Issuu on Google+

NLAW

ISSUE NO. 1 | FEBRUARY 1-7

THE BEST AND THE BRIGHTEST: THE KIDS OF ORANGE COUNTY

NATIONAL LITERACY ACTION WEEK

SCALE Tutors who devote their time to orange county students every week

NC LITERACY CORPS Those who go above and beyond to implement equality everyday

ORANGE COUNTY SCHOOLS Those who teach us something everyday.


Purpose behind National Literacy Action week

On February 1, 1960, four black college freshmen in Greensboro, North Carolina sat at the counter of a local Woolworth store and ordered coffee and pie. They were refused service (blacks were allowed to eat only at lunch counters designated for “coloreds”). The students stayed, occupying the seats until closing. The next day they returned with 26 other students. Their action sparked college protests across the South, bringing students into the civil rights movement in dramatic numbers. Later that year, 120 student sit-in leaders from across the South gathered at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC, and formed the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). SNCC became one of the most effective and creative components of the civil rights movement. (Co/Motion Guide to Youth-Led Social Change)

Many students have asked the question, “Why would people out in the ‘real world’ listen to the voices, actions and opinions of college students?” Perhaps the only sensible response to this question is, “Well, why not?” In a democratic society, people have the rights and responsibility (regardless of their age or other identity) to share information and perspectives that can make that society better. College students have good ideas and important things to say.

The world needs students to share those good ideas! Students have also asked: “What power do we have? Will people listen to us?” History has shown that students are powerful. And people will listen. In fact, college students have always been at the forefront of movements for social change. Students were integral to the success of the Civil Rights Movement, as they organized campuses and participated in Freedom Rides, sit-ins and marches. College students also helped lead the anti-war movement against U.S. military engagement in Vietnam. In the 1980’s, students worked to raise national awareness about hunger and homelessness. Currently, students are leading campaigns to combat sexual assault, racism, to improve access for LGTBQ students, faculty and staff on campuses and in communities.


NLAW WORD SEARCH

ENCOURAGE EQUALITY GAMES LITERACY LOVE PLAY

POWER READING SCALE SCHOOL SHARE WRITING


The Numbers Don't Lie 800

36

43%

MILLION PEOPLE WORLDWIDE ARE ILLITERATE

MILLION ADULTS IN THE US CANNOT READ, WRITE, OR DO BASIC MATH ABOVE A THIRD GRADE LEVEL

OF AMERICANS WITH LOW LITERACY ARE IMPOVERISHED

16.8%

65%

1 in 3

OF PRISON INMATES HAVE LOW LITERACY

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS DROP OUT EACH YEAR

OF US ADULTS AGES 18-24 DID NOT GRADUATE HIGH SCHOOL OR OBTAIN EQUIVALENCY

Stats via literacypartners.org


Opposites Crossword Puzzle

Across

Down

3. old 5. outside 6. left 8. old 9. empty 10. happy 11. cold

1. little 2. fun 4. dirty 7. short 9. slow


FELIX EVANS - AMERICA READS TUTOR

First and foremost I am there for my tutees, as someone they can trust and spend time with." "

The hunger to learn that I see so strongly in my young tutees illuminates, for me, the importance of literacy. So many doors and opportunities are opened to those with literacy skills, and therefore unequal literacy education leads to unequal opportunity. Equality in literacy education equals justice. One of the tactics I always go back to with my students is to constantly affirm their capability to do. When a tutee says the words “I can’t”, I stop what we are doing to tell them that they are smart and good at reading, and I tell them to repeat the phrase “yes I can” three times.

I want to reinforce to the student that they are smart and capable. One girl in particular would constantly say “I can’t” when I asked her to read something or do an activity, but after some time, she stopped saying “I can’t.” One day, after she successfully got through the alphabet, I told her, “that was great reading, do you know how smart you are?” and she beamed and said, “I am ALL the way smart!” Her joy made me realize that teaching literacy is not just about making sure the students know how to read–it is about building a positive mindset towards education and providing the tools needed for students to satisfy their hunger for knowledge, so that they have lifelong access to opportunity.

NO. 1 Why do you think literacy is important?


Alphabet Bingo


Today a Reader, Tomorrow a Leader

RAINY DAY ACTIVITIES Word Fishing

WHAT YOU'LL NEED: Ping pong balls, bug catching nets, painter’s tape, a permanent marker, a plastic tub, and some water STEP 1: Wrap some painter’s tape around the handle of your nets. Write the ending of the word families on each net. Examples: _op, _at, _ack, and _an. STEP 2: Write words for each word family on your ping pong balls. . Examples: STEP 3: Give your child a net and encourage him/her to go fishing for ONLY words that have the same ending sound as the net he/she is holding.

! n u F e v Ha at word family: bat cat fat hat mat pat rat sat

_

ack word family back hack jack lack pack quack sack tack

_

www.icanteachmychild.com

an word family: ban can fan man pan ran tan van

_

op word family: cop hop mop pop top stop drop plop

_


WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE ACTIVITY TO DO WITH YOUR TUTOR?

1

I like to create funny sentences about animals" "

2nd Grade, Carrboro Elementary

-

2

My favorite activity is writing a letter to my favorite character. I like Harry Potter" "

-

3

I like when we get to make our own bookmarks to read with " "

-

4

5th Grade, Holmes Daycare

3rd Grade Estes Hill

When we play soccer and make funny stories as we kick it back and forth " "

-

1st Grade Communiversity


ALL ABOUT

Valentine's Day Every Year, Valentine’s Day is on February 14th. It is a holiday about love. Often times, you will see hearts, doves, and chocolate on Valentine’s Day. Valentine’s Day is a great day to spread love and appreciation to your friends, family, teachers, and service workers, too! You can make them a sweet card, give them a big hug, and even give them a sweet treat." WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO ON VALENTINE’S DAY?

Valentine’s Day Is on ________________. What is something you would give someone on Valentine’s Day ____________. Who should you appreciate on Valentine's Day? ____________________. What is something you would not do on Valentine's Day? _____________________. Is Valentine's Day in November? _______.

QUESTIONS ABOUT VALENTINES DAY


At SCALE, we believe that literacy is more than just reading and writing. Our definition involves critical thinking and action. Increasing literacy skills helps learners achieve their goals and empowers them to be more effective advocates for both themselves and their communities. As a result, literacy is a tool for personal and social transformation and a vehicle for social justice. We promote a participatory, learner-centered approach to literacy in which power in the program and in the classroom is shared with learners, volunteers, and community members. Shared decision making – about lesson content, choice of reading materials, or program evaluation – makes our outreach more relevant to individual and community literacy needs.

Further, to be effective, we address, and invite you to consider, the larger societal contexts of education. How do culture, class, and other “isms” influence our opportunities? Which policies create greater opportunity, and how can we be a voice for those policies? Throughout this site, we aim to provide information and inspiration to college students, program administrators and learners themselves so that together we can address the underlying barriers to literacy.

RE-BALANCING THE SCALE OF EDUCATION

SCALE supports campus - based literacy programs locally , statewide , and nationally . We work with all types of program models , including : America Reads Adult Basic Education Youth Literacy and Mentoring English for Speakers of Other Languages Family Literacy GED Preparation Workplace Literacy Advocacy and Activism . The college students serving in these programs include volunteer / paid tutors or coordinators , AmeriCorps members , VISTA members , and service - learning students .


E

D

U

C

A

T

I

O

N

T

I

M

E

W

E

C

A

R

E

Crystal Yullie's Tutoring Experience ,

After working in the school system

N E H C T K

-

I have a strong new found respect

. Now, don’t get me

for teachers

S

, I’ve always appreciated and

'

wrong

E T N A D

looked up to the teachers in my

, but now, after doing just a

life

F O

small part of what they do every

.

together

D E H P A R G O T O H P

how these books can bring us

Y B

and learn and it s amazing to see

:

. We laugh

on a trip to new worlds

Y E S L E K

if we have both become voyagers

Z I T R O

, but as they open the books and begin to read, it’s as to these children

/

significance of bringing the books

D E L Y T S

, and they all love to read! Sometimes, I forget the them both

Y B

one is characterized by a mix of

:

! While one is outgoing and enthusiastic, another is quiet and demure, still another

N E R U A L

and they re great

R E V O O H

,

school with three amazing kids

/

I serve at Carrboro elementary

"My favorite parts of the sessions are when I can see their creativity manifest in our activities."

Y S E T R U O C

, I see just how much teachers have put into their students, and I’m thankful. day


Sight Word HopScotch This is a fun, interactive outdoors activity that anyone at any reading level can play.

WHAT YOU'LL NEED

List of appropriate sight words

Chalk of your choice

Open side walk or concrete to draw on

DIRECTIONS

In an open and safe area, draw a large hopscotch board for your child. In each blank box, write out one of their sight words. Then allow your child to hop from each tile while calling out the corresponding word. Having your child step on their sight words is a way to engage them in sight word practice and is different than typically reading off a list.

iowareadingresearch.org


- BEAT THE SWEET TOOTH -

INGREDIENTS Children need to be able to refuel throughout the day to maintain energy and focus on academics, and that's where snacking comes in. It's crucial these snacks be health-conscious, as studies show that in states where laws require schools to sell only snacks that meet certain nutrition requirements children gain less weight as they get older. Children may also need to fill in certain nutrient gaps left by meals. Healthy snacks also boost energy, while sugary treats and other junk food can lead to a quick crash and overeating at the next meal.

2 CUPS FRESH BLUEBERRIES , RASPBERRIES , STRAWBERRIES AND SLICED BAN ALL MIXED UP 2 CUPS OF PLAIN OR VANILLA YOGURT 1 / 4 CUP WHITE SUGAR 8 SMALL PAPER CUPS 8 POPSICLE STICKS

. Healthy eating in childhood helps build a foundation for a lifetime of smart choices. Fruits, veggies, whole grains

PROCEDURE

and low-fat dairy products make good snacks. Healthy beverages include low-fat milk, water, soy drinks and 100 percent fruit juices. The majority of snacks should be fruits and vegetables, since most children do not meet the recommended daily servings, and the vitamins in fruits and vegetables are crucial to preventing disease later in life. Sending a healthy, accessible snack along lessens the likelihood a child will turn to vending machines, if they're available. Portion control is also important; a rounded handful of any snack—250 calories or less—is usually an appropriate amount.

HEALTHY AFTER SCHOOL SNACKS JOIN THE BANDWAGON !

Place the mixed blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, sliced bananas, yogurt, and sugar into a blender. Cover, and blend until fruit is chunky or smooth, as desired. Fill paper cups 3/4 full with fruit mixture. Cover the top of each cup with a strip of aluminum foil. Poke a popsicle stick through the center of the foil on each cup. Place the cups in the freezer for at least 5 hours. To serve, remove foil and peel off the paper cup.


T

U

T

O

R

I

N

G

1 0 1

E

D

U

C

A

T

I

O

N

M

A

T

E

T

R

" They teach me something new everyday"

Erica Elliott : Tutor Recently

, my tutees and I

If a student chose to do a card

,

One student in particular wrote

worked on activities for Make A

they d write about one of their

a paragraph on why this person

Difference Day

favorite books or a character on

made her smile and that it was

making cards and bookmarks

the inside and then use the

her duty to do the same for

for people that are important in

outside as decoration

them

would talk about how they

It was truly inspiring to see how

tutees about a person they d like

related to the character and the

serious the students took this

to either recognize or reach out

book and some would use it as a

activity

suggestion of how their targeted

wonderful to see how children

person could get more involved

perceive how to make

. We focused on

. I asked each of my

their lives

’

to

- that way it can be centered

on their ideas of how to make a

. They all had their

'

. Some

. Those who decided

.

. It also was very

’

. It really

difference

in reading

someone s day better

own unique ideas around how to

to do a bookmark used one side

goes to show that little things

make a positive difference in

to write about why literacy is

can make the biggest difference

someone s life and they all

important to them and used the

I am so excited to hear about the

reached out to a variety of

other side for decoration

reactions people got when the

people

Students also included reasons

students gave their recipients

cards to parents and friends

why they believe this person

the cards and bookmarks

while others leaned toward

was important to them and why

’

. Some students wrote

.

teachers and firemen

. The

they deserved to be smiling and

.

having a better day

.

.

S


Homework Help

1

SET UP A HOMEWORKFRIENDLY AREA

4

MAKE SURE KIDS DO THEIR OWN WORK They won't learn if they don't think

Make sure kids have a well-lit place to complete homework. Keep

for themselves and make their own

supplies — paper, pencils, glue,

mistakes.

scissors — within reach.

2

SCHEDULE A REGULAR

5

BE A MOTIVATOR AND

STUDY TIME

MONITOR

Some kids work best in the

Ask about assignments, quizzes, and

afternoon, following a snack and

tests. Give encouragement, check

play period; others may prefer to

completed homework, and make

wait until after dinner.

yourself available for questions and concerns.

3

KEEP DISTRACTIONS TO A MINIMUM

6

PRAISE THEIR WORK AND EFFORTS

This means no TV, loud music, or

Post an aced test or art project on

phone calls. (Occasionally, though, a

the refrigerator. Mention academic

phone call to a classmate about an

achievements to relatives.

assignment can be helpful.)

kidshealth.org


NOT HI NG AS

B AD

T E L L

I S AS

YOU

GOI NG

T O

E VE R T HE Y I T ’ S BE .

SWEET ESCAPE: READING IS EVERYWHERE

Finding time to read is an important part of developing literacy skills for all kids. And there are many easy and convenient ways to make reading a part of each day — even when it's tough to find time to sit down with a book. Car trips, errands, and waits in checkout lines and the doctor's office are all opportunities for reading. Keep books or magazines in your car, diaper bag, or backpack to pull out whenever you're going to be in one place for a while. Even if you can't finish a book, read a few pages or discuss some of the pictures. Encourage older kids to bring favorite books and magazines along wherever you go. While it's tempting to provide electronic games and readers, be sure to alternate electronic media with plenty of opportunities to read traditional print books.

Reading opportunities are everywhere you go. While riding in the car, for example, encourage kids to spot words and letters ( on billboards , store signs , etc .), turning it into a game ("Who'll be the first to find a letter B?"). While shopping, ask your preschooler to "read" pictures on boxes and tell you about them. Point out the difference between the words and the pictures on the boxes. Encourage older kids to tell you what's on the shopping list. Even when you're trying to get things done, you can encourage reading. While cleaning, for instance, you might ask your child to read a favorite book to you while you work. Younger kids can talk to you about the pictures in their favorite books. kidshealth.org


What Do

You Spy?


AmeriCorps is a civil society program supported by the U.S. federal government, foundations, corporations, and other donors engaging adults in public service work with a goal of "helping others and meeting critical needs in the community." Members commit to full-time or part-time positions offered by a network of nonprofit community organizations and public agencies, to fulfill assignments in the fields of education, public safety, health care, and environmental protection. The program is often seen as a domestic Peace Corps. It employs more than 75, 000 Americans in intensive service each year. AmeriCorps connect caring, capable people with students who benefit from their time and personal attention. Millions of people serve to help millions of students succeed. The efforts of Americorps will bring proven national service efforts to schools and communities where students lack the attention and support they deserve. They promise to help all students engage and achieve.


National Literacy

Action Week


NLAW Literacy Magazine 2017