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Embracing the past

Defining the presen�

Shaping the futur�

OFFICIAL VISITORS GUIDE


�able of �ontents

301 North Queen Street • PO Box 157 Kinston, NC 28502 Phone 252-527-2500 or 1-800-869-0032 Fax 252-527-1914 Web site: www.VisitKinston.com Email: info@VisitKinston.com

SpecialThanks Corporate Resources & the Convention & Visitors Bureau offer sincere appreciation to the following individuals who provided assistance with the preparation of this Visitors Guide: Lee Raynor; Adrian King - Pride of Kinston; Sandy Landis and Elaine Carmon - Community Council for the Arts; Ben Knight - Chef & the Farmer; Aubrey Barwick; Bobby Smith - Kinston Drag Strip; Will & Karen Barker & family; Jane Phillips; Carol Tyndall; Jay Statum; Betty Anderson; Bob Smith; Tommy Harper; Amy Craven; Brandon Baird; Taylor & Caleb Goff; Desi Brochure; Erin Hill; Byrd & Pat Humphreys The information in this directory was gathered and carefully compiled in such a way as to insure maximum accuracy. However, neither Corporate Resources nor the Kinston-Lenoir County Convention & Visitors Bureau can guarantee the correctness of all information nor the complete absence of errors and omissions; hence, no responsibility for the same can be, nor is assumed.

Designed and printed by Corporate Resources (252) 523-7654

Eastern NC BBQ

Neuseway Planetarium Photo by Joel Smith

Welcome.......................................................2-3 Attractions....................................................4-7 Recreation..................................................8-13 Accommodations.....................................14-17 Dining & Shopping..................................18-27 Special Events...........................................28-31 Kinston History........................................32-33 Maps..........................................................34-35 Helpful Information.....................................36

Festival on the Neuse

Lenox Factory Outlet


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�long-leaf pines, and nestled along Settled in the shade of majestic

the banks of the mighty Neuse River, is a city called Kinston, home to Southern hospitality flavored with generous portions of history, activities and mouthwatering cuisine.   From its pre-colonial establishment to today, Kinston

governor of North Carolina.   Kinston originally was called “Kingston” in honor of England’s King George III. That was in the days when North Carolina was a British colony and paid its taxes to the crown. After the colonies won their independence, Kinston dropped the “g” in its name to become one of America’s newest

famous Lenox china produced here, and as modern as the medical supplies shipped around the world by West Pharmaceutical Company.   The whisper of breezes wafting through stately oaks and the perfume of magnolia blossoms prompts visitors to linger, capture the moment with their cameras,

has set the standard for other communities to meet. This is where Indian tribes gathered along the riverbank, and early settlers delighted in the rich soil. The area produced great statesmen and true patriots such as Richard Caswell, a Revolutionary War hero and the first elected

cities. However, it retained the names of Queen and King streets, and few of today’s visitors realize they are traveling along routes first established more than three centuries ago.   Gracious homes and historical sites still abound in Kinston. The city is as traditional as the world-

and preserve in their minds a glimpse of time that will linger long in their memories.   A visit to Kinston is a gift to treasure, whether by an adventurous single traveler, a couple thirsting for a return to gentler times, or an active family longing to experience sports,

Kinston’s Farmers Market

Living History Program 

Kayaking on the Neuse River


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

Frenchman’s Creek history, camping, arts, drag racing and shopping in a single destination.   Children will delight in spotting – or catching -- huge catfish lazing on the bottom of the Neuse River. The Nature Center and planetarium will capture their imagination, and the whack of a baseball in historic Grainger Stadium offers a taste the way the

game was meant to be played - for the love of the sport.   History lovers can explore the CSS Neuse II, the world’s only full-size replica of a Confederate gunboat, or see the original boat, rescued after 100 years of sitting silently on the bottom of the Neuse River.   Southern cooking, or meals served with a touch of European

flavor, are a feature of Kinston restaurants. No one goes away hungry, and everyone will have enough money left to return for a second visit!   You’ll never feel more welcome, or more at home, with a visit to Kinston, where comfort and sociability go hand-in-hand. Come visit, and learn the real meaning of, “Y’all come on back, y’hear?”

Kinston’s Winter Bluegrass Festival

Arts Council Gift Shop 


��ractions 1st Battle of Kinston 1862 & Battle of Wyse Fork 1865 Battlefields

1st Battle of Kinston - One block south of U.S. 70 East at the corner of Meadowbrook and Harriet Drives. Battle of Wyse Fork - Hwy 70 East toward New Bern near the community of Wyse Fork (252) 523-2500; (252) 522-0540 Hours: Dawn until dusk Admission: Free historicalpreservationgroup.org

Confederate and Union flags flown at the time of the battle. A walking path tops a berm, and along the side are markers for each state whose soldiers fought in the battle, along with the state’s regiments. Examples of breastworks still remain. The battlefield is part of the North Carolina Civil War Trails program, which helps provide historical markers to interpret campaign sites and corridors of the Civil War.

In the twilight of a December night, the sounds you hear might be a breeze tickling the grass, or the long lost voices of Confederate and Union soldiers fighting to the death. The bloody First Battle of Kinston began on Dec. 10, 1862 and left 685 people dead after 3,000 Confederates faced 20,000 Union troops. Now you can walk this hallowed ground.

The Second Battle of Kinston, often called the Battle of Wyse Fork, was fought March 7-10, 1865, near Southwest Creek. Confederate forces numbered 8,500 against 12,000 Union troops as the federal army advanced from New Bern toward Goldsboro. Their goal was to secure the New Bern-Goldsboro Railroad so it could supply Gen. William T. Sherman’s army. The battle left 1,500 Confederates and 1,001 Union casualties.

A plaza on the battlefield displays the U.S. flag flanked on either side by the

At present, 56 acres of earthworks are preserved.

CSS Neuse Museum

100 N. Queen St. (252) 522-2091 Hours: 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thursdays Admission: Free Can you solve the mystery of the Union button found among artifacts of the CSS Neuse ironclad gunboat when it was rescued in 1963 from the bottom of the Neuse River? The question has puzzled history buffs, who theorize it might have come from a Union soldier’s coat scavenged by a Confederate soldier, or it might be a clue that Union soldiers entered the river back in 1865 to collect their own souvenirs from the destroyed ship. Historians have learned much about Confederate Navy life from other artifacts salvaged from the boat. Museum visitors can see coal rakes used to keep the coal evenly burning in the boat’s huge boilers, cannonballs, ammunition shells, a belt buckle, wrenches, files, shovels, sockets, the cook’s stove, the bell from the CSS Neuse and an intact bottle of Lea and Perrin’s Worcestershire sauce. A rare English-made cuff button from an officer’s coat, a button bearing the N.C. state seal and another with the Confederate Navy emblem are among the treasures on display. A wall plaque offers information on some of the boat’s crew members, including Capt. Joseph Price and 2nd Lt. Richard Bacot. Also on the wall are photos showing the rescue operation undertaken to bring the CSS Neuse up from its watery grave in the Neuse River. A cut-out scale model of the boat gives visitors a birds-eye view of life aboard a Civil War gunboat, and a video presents a history of the boat. Another video, available on request, shows plans for the museum’s future and how those plans will be implemented.

CSS Neuse State Site 


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

Harmony Hall CSS Neuse State Site and Gov. Richard Caswell Museum 2613 W. Vernon Ave. (U.S. 70 Bus.) (252) 522-2091 Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays Admission: Free ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/neuse/ neuse.htm Richard Caswell came to North Carolina from Maryland while he was still a teenager. The story of his life is the story of the American Revolution and this state’s birth as an independent state. Caswell, one of America’s least known heroes, is memorialized in a museum at the state site bearing his name. Caswell was a Revolutionary War hero, North Carolina’s first elected governor and a prominent businessman. He was a delegate to the Second Continental Congress, and only ill health prevented him from becoming a signer of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.

Included among the regular exhibits at the museum are the Caswell family Bible, a tea set that belonged to his daughter, a bell Caswell used to convene the N.C. General Assembly, and one of his law books. Also displayed in the exhibit is a mannequin dressed in a major general uniform and a sword similar to one that Caswell might have worn.

Iron confiscated from Atlantic & North Carolina Railroad Company tracks between Kinston and New Bern was rolled into plates and used to cover the boat. The propeller and shafts were made in the Confederate Naval Yard in Charlotte. The boiler is believed to have come from the Baltimore and Ohio No. 34 train, and her engine from a saw mill in New Bern.

* * *

The story of the boat’s construction, her short life and her eventual 100-year sleep beneath the waters of the Neuse River is a captivating one. You’ll learn why N.C. Gov. Zebulon Vance allowed railroads to be plundered for iron, why construction was delayed so long, how Union sailors nearly captured the coveted ironclad and why it finally sank with an 8-foot hole in its port side.

One of only three remaining Civil War ironclads, the CSS Neuse was a ram, designed to collide with, and sink enemy boats. Free guided tours of the remnants of the ship are available at the site. She was built in nearby Whitehall, now Seven Springs, just a short distance away. Confederate Naval Cmdr. James W. Cook, a native North Carolinian, oversaw her construction as well as that of the CSS Albemarle and an unnamed ironclad in Tarboro. 

The short life of the boat reflects in many ways the determined but frustrated and ill-fated history of the entire


��ractions Confederate fighting forces as they struggled against the might of the Union Army.

CSS Neuse II

Corner of Herritage and Gordon Streets (252) 523-1954 Hours: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday; 9 a.m-5 p.m. Saturday; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday Admission: Free. Donations appreciated cssneuseii.com Visit the world’s only full-sized replica of a Confederate gunboat to realize what life was like during the Civil War. The project is under the direction of master shipbuilder Alton Stapleford, who is often at the site when visitors tour the boat. The 158-foot long boat draws visitors from across the United States and from foreign countries. If you’re fortunate, you may visit the Neuse II while teens train as Confederate naval cadets. The boat rests a scant distance from the “cat hole” in the Neuse River where the original ironclad gunboat sank during the Civil War. A tour will reveal details of the sailors’ lives – their quarters, the ship’s boiler that needed constant attention, the gun mountings, dining quarters, captain’s quarters, the gigantic propeller, and hear details sure to capture your attention and leave you with a truer sense of navy life in the mid-1800s.

Caswell Center Museum

2415 W. Vernon Ave. (252) 208-3780 Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, and by appointment Admission: Free caswellcenter.org The Stroud house, home to the Caswell Center Museum, built in the late 1800s

and once was the main house of a plantation. In 1911, thanks to Dr. Ira Hardy, it opened as the state’s first residential facility for mental retardation patients. Touring the museum gives visitors a glimpse into treatment methods used nearly a century ago, as well as displaying a sample of papers, photographs, maps and medical artifacts used during those days. Caswell Center continues to be home to mentally disadvantaged patients. A visit will provide a unique sample of psychiatric care during the specialty’s early days.

Caswell No. 1 Fire Station Museum

118 S. Queen St. (252) 522-4676; (252) 527-1566 Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue., Thur., Sat. Admission: Free Almost every man, at some time in his youth, yearned to be a fireman, riding on the back of a red fire truck and ringing the bell to tell everyone within hearing distance that help was on the way. See some of the century’s earliest fire equipment, including a truck that was on the scene during Kinston’s devastating fire of 1895 that destroyed nearly all downtown homes and businesses. The building, on the National Register of Historic Places, is the city’s original fire station and the oldest brick structure in Kinston.

Cultural Heritage Museum

242 S. Queen St. (toll free) (877) 324-5366 Hours: 11 a.m.-3p.m. Thurs.-Sat. and by appointment Admission: Free. Donations accepted culturalheritagemuseum.com Dedicated to portraying the history of African-Americans in eastern North Carolina, the Cultural Heritage Museum particularly focuses on the role of 

blacks who fought during the Civil War. The museum is in the former Peoples’ Bank, a building that began as Lenoir County’s first bank for blacks. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Harmony Hall

109 E. King St. (252) 522-0412 Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Tue.-Sat. Admission: Free Jesse Cobb built this colonial showplace in 1772, four years before the American colonies’ war for independence. Richard Caswell, Revolutionary War hero and North Carolina’s first elected governor, once owned the house and for a brief time it became the state’s capital, housing important records and accounts. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Harmony Hall is lovingly restored and furnished with meticulous attention to detail. Many original features, such as brickwork and moldings, are examples of work by early Kinston craftsmen. Visitors will see a unique collection of antique dolls and period furniture, including rope beds. A garden features flowers and plants indigenous to the area and appropriate to the age of the house. An antebellum schoolhouse sits at the rear of the property, complete with desks and blackboards.

Heritage Place

231 N.C. 58 South on the Lenoir Community College campus (252) 527-6223 Hours: 9 a.m-5 p.m. Mon.-Wed. & Fridays; 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays Admission: Free lenoir.cc.nc.us/lrc/heritage/home.htm You won’t find a better collection of


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

historical information about eastern North Carolina, Virginia and South Carolina than at Heritage Place. And you won’t find a friendlier staff willing to help you. Walking into the room is like taking a step back in time. Be sure to inspect the Colonial-era artifacts that include maps, quilts, books and other treasures. Pick up a family tree packet and trace your roots. Read priceless family notes and records donated to the center, as well as wills, deeds and vital statistics. You can even study U.S. Census reports from 1790 to 1930, or local newspaper records from 1850 through current issues. You can get online help from HeritageQuest. Here’s a goldmine of information that takes only a little digging to unearth a big treasure.

Kinston-Lenoir County Visitor’s and Information Center

tions and the Blue-Gray Scenic Byway run until 5:00 p.m.

Maplewood-Hebrew-Cedar Grove Cemeteries Shine and Davis Streets Hours: Dawn until dusk Admission: Free

The city’s oldest municipally-owned cemetery is a 21-acre treasure of unique monuments on graves dating back more than a century and a half. Many members of Kinston’s leading families are buried here, and some tombstones date back to the 1840s. The Maplewood, Hebrew and Cedar Grove cemeteries have been combined over the years into one cemetery with 8,000 plots. Divided racially until 1963, Maplewood and Oak Grove cemeteries are the final resting places for black,

white, Protestant and Jewish residents. The space separating the two burial grounds contains unmarked graves believed to contain old graves of the city’s poor. One area contains a large mass grave of Confederate soldiers who died during the Battle of Kinston in 1862. The United Daughters of the Confederacy erected the original monument 30 years later. The organization replaced the base of the monument in 1998. Graves of many blacks buried in Cedar Grove do not have headstones, which were made of wood and rotted over the years. The Hebrew section of Maplewood is where Jewish residents are buried. A decorative gate encloses the monuments, which range from ornate to simple, from tall to tiny.

Hwy 70 and 258 South 101 East New Bern Road (252) 522-0004 Hours: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday Admission: Free The Kinston-Lenoir County Visitor’s and Information Center is located on the historic battlefield of the First Battle of Kinston. Indoor and outdoor displays are representative of the 1862 First Battle of Kinston and the Civil War. Restroom facilities, pet facilities, vending area, and local, regional and national maps are available. A 30 sq ft fiber optic map of Lenoir County and surrounding area interprets the North Carolina Blue-Gray Scenic Byway, through the Lenoir County area, and the First Battle of Kinston. A 50 seat auditorium with films showcasing Lenoir County and its current attrac-

Caswell No. 1 Fire Station Museum 


�ecreation

Kinston Drag Strip Barnet Disc Golf Course 100 Sand Clay Road GPS Coordinates: N 35°16.725’; W 077°38.429’ (252) 939-3332 Hours: Dawn to dusk Admission: Free kinstondiscgolf.com

Spend a morning or the entire day enjoying one of America’s hottest new sports – disc golf! Barnet Park’s 18hole course winds through the woods around the park. You’ll find downhill holes, uphill holes, doglegs and one heavily obstructed hole, but most of what you’ll find is a day of great fun for all ages. Play doubles at 6 p.m. every Tuesday, but come early to sign up. Bring your own equipment, or purchase what you need at the county Parks and Recreation Department, 405 N. McLewean St., during regular business hours. A concession stand is open during organized events. Check the website for special events.

Phone 252-527-9111

Purchase & Print tickets online at

www.kinstonindians.com

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1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

Community Council for the Arts

400 N. Queen St. (252) 527-2517 Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Tue-Fri; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.; Closed Mondays Admission: Free www.kinstoncca.com Art lovers won’t want to miss a stop at the building now housing one of the finest arts centers in the state. The state-of-the-art 30,000-square-foot center began its life in the early 1900s as a wholesale grocery store and today is on the National Register of Historic Places. (Legend says Kinston’s first bottle of Pepsi-Cola, invented in nearby New Bern, was sold here.) Visual art occupies one-third of the space, with exhibits changing every six to eight weeks. As many as 300 works by up to 200 local, regional, national and international artists are on display at any given time. The center supports ten non-profit artist groups, including wood-turners and model train enthusiasts. A large, detailed train display is part of the permanent exhibit, and runs from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. every first and fourth Saturday of the month. The center’s collection includes paintings, photographs, sculpture, pottery, wood and fiber arts. Special exhibits and programs are listed on the center’s Web site. The CCA will be the only arts center east of Raleigh to be listed on the Public Art Trail, beginning January 2008.

Kinston Drag Strip

2250 N.C. 11/55 South Open: Thursdays through Sundays (252) 527-4337; (252) 522-9551 Tickets: $10 Special events $15; 12 and under: free kdsmotorsports.com Spend a day or an evening watching

Neuseway Nature Center one of auto racing’s most thrilling events! The Kinston Drag Strip has been in continuous operation since 1960 and its concentration on familyoriented fun is one big reason. A 1/8 mile and ¼ mile track offers fans the chance to see as many as 150 cars battle for up to seven hours on a regular 

night. Drivers come from across North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina and as many as 15 other states. Come for the weekend and pitch a tent for the day. Nearby are several excellent motels. Kids love meeting and talking with the drivers. A snack bar provides plenty of food throughout the race. Sit in the


�ecreation bleachers or bring your own lounge chair. Lots of bathrooms. Kids 12 and younger admitted free. All events are sanctioned and insured by the International Hot Rod Association. Don’t miss a day at the races!

Kinston Indians Baseball

Grainger Stadium: 400 E. Grainger Ave. (252) 527-9111 Admission: $4-$6; Children under 4 - Free kinstonindians.com Old-timers love to tell how Babe Ruth once played baseball in Kinston, but younger fans are more interested in today’s Indians, winners of two Carolina League championships in the past three years. The Kinston Indians are a farm team of the Cleveland Indians, and many players go on to play for major league teams. The history of baseball in Kinston goes back to the late 1800s, although the affiliation with the Cleveland Indians did not begin until 1986. Historic Grainger Stadium, the KTribe’s home, is a premium site and has won awards for its beautiful and immaculately-maintained field. The stadium was renovated recently to provide new scoreboard technology, comfortable seating and plenty of restroom space. Here’s baseball in its purest sense – no high-powered egos, no enormous salaries – just players who give the game everything they’ve got every night of every season. Even the 7th inning break is special, with the team often staging contests and entertainment for kids and older fans. Come hungry and go away satisfied with a wide selection of peanuts, popcorn, hamburgers, hot dogs, nachos, ice cream and other snacks available

Neuseway Planetarium 10


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

at the snack bar or through vendors traveling up and down the aisles. And by the way – parking is free!

Neuseway Nature Center and Campgrounds

401 W. Caswell St. (252) 939-3367 Hours: 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sundays; Closed Mondays Admission: Free to Nature Center; fee at campgrounds neusewaypark.com Whether you’re an RV-er or a tent camper, Neuseway Campgrounds has got you covered! Here you can camp under the stars and listen to the nightly sounds of owls and frogs on the nearby riverbanks. Just a short walk away are the nature center, museum and plan-

etarium. Full hook-ups, including water and sewer, bathrooms and showers, fire rings, picnic sites, a dump station, 20-, 30-, and 50-amp electric hook-ups, river access and a covered 30-foot by 60-foot picnic shelter are available. Full hookups are $10 per day. Tent sites are $6. Reservations will assure you of a spot. Facilities are also available for larger groups, such as family reunions. *** Spend a day or a week at the Nature Center and you’ll wonder where the time went! Here’s a safe, entertaining and educational place for children that will capture their minds and hearts. Exhibits include plants and animals native to North Carolina such as poisonous and non-poisonous snakes, turtles, alligators, raccoons, osprey and a red-

Neuseway Planetarium and Health & Science Museum

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Explore the beauty of eastern North Carolina by bicycle. Whether you’re riding for exercise or just cruising for pleasure, we have the right bike for you. Shop our large selection of affordable, quality bicycles.

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tailed hawk. A talking African Grey parrot enjoys telling a nearby cockatoo to be quiet, and the parrot’s conversation will amaze children. A saltwater tank lets children touch sea creatures, and experienced staff members will help them climb a 16-foot by 24-foot rock climbing wall. If fishing is your passion, you can borrow a rod, reel and tackle to fish in one of the center’s ponds stocked with channel catfish. Rather go boating? Sixteen-foot Mohawk canoes, oars and life jackets can be reserved by calling 252.939.3367. And if you enjoy walking, several self-guided nature trails wind their way through the 55-acre site. Enjoy a ride around a woodland path on Big Daddy’s Express, a miniature train. Purchase tickets at a full size caboose for only $1.

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403 W. Caswell St. (252) 939-3302 Hours: 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sundays; Closed Mondays Admission: Free neusewaypark.com Kids will love the fun and never realize they’re learning as they crawl through giant models of intestines, a mouth, a stomach, an underground tunnel of blood vessels or watch a puppet show

(FUQBEEMJO Take a quiet trip down the Neuse River by kayak or

canoe. Discover one of Kinston’s best-kept secrets. Put in at Neuseway Nature Center or find your own private getaway. Paddle the river while enjoying nature, whether fishing or birdwatching. Go tandem or go solo. Make your own adventure and see where it takes you.

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�ecreation in the museum. They’ll love the bubble machine and other hands-on health and science exhibits designed to teach and amuse children of all ages. The 52-seat planetarium has a giant dome to display the sun, moon, stars and planets. Children and adults will gaze with wonder at the galactic shows offered at 1 and 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. On Saturdays, shows start on the hour from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., and on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m.

Neuse River The 2-million-year-old Neuse River is the longest river within the state’s borders and offers visitors unforget-

table opportunities for recreation and relaxation. Here is where the Neusiok Indians gathered long before English settlers arrived in the New World, and gave the river its name in 1584. Whether you spend a peaceful afternoon with a picnic basket along the riverbank, or on a guided kayak trip observing exotic birds and shy land creatures, the twisting, winding Neuse will charm you with its natural beauty. A boat launch awaits on U.S. 70 next to the Neuse River Bridge for those with canoes or other small watercraft. Don’t forget the fishing gear! The Neuse is home to catfish, bass, flounder, shad, mussels and the famous Carolina mudpuppy, a salamander that grows 11 inches long.

West Water Park 12

Spend a couple of hours or the entire day on the river and collect breathtaking photographic souvenirs. Prefer to keep your feet dry? The Neuse Nature Center caters to landlubbers by offering riverside walkways and swings with perfect vistas of the Neuse.

Riverside Bicycles and Outdoor Sports

210 W. Gordon St. (252) 520-9400 Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. TuesdaysFridays; Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4p.m. Closed Sundays and Mondays Outdoor enthusiasts will fall in love with Nature’s many sounds and scenes


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

along the Neuse River. A qualified instructor is ready to teach you how to use a kayak. You can buy your own or rent a kayak to drift with a trained guide serenely down the river. See a family of otters play; get a glimpse of a myriad of bird species – including graceful herons. Some lucky kayakers have reported seeing nesting eagles and one person told about an alligator sighting. Several historically-significant Civil War sites are scattered along the riverbank. Guides are equipped with first-aid kits. Rent, or buy, a single or tandem kayak. If you’re a biking enthusiast, Riverside carries high quality bikes to purchase and a free map of bike paths around the county. Pick up a map or a paddle and enjoy a memorable experience in the great outdoors.

West Water Park

1160 Strawberry Branch Road (252) 520-9378 Open: Memorial Day-Labor Day Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. MondaysSaturdays; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sundays Admission fee: $9 – Full-day pass $6 – Half-day pass (Mon.-Fri.) $7 – Half-day pass (Sat. & Sun.) Beat the heat as you swing on a trapeze 10 feet above a sparkling pool, or zip down a four-story water slide into another pool. Whether you want to spend the day relaxing by one of five pools, diving or playing water basketball or volleyball games, this is the place to enjoy the day with the entire family. You can feel safe knowing certified lifeguards are also on duty. Snacks and sodas are available. Private party bookings and birthday packages for groups and organizations are also available.

Kinston Indians Baseball 13


�ccommodations From a night spent in a historic bed and breakfast to a night spent under the stars, we offer the perfect night’s accommodations no matter what your style. Whether yours is a weekend full of family fun or a quiet weekend getaway, you are sure to find the right home-away-from-home as you explore the local history, attractions, shopping and dining the area has to offer.

BED AND BREAKFAST

CAMPGROUND

The Bentley Bed and Breakfast Inn

Neuseway Nature Park and Campground

117 W. Capitola Avenue Kinston, NC (252) 523-2337 www.bentleybedandbreakfast.com The Grainger Hill National Historic District includes The Bentley Bed and Breakfast Inn, formerly known as Vernon Hall. This beautiful dwelling includes 6 bedrooms, 5 full bathrooms, 2 half baths, and 9 fireplaces. The 13 acre estate is located in close proximity to downtown Kinston’s shopping and dining.

(252) 939-3367 www.neusewaypark.com

The Neuseway Nature Park has a full service campground featuring 8 full hook-up sites for RVs, additional sites with 30-amp hookups, and plenty of tent sites. In this beautiful 55 acre setting, visitors can enjoy fishing, hiking, biking, picnicking, canoeing, and a rock climbing wall. There is also a meeting facility on site.

1-800-HOLIDAY or Direct 252-559-8888 HOTEL & SUITES

1156 Hill Farm Road, Kinston, NC 28504 www.holidayinnexpress/kinston

• Select Rooms have Microwave & Refrigerator • Suites have Wet Bar, Microwave & Refrigerator • Complimentary Deluxe Breakfast Bar • High Speed Internet Access

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1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

HOTELS Comfort Inn

200 W. New Bern Road Kinston, NC 252-527-3200 www.comfortinn.com Conveniently located on Hwy 70 and Hwy 258, this hotel is close to many area attractions and businesses. Spacious guest rooms are equipped with microwaves, refrigerators, irons, ironing boards, hair dryers, and cable TV complete with HBO. Some rooms feature whirlpool baths and all guests are treated to a deluxe continental breakfast and free weekday newspaper. In addition, guests can utilize the high-speed internet access, fitness room, and swimming pool.

Hampton Inn

1382 Hwy 258 South Kinston, NC 252-523-1400 www.hamptoninn.com

Hampton Inn

This quality hotel is located just 2 miles from downtown Kinston. The clean, comfortable rooms come complete with irons, ironing boards, coffee makers, and cable TV with movie channels. Guests can enjoy wireless internet access in the lobby, high-speed internet connections in rooms, and free copies of weekday USA Today newspapers. The Hampton Inn also offers two types of complimentary breakfasts: the On the House hot breakfast and On the Run breakfast bags.

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Neuseway Park & Campground

�ccommodations

Days Inn

410 E. New Bern Road Kinston, NC 252-527-6064 www.daysinn.com Located across the street from Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant, the Days Inn offers all first floor rooms with convenient parking. Guests receive a complimentary continental breakfast every day and have access to a free wireless internet connection. Rooms feature coffee makers, microwaves, refrigerators, hair dryers, and cable television with Showtime. Nonsmoking rooms are available upon request.

WestParke Inn & Suites

Indoor Pool Meeting Facility Complimentary Continental Breakfast

For Reservations 252-527-1500 4774 Hwy. 70 West, Kinston, NC 28504 16


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

Holiday Inn Express

Super 8 Motel

West Parke Inn and Suites

Kinstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest hotel is located next door to a movie theater and restaurant. Every weekday morning, guests will find a complimentary USA Today outside their door as they leave to visit the deluxe breakfast bar. Guests have available to them a fitness center, an outdoor pool, wireless internet access, and in-room high-speed internet connections. Spacious King suites with Jacuzzis are also available.

Located just 10 minutes from the airport, this motel offers free parking, cable TV, and high-speed internet connections. Safe deposit boxes, irons and boards, and cribs are available upon request. Guests can enjoy river view rooms and a complimentary Super Start breakfast.

This spacious hotel is newly renovated and located on Hwy 70 just outside of Kinston. It features a fitness room, indoor pool, and meeting facility. Guests are treated to a deluxe continental breakfast, wireless internet access, and complimentary copies of USA Today. Two bedroom suites are also available.

1156 Hill Farm Road Kinston, NC 252-559-8888 www.hiexpress.com

212 E. New Bern Road Kinston, NC 252-523-8146 www.super8.com

4774 Hwy 70 West Kinston, NC 252-527-1500 www.westparkeinnsuites.com

Kinston Motor Lodge 501 Herritage Street Kinston, NC 252-527-2171

Located on Herritage Street in downtown Kinston, only minutes from Heritage Landing one of Kinstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier shopping areas. Guest rooms are equipped with microwaves, refrigerators, irons, and cable TV.

Neuse River Inn & Suites 208 E New Bern Ave (Hwy 70) Kinston, NC 252-527-4115

The Bentley Bed & Breakfast Inn

Conveniently located on Hwy 70 and Hwy 258, this hotel is close to many area attractions and businesses. Spacious guest rooms are equipped with microwaves, refrigerators, irons, ironing boards, and cable TV complete with HBO. In addition, guests can utilize the high-speed internet access, and swimming pool.

17


�ining & �ho�ing

DINING GUIDE Abbott’s Country Buffet (252) 527-5613 3700 W. Vernon Ave. Traditional Southern cooking buffet-style Tue-Fri: L D Sun: L

$B

Aggie’s (252) 208-1449 901 W. Vernon Avenue Steak subs along with a variety of hot and cold sandwiches. Mon-Sat: L D

Andy’s www.andyscheesesteaks.com • Heritage Plaza; (252) 526-5189 • 300 W. Vernon Avenue; (252) 527-5778 • Vernon Park Mall; (252) 522-2211 • 304 East Washington St, LaGrange (252) 566-2434 • 6018 Hwy 11 South, Pink Hill; (252) 568-2366 Cheesesteaks and cheeseburgers, freshly squeezed orangeade and lemonade, and thick milkshakes. Daily blue plate specials. Mon-Sun: L D

$

$

Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill and Bar www.applebees.com (252) 233-0362 4483 Hwy. 70 West Casual dining atmosphere featuring menu items by Tyler Florence. Mon-Sun: L D

$$

Arby’s www.arbys.com (252) 527-1085 4173 W. New Bern Road Fast food restaurant specializing in Market-fresh sandwiches. Mon-Sun: L D

$

18


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

LEGEND

$ Less than $10 $$ Between $10-15 $$$ More than $15

BJ’s Grill (252) 566-4702 7823 Hwy 70 West, La Grange Serving traditional Eastern North Carolina fare ex. BBQ, Fried Chicken, etc. Mon-Sat: B L

$

Barn Steakhouse (252) 522-2284 3630 W. Vernon Avenue “Quality Dining Experience.” Serving Prime Rib, Sirloin, Rib Eye, Filet Mignon. Mon-Sat: D

$$$

Baron & the Beef (252) 527-6787 Hwy 70 East Fine dining steakhouse featuring deluxe salad bar. Mon-Sat: D

$$$

-on Fri & Sat B

Billy’s Drive-in (252) 523-3754 2010 N. Queen Street Cheeseburgers and fries in a casual, pick-up atmosphere. Mon-Sat: L

B = Breakfast L = Lunch D = Dinner

Smoke Free ABC Permit Credit Cards

R Reservations Suggested B Banquet Room D Delivery Available

Bluebird Cafe

Brown’s Sweet Treats

(252) 527-5058 225 E. New Bern Road (Hwy. 70 Bypass) Inside Neuse Sport Shop Home cooking. Lunch, all-day breakfast. Mon-Sun: B L

(252) 527-3700 1604 W. Vernon Avenue Fresh baked pastries and desserts. Custom made cakes.

$

www.burgerking.com • 2402 N. Herritage Street; (252) 939-1465 • 601 E. New Bern Road; (252) 523-6490 • 2015 W. Vernon Avenue; (252) 523-1864 Fast food restaurant featuring charbroiled burgers. Mon-Sun: B L D

Bojangles www.bojangles.com • 1028 W. New Bern Road; (252) 527-1664 • 3007 N. Herritage Street; (252) 559-2014 • 400 Vernon Avenue; (252) 523-1783 • 7858 Hwy 70 West, La Grange (252) 566-3425 “Famous chicken and biscuits” Mon-Sun: B L D

$

The Broken Eagle Eatery (252) 527-3446 220 N. Herritage Street Fine Dining – specialties include Sterling Silver steaks and local seafood. Tue-Sat: L D; Sun: L

$$$

B

$

$

Burger King

$

Byrd’s Restaurant • 1523 Hull Road; (252) 208-0280 • 196 Hwy 58 South; (252) 523-3422 Casual “country cooking” Mon-Sun: B L

$

The Chef and the Farmer www.chefandthefarmer.com (252) 208-2433 120 W. Gordon Street Upscale dining in a modern atmosphere. Wed-Sat: L D

$$$ 19

BR


�ining & �ho�ing Chen’s Chinese

Cubbie’s

Dairy Queen

(252) 520-0153 211 W. Vernon Avenue Authentic Chinese cuisine; eat-in or carry-out. Mon-Sun: L D

(252) 523-9715 802 Vernon Avenue “Famous” cheeseburgers and milkshakes. Mon-Sun: L D

$

$

www.dairyqueen.com (252) 520-7622 3701 W. Vernon Avenue Fast food chain serving hamburgers, hotdogs, and “Blizzards.” Mon-Sun: L D

Chick-fil-A

Dairy Bar

www.chick-fil-a.com (252) 523-9864 Vernon Park Mall Chicken sandwiches, nuggets, and strips served with waffle fries or fruit salads. Mon-Sat: L D

(252) 523-7734 225 E. New Bern Avenue (Hwy 70 Bypass) Frenchman’s Creek Ice cream, shakes, sundaes, hotdogs.

$

China King • 2000 W. Vernon Avenue; (252) 522-3330 • 5921 Hwy 11 South, Pink Hill; (252) 568-2588 Buffet-style Asian dining. Mon-Sun: L D

$

$

Domino’s Pizza www.dominos.com (252) 523-4422 1201 W. Vernon Avenue Made-to-order pizza for delivery or carry-out. Mon-Sun: L D

$

D

Fine Dining in Kinston’s Historic Downtown 252-527-3446

220 N. Herritage St. • Kinston, NC

$

Lunch - Mon-Sun 11:00 - 2:00 Dinner - Mon-Sat 5:30 - 9:30

Christopher’s (252) 527-3716 217 N. Queen Street Country cookings served in a casual atmosphere. Mon-Sat: B L D

$

Featuring Sterling Silver Premium Beef & Finest Seafood 20


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

LEGEND

$ Less than $10 $$ Between $10-15 $$$ More than $15

B = Breakfast L = Lunch D = Dinner

Smoke Free ABC Permit Credit Cards

R Reservations Suggested B Banquet Room D Delivery Available

El Norteno

The Family Restaurant

Golden China Buffet

(252) 523-4709 1701 W. Vernon Avenue Authentic Mexican cuisine. Mon-Sun: L D

(252) 568-4758 Pink Hill Traditional Country cooking in a family friendly environment. Mon-Sat: B L D

(252) 523-6808 4147 W. Vernon Avenue Authentic Chinese cuisine served buffet-style. Mon-Sun: L D

$

$

$

-on Sundays

El Ranchero

Grounded Gourmet Coffee and Juice

3647 W. Vernon Avenue Traditional Mexican dining. Mon-Sun: L D

(252) 527-7010 115 S. Queen Street Gourmet coffee, cookies, snacks and juices. Mon-Thurs: B L D Fri: B L

$

$

Golden Corral www.goldencorral.net (252) 523-7585 4468 W. Vernon Avenue Family friendly environment with wide variety of food on the buffet. Mon-Sun: L D, Sat: B

$$

B

Hamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant www.hamsrestaurants.com (252) 939-9560 3021 N. Herritage Street A wide variety of food in a family friendly, laid-back atmosphere. Mon-Sun: L D

$$ 21


�ining & �ho�ing Hardee’s

Ken’s Grill

Lilly’s Subs & Pizza

www.hardees.com • Hwy 70 East; (252) 527-7925 • Kinston Point; (252) 523-3323 • 200 W. Vernon Avenue; (252) 527-1222 Fast food chain featuring “Thickburgers” and fried chicken. Mon-Sun: B L D

(252) 566-4765 7645 Hwy 70 West, La Grange Grill, Barbeque Wed & Sat

(252) 523-0011 2423 N. Herritage St. Homemade pizza, subs, pasta. Burgers. Mon-Sat: L D

$

Hibachi Express (252) 939-1816 2405 N. Herritage Street Traditional Japanese cuisine cooked on a hibachi grill. Eat-in or carryout. Mon-Sun: L D

$

House of Wang (252) 527-7897 710 W. Vernon Avenue Serving Asian and American style cuisine in a casual atmosphere. Mon-Sat: L D

$

B

$

Kentucky Fried Chicken www.kfc.com (252) 527-6411 1613 W. Vernon Avenue Fast food restaurant specializing in family style fried chicken meals. Mon-Sun: L D

$

King’s Restaurant www.kingsbbq.com • Hwy 70; (252) 527-2101 • Vernon Avenue; (252) 527-1661 • North Queen Street; (252) 523-3303 Eastern Carolina Barbecue and Fried Chicken. Mon-Sun: L D

$

DB

(252) 523-1005 1600 N. Queen Street Traditional Eastern Carolina BBQ; eat-in or carry-out. Mon-Sat: L D

$ Less than $10 $$ Between $10-15 $$$ More than $15

$

Lovick’s Café (252) 523-6854 320 N. Herritage Street Country style dining with specialty “doughburgers.” Mon-Sat: B L

(252) 527-9600 909 W. Vernon Avenue Authentic Chinese food. Eat-in or carry-out. Mon-Sun: L D

$

$

LEGEND

• 2459 Hwy 258 North; (252) 520-0025 • 402 E. Washington Street, La Grange; (252) 566-5044 Specialty pizzas and subs in a family-friendly environment. Eat-in or carry-out. Mon-Sat: L D

Main Moon

(252) 527-7877 225C E. New Bern Road Country cooking served buffet style. Mon-Sun: L D

$

Little J’s Pizza & Subs

$

Kinstonian Family Restaurant

J & L Bar-B-Q

$

B = Breakfast L = Lunch D = Dinner 22

Smoke Free ABC Permit Credit Cards

R Reservations Suggested B Banquet Room D Delivery Available


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

McDonald’s www.mcdonalds.com • 612 E. New Bern Road; (252) 523-8925 • 110 W. Vernon Avenue; (252) 523-6665 Fast food restaurant specializing in hamburgers and French fries. Mon-Sun: B L D

$

Olympian Restaurant (252) 523-0333 601 W. Vernon Avenue Greek style cuisine in a family friendly atmosphere. Mon-Sun: L D

$

Papa John’s Pizza www.papajohns.com (252) 527-8585 1004 W. Vernon Avenue Carry-out and delivery pizza restaurant. Mon-Sun: L D

$

D

Pastimes (252) 527-7828 674 Stratford Road Sports bar with pub food. Mon-Sun: L D

$

Peach House

Pizza Hut

(252) 522-2526 412 W. Vernon Avenue Quaint sandwich shop with sandwiches, soups, salads, espresso, desserts and daily features, perfect for a nice luncheon. Mon-Sat: L

www.pizzahut.com (252) 523-1175 1802 W. Vernon Avenue Pan pizzas and many side dishes available. Eat-in, carry-out, or delivery options. Mon-Sun: L D

$

23

$

D


�ining & �ho�ing Pizza Inn

Ruby Tuesday

www.pizzainn.com (252) 523-9700 2918 N. Herritage Street National restaurant chain featuring pizza buffet including salads and “pizzerts.” Mon-Sun: L D

www.rubytuesday.com (252) 523-4067 3725 W. Vernon Avenue Casual dining restaurant featuring extensive salad bar. Mon-Sun: L D

$

Pizza Plus

$

(252) 566-4067 7877 Hwy 70 West, La Grange Wide variety of seafood served in a casual environment. Wed-Sun: D

$$

San Juan

(252) 568-2704 4149 Hwy 11, Deep Run Made-to-order pizza for eat-in, delivery or carry-out, plus subs Mon-Sun: L D

www.sanjuanmexrest.com (252) 527-2519 2423 N. Herritage Street Traditional Mexican restaurant and cantina. Mon-Sun: L D

$

$

D

Sandpiper Seafood House and Oyster Bar

Smith’s Cafe (252) 522-4040 2424 US 258 North Southern country cooking, cafeteria style Mon-Fri: B L Sat: B

$

D

Pizza Villa (252) 527-2260 1400 W. Vernon Avenue Family friendly dining specializing in homemade pizzas and lasagna, and featuring salad bar. Mon-Sat: L D

Famous for Bar-B-Que and Chicken Since 1936

$

Rightway • 3001 N. Herritage Street (252) 559-1360 • 1050 W. New Bern Road (US 70 Bypass) (252) 523-0262 Southern-style cooking; baked goods, milkshakes Mon-Sun: B L D

10:30 AM - 9:00 PM MON - SUN www.kingsbbq.com

Bar-B-Que Pork, Beef, Chicken, Turkey & Ribs Fresh seaFood • home style Vegetables daily specials  breaKFast - saturday & sunday - hwy. 70 only

$

Hwy 70 East - 527-2101 North Queen St. - 523-3303 West Vernon Ave. - 527-1661 24


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

Stacey’s (252) 523-2440 834 Hardee Road Inside Vernon Park Mall Burgers, pizza, sandwiches, subs, ice cream Mon-Sun: L D

$

Subway www.subway.com • 2405 N. Herritage Street; (252) 523-9188 • 4153 W. Vernon Avenue; (252) 523-6913 • 4101 W. Vernon Avenue; (252) 523-5414 • 401 E. New Bern Road; (252) 523-2427 • 2719 Hwy 11-55; (252) 520-7770 • 5899 Hwy 11 S., Pink Hill; (252) 568-9924 Made-to-order sub sandwiches, with many low-fat options. Mon-Sun: L D

$

Supreme Deli & Subs (252) 523-2230 106 E. Vernon Avenue Deli-style subs made-to-order. Mon-Sat: L D

$

Taco Bell

Wendy’s

www.tacobell.com (252) 527-5555 1806 W. Vernon Avenue Fast food chain serving tacos, burritos and many other specialty items. Mon-Sun: L D

www.wendys.com • 4535 Hwy 70 West; (252) 522-3050 • 2409 N. Herritage Street; (252) 527-5806 “Old Fashioned” hamburgers, specialty salads, and “Frostys.” Mon-Sun: B L D

$

Two Dogs Pizza (252) 568-6301 Hwy 11 South, Pink Hill Pizza, subs, pizza buffet and salad bar. Mon-Sun: L D

$

LEGEND

$ Less than $10 $$ Between $10-15 $$$ More than $15

B

$

Wok & Roll (252) 523-7400 2424 N. Herritage Street Asian cuisine served in a casual atmosphere. Mon-Sun: L D

$

B = Breakfast L = Lunch D = Dinner 25

Smoke Free ABC Permit Credit Cards

R Reservations Suggested B Banquet Room D Delivery Available


�ining & �ho�ing SHOPPING GUIDE

Farmers Market

Frenchman’s Creek U.S. 70 West

Downtown Kinston

100 N. Herritage St. (252) 527-9565

Queen Street Named for Queen Charlotte, wife of King George III, Queen Street is a collection of interesting architecture and welcoming merchants. Shops offering furniture, antiques, family clothing, books, watch repair and a host of other items line the wide street. You can even stop for a cup of coffee and enjoy it at a sidewalk table. Don’t forget to explore the shops along the side streets – you might find a treasure! Plenty of on-street parking, as well as city-owned parking lots – all with free parking.

Fresh from the garden! Delicious berries, juicy tomatoes, melons bursting with flavor, buttery-sweet corn – you’ll find it all and much more at the Farmers Market. Here’s the perfect place to shop when you’re preparing a picnic lunch by the Neuse River, or stocking up the refrigerator in your RV. You’ll find friendly, knowledgeable growers who will help you find produce at its peak of flavor and at prices you won’t beat anywhere. From earliest spring until late winter, North Carolina gardens provide Nature’s bounty. Get there early for the best selections!

Shop in an atmosphere of leisurely elegance. Whether you’re looking for a special outfit to celebrate a momentous occasion or a toy for a new baby, you can find it in this unique collection of shops clustered near a fish pond. People come from miles around to select sporting goods at the Neuse Sports Shop, and walk across the street to have barbecue or buffet at King’s Restaurant. Or order an ice cream sundae from a soft-serve shop and eat it by the water where ducks delight in begging for treats. Here’s a great place to relax and enjoy the beautiful scenery.

Kinston’s #1 Salon & Spa since 1903

124 NORTH QUEEN ST. KINSTON,NC 28501 PHONE 527-1166

Men’s, Boy’s & Children’s Clothing Men’s, Ladies’ & Children’s Shoes Infant Furniture and Accessories

Perms • Haircuts • Color • Relaxers Massages • Manicures • Pedicures Facials • Microdermabrasion Body Scrubs • Body Wraps Body Bronzing • Spray Tan • Body Waxing Mineral Make-up Arbonne • Redken • Pureology • OPI • Grund Gift Certificates and Spa Packages Bridal Parties Welcomed

Boutique by the Neuse 124 North Queen Street • Kinston, NC

252-523-7222 Located inside of H. Stadiem

(252) 527-8515 - Salon (252) 526-5074 - Spa 408 N. Herritage Street • Kinston, NC 28501 www.alisonandco.com 26


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

Herritage Landing Herritage Street Here’s where you’ll find an eclectic grouping of specialty shops and restaurants catering to the unusual. You can special order a mirror or search for antiques. Buy the latest women’s fashions, an art print or get a manicure and a haircut. Spend the day in a spa, or select fresh seafood to cook on a grill at the Neuseway Nature Center. Make an appointment at an award-winning photography studio or find a special pan at a restaurant supply store. And if you’re hungry, you can enjoy dining al fresco with steaks or other American fare, while another restaurant specializes in fine cuisine. Here is the site of some of the city’s oldest businesses, now reborn to fit the 21st century.

Community Council for the Arts Gift Shop 400 N. Queen St. Phone: (252) 527-2517 Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m., TuesdaysFridays; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays Look, linger and shop in the premier showplace for artists working in a variety of media. This tiny shop is crammed floor to ceiling with beautiful examples of jewelry, pottery, paintings, drawings, photography, woodcrafts, children’s toys, glass and other highly desirable, and reasonably priced, products from local artists, artisans and writers. In the book corner, you’ll find local writers with expertise in Kinston and Lenoir County facts, Southern cooking recipes, North Carolina – even the coast. Don’t forget to pick up hand-

made gift cards or a pen fashioned by a local wood-turner. If you’re looking for a new handbag, hat or scarf, prepare to be amazed at the difference an artist can make in its creation. You can even select from seasonal decorations. The selection changes constantly.

Lenox Factory Outlet 1800 Dobbs Farm Road (252) 559-7373 www.lenox.com Don’t miss the chance to visit the outlet store at America’s most famous bone china manufacturer. Known worldwide for its quality dinnerware, ornaments, crystal and flatware, you can buy examples of Lenox products at 20 to 50 percent off. Whether you select an entire set of china or the perfect bud vase, you won’t leave the store emptyhanded. The selection varies day to day, so don’t forget to return before you head back home.

Vernon Park Mall 834 Hardee Road (252) 523-8969 Anchored by two major department stores, Vernon Park Mall offers true family shopping. Kids will love watching the monkey at the pet shop but be careful – a puppy might steal your heart. The sporting goods store will have your favorite team’s jersey and you’ll find well-crafted gift ideas at another shop. If you’re looking for a book or a magazine to while away your leisure hours, you’ll find a wide selection in the bookstore. Jewelry, shoes, fine watches, swimwear and much, much more are available under one spacious and convenient roof. For a snack, lunch or just a refreshing drink, stop by one of several eateries at the food court. 27


�pecial �vents

Kinston Winter Bluegrass Festival “Father of Our State” Gov. Richard Caswell Celebration

August 12-19, 2007 (252) 522-0540 Admission: Free to most events Surveyor, Revolutionary War hero, husband and father, proponent of free education, Continental Congress delegate, governor: bare hints about the pivotal roles played by Richard Caswell during the birth and infancy of our country. The state will pay homage to Caswell, who called Kinston home, from Aug. 12-19, 2007. All 100 North Carolina counties are being asked to designate the period as Richard Caswell Week. The Lenoir County Colonial Commission under the auspices of the Historical Preservation Group is organizing

the Kinston tribute, with assistance from the staff at the Gov. Richard Caswell Memorial State Historic Site Museum on U.S. 70 Business. The celebration begins at 3 p.m. Aug. 12 at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church with a memorial service, followed by the laying of a wreath and a presentation of flags at the Caswell Memorial on the grounds of the Lenoir County Courthouse at 5 p.m. As the week moves on there will be concerts, lectures, and living histories, working toward a re-enactment funeral for Caswell conducted by Masons on Aug. 17. A glass-covered, horse-drawn hearse will deliver the Caswell “body” to the Caswell Family Cemetery, where full Masonic Rites will be given. Following the funeral a ribbon cutting will take place at the Gov. Richard Caswell Memorial State Historic Site Museum, which will re-open with 28

new exhibits. Many state dignitaries will be in attendance and the general public is invited. Military demonstration and other colonial living histories will take place throughout the rest of afternoon. A fife and drum corps from Tryon Palace will demonstrate how the instruments were used to direct firings and give orders on the battlefields. Caswell, a Maryland native who moved with his family to North Carolina at age 16, is one of the least-known Revolutionary-era patriots and heroes. Yet, he was a correspondent of George Washington, a drafter of the U.S. Constitution, a war hero, the first elected governor of the state and served six terms. John Adams described Caswell this way: “We always looked to Richard Caswell from North Carolina. He was a model man and true patriot.”


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

Revolutionary War Living History Program

CSS Neuse State Site and Gov. Richard Caswell Museum August 18-19, 2007 2613 W. Vernon Ave. (U.S. 70 Bus.) (252) 522-2091 Admission: Free Learn about life on the battlefield in Colonial times – information you’ll never find in a history book. Re-enactors portray the hardships and the fun of life in those long-ago years through living history exhibitions. A Revolutionary War encampment on Aug. 18-19 will demonstrate authentic dress of soldiers and civilians. See a camp the way it would have been in 1776 as the British redcoats and Colonial militia drilled and went about their daily lives. Here is a depiction of life during Maj. Gen. Richard Caswell’s military career. Peer into tents to see the types of equipment used by armies, their cooking utensils, artillery, and the type of food they ate. Watch firing demonstrations and learn the correct commands issued in battle.

Garden Spot Festival Downtown La Grange, N.C. September 8-9, 2007 (252) 566-9691 Admission: Free

The perfect way to end Labor Day week is a short ride west on U.S. 70 to La Grange to celebrate the 27th Annual Garden Spot Festival. The town’s nickname is “The Garden Spot,” and resident prove its appropriateness every year with spectacular flower and veggie gardens. This festival celebrates their work and the town itself with live music, children’s games and activities, dancing and great food. The area’s best outdoor grill kings will compete in

the first Garden Spot Chicken Cookoff and you can taste the results of their work. Tuck a flower behind your ear and join the fun in La Grange at Community Park on Railroad Street. Admission is free.

Wil King Antebellum Ball September 29, 2007 Tickets: $25 per person www.historicpreservation.org

Did you ever wonder what it would be like to spend an evening as Scarlett O’Hara or Rhett Butler? Now you can! Become a lovely Southern belle in period costume or a dashing Southern gentleman at this unique annual costume ball where you can dance to period music, sip punch and nibble on delicacies throughout the evening. (Some folks prefer to wear their modern dress, and that’s OK too.) The ballroom features a large mural of Tara, the Georgia plantation home of Miss Scarlett. You might hear talk about many happenings in the community — such as: When is the next reenactment? Where are the Civil War Trails? Can I still get prints of the Wyse Fork Battlefield? Just what kind of undergarments did the ladies really wear under those beautiful gowns? The Historical Preservation Group sponsors the ball, and proceeds are used for the preservation and development of Lenoir County Civil War battlefields.

Salute! A Tribute to America’s Veterans November 9-11, 2007 Downtown Kinston (252) 560-0589; (252) 522-0517 Admission: Free to all events www.salutevets.org

One of the area’s biggest festivals, Salute shows veterans and active service 29

members they don’t walk alone for freedom, especially in Lenoir County. The theme of this year’s week-long tribute is Forces of Freedom and culminates with a display by World War II re-enactors, sky dives, a weekend parade, ceremonies, nationally-known guests, vendors, a flag retirement ceremony, a POW/MIA service and a USO-style variety show that often brings tears to the eyes of battle-worn vets. Past festivals have featured car shows, motorcycle rallies by nationallyknown Rolling Thunder and Southern Cruisers Riding Club, and more activities for all ages. National Sojourners stage a spectacular ceremony honoring our country’s flag history. Members of the group are Master Masons who wear replicas of the 1776 uniforms and address what is happening to respect for the American flag. Organizers say this year’s event will be the largest ever. It’s a heart-warming tribute to the men and women who gave, and continue to give, so much to our country.

CSS Neuse Naval Living History Program

CSS Neuse State Site and Gov. Richard Caswell Museum 2613 W. Vernon Ave. (U.S. 70 Bus.) November 17-18, 2007 (252) 522-2091 Admission: Free A Civil War living history encampment will be held in 2008. Learn about military and civilian life in the mid-1800s. Re-enactors will demonstrate soldiers’ drill techniques, camp life and cooking, and illustrate how women took care of their homes, farms and families while their men were on the battlefield. Visitors are invited to view numerous field artillery pieces and watch blacksmiths at work. There is a special artillery firing after dark. Children will


�pecial �vents be dressed in the styles of the time and play long-forgotten games of their ancestors’ times. Marvel at the way horses execute commands. It’s authentic history and it might amaze you.

Winterfest

Kinston Drag Strip 2250 N.C. 11/55 South January, 2008 (252) 527-4337; (252) 522-9551 Tickets: $10; Special events $15; 12 and younger: free

place in the hearts of bikers -- and probably the respect, if not the envy, of every designer of every sports machine. Leather jackets and black boots came to symbolize this new brand of the American cowboy. Instead of the open plains, the open highway came to be this new creature’s place of hard riding. Bikes are on display for several days before the culmination of the exhibition, a reverse drawing and special dinner. Check the Web site for dates and dinner ticket prices.

The first track in North Carolina to be open year-round, Winterfest is the season’s premier event. One of eight special races, Winterfest is the first weekend after New Year’s Day. Drivers come from up and down the eastern seaboard and from as far away as Texas and the Midwest to vie for huge cash prizes. If you’re a drag strip fan, you won’t want to miss the most thrilling race of the year. Always free parking, plenty of bathrooms and a snack bar to satisfy your appetite throughout the race. All events are sanctioned and insured by the International Hot Rod Association.

9th Annual “Soup & a Bowl”

Party with the Harleys

Kinston Winter Bluegrass Festival

Arts Council, 400 N. Queen St. January 5-19, 2008 (252) 527-2517 Exhibition: Free www.kinstoncca.com If you’re an “Iron Horse” fan, you won’t want to miss the Seventh Annual Motorcycle Party in January at the Community Council for the Arts. Three dozen or more bikes, old and new but mostly Harley-Davidsons, will be on display. Motorcycles, designed for looks, action and traction, have driven through more than 100 years of American history to earn a special

Arts Council, 400 N. Queen St. January 27, 2008 (252) 527-2517 Tickets: $15 www.kinstoncca.com

The Community Council for the Arts will hold its Soup and a Bowl at noon Jan. 27, 2008 at the Arts Center. The ticket price includes a handcrafted ceramic bowl to be filled with homemade soups. Nothing tastes better on a cold January day! Dessert is included. Arrive early to ensure finding that perfect, one-of-a-kind bowl.

231 N.C. 58 South off U.S. 70 West (Lenoir Community College Gymnasium) February 15-16, 2008 Admission: Varied (see below) (252) 522-1066 www.kinstonwinterbluegrass.com Music fans across the nation mark Kinston as the place to be every year on the third weekend in February. It’s the indoor Winter Bluegrass Festival, a rousing two days filled with the sounds of yesterday presented by masters of the genre. Held indoors, with conference seating, the comfortable setting 30

encourages attendees to settle back and enjoy. Just bring an extra pair of shoes in case you wear out the ones you’re wearing by toe-tapping through the weekend. Big name performers delight the crowd and jammers will always find extra space. Food is available on the surrounding campus. Advance two-day tickets are $50, or $70 at the door. The music begins at 3 p.m. Friday and continues until 11 p.m. Saturday’s hours are noon until 11 p.m.

4th Annual Model Railroad Show

Arts Council, 400 N. Queen St. Feb 9-10, 2008 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. (252) 527-2517 Admission: Free www.kinstoncca.com All men are boys when it comes to model trains and even girls are picking up the hobby. The big annual Model Railroad Show will give you a chance to become reacquainted with a childhood fascination or pick up pointers for your own collection. The show is organized by the Kinston Area Railroad Modelers Association, and is an eagerly anticipated event. HO gauge and other size trains fly along tracks running through town and countryside, under tunnels and around mountains dotted with trees, a waterfall and rock formations. The details of the layouts are incredible and show the results of a painstaking dedication to authenticity. Don’t miss this show – you’ll love it!

Run for the River

Downtown Kinston March 29, 2008 (252) 522-4676 Admission: Entry fee www.downtownkinston.com Small enough to enjoy, big enough


1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

to attract the most passionate runner – it’s Kinston’s annual run taking racers along a path near the beautiful Neuse River. Run the full 8K, or take one of the shorter routes, but no matter which one you choose all ages will have a great day of healthy fun. The event got its start in 2006 with a dedicated crowd that swelled for the 2007 race. Fathers and sons, moms and daughters, husbands and wives can test their running skills against each other or against other runners. Check the Web site for more information and mark your calendar today.

Festival on the Neuse

Downtown Kinston April 25-26, 2008 (252) 527-1131 Admission: Free www.festivalontheneuse.com The city’s oldest annual festival is a splurge of eating, entertainment and anticipation – which cook will walk off with the coveted award for best barbecued pig? If you’ve never been quite sure why God invented pigs, the answer will be obvious after your first taste of eastern North Carolina-style barbecue. The fun begins on Thursday with a golf tournament. On Friday night before the big doings on Saturday, cooks from across the South gather to slow-cook pigs with elaborate equipment rarely seen outside a specialty store. Decorations around the cooking tents range from sublime to ridiculous and most will evoke a hearty laugh. On Saturday, the festival is fully underway, with music, a clown, a duck race, vendors, face painting, art activities, a magic show, storytelling, games and the announcement of barbecue chef winners and presentation of cash prizes. It’s just too much fun to miss!

Sand in the Streets Outdoor Concerts

Neuseway Park, Gordon & Mitchell St. Dates and Hours: June-Sept. every other Thurs. starting at 6 p.m. (252) 522-4676 www.downtownkinston.com Come join in the fun as Sand in the Streets brings popular bands to outdoor audiences. With a broad range of bands and warm weather these concerts provide the opportunity to enjoy both good music on the banks of the Neuse River. See website for schedule.

The Harmony Hall Players Harmony Hall, 109 E. King St. Dates and Hours: Varied (252) 522-0412

Harmony Hall Players features music from the 18th century era. Classically trained musicians and ensembles from up and down the East Coast share their vocal and instrumental talents on the harpsichord, violin, cello, piano, viola and trumpet. Musicians gather

Run for the River 31

throughout the year in Harmony Hall to perform works by great composers such as Mozart, Bach and Beethoven. E-mail harmonyhall@ncisp.net for a schedule or check the Web site: www. lenoircountyhistorical.com.

Eastern NC Bluegrass Assoc. Bluegrass Jam Sessions

231 N.C. 58 South off U.S. 70 West (Lenoir Community College Gymnasium) 2nd Saturday each month (252) 523-5735 www.kinstonwinterbluegrass.com Bluegrass fans gather on the second Saturday of every month to hear local and regional bands give their best. The series is in its 25th year of entertainment. The family-style entertainment offers plenty of room for jammers. Door prizes cap off the night. Doors open at 6 p.m., music begins at 7 and wraps up at 9:30 p.m. Admission is only $6 per person. Children 12 and younger free when accompanied by an adult.


�inst�� �istor� 1729  Robert Atkins received a grant for land on which part of Kinston now stands. 1758  Tobacco inspection warehouse built about this year at the future site of Kinston. December 1762  North Carolina General Assembly established the town of Kingston, named in honor of King George III, on the Atkins banks on the Neuse River. Kingston was the 20th town officially established province – the land was owned by William Herritage the lots were later inherited by his daughter Elizabeth. Jan.18, 1777  Richard Caswell, Revolutionary War hero became the 1st elected Governor of the State of North Carolina. 1777-1780  During Governor Caswell’s terms in office meetings of the Council of State and the general assembly were held in Kinston at Harmony Hall. 1785  Bishop Asbury, the 1st Methodist Bishop in American preached in the Courthouse.

1791  Lenoir County was formed from Dobbs County. 1825  Kinston Incorporated 1850  1st election of Kinston City Officials. July 1855  The American Advocate newspaper was established in Kinston. April 29, 1858  Construction completed for the 1st railroad (Shoofly and Cannonball) December 14, 1862  1st Battle of Kinston - Civil War. In December 1862, Union Gen. George Foster led 10,000 infantry and cavalry from the Federal garrison at New Bern on a raid to the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad near Goldsboro. The action was designed to disrupt the supply line to the north and support Gen. Ambrose Burnside’s attack at Fredericksburg (ultimately illfated). March 10-12, 1865  Battle of Wyse Fork - Civil War. When Union troops occupied Kinston in March 1865, the CSS Neuse Gunboat was

burned by its crew, resulting in a large explosion in her port bow, which sank the vessel. 1877  Federal troops withdrew from the South bringing an end to political reconstruction - J.T. Burch began growing bright leaf tobacco on the farm of Council S. Wooten Dr. R.H. Lewis began operating the Kinston Collegiate Institute. October 1878  Fire destroyed the Lenoir County Courthouse and many of the counties important records. February 1880  Second fire destroyed the Courthouse and the remaining records except the grantee index. August 3, 1881  More than 12,000 people attended the dedication of the Gov. Richard Caswell monument. April 6, 1882  First issue of the Kinston Free Press, Editor Josephus Daniels, paper is still in operation today. 1895  Disaster struck the heart of Kinston – the 3rd fire broke out in downtown Kinston and raged out of control until every building in a two square block area was destroyed, including stores and residents. This was only the beginning, between Feb. and June 21 fires occurred that just about destroyed Kinston. 1895  Jesse Grainger constructed the Kinston Carolina Warehouse. 1911  Caswell Training School - North Carolina School for the Feebleminded - Caswell Center is the oldest of the five State operated mental retardation facilities in North Carolina.

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1-800-869-0032 www.VisitKinston.com

“�ather o� �ur �tate” Governor Richard Caswell

In 1746 young Richard Caswell, age 17, and his family arrived in New Bern from Maryland. He was soon employed as deputy surveyor by James McLlwean, Surveyor of the colony of North Carolina. Fate would have it that he would meet and fall in love with McLlwean’s daughter Mary. Mary died young and Caswell later married Elizabeth Herritage. Elizabeth was the daughter of William Herritage, a man that influenced Caswell’s career as an attorney. It wasn’t long before Young Caswell bought land in what later became Kinston. As a surveyor Caswell laid out the town of Kinston and helped named the streets of which one is named Caswell. It was here he learned law and practiced as an attorney. His personal fortune grew as he became the owner of various businesses and farms. Richard Caswell’s interest in the affairs of state intensified with the passing of time and he became a strong legislative leader. By 1774 the colony was feel-

ing a spirit of rebellion against Great Britain. At the first Provincial Congress of North Carolina Richard Caswell along with William Hooper and Joseph Hewes were elected to represent North Carolina in the First Continental and Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia. Because of Caswell’s commitment to his military duties as commander of the militia of the New Bern District and his job as treasurer for the state, Caswell declined to serve in the third Continental Congress. Had he accepted the appointment to serve a third time he would have been one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Caswell led the colonial forces at the Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge where the patriots overwhelmed the Tory’s and forever turned the tide against the British in North Carolina. This victory led to Richard Caswell becoming a notable hero of the American Revolutionary War. Caswell was now promoted Major General over the Army of North Carolina. 33

Under the provisions of the new state’s constitution the General Assembly elected Caswell the first governor of the state of North Carolina. He served for six terms as governor. The times following the revolution were turbulent years but under Caswell’s leadership, as a great mediator and apt politician, the state survived and grew. In 1789 while presiding over the General Assembly, Caswell was stricken with a fatal stroke. His funeral was held in Fayetteville, where he died, with the General Assembly attending as a group. Caswell was a Mason and the Masonic rites were performed. It is believed by many that his body was returned to Kinston where he is buried in the family cemetery. Caswell spent much of his personal fortune on the army he commanded during the Revolution and when he died his fortune had greatly diminished. He had sacrificed it for liberty and freedom from tyranny. His life was one that was dedicated to the cause and he was truly the “Father of Our State”.


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ACCOMMODATIONS OAK MONT

21 The Bentley BedR & Breakfast..........F2 1 1st Battle of Kinston 1862 .............F5 22 Comfort Inn of Kinston...................E4 Civil War Battlefield Park 23 Day’s Inn........................................F5 2 Battle of Wyse Fork 1865 ............. H5 24 Hampton Inn..................................E4 Civil War LINCOLN Map Marker ST 25 Holiday Inn Express Hotel ............ A3 3 Css Neuse Museum.......................F3 and Suites 4 CSS Neuse State Historic Site & .. C2 26 Kinston Motor Lodge......................F2 Governor Caswell Memorial 27 Neuse River Inns & Suites..............F4 5 Css Neuse II..................................F3 28 Neuseway Nature Park...................E3 6 Caswell Museum........................... C2 & Campground 7 Caswell No. 1 Fire Station Museum...F3 29 Super 8 Motel.................................F4 8 Cultural Heritage Museum..............F4 30 WestParke Inn & Suites................. A3 9 Harmony Hall.................................F3 10 Heritage Place Genelogical Library...F5 SHOPPING 11 Maplewood & Cedar Grove ...........F3 31 Community Council for the Arts.....F2 Cemeteries Gift Shop D

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32 Downtown Kinston.........................F3 33 Farmers Market..............................F3 34 Frenchman’s Creek ........................F5 Shopping Center 35 Herritage Landing...........................F3 36 Lenox Factory Outlet..................... A1 37 Vernon Park Mall........................... D2

12 Barnet Park Disc Golf Course........ A1 13 Community Council for the Arts.....F3 14 Kinston Drag Strip......................... B5 15 Kinston Indians (Grainger Stadium).....F2 16 Neuse River Wildlife Boat Ramp.... C3 17 Neuseway Nature Center................E3 OTHER 18 Planetarium, Health, &...................E3 ´ 38 Kinston Lenoir County............F3 Science Museum & Campground Convention & Visitors Bureau 19 Riverside Bicycle & Outdoor Sports...F3 20 West Water Park.............................F5

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�el�ful �nformatio� Emergency Contacts

Lenoir Memorial Hospital

For emergencies dial 911; however; listed below you will find the number for the Administrative Offices of Law Enforcement agencies and Rescue Squads:

Lenoir Memorial Hospital is a 306 bed Conveniently located on Hwy. 70 not-for-profit hospital consisting of 263 between the state capital, Raleigh, and acute care beds, a 26-bed transitional North Carolina’s coast and only 60 66 Arlington care unit and a 17-bed inpatient rehaminutes from I-95 and I-40, Kinston Alexandria bilitation center. LMH provides general can be easilyRappahannockRiver reached from anywhere. PotomacRiver ShenandoahRiver medical, surgical, pediatric, and obstetri95 cal-gynecological services and special64 JamesRiver Richmond ized services in cardiology, pulmonology, 64 oncology, gastroenterology, neurology, AppomatoxRiver Roanoke Hampton radiology, orthopedics, urology, oph- 81 Newport News Norfolk Virginia Beach thalmology, rheumatology, plastic and 85 VIRGINIA Portsmouth 77 reconstructive surgery, thoracic and 85 Winston-Salem vascular surgery, otolaryngology, and YadkinRiver RoanokeRiver emergency medicine. For additional in- 85 Greensboro Durham 95 40 Raleigh 70 formation about the services available at Goldsboro 77 26 KINSTON LMH, or to arrange a personal newcomNeuseRiver Charlotte New Bern ers tour, please contact the Community Greenville 85 NORTH CAROLINA BroadRiver Relations department by calling 25240 77 95 522-7846. Lenoir Memorial 26 Hospital is Wilmington located at 100 Airport Road in Kinston. Florence SaludaRiver

• Kinston Fire Dept: 252-939-3220 • Kinston Police Dept: 252-939-3161 • Kinston Rescue Squad: 252-522-7895 • Lenoir County Sheriff’s Dept.: 252-559-6100 • Lenoir County Rescue Squad: 252-522-7895 • Lenoir Memorial Hospital: 252-522-7000 • NC Highway Patrol 1-800-441-6127

Log on or stop by

• State Bureau of Investigations: 252-756-4755

Columbia

20

Getting Here

SOUTH CAROLINA

SavannahRiver

Charleston

Mileage

Whether you’re interest is local history or family activities, start your visit by checking out our newly designed website. Complete with dining guides and attraction information, you will discover everything you need to plan your trip. When you arrive in the area we are conveniently located downtown, so be sure to stop in. Our staff will be happy to supply you with brochures, maps, directions and information about current events. 301 North Queen Street •1-800-869-0032

From Kinston to major US cities. New Bern, NC......................................35 Raleigh, NC..........................................78 Wilmington, NC...................................88 Fayetteville, NC....................................97 Myrtle Beach, SC................................160 Kitty Hawk, NC...................................178 Richmond, VA....................................196 Roanoke, VA.......................................245 Charlotte, NC.....................................246 Washington, DC.................................305 Atlanta, GA.........................................469 New York, NY......................................540 Orlando, FL........................................628

Civil War Trails Be sure to stop by the Convention & Visitors Bureau to receive your NC Civil War Trails packet.

www.VisitKinston.com 36


301 N. Queen Street â&#x20AC;˘ Kinston, North Carolina 28501 1-800-869-0032 â&#x20AC;˘ info@visitkinston.com

www.VisitKinston.com

Kinston/Lenoir Co. Visitors' Guide  

The official visitors's guide for Kinston and Lenoir County, North Carolina. Find out what recreational, cultural and travel opportunities a...