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Midwest Adventuring

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Š 2014 Driftless Magazine. All rights reserved.


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ISSUE ONE | Summer 2014 readdriftless.com

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............. 6 | Flora + Fauna of the Midwest illustration by Diana Sudyka ............. ............................... 8 | Limestone Quarries photos by Leah Fithian .................. .......................... 22 | Lighthouses of the Great Lakes words by anonymous with illustration by Christine Novotny ............................................ 24 | Flatbread Party photographs by Sadie Dempsey ............................................................................. ...................................................28 | Sweet Corn Custard Tart recipe by Danielle Jamnik with illustrations by Amy Lukas ................................................................. ....................... 30 | Artifacts words and photos by Jaclyn R. Wright ....................... 36 | Grand Rapids City Guide words and photos by Jill DeVries .......................... .................. 62 | Summer Seasonals illustrations by Christine Novotny ................ .............................................................................. .... 64 | Siosi Design + Build interview with Audim Culver and Ivy Siosi ........................................................... ............................. 70 | Wild Rice Three Ways recipes and photos by Crystal Neff ................... 76 | A Guide to the Cleveland Art Scene words by Anna Wallace ..... ....................................... 80 | Hmong Village words by Annie Wang ................... ......................... 82 | Summer Grill Out recipes by A Couple Cooks ....................... ................................................................. 92 | The Taste of Home an essay about growing up in Missouri by Lisa Adams .................................................................. ...................... 94 | U-Pick Farms of the Midwest illustration by Amy Lukas ........

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This magazine is for anyone who has ever felt a connection to these Midwestern states, whether in the form of loving someone from them, taking a deep breath on one of their dune shores, cherishing food grown from their soil, or sneaking a swim in one of their many legendary lakes. This magazine is also for anyone who has ever looked down upon these states as merely ‘fly-over’ country and has yet to give them a second glance. We hope the following pages provide a deeper look into the offerings of this amazing part of the country. This magazine is a reminder that creativity can grow anywhere—but that it most certainly thrives here in the Midwest.

CONTRIBUTORS Lisa Adams was raised in the

Midwest and is now a food writer and personal chef in New York City. She posts weekly food and thought on her blog, All Good Things.

Sadie Demsey is a 22-year-old

film photographer from Wisconsin, studying sociology, and gender and women’s studies at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. When she is not taking photographs, she spends her days adventuring, collaging, and making zines.

Jill DeVries is a wedding and commercial photographer based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She can usually be found starting a dance party or eating tacos. Her true passion is travel, but she loves calling the Great Lakes State home. Danielle Klein Jamnik is a graduate of the French Pastry School and a baker at Floriole in Chicago, Illinois. She is inspired by the flourishing talent of the local food industry and by the seasonal produce of the Midwest. Danielle makes her home in the Noble Square neighborhood with her husband and two cats. Crystal Neff spent most of her life

in the Sonoran Desert and reluctantly found herself in the heart of Minnesota in her early twenties. Her reluctance was short-lived, however, and she developed a fondness for “sky-tinted”

waters and Minneapolis’ thriving local art scene. Crystal has since relocated to the west coast, and spends her days working with artists of all kinds, experimenting with vegan recipes, taking photographs, writing, and exploring.

Sonja & Alex Overhiser are the

husband-and-wife team who develop and photograph healthy, whole foods recipes published on their blog, A Couple Cooks. Advocates of fresh, seasonal eating and home cooking, they live and work in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Ivy Siosi & Audim Culver are the owners of Siosi Design + Build, a design/woodworking/art team in Bloomington, Indiana. They fell in love in 2010 and quickly adopted their ascent into the tactical intent to combine history, craft, purpose, and play. Their collaborative practice has since evolved into designing fine furniture, running a business, and finding common obsessions—at the moment, making bows, arrows, and targets. Diana Sudyka is an illustrator and painter from Chicago, who creates book and album covers, screenprinted gig posters, and original watercolors. Anna Wallace was born and raised in Durham, North Carolina. She became an honorary Midwesterner while

attending the Cleveland Institute of Art and fell in love with the rust belt. Anna returned to Durham postgraduation, where she now works, sells, and shows at many of the local arts organizations.

Annie Wang is a freelance food photographer in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She’s the editor of the website Tasteseekers Kitchen and keeps a blog, Frites and Fries. Jaclyn Rose Wright received a BA from Southern Illinois University Carbondale in Cinema and Photography in 2009. In 2013 she was the recipient of the Fine Art Project Grant from Indiana University. Her work has been shown both nationally and internationally, and has been featured on several internet galleries and blogs. In the spring of 2014, she was the Visiting Artist in Residence at the University of Cincinnati. Special thanks to Michele Keehan for her proofreading help; to the amazing, early supporters of the publication: Lisa Adams, Jessica Berndt, Elizabeth Bockstiegel, Kristine Claghorn, Jan and Al Davis, Betty Fry, Glen Furr, Gabrielle Gonzalez, Kristin Londergan, Jason Lukas Judy Mason, Lorraine McClain, Jessica Newlin, Mallory Rickbeil, Gwendolyn Rugg, Katie Sowder, Taylor Swaim, Phi Tran, Kurt Westerhausen, and Wyatt Worcel; and to all future supporters and readers.

Visit readdriftless.com to learn more about our team and these wonderful folks! 4


Leah Fithian Creative Director Shelly Westerhausen Creative Director Jessica Elaine Kleoppel Editor and Designer Christy Deines Editorial Assistant Amy Lukas Illustrator Christine Novotny Illustrator


FLORA + FAUNA of the Midwest illustration by Diana Sudyka

MAPLELEAF VIBURNUM | These shrubs produce small white flowers in the spring and can be found in mixed woods on slopes, bluffs, and ravines. Their leaves have a similar appearance to the maple leaf, hence their namesake.

AMANITA | A genus that contains over 600 species of mushrooms, many of which are poisonous. They account for 95% of mushroom poisoning fatalities. BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER | This bird’s thin and squeaky song is one of the first signs that spring has begun in the Midwest.

RED ADMIRAL | This butterfly usually resides in warmer climates, but migrates north in the spring. It is identified by its red, dark brown, and black wing pattern.

BROAD-BANDED FOREST SNAIL | These land snails are commonly found under dead wood, leaves, limestone, and shale. They typically only come out during night or rainfall.

RED TRILLIUM | These beautiful red and white flowers often smell of rotting meat—they are pollinated by flies.

CHIPMUNK | In addition to their diet of nuts, they also enjoy munching on grass, fruit, buds, small frogs, worms, and bird eggs.

SHOOTING STAR | This showy flower has a tall stem, and leaves at the base.

CONEFLOWER | This perennial sprouts daisy-like flowers that vary in color with dark raised centers.

SPOTTED SALAMANDER | This amphibian is covered in yellow spots that are linked to the symbiotic algae that use them as a host.

LIPSTICK LICHEN | This genus of moss-like lichens is adored by reindeer and caribou as a favorite winter forage snack.

WHITE PINE | The state tree of Michigan is only found in the northern Great Lakes region.

LUNA MOTH | This lime-green moth has a wingspan of up to 114mm, which makes it one of the largest moths in North America.

WOOD THRUSH | This bird is known for its flutelike songs and cinnamon-brown upperparts that are perfect camouflage for forest leaves.

MAIDENHAIR FERN | These ferns are distinctive in appearance with dark stripes—often red—and bright green leaves. They require moist soil, so you’ll most likely spot them near a stream or waterfall.

WOOLLY BEAR CATERPILLAR | An old wives’ tale predicts: the wider the middle brown section of this caterpillar, the milder the coming winter.

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11 x 14 inch archival giclee print of gouache painting by the same name. Originally printed with archival pigmented inks on cotton rag paper.


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LIMESTONE QUARRIES words and photos by Leah Fithian

The abandoned limestone quarries that dot the landscape of south-central Indiana are eerily beautiful places. They have huge sun-warmed rocks to sunbathe on and crystal clear bluegreen waters that delve deep into the earth below, hundreds of feet down in some areas. There are plenty of small fish, algae and other sea grasses, old machinery like abandoned quarry equipment, and the occasional humans swimming and floating around (who are technically illegally trespassing on privately owned property). Each one is unique in not only its surrounding landscapes, but in their personal histories as well. The first commercial quarry was opened in Stinesville, Indiana, in 1827. Because of its extreme durability and high quality, Indiana limestone can be found in the Empire State Building, the Pentagon, the Yankee Stadium, the National Cathedral, the Biltmore Estate, and the Hotel Pennsylvania. Colleges and universities all over the Midwest use Indiana limestone for campus buildings. After the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, Indiana limestone was used extensively to rebuild the city. And recently, there has been more and more interest to turn many of the abandoned water-filled quarries into parks for the public to enjoy. The following 35mm photographs were taken over a number of trips to the quarries one summer in Bloomington, Indiana. The images were created to embody these notions of summer adventure, the immense beauty that lies in the unknown, and to capture the insignificant moments that make you realize just how good you have it. They are representative of not only the memories of dear friends who have now drifted away from the Midwest, but also of the ethereal emotions that overcome you while visiting these places, the fleeting moments of everyday life, and the seemingly endless nostalgia of summers past.

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I Lake Like Michigan Words by Anonymous

We swam into the darkness, but the darkness came to us. Swimming in the shallow until our feet no longer touch the sand. Footprints leading deeper, less rocks and more land than we realize. More plots of men than we recognize. We don’t see the size of the creature that lives beside us. We don’t put one and one together when we listen to it breathing. Lapping up the sand as if it were water, lapping up the sand is the water. Things happen that we do not see occur, on the northern, southern, and western shores. Beings live around us, but we do not see. So we must open the eyes to see this inland field, to swim above the darkness and dive when the time is fit. When the water is calm, and you concentrate, you can see yourself edging at the entrance, calm and collected, breathing towards a reflection.

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FLATBREAD PARTY photographs by Sadie Dempsey words by Shelly Westerhausen and Leah Fithian

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SIMPLE FLATBREAD 1 3/4 cup all purpose flour 1 tsp. baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup water 1/3 cup olive oil Preheat oven to 450°F and place a heavy baking sheet in the middle rack to warm up with the oven. Stir together flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Form a well in the center and pour in the water and oil. Fold the dry ingredients into the wet until a dough forms. Knead dough gently about 5 times on a floured work surface. Divide the dough in three, and roll each piece out on a lined baking sheet, until they are roughly 10” each. Brush with olive oil, and, one at a time, place the dough rounds on the preheated baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake 8–10 minutes, or until slightly browned in spots. Remove from oven and repeat with other two pieces of dough. Top with all your favorite foods, like—fresh cheese, greens, cold-pressed olive oil, pesto, fresh and roasted vegetables, chickpeas, olive tapenade, herbs, and flavored salts.

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It’s that time of year again! Gather your friends, cook up a meal, sit down together, and—just BE.

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Sweet Corn Tart PATE SUCREE adapted from Rose Levy Berbaum’s recipe in The Pie and Pastry Bible

3 Tbsp. evaporated cane sugar 6 Tbsp. unsalted butter 3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 1/2 cup almond flour, toasted 1 tsp. fresh rosemary, minced 1 pinch sea salt 4 tsp. whole milk 1 egg yolk

recipe by Danielle Klein Jamnik

In a food processor, pulse the butter and evaporated cane sugar until incorporated. Add flours, rosemary, and salt; and pulse until the butter is pea sized. In a separate bowl, mix together the milk and egg. Add milk/egg mixture to the food processor and pulse until combined. Empty the crumbly dough onto a piece of plastic wrap and press to form a disc. Refrigerate overnight to allow flour to hydrate (don’t skip this step!). Preheat oven to 350°F. Roll the dough approximetely 1/8” thick and line a 10” tart pan. Trim edges and put into the freezer for 10 minutes. Once dough is firm, remove from freezer and bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Allow to cool before adding custard.

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BUTTERMILK CORN CUSTARD 3 cups heavy cream 1 cup buttermilk 6 ears of corn 3/4 cup evaporated cane sugar (or juice) 2 pinches sea salt 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2 Tbsp. cornstarch Shave kernels of corn off the cobs (and reserve kernels for another project). Place the cobs into a large saucepan along with the milk, buttermilk, sugar, and salt. Bring mixture to a boil and then immediately remove from heat. Cover, refrigerate, and allow to steep overnight. Place egg yolks into a large bowl with the cornstarch and whisk until all the lumps have disappeared. Whisk in milk mixture along with the vanilla and carefully pour into the tart shell. Bake at 300째F for 50 minutes.

HONEY CARAMEL 1/2 cup evaporated can sugar (or juice) 2 Tbsp. water 1 pinch sea salt 1 Tbsp. wildflower honey 1 Tbsp. butter 1/2 cup heavy cream Add all ingredients except for cream to a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Bring to a simmer and let cook until it turns dark amber in color. Remove from heat and gradually whisk cream into pot. Serve alongside tart.

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ARTIFACTS words and photos by Jaclyn R. Wright

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In Japanese culture, the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw, and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put into place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri to keep heavy snow from breaking any weak branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve many aspects of the landscape has always been significant to the Japanese aesthetic. This way of thinking brought up the ways in which different cultures, and individuals, place significance on particular objects and philosophies. Much like an archeologist, I began collecting and cataloging my own personal artifacts as a means of preservation. By approaching this personal subject matter through such a systematic perspective, I have been able to decontextualize and deconstruct the significance of each piece I catalog. The work is carefully balanced between a personal and clinical view. The images are a reference to an anthropological perspective, so that they may, in some sense, become informative of particular social and cultural practices. Through still lifes, the images mimic the ways in which archival information is documented and photographed, so that the subject may accurately represent ‘reality.’

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City Guide

Grand Rapids words and photos by Jill DeVries

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Rowster Coffee | 632 Wealthy Street SE | rowstercoffee.com

I can think of nothing better than a Burundi pour over and a seat in the front window to people watch.

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Rowster is my neighborhood coffee spot and it just feels like home there. The staff is friendly and welcoming, and it’s clear that they truly love coffee and work hard to create an environment where anyone can enjoy it. The menu is simple but satisfying and demonstrates a value of quality over quantity. Be sure to carve out some time in your day for a trip to Rowster. I can think of nothing better than a Burundi pour over and a seat in the front window to people watch.

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Che c ko utt her e s to f I s s ue1bypr e o r de r i ng yo urc o pyt o dayo ve rato ur I ndi e go goCampai gn. Thankss omuc hf o rt aki ng t het i met oc he c ko ut Dr i f t l e s s ,do nat i ng,and s pr e adi ngt hewo r d!


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