the resort’s interiors with its stupendous surroundings. Deliberately void of addictive technology like phones, radio, television and Internet, the 600-acre resort offers a muchwelcome solace for those seeking reprieve from a hectically paced life. The architecturally stunning getaway is also a gourmand heaven with near limitless foodie possibilities: guests can learn about exotic ingredients and spices, prepare delicacies and dine on the most delicious food, all while basking in the glow of perks one expects of a über-luxury resort. With top-notch service, majestic views, a worldclass spa and a restaurant featuring the culinary masterpieces of a James Beard Award-winning chef there is a bounty of options in which to indulge. Go for one of Chef Allen Susser’s themed culinary events, centred on motifs like indigenous spices, creative uses of mango and “Cooking in Paradise”, and return home armed with new epicurean delights. There is even an organic farm and historic plantation on the hotel’s property. Anse Mamin, a 1900s sugarcane-plantation-turned-cocoabean-farm, still bears cocoa trees and produces the resort’s chocolates, in addition to crops of avocado, oranges, tangerines, guavas, papaya, coconut and more. For those simply looking to enjoy first-class cuisine, meals at Jade Mountain are fully customisable – special menus and private dining experiences, from intimate beach picnics to white tablecloth affairs on starlight terraces, are always possible. The resort’s bevy of dining options include amongst others the exotic Apsara menu – the cuisine of St. Lucia with an East Indian influence, Emerald’s – a solely vegetarian establishment and the informal Jungle Grill. You may come for the food, but you will stay for the view: evenings at Jade Mountain are best spent with on the enchanting Celestial Terrace, an elevated space ideal for spirits, sunsets and, of course, stargazing. >

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42 | ORIGINAL RETREATS

Rosalie Bay Get back to nature at this lush refuge in Dominica Nestled on the Atlantic side of Dominica, Rosalie Bay is an eco-friendly haven where green technology like solar-power panels and wind turbines meshes seamlessly with all of the amenities to be expected of a luxury hotel. The verdant resort’s 22 acres – situated in a valley at the base of Morne Trois Pitons, a UNESCO World Heritage Site – are home to an organic garden, a labyrinth made of river stones, a Koi pond for meditation, a full-service restaurant and an ocean-front spa, all flanked by an inviting black-sand beach and the crystal-clear Rosalie River. Nine pastel-coloured cottages, painstakingly crafted by local builders over nearly nine years, house twenty-eight guestrooms filled with furniture and artwork created by Dominican artisans and artists. The recently completed hotel’s modern amenities purposely harmonise with the island’s idyllic surroundings. Take the natural saltwater pool, for instance: its onyx finish imitates the beach’s dark volcanic sand, while a deck made of river stones puts commonplace poolside concrete to shame. The tranquil Kalinago Spa boasts treatments that incorporate volcanic mud and hand-pressed oils from Dominica, while the upscale Zamaan Restaurant features a menu of fresh exotic and indigenous foods, which can be tailored to vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free diets. The retreat is a dream for those in pursuit of a healthy lifestyle, offering free Yoga classes, kayak rentals and guided tours through the garden. Guests can also consult with a wellness coordinator who takes a holistic approach in recommending services and classes to improve guests’ individual wellbeing during their stay, as well as taking part in cooking classes taught by the restaurant’s chef centre on nutritional cuisine, with an emphasis on recipes that guests can recreate once they have returned home. From March until September, guests can watch Leatherback, Hawksbill and Green turtles nest on Rosalie Bay’s beach. And, the concierge will gladly coordinate excursions of scuba diving, whale watching, hiking to nearby waterfalls or, for thrill seekers, the seven-hour trek to Boiling Lake – the volcanic body of water in the centre of the island. Committed to protecting the local environment, the resort’s goal is evident in its recycled-wood Adirondack chairs; turtle-

protection initiative complete with hired staff to monitor eggs during hatching season; locally sourced and UV-filtration treated water; and one-and-a-half acre garden supplying the restaurant with organic cinnamon, guavas, papayas, noni juice and more. Nearly seventy percent of Rosalie Bay’s power is generated by on-property solar panels and wind turbines. This conservational effort, combined with the resort’s serene atmosphere, dispels the unkempt-tree-hugger stereotype of bygone years, proving that diminishing one’s carbon footprint does not require the sacrifice of luxury or style.


CAYMAN’S BLACK MAGIC MAN | 43 TREASURE ISLANDS

Kanopi House Rooms with a birds-eye view of Jamaica’s famed Blue Lagoon If the Swiss Family Robinson had had generous economic means with which to build island abodes, their digs would have played out like this: elegant colonial-meets-West-Indian bungalows cradled in the treetops, intimately shaded by 100foot banyans, anchored by floors of renewable Spanish elm and sweetwood and filled with handcrafted Jamaican art and furniture. Kanopi House, in Jamaica’s Portland parish, makes this whimsical daydream a reality with its tree-houses overlooking a tranquil lagoon. The fun yet fancy accommodations feature windows encased by cedar shutters, locally-quarried stone tiles, indoor and outdoor showers, upscale earthfriendly bath products, plush cotton robes and kitchenettes stocked with Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee, light provisions and, of course, fine wine. There are no televisions (Kanopi House prefers to keep the focus on Mother Nature) but rooms are equipped with Bose stereos and iPods pre-loaded with classical selections like Mozart. Watch a beautiful glowing daybreak, or settle in with a glass of wine for a warm sunset from the privacy of your own sheltered veranda, a lounge space flanked by ‘walls’ of French doors, allowing complete immersion in the rainforest’s green splendor from the comfort of your home away from home.

While there is certainly plenty to experience on the lush sixacre property – dine on authentic Jamaican dishes and freshly caught yellowtail snapper at the Great House’s pink limestone terrace, snorkel the surrounding reef, or kayak across the lagoon to deserted Monkey Island for a romantic picnic prepared by the hotel’s chefs – further exploits can be found nearby. Expect adventure but leave the planning to Kanopi’s hosts, who regularly arrange excursions on request, including privately-guided treks to a local waterfall, leisurely rafting trips down the Rio Grande complete with one’s own guide, and their signature Rum Shop Tour – an afternoon barhopping trip through the town of Portland. There is also the possibility of nearly anything else the daring heart may desire: mountain biking, bathing in hot springs, diving, surfing at Boston Beach, spelunking at Nonsuch Caves and more. After a day of exploration, book an inroom massage to soothe muscles and mind. Order dinner in, open the French doors and a bottle of wine and settle in for a glorious evening under the leafy canopy as the sounds of the rainforest lull you into a peaceful rest. We think the Robinsons would approve.

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TIMPECK

T I M ’S T OP TE N

2. Furniture: Hans Wenger’s Shell Chair – ‘the smiling chair’.

5. CitiZ Nespresso

1. Designer: Legoretta, for his clean style, attention to detail and use of colour and light. Hugh Newell Jacobsen, for his ability to distil a regional vernacular into the cultural essence and then reinterpret the form with clean contemporary simplicity.

3. Design Tool: As one of the older generation – a 2B pencil with a sharpie for the hard lining! 4. Sustainable Gizmo: The Solio charger – keeps everything topped up with solar power, even in the depths of the Serengeti!

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5. Appliance: CitiZ Nespresso coffee machine. 6. Artist: Mark Rothko and his wonderful use of colour to stimulate the emotions. 7. Car: My wife’s 1967 VW Beetle – takes me back to my youth. 8. Hotel: Recently, I enjoyed visiting Amanyara on Turks and Caicos. It is a wonderful interpretation of tropical architecture that fits well into the indigenous vegetation of a coral island.

RL: Why did you choose to become an architect? TP: As a child I wanted to be an artist but was under parental pressure to take up a “real career.” Blessed with talent, I looked for ways to translate this into something tangible. Early on I became aware of the role that architects play as designers of the sculptures in which we live and work, and that also have such visual impact and social significance on our society. RL: What was the first thing that you designed? TP: My first work experience was with Chamberlin Powell and Bon on the Royal Shakespeare Company Theatre at the Barbican in London. It was wonderful to work with Bon – he had phenomenal attention to detail. It was a great foundation for a career in architecture. RL: Describe your design aesthetic. TP: I approach design with a great deal of respect for context and culture. At OBMI we are lucky enough to touch some of the most unique and beautiful corners of the world. Our roots in the islands have endowed us with a high level of sensitivity to the influences of environment and culture allowing us to address this privilege with a high level of sensitivity. Architecture is a visual but also very

2. Hans wegner’s Shell Chair

much a spatial experience. The quality of space within or around an excellent piece of architecture has the ability to go beyond the visual to a far deeper spiritual experience. RL: What are you working on at present? TP: I am a designer at heart and maintain an active role in a variety of projects from residences, as part of OBMI’s Island Living programme, to larger resort developments across the globe, under our Destination Creation brand. On a personal note I have just finished painting my wife’s custom shaped surfboard. RL: What inspires you today? TP: We live in the Caribbean – what more inspiration can we seek than the natural beauty that surrounds us every day? In a broader sense, as architects, we have the opportunity of creating dreams: weaving varied goals and desires with creativity to produce a solution that surpasses our client’s imagination. Inspiration comes from observing the client’s pleasure when they absorb the result of our endeavours.

9. Book: Anything from Iain M Banks – an author with great imagination. 10. Holiday: I travel so much for work that often getting back home can feel like a holiday. My wife is a commercial pilot and can often accompany me, so our holidays are frequently a few days tacked on to a business trip. For more information visit: www.obmi.com

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Rothko 6. Mark


RUM

the spirit with a spirit From light and sweet to dark and stormy, raise your glass to spiritual perfection in the form of fine Caribbean rum. Words by Juliet Austin

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or the tipple that has toppled every one of its rivals in the spirit world, one unequivocal truth prevails: not all rums are created equal. Synonymous with the Caribbean, the convoluted rags-to-riches story of how the region’s liquid gold conquered the world is a page-turner of epic of proportions. Filled with romanticised tales of rebellion and intrigue, it documents the ascent of a “hot, hellish and terrible” brew along a centuries-long path to becoming one of the world’s most legendary and luxurious libations. >

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50 | CHANGING TIMES

Photo courtesy of Authentic Caribbean Rum

“There’s nought no doubt so much the spirit calms as rum and true religion” Lord Byron

Intractably tethered to the history of sugar and the golden era of exploration, rum is a bottled chronicle of the political, economic and cultural histories of the Caribbean. Antecedents date back to antiquity with the ‘brum’ of the Malay people used to cure colds and sterilise wounds. In the fourteenth century, Marco Polo described a, “wine made of sugar,” however, it was Christopher Columbus who in 1494, on his second voyage to Hispaniola, introduced sugarcane to The Tropics. Nevertheless, it would not be until the seventeenth century that plantation slaves in

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Lord Byron

Barbados, discovered that molasses, a byproduct of the sugar refining process, could be fermented into alcohol to create the first true rum – a foul-tasting liquor originally known by the dubious moniker, Kill Devil. Within a few short years, rum had begun its reinvention and left its fiery genesis behind. As one Dutch sea captain wrote: “The spirits are now smoother to the tongue and have acquired a gold colour during the voyage.” By 1663, Mount Gay Distillery in Barbados, still the world’s oldest operating rum producer, kick started the rise of rum in the region making it the


epicentre of the rum empire – a role it would never relinquish. Transforming itself from what rum historian Wayne Curtis calls, “swill to swanky”, rum ascended from “the gutter to the great room”, and in doing so became the unsuspecting currency of the transatlantic slave trade; the original global commodity in a complex alcoholic web of trade and credit. In response to insatiable demand, the notorious triangular slave trade facilitated the unprecedented growth of the rum industry into the New World and beyond. Taken by the spirit, records suggest that by 1763 there were 159 rum distilleries in New England alone, producing a staggering 2.7 millions gallons of rum to a populous unable to quench their thirst for a taste of The Tropics. Inevitably, trading by English privateers became piracy on the high seas, signalling the beginning of the drink’s swashbuckling associations with buccaneers, smugglers and the rumrunners of the Prohibition years. Legend says that Blackbeard himself liked to mix rum with gunpowder, lighting it before swilling, while the British Royal Navy introduced statutory daily half pint rum rations for all sailors. Even Admiral Horatio Nelson is rumoured to have been partial to more than just the occasional tot. The story goes that after his fall at Trafalgar, his body was preserved in a cask of rum during transportation back to England. Unfortunately, sailors could not resist drilling holes and draining the rum inside, hence the term, ‘Nelson’s Blood.’ Yet, despite being dealt a rum hand with such tales of ill repute, the refinement of rum-making techniques enabled it to evolve alongside the rich and diverse heritage of the region until its amber nectar reached the distinction of being the only spirit worthy of accompanying a Caribbean sunset. Having spent nigh on two centuries perfecting the art of distillation, aging and blending from harvesting and milling to the ‘sugary sorcery’ of fermentation, master blenders from some of the most exalted names in Caribbean rum now produce their own incarnations of pure liquid heaven. Reliant on the particulars of climate, geography, personality and passion, most

Photo courtesy of Authentic Caribbean Rum

RUM – THE SPIRIT WITH A SPIRIT | 51

are aged in oak barrels in a process lasting several months to extended periods of thirty or so years. The spirit is then left to breathe, acquiring its intensity, colour, flavour and character. Not all are blended, however, and it is these more refined vintage single cask rums that have become the most revered and highly sought. Now considered the height of sophistication, rum has become the new cognac of the millennium. Infused with a riot of tropical flavours including aromatic spicy vanilla with hints of peppery tobacco and silky smooth fudge cinnamon with a buttery sweet caramel fade, colours vary from light to mellow amber and full-bodied dark red, engaging all the senses in a pure liquid ecstasy. Driven to drink, savvy imbibers tend to consume their ‘poison’ neat and unadulterated, savouring the drink’s manifold complexities in a salute to spiritual perfection. As Lord Byron stated, “There’s nought no doubt so much the spirit calms as rum and true religion,” and as generations of tipple-takers can attest, having sipped this golden elixir that makes taste buds swoon, once imbibed this spirited sunshine in a glass is bound to become a religion. Cheers!

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enetian plaster has long been the stuff of masterpieces, evoking the ornate churches of famed architect, Andrea Palladio, and the rich patina of Italy’s luxurious palazzos and grand villas. Thousands of years BC, ancient Egyptians used it for its durability, later Romans employed it for the architectural masterpieces so synonymous with their empire and, during the Renaissance, Venetians adorned their interiors, embracing the material’s ability to withstand the damaging effects of water, salt and humidity – concerns so central to modern life in the Caribbean. Today, one innovative New York company has added to its portfolio an exciting new twist on the old classic. Applying genuine Venetian plaster paper to the walls of some of the planet’s most decadent homes, New York’s Studio E Hand Painted Wallpaper has brought the highly sought-after, “historyrich finish” to the modern world. Employing authentic artisans and application techniques, gone is the need to hire and transport skilled labourers to painstakingly plaster one’s walls. Imported from Italy as a paste made from aged, kiln-fired limestone and the purest of marble dust, the material is seasoned wet for up to a year before processing as a finished plaster. “The material enables us to either spread it on in very thin layers for subtle translucent gradations or to give a smooth polishedstone finish. It can also be made to be very textural with brushes, different types

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New York design powerhouse, Studio E, gets plastered with indulgent gilded panels and genuine Venetian plaster finishes. Words by Maria Carter Photos courtesy of Patricia Fisher Design and Studio E


of tools, embossing, imprinting and things of that nature,” comments Denise Vasaya, Marketing and Sales Director at Studio E. Layering the plaster onto sturdy recycled paper backing on vast 30-footlong tables in its workshop, handmade panels imitate all the grandeur of Venetian plaster or the decorative glamour of metal, yet are ultimately more cost effective, durable and consistent than the originals. Unlike days gone by, working onto paper rather than directly onto surfaces, means that repairs simply require substituting the blemished panel for a fresh piece, compared to re-doing an entire wall of the genuine article, which cannot easily be patched or matched. Incorporating Studio E’s Sasha, a lightblue shimmery Venetian plaster paper with a smooth finish, into the scheme for a guest-bedroom designer show-house, US interior designer, Patricia Fisher, enthuses, “I always look for something to get the mind working. This wallpaper launched the room. Its tactile quality and powdery finish elicited a response from every single person who walked into the room – they would swoon over it, touch it – it was a very influential part of the design.” Periodically developing new textured designs and cleverly-named collections to give their clients fresh ideas, including lovely imprints like snakeskin and Queen Anne’s Lace applied to metallic paper, the

made-to-order nature of Studio E’s versatile wall coverings means that each request is fully customisable. All plasters are hand tinted and blended, then textured before burnishing and polishing to a satiny sheen. “By adjusting the texture or the colour of the shimmery powder applied to the top of the paper, it becomes a completely different look,” observes Vasaya. “They’re all handmade papers, so each and every one is unique.” Free of toxic compounds and made on primarily post-consumer recycled poly/cellulose fibre or biodegradable paper, Studio E’s impressive environmental credentials and socially responsible business model, guarantee breathable products that, while inhibiting the growth of mold, are sustainably manufactured in ways that respect artisans and promote fine decorative arts’ traditions, while touching the earth gently. Installed with eco-friendly pastes and deinstalled with just water, water-borne paints, plasters and varnishes limit harmful emissions of volatile organic compounds, creating healthy, environmentally friendly spaces with wow factor to boot. Issuing in a new era of classic to modern style, Studio E’s simple, atmospheric decorative wall panels possess stunning visual appeal guaranteed to turn any abode into a masterpiece.

First page: Sasha Venetian plaster as used by Patricia Fisher Design. This page above: Custom paper for Tiffany & Co. Wall Street Store. Below, top row from left: All from the Metallic Collection: India #2210 Sun, Stella #2571 Dawn Gold, Olivia #2180 Sun. Middle row from left: All from the Metallic Collection: Princess Leia #2451 Silver, Princess Grace #2481 Silver, Princess Grace #2483 White Gold, Jackie O #2511 Silver. Bottom row from left: Metallic Collection: Edith #5507 Metallic Collection: Custom Color, Stella #2575 Dusk Gold, Broken Color Collection: Charlotte #5032 Geranium.

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JAKES RESORT | 57

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H O U R S in Dominican Republic

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Occupying two thirds of La Hispaniola, the Dominican Republic is the second largest island in the Caribbean. A truly exotic destination, its ecological diversity encompasses approximately 18,000 square miles which include 750 miles of coastline, rich foliage of forest and mangroves, rivers and beaches, natural springs and waterfalls and, of course, pleasant tropical weather. A fascinating destination with an abundance of natural beauty, it is a nature lover's dream complete with culture, history, luxury and flavour. 1

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take in the sights

Visit the colonial building of Santo Domingo built by the original Spanish settlers. Do not miss the beautiful Alcázar de Colón – built in the 16th century it is the oldest Viceregal residence in the Americas. Amble through Columbus Park, the "urban living room", in the city's ancient quarter, where everyone goes to enjoy the tree-lined streets and architecture that dates back several centuries.

sanctuary

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The stunning 176-suite oceanfront Sanctuary at Cap Cana Resort features architecturally stunning designs that reflect both Caribbean and European influences. With beautiful ocean-front suites and swim-out access, the marina has five restaurants and bars, five pools, a lavish spa and 18,000 square feet of event space. One of the Caribbean’s most attractive new destinations, it will easily fulfill your every desire.

indulge

Located on one of Samaná's most beautiful beaches, is the premier fine-dining restaurant, Porto. Commanding an intimate open-air setting with panoramic views of the tranquil-blue Atlantic Ocean, it features the best of fresh, locally sourced ingredients prepared with unmatched culinary skill. With a diverse menu offering both traditional and innovative cuisine, it is a stop your taste buds will demand.

fore play

Cabarete Beach is globally recognised as the ‘kiteboarding capital’ due to a perfect combination of beaches, wind and waves. Kiteboard rental shops and experienced instructors are available in Cabarete all along the area known as Kite Beach. During the month of July windsurfers launch themselves into the water for the Windsurfing World Cup held on the Bay. Which ever ride you prefer, Caberete has the right conditions for a day of adventure on the open ocean. For more information on the Dominican Republic, visit www.godominicanrepublic.com.

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Take a break at The Bagua Spa nestled in the Casa Colonial Beach & Spa. Situated on the lively north coast, the spa provides a cross-cultural experience that blends the best of indigenous and European treatments. Combining Old World elegance with distinct contemporary

4 styling – sheer curtains, eclectic furnishings and one-of-a-kind art – The Bagua Spa infuses body and soul with complete relaxation.

Pete Dye's latest gem at Casa de Campo, To Dye Fore is a staggering 27 holes, 7,740 yard long course with seven cliff-side holes dropping 300’ to the Chavón River below with strong gusting winds and breathtaking views in a one-of-a-kind location. Play golf surrounded by the Caribbean Sea, the Dominican mountains, the Chavón River, the Casa de Campo Marina and the Altos de Chavón artists’ village. Said to rival the legendary Teeth of the Dog course, To Dye Fore is a welcome addition to Casa de Campo's golf triad.

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soul seeker

splash out Samaná Bay is one of Mother Nature's most exciting natural excursions. Each January through March more than 10,000 Humpback whales of the North Atlantic population return to the waters surrounding the Dominican Republic to mate. Hop on a boat and witness these magnificent creatures up close for yourself. Definitely a wet and wild experience of a lifetime.

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treasure

ISLANDS While there is an abundance of highly desirable island resorts from which to choose in the Caribbean, the pleasures of high-end exclusivity may best be enjoyed on the uncrowded, sand-dollar-flecked shores of private island resorts. Here are three that offer world-class service, bountiful natural beauty and, perhaps most importantly, far-above-the-fray privacy. Words by Scott Rose RL


CAYMAN’S BLACK MAGIC MAN | 61

SANDALS ROYAL CARIBBEAN Montego Bay, Jamaica – The very best of both worlds Sumptuous mahogany furnishings, impeccably manicured tropical gardens, private butler service – these exemplify the escape to cosseted relaxation available at the Sandals Royal Caribbean – an all-inclusive resort along Jamaica’s picturesque, sun-caressed Montego Bay. Yet the glory of this vacationer’s sanctuary is only fully appreciated when one indulges on the private offshore island of Bali Hai, an exotic isle providing the ultimate extravagance of a resort-within-a-resort. Take a dragon boat across the glassy sea to this private cay, where a myriad of temptations await. Pamper yourself with a private cabana massage behind billowing white curtains – as gentle waves lap the shore, dine on Thai-style cuisine while delighting in the uplifting ocean vista, or frolic on the exquisite sugar-sand beaches. Meanwhile, back on the mainland, the stately elegance of the porte-cochère entryway speaks to delights hidden just beyond. Choose one of the graciously decorated swim-up suites – complete with a private butler to attend to your every desire – and you will be able to go directly from the soothing waters of the Crystal Lagoon into those of your private deep soaking tub. Then again, for a profoundly restful experience, opt for a luxurious treatment at the resort’s Red Lane Spa, where European services make use of natural island botanicals – think green coffee beans, bamboo crystals and comforting aloe vera. Le Jardinier, one of the resort’s many restaurants, serves French-influenced cuisine, while the beach-front grill, Bamboo Shack, specialises in authentic Jamaican fare. Smoked marlin with tropical fruit salsa, a medallion of beef tenderloin with herb brandy sauce and a Caribbean coconut pie dessert as well as many other scrumptious delicacies can be special ordered for a private candlelight dinner under the Island Gazebo on Bali Hai – just ask your private butler to arrange it. Other vacation-within-a-vacation pleasures to be enjoyed include reggae afternoons on the beach, tennis lessons with the pro, windsurfing, kayaking, scuba diving, exploring tidal pools full of sea urchins as well as a wealth of vividly-coloured tropical fish – and, for those in a mood simply to kick back, there is always the beach-front, fresh-water pool with its swim-up bar. Revelling in a best-of-both-worlds' experience, it is simple to drink in the sheer easy-living joy readily available at Sandals Royal Caribbean in Montego Bay. >


62 | TREASURE ISLANDS

KAMALAME CAY The Bahamas – Far from the maddening crowds Add “pinch-yourself, can-this-be-real?” natural beauty to quintessential barefoot chic and you get the 97-acre private island of Kamalame Cay, just off the northeast coast of Andros in The Bahamas. This very personal elite resort, the lovinglycultivated vision of the Hew family, features generously-spaced cottage and beach suites, a custom villa, the central Great House and even a fully-staffed, four bedroom private villa – the Cove – atop a scenic rocky bluff. Tastefully appointed with classic Caribbean lofty peak ceilings, dwellings are characterised by a sophisticated mix of plush furnishings with Indonesian accents, endless windows with dramatic views, and French doors with removable muslin curtains, all chosen to maximise the indoor-outdoor design. Golf carts – automatically assigned to guests upon arrival – underscore the pleasant, unhurried pace of this secluded Caribbean Shangri-La; hammocks strung between towering

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palm trees swing in the warm breeze, inviting one to laze the day away, while the never-ending dock tempts an early evening amble to ponder the splendiferous Caribbean sunset. Yet Kamalame abounds with opportunities to enjoy more dynamic pursuits. Sport fishing in these environs, particularly for bonefish, is unmatched, and day trips with seasoned guides are easily arranged by the friendly staff. Other adventurous options include sea kayaking – during which one might observe dolphins cavorting – snorkelling, tennis, nature walks, tours of nearby towns and even an exhilarating seaplane ride to explore nearby sand cays and where a private gourmet picnic on the secluded sandy shore can await. Off Kamalame’s pristine shores lies the world’s third largest barrier reef, a marine replenishment zone; like a mermaid’s song, it calls one’s name, inviting a plunge into undersea adventure around colourful coral gardens. Conveniently, Kamalame’s PADI dive centre offers instruction from beginner through to advanced specialty levels, including classes in digital underwater photography. Kamalame Cay throws its annual “I Love Lobster” food festival in August, when guests can travel out to the reef to see the crustaceans caught live, and then take lessons in lobster preparation. During the rest of the year, meals feature fresher-than-fresh local seafood, tropical fruits and other assorted delicacies served in the Great House. If a spa can only be as relaxing as its ambience, then Kamalame Cay’s Overwater Spa constitutes a premonition of nirvana. Poised above turquoise waters at the terminus of a 200foot pier, the spa’s treatment rooms feature glass floors and floor-to-ceiling windows to capture the breathtaking azure expanses of the Caribbean Sea. Whether indulging in the rejuvenating Body Melt Back Therapy or the heavenly Seaweed Botanical Wrap, reposing in this unique locale, with its endless ocean panoramas, reminds of Jacques Cousteau’s marvellous insight: “The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.” The same might well be said, of the ultra-private, one-of-a-kind getaway that is Kamalame Cay.


TREASURE ISLANDS | 63

SCRUB ISLAND RESORT BVI – The discerning yachtsman’s private utopia Brand spanking new, and scheduled to complete its alliance with the esteemed Marriot Autograph Collection in early 2012, Scrub Island Resort seats all visitors securely in the lap of luxury. Whether standing on one of the many private beaches, the docks in the marina or a suite’s spacious veranda, the jawdropping beauty of infinite open skies, sapphire waters and poetic island outcroppings await. Exotic wood panels, natural stone flooring and gourmet kitchens typify the high-end décor of the accommodations, while personalised concierge service is as delightful and unobtrusive as an ocean breeze. Fortunately, owning a slice of this other-worldly oasis is as simple as it is satisfying: real estate opportunities on Scrub Island Resort range from partial to full ownership of existing homes to the purchase of an unspoiled land parcel where one may employ one’s own architect while still having full access to all the private resort’s five-star amenities. A cornucopia of epicurean offerings may be savoured in Scrub Island’s diverse dining establishments. At the fine-dining Caravela, enjoy continental classics with a Caribbean twist while revelling in the natural beauty of the surrounding Marina Village and Camanoe Island. Perched above Pavilion Beach, a fifteen-foot waterfall and the crystalline, lagoon-style pool, the open-air Tierra! Tierra! offers

lighter fare to tantalise the taste buds. Meanwhile, private dining can be arranged anywhere on the island, including in one’s suite, at Whale Watch Point or on a secluded, romantic stretch of the beach. And, to top it all off, Scrub Island chefs can prepare, to your specifications, any catch landed during your local sport fishing expeditions. As this resort was designed around the 55-slip marina, it is a quality destination for water sports’ enthusiasts. The Marina Village is home to a full-service dive shop, facilitating scuba diving or snorkelling excursions that could well bring you face-toface with such magnificent marine creatures as the queen triggerfish or the sea goddess nudibranch. Guests may also enjoy kayak eco tours with the resort’s knowledgeable staff biologist, personalised charter trips out to the North Drop in pursuit of blue marlin, or a jaunt over to Tortola for a tour of historic Dutch settlements. The Ixora Spa, named for the flowering tropical plant often used in Hindu worship and Indian folk medicine, is not to be missed. Situated in a hillside villa with uncommonly spacious treatment rooms and picturesque views, the spa is already drawing worldwide praise with the inventiveness of its superexclusive offerings such as anti-oxidant serums, facial masques and exfoliating body scrubs. Relaxing on your private Scrub Island, whether in pool, tub or sea, the resort casts a lingering luxury spell, certain to leave you dreaming of the high seas.

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fantasy

reality

Cuban artist David Rodriguez

Words by Natalia Taylor

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ARTIST PROFILE – DAVID RODRIGUEZ | 67

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s a child growing up in Cuba, David Rodriguez would go up to his grandparents’ attic and lose himself for hours among the abandoned, broken items he found there. Years later, these forays into the dark recesses of junk rooms, filled with dusty household goods, would be recreated on canvas, in his unique depictions of well worn pots and pans, rusting bicycles and old toys. By infusing elements of fantasy or magic into these depictions of forgotten articles, Rodriguez’s work captures the outlook of a child, a sense of wonder in a world of make-believe. It is this seamless blending of the possible and the impossible, the meeting of reality and fantasy in a single scene, which is the hallmark of Rodriguez’s work. It is a style that Ramon Cernuda, owner of the specialist Cuban art gallery, Cernuda Arte, that exclusively represents him, describes as Magical Realism. As a genre it is most often associated with the fiction of Latin American authors, where supernatural, impossible events are recounted as if they were quite unsurprising. In Rodriguez’s art, the same elements of fantasy are presented as part of the every day: the neck of an abandoned violin becomes the stalk of a plant bursting into leaf in Adagio; a little girl on a rocking horse in Cavalcade reaches her hands towards a giant butterfly; tiny wisps of cloud are suspended over a mug in Clouds in my Coffee. Magical Realism refers not only to the way Rodriguez presents the impossible as real, but, according to Cernuda, “His technique is Realist in the sense that the objects are painted in a natural way.” Indeed, the relics Rodriguez paints are so authentic one feels one could almost reach out and touch them, and by including their imperfections it seems he breathes life into them: “…an old doll becomes animated and alive; a chipped coffee pot starts to steam; a dilapidated paint bucket overflows with dripping wet pigment,” says Cernuda. While there is the suggestion of inanimate objects coming to life, the more magical elements are underplayed, making it easy for the viewer to accept fantasy as reality.

Opposite page: Make a Wish, (2011), oil on canvas. Above: The Return, (2005), oil on canvas.

Rodriguez’s paintings pulse with a sense of poetry, the story being told with subtlety and delicacy, and the theatre-like setting of so many of his works underscore this impression. Often his protagonists are depicted against a dark night sky, appearing to be spot lit in the centre of a stage, as we see in The Return, where a centaur

carries a ladder across a barren landscape, or in Make a Wish, where a young witch watches shooting stars through a telescope. “In the work of every painter, there always exists an interwoven part of his inner world, which is not something that he consciously reflects in his art,” reveals Rodriguez. “In my case, the presence of >

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elements that refer to childhood and innocence are an allusion to precisely the nostalgia of that childhood left behind.” A graduate of the acclaimed San Alejandro Academy of Art in Havana and later the Graduate Arts Institute of the same city, Rodriguez has been painting since he was a young boy, although it was not always his ambition to make a career out of it. Despite twelve solo exhibitions and over thirty group exhibitions to date in numerous countries, and having been presented at various major art fairs in the USA, there is surprisingly little information available about the artist. This might at first seem surprising, bearing in mind how well established he is in his field. However, when one considers that until five years ago he was based in Cuba where, he explains, “The art market is very limited, made up of a select group of foreign visitors and collectors who promote the arts,” and where, “the artist…does not have to worry about mortgages, bills or car insurance,” the fact he has devoted his energies to painting, rather than marketing himself, becomes understandable. Now that Rodriguez is residing in the US, this is changing. Rodriguez reveals that his more recent artwork reflects the very different social and economic structure in which he is now living. “The visually romantic world that was instilled in me during my life in Cuba has now seemed to leave me, in exchange for a more Pop Art-driven creation,” he explains. Today he is experimenting with different compositions, painting single items – often mass produced items, like coffee cups, cans of paint or light switches, in which he says he hides messages. Although the child-like wonder of his earlier art may be maturing as his circumstances change, it is clear that the playful and mysterious elements that characterise his style will live on through his future work. Opposite top left: Vanity, (2010), oil on canvas. Opposite top right: Adagio, (2007), oil on canvas. Opposite bottom left: Hiatus, (2011), oil on canvas. Opposite bottom right: Turn Me On (2011), oil on canvas. Below: Clouds in my Coffee, (2011), oil on canvas.

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To view more of Rodriguez’s work, visit: www.reallifecaribbean.com

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70 | REAL REPORT

Look back, leap forward

• Public Debt and Taxes: higher national debt and unemployment will mean higher taxes in most developed economies. Plans to reorganise corporate structures in lower tax jurisdictions that may have been seen as too expensive or awkward to implement in the past are likely to become increasingly attractive as corporate (and personal) taxes outside of the region become more onerous. Lower tax jurisdictions within the region are well placed to benefit from any such restructuring reorganisation initiatives.

In order for companies and individuals to maximise the potential benefits from these opportunities, A look back at 2011 and how we in the region they will need to become increasingly can prepare for the year ahead. By Nigel Rouse of KPMG creative in their approach to marketing, as well as more diligent at ooking back at the last twelve months, one cannot help but managing themselves internally. Key things that they will want think that most developed economies have been locked in a to consider are: state of economic ‘limbo’. The economic issues that plagued • Marketing: as a lot of the opportunities lie outside of our Europe and the US in 2010 (in fact most ‘developed’ economies) traditional markets, we will need to be increasingly have only become worse; national debt and unemployment have innovative and determined in targeting new business. increased, social unrest seems to have gathered momentum and Business networking, the internet and business alliances are the future of the Euro appears even less certain. all areas that will help us tap into opportunities in these unfamiliar territories; Over the next twelve months it is tough to see things getting • Compliance: businesses will need to ensure that they are much better. The difficult political and economic decisions properly set up to manage an increasingly onerous level of needed to bring about recovery (largely in the form of jobs) administrative and disclosure based requirements from within these sovereign states will not come about easily, nor will overseas tax and regulatory authorities. Developments such any subsequent recovery happen quickly. With public debt as Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FACTA) will only approaching post Second World War levels and youth continue as overseas governments become increasingly wary unemployment at unprecedented levels, one fears that a of lower tax destinations; sustainable recovery will take years to engineer and implement. • Accounting and Management Information: a lot of businesses will experience some form of financial strain or Despite all of the negative news coming from Europe and the pressure over the coming months/years. It is vital that US, if we in the Caribbean focus on areas of local and overseas companies ensure their internal accounting, business opportunity we may be partially able to shelter ourselves from planning and reporting structures are sufficiently robust to these issues. One may consider the region’s main areas of allow management teams to get them through these opportunity to be likely to include: difficult times. A proper management reporting and • Growing Economies: a number of economies are actually budgeting framework should provide management with the growing at the moment (mainly those with significant natural necessary information and time to mitigate potential resources). For example, Brazil is currently going through a exposures and to take correcting action before an issue period of strong economic growth, with GDP growing by 7.5% escalates into a crisis last year, aided by the largest discovery of oil in 30 years. I am positive that with continued growth these economies will In summary, 2011 was certainly a tough year for most present excellent opportunities for us in the region (especially countries. Many developed economies have yet to start within the offshore finance and tourism sectors); formulating credible strategies for a sustainable recovery, let • Productivity Gains: many believe there is currently a lot of alone implement them. 2012 is likely to be just as trying. It is spare capacity within the market (especially within state important that governments and businesses in the Caribbean owned entities). Through the continued privatisations of these develop clear strategies now that allow them to both benefit assets, local governments will be able to unlock productivity from opportunities in growing ‘niche’ markets, as well as gains from these businesses, which will in turn help stimulate properly manage their ongoing operations through a potentially supporting businesses and drive overall economic growth turbulent and difficult year ahead. If we in the region can (consider the gains made under the Thatcher Administration manage this, we will be well placed to weather, if not benefit, in the 1980s in the UK for example); from the coming storms.

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72 | REALTOR PROFILE

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real estate FEATURE PROPERTY Sunset Point, Cayman Islands ........................74, 75 BAHAMAS Caves Heights .......................................................76 H.G. Christie Ltd. ..................................................76 Seaview Properties ................................................78 BARBADOS Godiva Realty.........................................................76 BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS BVI Sotheby's International Realty .......................79 CAYMAN ISLANDS International Realty Group Ltd, (IRG) ............74, 75 Regal Realty............................................................78 RE/MAX Cayman Islands ................................77, 78 ST. LUCIA St. Lucia Homes Real Estate Company................78 TURKS & CAICOS Turtle Breeze Villas................................................78 UNITED STATES Las Olas Realty Group ..........................................78

Photo courtesy of The Mustique Company


74 | INDUSTRY NEWS

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INDUSTRY NEWS | 75

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CARIBBEAN REGION ARCHITECTS Andrew Goodenough Architects, Antigua.. ........................(268) 460 1489 Brisbane N. & Associates, St Kitts Nevis...........................(869) 465 5111 Caribbean Design, Architects & Engineers, Barbados.......(246) 427 5696 Robert Towell. RIBA ............................................................(345) 946 6681 Roger Downing & Partner Co. Ltd, BVI...............................(284) 494 2762 John Doak Architecture, Cayman Islands ..........................(345) 946 3625 Lancaster Associates, St Kitts & Nevis ...............................(869) 465 7931 Lee H. Skolnick Architecture...............................................(212) 989 2624 Melon Design, St Lucia ......................................................(758) 458 4605 OBM International Antigua .........................................................................(268) 462 1047 Bermuda ......................................................................(441) 278 3550 British Virgin Islands......................................................(284) 494 2148 Cayman Islands ...........................................................(345) 949 8115 Miami............................................................................(305) 537 7100 Trinidad and Tobago.....................................................(868) 624 6449 ATTORNEYS O’Neal Webster, BVI. ...................................................(284) 494 5808 Lex Caribbean, Trinidad & Tobago .....................................(868) 628 9255 Ogier, BVI............................................................................(284) 494 0525 AVIATION & AIRLINES Arrindell Aviation Services, St Maarten .......................(599) 546 7641 Biz Jet To Yacht (FBO 2000), Antigua .........................(268) 562 4347 Bohlke International Airways, St Croix ........................(340) 778 9177 I Am Caribbean Inc, Barbados....................................(242) 428 1704 I Am Jet Centre, Jamaica ............................................(876) 971 9033 Island Air, Cayman Islands ..........................................(345) 949 5252 Lloyd Aviation Services, Anguilla.........................................(954) 804 4288 Million Air San Juan, Puerto Rico ........................................(787) 994 3200 MN Aviation, Puerto Rico ....................................................(787) 791 7090 Odyssey Aviation Asheville Regional Airport .............................................(828) 684 6832 Charleston International Airport.....................................(843) 414 9200 Chicago Midway Airport ...............................................(773) 284 2867 Cincinnati Lunken Airport..............................................(513) 871 2020 Port Columbus International Airport ..............................(614) 238 3900 Lafayette Regional Airport ............................................(337) 234 3100 Lynden Pindling International Airport, The Bahamas ....(242) 702 0200 New Orleans Lakefront Airport......................................(504) 241 2800 BANKS & FINANCIAL SERVICES UBS – Global Bank......................................................(242) 394-9300 First Caribbean International Bank ......................................(246) 367 2300 KPMG, Barbados................................................................(246) 427 5230 KPMG, Cayman Islands .....................................................(345) 949 4800 Scotiabank Private Client Group : Bahamas:...............................................................(242) 502-5701 Cayman..................................................................(345) 914-6274 Dominican Republic ..............................................(809) 545 8110 Barbados ...............................................................(246) 417 2004 Trinidad & Tobago .................................................(868) 625 3566 Turks & Caicos.......................................................(649) 941 3971 Jamaica..................................................................(876) 946 7215 St. Kitts Investment Promotion Agency (SKIPA)..................(869) 465 1153 Republic Bank, Trinidad......................................................(868) 625 3671 DESIGNERS Adriana Hoyos .............................................................(305) 572 9052 All Wet Beach Wear, Caribbean..........................................(945) 931 3349 DCOTA: Design Center of the Americas............................(954) 920 7997 Island Company .................................................................(561) 833 8110 Lapierre's Marble ...........................................................(590) 590 873 249 Marble of the World ............................................................(954) 745 9700 DEVELOPERS / CONSTRUCTION / SURVEYORS BCQS International Bahamas ................................................................(242) 393 5352 Barbados ...............................................................(246) 428 8091 British Virgin Islands ..............................................(284) 494 7144 Cayman Islands .....................................................(345) 949 8644 St Lucia ..................................................................(758) 450 7040 Turks and Caicos ...................................................(649) 946 4238 Decco Products Int’l Inc. ....................................................(305) 266 0104 Enviroshake, Canada .........................................................(416) 648 0620 Harris Civil Engineers, USA.................................................(407) 629 4777 Goldeneye Development, Jamaica ....................................(876) 297 7777 Mansail Development Group, LLC, USA ............................(813) 254 3110 Rotherley Construction Inc, Barbados................................(246) 425 0950 St Kitts Nevis Anguilla Trading & Developing Co Ltd..........(869) 465 2511 Victor International...............................................................(284) 364 2400 INSURANCE Guardian General Insurance, Trinidad ...............................(868) 625 4GGL Island Heritage, Barbados..................................................(246) 426 2218 KITCHENS, BATHROOMS & CABINENTRY EuroGroup International ......................................................(305) 513 0066 Downsview Kitchens of Dania ............................................(954) 927 1100 Downsview Kitchens of Juno .............................................(561) 799 7700 Kitchen Design Studio in Dominican..................................(809) 541 7707 Kohler, Caribbean ...............................................................(920) 457 4441 Stafford Flooring .................................................................(441) 295 9744

Delta Faucets .....................................................................(317) 587 1248 Living Design, St Kitts.........................................................(869) 465 3223 POOLS & OUTDOOR DESIGN Caribbean Botanical Designs, St. Lucia.............................(758) 721 2177 John Hopkin, Grenada .......................................................(473) 444 5797 David Tisherman’s Visual Inc., California ............................(310) 379 6700 Laurent Paméla, Asla..........................................................(239) 738 4427 MKS International................................................................(345) 916 7612 Tuuci ...................................................................................(305) 636 7882 REAL ESTATE AGENTS American Home Mortgage Funding, LLC ..........................(954) 551 5559 BVI Sotheby’s International Realty ..............................(284) 494 5700 Godiva Realty (Barbados) .......................................... (246) 249 8032 Christie's Great Estates Anguilla........................................................................1 888 226 4845 Antigua & Barbuda .......................................................(268) 562 6042 Bahamas ......................................................................(242) 322 1041 Barbados .....................................................................(246) 432 0840 Bermuda ......................................................................(441) 296 0278 British Virgin Islands......................................................(284) 494 2446 Cayman Islands ...........................................................(345) 815 7777 Dominican Republic.....................................................(829) 473 0000 St. Martin ................................................................(590) 590 51 02 85 Turks & Caicos .............................................................(649) 941 4105 US Virgin Islands ..........................................................(340) 775 9000 St. Barth .................................................................(590) 590 29 88 91 Knight Frank ............................................................+44 (0) 207 629 8171 St Lucia Homes..................................................................(758) 450 0877 Terra Caribbean ..................................................................(246) 434 9000 RESORTS / MARINAS Cap Cana, Dominican Republic.........................................(809) 227 2262 Curtain Bluff, Antigua ..........................................................(268) 462 8400 The Estates on Sundance Ridge, St Kitts ..........................(869) 466 1277 Jade Mountain, St. Lucia....................................................(758) 459 4000 Kamalame ..........................................................................(876) 632 3213 Kanopi ................................................................................(876) 632 3213 Ladera, St. Lucia ................................................................(758) 459 6600 Nanny Cay Village, BVI .......................................................(284) 494 4895 Nisbet Plantation, Nevis.....................................................1 800 742 6008 Rosalie Bay, Dominica........................................................(767) 446 1010 Sandals...............................................................................(888) 726 3257 Scrub Island, BVI .............................................................1 (877) 890 7444 Sothern Cross Club, Little Cayman ....................................(800) 899 2582 Sugar Beach, St. Lucia ...........................................+44 (0) 844 921 0126 Sugar Ridge, Antigua .........................................................(268) 562 7727 Villa Aquamare, BVI.............................................................(787) 531 0232 SHIPPING Blue Caribbean Shipping ................................................(242) 325 7888/9 Tropical Shipping ..................................................................800 638 8767 SHOPPING, JEWELLERY & AUTO PASSMAN ...........................................................................(866) 727 7626 Marvin Watches ...............................................................1 (800) 237 9477 Effy Jewelers Aruba............................................................................(297) 588 9812 Bahamas ......................................................................(242) 326 7560 Curacao......................................................................(5999) 461 9790 Grand Cayman.............................................................(345) 949 3393 Puerto Rico...................................................................(787) 721 0256 St Kitts & Nevis.............................................................(869) 465 1339 St Maarten ....................................................................(599) 542 3951 St Thomas ....................................................................(340) 776 3339 TOURISM BOARD Antigua and Barbuda Tourism Authority .............................(268) 562 7600 Saint Lucia Tourist Board ....................................................(758) 452 4094 BVI Tourist Board ................................................................(284) 494 3134 St. Kitts Tourism Authority....................................................(869) 465 4040

CAYMAN ISLANDS ARCHITECTS Design (Cayman).........................................................(345) 949 2800 John Doak Architecture...............................................(345) 946 3625 ATTORNEYS Conyers Dill and Pearman..................................................(345) 945 3901 J Barry Smith Attorney-at-Law.............................................(345) 943 7700 ART & ARTIST Hannah Cook Studio ..........................................................(345) 916 3060 AVIATION SERVICES Island Air .............................................................................(345) 949 5252 BANKING & MORTGAGES Butterfield Bank ..................................................................(345) 949 7055 Cayman National Bank .......................................................(345) 949 4655 Fidelity Bank (Cayman) Ltd.................................................(345) 949 7822 First Caribbean International Bank (Cayman) Ltd ...............(345) 949 7300 HSBC Bank (Cayman) Ltd..................................................(345) 949 7755

CONDOMINIUM & VILLA RENTALS The Ritz-Carlton Luxury Rentals..........................................(345) 326 1278 Cayman Villas, Vacation Rentals.........................................(345) 945 4144 Cotton Tree .........................................................................(345) 943 0700 CONDO/RESIDENCES DEVELOPMENTS Crystal Cove .......................................................................(345) 949 4979 The DeckHouses at the Ritz-Carlton (Grand Cayman) ......(345) 815 7777 The Terraces at Camana Bay .............................................(345) 640 3808 Oceana...............................................................................(345) 949 6170 Opus I & II ..........................................................................(345) 949 4979 DEVELOPMENTS / MARINAS Camana Bay.......................................................................(345) 946 2229 The Bacadere Marina .........................................................(345) 949 3743 DEVELOPERS Davenport Development Ltd .......................................(345) 949 4979 Orion Developers ...............................................................(345) 815 7777 DART – Camana Bay .........................................................(345) 943 3278 INTERIOR DESIGN & DECOR Design Studio ..............................................................(345) 945 4977 Sticks & Stones ..................................................................(345) 947 8663 KITCHENS, CABINETRY & FLOORING Stafford Flooring .................................................................(345) 943 2722 Storage Solutions ...............................................................(345) 525 2647 PROPERTY INSURANCE Fidelity, Cayman Islands .....................................................(345) 949 7822 Island Heritage ...................................................................(345) 949 7280 REAL ESTATE AGENTS Dreamfinders, RE/MAX Cayman Islands ............................(345) 945 1585 Paradise Properties Cayman ..............................................(345) 949 7355 Dart Realty ..........................................................................(345) 943 3278 IRG International Realty Group Ltd......................................(345) 623 1111 Michael Joseph, RE/MAX Cayman Islands.................(345) 949 6170 Cayman Islands Real Estate Brokers Association (CIREBA) ....(345) 949 7099 Regal Realty........................................................................(345) 943 0007 SHOPPING, JEWELLERY & ENTERTAINMENT Island Companies...............................................................(345) 640 5337 PASSMAN ...........................................................................(345) 949 0123 Paramount Media................................................................(345) 949 8423 SURVEYORS & PROPERTY CONSULTANTS Charterland .........................................................................(345) 623 2772

BAHAMAS AVIATION & AIRLINES Bahamasair.........................................................................(242) 377 8452 Cat Island Air ......................................................................(242) 377 3318 Executive Flight Support .....................................................(242) 424 9598 Odyssey Aviation Bahamas................................................(242) 702 0200 Western Air..........................................................................(242) 377 2222 ARCHITECTS Artech Bahamas Ltd...........................................................(242) 327 2335 Bruce LaFleur & Associates ...............................................(242) 323 8421 BANKS Scotia Bank ........................................................................(242) 502 5799 SG Private Banking .............................................................(242) 302 5000 CONCIERGE SERVICES Platinum Pineapple......................................................(242) 393 4921 Island Concierge Services..................................................(242) 362 6861 INTERIOR DESIGN & DECOR Downsview Kitchens of Nassau ..................................(242) 377 0004 Nassau Florist.....................................................................(242) 393 2223 RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS Bayroc Beach Residences.................................................(242) 327 0112 Caves Heights....................................................................(242) 327 8867 Lyford Cay ..........................................................................(242) 362 4211 Ocean Club Residences and Marina .................................(242) 363 3000 Old Fort Bay........................................................................(242) 362 6434 The Reef Residences .........................................................(242) 363 6838 REAL ESTATE AGENTS H.G. Christie .......................................................................(242) 322 1041 Sea View Properties............................................................(242) 327 1566 RESORTS & SPAS Compass Point...................................................................(242) 327 4500 Dermal Distributions ...........................................................(242) 327 6786

TURKS AND CAICOS AVIATION & AIRLINE Air Provo Centre..................................................................(649) 946 4181 ARCHITECTS RA Shaw Designs ........................................................(649) 941 4394 BANKS Hallmark Bank & Trust Ltd ..................................................(649) 946 5524 Royal Bank of Canada........................................................(649) 941 4667 CONDO/RESIDENCIAL DEVELOPMENTS NorthWest Point Resort.......................................................(649) 941 8961 The Estates of Grace Bay Club ..........................................(649) 941 3900 The Gansevoort ..................................................................(649) 941 7555 The Sands at Grace Bay ....................................................(649) 946 5199 The Shore Club ..................................................................(649) 232 1067 Turtle Breeze ......................................................................1 866 331 4269 DEVELOPMENTS Regent Village.....................................................................(649) 941 4400 The Saltmills........................................................................(649) 946 4238 INSURANCE International Insurance Agency Ltd ....................................(649) 941 3195 The Insurance Centre .........................................................(649) 941 4814 INTERIOR DESIGN & DECOR Design Studio.....................................................................(649) 941 4848 Finishing Touch............................................................(649) 941 4393 REAL ESTATE AGENTS NW Hamilton Realty............................................................(649) 946 4060 Pine Cay Realty ..................................................................(649) 231 4884 Turtle Breeze Villa ................................................................(866) 331 4269



REAL LIFE Winter 2012