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Cover Design â&#x20AC;˘ Maria Surawska Editor in Chief â&#x20AC;˘ Tatyana Safronova Art Director â&#x20AC;˘ Nikita Sorokin Copy Chief â&#x20AC;˘ Whitney A. Harris Listen, Hear â&#x20AC;˘ Caitlin Cremer Stage, Screen & in Between â&#x20AC;˘ Keri Carpenter Around Town â&#x20AC;˘ Stephanie Prather CU Calendar â&#x20AC;˘ Alyssa Vale Photography Editor â&#x20AC;˘ Amelia Moore Designer â&#x20AC;˘ Maria Surawska Photography â&#x20AC;˘ Amelia Moore, Nikita Sorokin Copy Editors â&#x20AC;˘ Matt Albert, Will Kurlinkus Sales Manager â&#x20AC;˘ Mark Nattier Marketing/Distribution â&#x20AC;˘ Brandi Wills Publisher â&#x20AC;˘ Mary Cory

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UNDER THE COVER |1-3| 3 3 3 |4-7| 4 5 | 8 - 10 | 8 8 9 9 9 10

INTRO This Modern World Life in Hell First Things First

AROUND TOWN Beyond Organic Navigating the Windy City

LISTEN, HEAR Senses Fail: Saving the Best for Last A Quick Peek, Cold War Kids Welcome to Dark Meat Concert Review Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Picks CU Sound Review Spin in/Flip it/Reverse it

10 on the web: www.readbuzz.com e-mail: buzz@readbuzz.com | 12 - 13 | THE HOOPLA write: 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 12 The Art of Being Wicked call: 217.337.3801 We reserve the right to edit submissions. Buzz will not publish | 14 | STAGE, SCREEN a letter without the verbal consent of the writer prior to 14 Movie reviews publication date. Buzz magazine is a student-run publication of Illini Media Company and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of | 15, 16, 24 | THE STINGER 15 Doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; it Well the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students.

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J u n e 21

I CANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T HELP IF Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;M AGGRESSIVE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;CAUSE Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;M HALF-VAMPIRE HALF-WEREWOLF.

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tatyana safronova EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTE The most convincing call for abstinence that I encountered in all of my education didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even happen i n a sex ua l education class. It was in freshman-year biology. We, the students, gasped, clenched our teeth and shuddered one morning as we watched two videos: one of a view from inside a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s penis as he ejaculated and one of a birth. The ejaculation managed to gross out many of the guys and the birth looked so painful and so traumatic that a vocal few vowed to never have sex. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; It Well (Stinger, 15) discusses the messages we are fed as kids in school and how students can become more instrumental in their own sexual education. The ineffective fear tactics used in public school to dissuade me from sex, drugs and alcohol remain a lighthearted memory. I remember the beer goggles I had to wear while shooting hoops that were supposed to show me what it was like to be drunk. They had no effect on me because I had never been really interested in drinking, and getting drunk one night was its own deterrent. All I retained from those lessons were anti-smoking slogans, gruesome photos of STDs and, of course, the video of the birth. Sadly, ver y little advice was practical or applicable, and so it went by the wayside. Only once did an actual nurse come to speak to us students about checking ourselves for cancer. The rest of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;educationâ&#x20AC;? was based on scary pictures

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and tales of the doomed fates of the transgressors and, often times, the poor victims close to them. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all seen the films about drug users robbing their families for those extra few bucks to buy more blow. That can be you, the movies say. Practically though, would a video administered in the context of a classroom ever be powerful enough to dissuade you from drugs and sex when stronger factors like boredom, hormones and peer pressure exist? New anti-pot ads recently came out, and they take a 180-degree turn away from those commercials that scare you into believing that if you smoke weed youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll kill someone. The ads are simple line drawings with irresistibly cute music and even cuter scenarios. In one, a guy and a girl are sitting on a bench and the guy lights up. The girl says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not again.â&#x20AC;? Soon, an alien spaceship lands nearby and the little ET guy approaches the couple. When the pot smoker offers ET a joint, the alien refuses, wins the girl and flies away with her on his space ship. Aw! That still seems like a shot in the dark; whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever stopped doing drugs because of a cute commercial? But at least this genre of moviemaking is getting more versatile and creative. Perhaps soon, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be going to the movies for your dose of abstinence messages and DARE. Oh, wait. That seems pretty certain now that the Motion Picture Association of America is considering giving automatic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Râ&#x20AC;? ratings to movies featuring smoking. Find more about the anti-pot commercial here: http:// www.slate.com/id/2168471/nav/tap3/ sounds from the scene


J u n e 21

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buzz weekly •

MY GRANDMA IS COMING INTO THE CITY SATURDAY TO BLEACH MY CAT.

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michael coulter FIRST THINGS FIRST

A POST-FATHER’S DAY TRIBUTE

For those who don’t need a holiday to thank Dad “Don’t call what you’re wearing an outfit, don’t ever say your car is broke, don’t worry about losing your accent, a southern man tells better jokes.” Excerpt from “Outfit” by Drive-By Truckers I can barely remember, but when I was a little kid my dad would take me for a drive every so often on Saturday mornings. It probably wasn’t what some people these days would consider an appropriate trip, but screw a whole lot of some people these days. There was a tiny little country bar a few miles from our house and the two of us would get in the pick up and drive down there when we got up in the morning. We’d pull up a stool at the bar and have a couple of drinks, a couple of Mountain Dews for me, a couple of Busch beers for Dad. I was only about five or six, but even then, there was nothing like having a couple of beers with him. Generally, I’d get to pull up a chair so I could stand on it to see the top of the pinball machine and I’d play a few games while Dad talked to a few guys. After that, we’d get some lunchmeat and a loaf of bread and drive around in the country. I’d still be trying to finish up my soda pop and dad had a can of beer between his legs. We’d listen to old country music from an AM radio station, eat a few sandwiches, and then eventually head back home. I’m fairly sure the speedometer on the truck never got past 30 mph. Then, and even now, it seems like about the best thing in the world. When I realized it was Father’s Day last weekend, the above thought came to my mind for a moment. I looked around a few stores but apparently Hallmark doesn’t make a card for memories such as that. Screw a whole lot of Hallmark, too. I never really felt like I needed a day or a card to tell my dad how I feel about him anyway. He knows. He and Mom came up last Saturday to visit and, I suppose, to celebrate Father’s Day, though they would have come without the holiday. Dad and I ran a few errands, and eventually, as the Coulter men are prone to do, we ended up at a bar. It was about 11 a.m., but the time of day didn’t matter much to either one of us, so we stopped by Huber’s to have a couple of

beers. The bar was pretty empty at that time of day and my friend, Mike, was bartending, so we just sat around and told stories and talked about baseball. Dad and I both had smiles on our faces the whole time. It wasn’t an unfamiliar feeling for me to be sitting at a bar, but I’m seldom, if ever, quite as content as I was that day. If you would have asked me when I was 16 or 25, I would not have picked my dad to be my favorite guy to have a beer with, but these days, I can’t think of another person who would bring me quite so much joy. It’s strange. For a period of time, my dad and I seemed about as different as could be, but as I get older, we get more and more alike. I’d like to think that both of us got smarter somewhere along the line, but I’m not sure that’s the case. I think we just came to understand each other a little better. It’s probably more like that old saying: I can’t believe how much smarter my dad gets as I get older. It’s funny; the amount of time I spend having a couple of beers and talking about things with friends. We talk about families, baseball, work, whatever comes to mind and it is sort of relaxing. I talk about the same things with my dad, but when it’s just us two, it seems a little more special. I’m not sure if he raised me to be so much like him or if I just ended up that way, but I’m happy with the outcome. I put the quote at the beginning because that song is mostly made up of advice that a father is giving his son and it always makes me think of my dad. I won’t list off the advice like the song does because I’m not sure I can recall all that much advice my dad gave me. He often made some suggestions but mostly, he and mom just raised me to recognize good decisions. It doesn’t necessarily mean that I make them on a regular basis, but at least I always know them when I see them. So, instead of a Father’s Day card that someone else wrote, my dad got a George Jones CD, a couple of beers, and some conversation instead. We a lway s sor t of celebr ate Ha l l m a rk holidays like that, but honestly, it wasn’t all that different from any other day. It wouldn’t have felt right getting him some sort of “regular” gift. It’s his day and I’m sure the beer and the conversation were all he really wanted to begin with. It wasn’t even my day, but that’s all I really wanted, too.

OOPS! WE MADE A MISTAKE • Although buzz strives for accuracy, we sometimes make mistakes. If you catch something we didn’t,

please let use know at buzz@readbuzz.com. When a correction is needed, it will be listed here.

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around town opportunity to visit the farm to make a connection with the place their food is grown and see the types of growing practices they use. Many PCSA members say the relationship has gone deeper, though. Ed Kieser, Chief Meteorologist for WILL radio in Urbana, was a PCSA member for several years. He has visited the farm and says his ongoing relationship with the Moores — and their meats and produce — get him excited about talking with the family at the farmer’s market every week. He said the opening day of farmer’s market is “like the opening day of the baseball season” in his household. For Kieser, the Moores are “sort of like family.”

THE MOORE’S FARMING PHILOSOPHY

BEYOND ORGANIC Community Supported Agriculture LAURA SULLIVAN • STAFF WRITER

Bill Stoerger of the Moore Family Farm hands Glenna Rogers of Champaign a bag filled with basil Saturday morning at the Urbana Farmer’s Market. “Their vegetables look the freshest and the healthiest. I’m going to plant the basil on my porch to grow all summer,” Rogers said. PHOTO BY AMELIA MOORE

T

he Iroquois River rose dangerously in January of 2005. And it kept rising. Water covered most of the Moore Family Farm’s 100 acres and then froze into one solid sheet of ice, effectively muting the vibrancy of the Watseka land that had been in the family for nearly 100 years. The situation might have been amendable if it wasn’t followed by an ice storm and a drought. The “biodiversified, regenerative, sustainable farm,” as owner Jim Moore puts it, was at a loss. They had no hay, no grass and no pasture for the free-range, grass-fed animals. The family approached Prairieland Community Supported Agriculture (PCSA), whose members put up money at the beginning of each season for weekly shares of the farm’s produce, and told them they would have to liquidate. That’s when the magic began. Anna Barnes, an organizer of PCSA, gave up work on Fridays to prepare for fundraising bake sales at the Urbana Farmers Market. Phone calls, e-mails and flyers gave way to an outpouring of generosity. A check arrived from Maine from a CSA member’s father. “He said, ‘You keep my grandchildren healthy,’” Diann

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Moore, wife of Jim Moore, recalled. Another check arrived, this time from England, from a member’s sister. Yet another member offered hay at a discount from her family’s stash, which was in high demand during the drought. “It’s humbling,” Diann said. “Some of your customers say, ‘We have to have you. We were George Bailey from It’s a Wonderful Life.” Together the efforts raised $8,000, according to Barnes. The farm was back on its feet but still not back to its original state. The latest study of Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs), conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in July 2005, found 1,144 CSAs in the United States, with 20 listed in Illinois. These CSAs could sustain 270,000 households nationwide, according to the study. Barnes said there are two or three CSAs in the Champaign-Urbana area, PCSA being the first. Community Supported Agriculture can be defined in terms of shared risk and shared joy. Members of a community support a farm financially by putting in a specified amount at the beginning of the season for “shares” of the farm’s produce, which is either delivered or picked up directly from the farm. Often farmers also offer their community support the B ETWEEN | CLASSIFIEDS | THE STINGER | CU CALENDAR

The Moore’s philosophy of farming goes back to an earlier time “when the life cycle was the life cycle,” Diann said. They try to diversify their farm, naturally raising many different breeds of animals and types of plants that all strengthen and contribute to the farm’s larger “macro” system. The grass-fed hogs use their snouts to till the ground where next year’s vegetable crop will be planted. “A pig’s snout is a tiller,” Diann contests. “The rams and billy goats are lawn mowers.” Cutting the grass is not a phrase on the family’s long chore list. The animals graze on a vibrant green “salad bar” of alfalfa, four to seven different types of lettuce, hay and clover. The coop where the laying hens peck around is moved to a different location around the farm on a weekly basis, a few-hour process which requires taking apart and reassembling open-air laying houses and electrical mesh fences for the maximum possible natural fertilization of the earth. The most unusual thing about the farm is found in the air: silence. “These are happy animals,” Diann said. There is also something that is not in the air. When driving to the Moore’s farm, which is about an hour and 15 minutes north of CU, there is a pungent stinging in the nostrils around Buckley, a small town south of Watseka. Diann said that this smell comes from a confinement chicken facility. Despite 1,500 goose-skinned baby chicks arriving by Fed Ex just a few weeks before, there wasn’t much of an odor to mention at the Moore’s. Everything on the farm is raised without any unnatural herbicides or pesticides, an intentional departure from the farming practices the Moores both learned in school at Parkland College and from those farming around them. All they knew was using pesticides, but the Moores said this kind of farming would not work on the small acreage that they had. They were failing financially and reached a point where they were living in a dirt-floor house, all their loans pulled from the bank. It was then that they decided it was “all or nothing.” They decided to diversify. Diann said that her husband already knew many natural growing practices from his grandmother, who lived on the farm for many years. Jim lived down the street, “but was always over at Grandma’s.”

THE RESULTS: AN “ARTISANAL” PRODUCT A staple of the American food system is consistency. Most people expect that when they pick up a head of lettuce at the supermarket one week and pick another up the next week the two will taste the same. McDonald’s has built its empire on consistency of product: A Big Mac in San Francisco tastes the same as a Big Mac in rural Texas. But PCSA members say this leaves out rich variations in the food system. These variations are akin to the difference in different years and growing regions for wine. “Artisanal” products are produced on a small scale, and each batch tastes a little different. “Our fall turkeys taste better than anywhere else. It is more artisanal, like wine and cheese,” Diann said. Adding that slight variations in grass or alfalfa create a different taste, a unique product. sounds from the scene


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buzz weekly •

THIS LOOKS ‘CHOPPED.’

5

NAVIGATING THE WINDY CITY EVANGELINE POLITIS • STAFF WRITER

PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.HOMEPAGES.DSU.EDU

The monotony of the same old sights, sounds and smells of Champaign-Urbana is lowering your spirits. You can hear the city noises calling in the back of your mind; you dream of being surrounded by shiny, glass sky scrappers, and sometimes, early in the morning, you can almost smell Chicago-style hot dogs wafting in through your bedroom window. You know these hallucinations can only be cured by a serious dose of the city. The only problem: you think you can’t afford a trip to Chicago because of pricey hotels and expensive cab rides. You’re wrong. The Amtrak provides an easy and economical solution to your Chicago cravings. Though the early morning train — leaving Champaign at 6:10 a.m. and arriving in Chicago at 9 a.m. — and the late train — leaving Chicago at 8 p.m. and arriving back in Champaign at 10:34 p.m.

— can be pricey, combined with a cheap rate found under the “Hot Deals” part of the Amtrak Web site, you can get to Chicago and back for under $45. These cheap weekly rates (usually $9.90 one way) must be booked ahead of time (usually 10 days) and leave only at certain times — departing from Champaign at 10:14 a.m. and arriving in Chicago at 1 p.m. or leaving Chicago at 4:05 p.m. and arriving in Champaign at 6:15 p.m. This combination leaves you with seven hours to spend doing whatever you love: going to museums, sightseeing or shopping. Plus, you won’t have to spend money on a hotel. But if you do want to invest in staying overnight in the Windy City, check out the local hostels on www.hostelworld.com for beds as cheap as $23.50 a night. Once you arrive at Union Station there will be all sorts of transportation available to you.

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BUFFALO BUFFALO BUFFALO BUFFALO BUFFALO BUFFALO BUFFALO BUFFALO.

J u n e 21

J u n e 2 7 , 2 oo7

A Brown line train and Orange line train contend for the intersection at the southeast corner of the Loop in Chicago. Photograph taken August 26, 2005 from the crossover walkway of the Adams/Wabash stop on the Green, Orange, Brown, and Purple lines by Kelly Martin. PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.WIKIPEDIA.ORG

Plan your “Casino nights” themed party today! 101 E. University Ave • Champaign Phone: (217) 351-5974

Up to 25% off on slot machines! Hey, Lil Linc’n!

Where are you headed off to?

How can you afford to go back and forth so often with These Gas Prices?

But didn’t you just come back?

The three most inexpensive and easiest modes are the free trolleys, the Chicago Water Taxi and the “L”. The free trolleys pick up on Adams Street, right by Union Station, and give you the option of three colorfully and geometrically-labeled routes. The Green Triangle takes tourists to the Art Institute and The Museum Campus: the Adler Planetarium, the Shedd Aquarium and the Field Museum. The Yellow Star trolley goes to Macy’s on State Street, Navy Pier and Millennium Park. And the last trolley route, the Red Circle, takes shoppers down Michigan Avenue. The trolleys run from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. until the beginning of September, with extended hours until 7 p.m. during the Taste of Chicago — June 29 through July 8. The Chicago Water Taxi is the least convoluted way to Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. To get to the taxi, exit Union Station along the river and go north about three blocks. Once you cross Madison Street the stairs to the taxi will be right in front of you. Not only do you have a

direct route to shopping (only one stop is made at LaSalle Street), you also get to see the city from a unique vantage point, and with a fair of only $4 for the entire a day, it’s well worth it. The water taxis run from 7 a.m. to about 7 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. to 6:20 p.m. on Saturday, and 10:35 a.m. to 5 p.m on Sunday and holidays (this is tentative). Finally, there is the “L” (the train system given its name because it is “elevated” off the ground). The “L” can take you practically anywhere in Chicago for about $4 for a roundtrip. If you want to catch an afternoon baseball game, take the Red line north to Addison for a Cubs game or South to 35th for a Sox Game. You can also gain access to all the trendy North Chicago neighborhoods like Wicker Park, Lake View, Lincoln Park and Wrigleyville by catching the northbound Red, Blue or Brown lines. So let your daily routine in CU bore you no more, and take a trip to Chicago.

Chicago-Got tickets to the Rabid Monkeys concert! You can’t get a better deal than that!

Yeah, Free! With LEX, your 7th Ride is on them!

Easily, when you ride a LEX bus for free

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listen, hear

Check out the calendar of page 22 for the entire schedule of music acts at the TASTE OF CHAMPAIGN!

SENSES FAIL:

Saving the Best for Last ALYSSA VALE • STAFF WRITER

June 22 at the Canopy Club, 708 S. Goodwin, will feature the tail end of an intensely long and vigorous tour for Senses Fail. “Yeah, we’ve been on tour for like almost a year,” said lead singer Buddy Nielsen, whose voice is coarse and is per iod ica l ly inter r upted by a f it of short yawns. Still Searching, the band’s second fulllength album, debuted eight months ago and has given the band a lot of hard work associated with its promotion. June 29 will mark their last concert on this headlining tour and the beginning of a much-needed break. “We basically have the whole summer off,” Nielsen said with newfound energy, “We’re gonna do a re-release, so what we’re doing is writing a couple new songs for the record. It’s gonna have a DVD, new songs, cover songs ...” When asked about the direction he hopes his new songs to follow, his answer is certain and straightforward. “I wou ldn’t rea l ly k now how to answer that because we haven’t started writing songs yet. That’s kinda one of those things you have to figure out when you start the process,” Nielsen said.

As for the current status of their songs, Senses Fail’s latest video of their single “Can’t Be Saved” has received some interesting and well deserved attention. “It was just a little way to try and do something different,” Nielsen said in laughter. Well, different is exactly what they got. The conflicting reviews caused Senses Fail bassist Mike Glita, to make a comment of it on their Web site where he said, “I know there have been a lot of mixed reactions from what I’ve seen, but I can assure all of you that the video really does make sense to the song if you really think about it and pay attention.” The very abstract video can be seen on the band’s MySpace page and is worth taking a close look at. As a whole, their attention, press, and fan base has grown tremendously in the last year. It’s hard to believe Nielsen is now 23 when not long ago he was just a senior in high school playing in a band. “I realized that everything else was gonna suck, and I was like ‘I gotta do this. I love this. There’s nothing else I wanna do and I totally don’t want to go to college,’” he said. Well maybe Nielsen is living his dream, but he still has one more prospect in mind. “Do you know what my ultimate life goal would be? To own the New York Yankees.” The concert this Friday will feature special guest and hardcore sensation From Autumn To Ashes as well as Inept. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. and tickets are $16.50 in advance. Come on out and pay tribute to a band making one last stop in CU before their well-deserved break.

PHOTO COURTSEY OF FRONTIERTOURING.COM

A QUICK PEEK IN THE LIFE OF A BONNAROOER

and a chat with Cold War Kids STAN MCCONNELL • STAFF WRITER

I was at Press Orientation at Bonnaroo’s media tent when I got a call from the Matt Maust, bassist and general ambassador of cool for Long Beach band Cold War Kids. Originally scheduled for a phone interview, I asked Matt if he wanted to meet. Soon enough, we were in his dressing room sharing beers and tales from the road. Having just arrived at the 700-acre farm turned fest, Matt was still surveying the often-called utopian that is Bonnaroo. Seeing his dry mop, his dusty black shoes and sweat-stained v-neck— default uniform for the Cold War Kids — I informed him of the free Garnier shampooing station, one of my most curious finds on the grounds. Like myself, the Cold War Kids had trouble entering the festival — rental car troubles and traffic delayed their arrival until a couple hours before they were slated to perform. Maust, drinking his pale ale while sprawled out on the couch, appeared calm and went on to expound on the nature of life on the road. “When I perform, I like to yell the lyrics,” Maust said. “But you also have to be an actor because you are playing

the same songs every night. Like “Hang Me Up To Dry” ... I don’t really want to play it tonight, but when you are on the stage, you never know.” After a few minutes, the band went on to play about an hour set, slightly longer than they are used to. They played two brand new songs, freshly written from sound checks while on tour in Europe. According to Maust, in order to be able to write while sound checking, “you have to train yourself to think that you’re not sound checking, to just ignore everything.” During the opening bass cranks of “Hang Me Out To Dry”, one of the Kids’s last tunes, Maust looked down at me (he let me linger backstage for the show) and began an obligatory strut around the stage, poignantly and precisely providing the crowd with explosive, blues-tinged rock. When the lead singer cried the refrain into the microphone, Matt helped engage the tent by howling the words to the sky, “too, too, too many times.” For the future, the Cold War Kids will be opening up for the upcoming leg of The White Stripes American Tour. Psh, as if they didn’t have enough fun at Bonnaroo. TOP PHOTO COURTSEY OF SPINNER.COM BOTTOM PHOTO COURTSEY OF POPWATCH.EW.COM

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WELCOME TO DARK MEAT

You Are Free To Dance About The Area KEN BEAVER • CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Lights, costumes, body paint ... perhaps a bassist wearing a dress paired with a Viking helmet. Sounds like a recipe for a fun show, or rather, a Dark Meat show. Dark Meat, a 13-23 piece psychedelic rock band with dancers and horns and two drummers, will be visiting Mike ’n Molly’s on Wednesday, June 27. In an interview with TinyMixTapes. com, bassist Ben Clack said that Dark Meat tastes like “clouds and butterfly wing filaments.” In other words, a band that tastes exotic, a band that tastes differently than your average Joe band. Clack also said that Dark Meat is a group of close friends that simply love to make music together — sounds delicious. In an interview with the buzz, Clack said he met singer/lead guitarist Jim McHugh roughly 10 years ago in North Carolina when the idea of Dark Meat began to flutter around in their heads. The creation of Dark Meat truly flew while under the influence of an Olivia Tremor

Control concert deep in the Georgian woods. “Everybody was on acid and mushrooms and stuff. We just saw how good psychedelic music could be and how we could do that, too,” Clack said. “We started out with four [members], and after like the third or fourth practice, we just started inviting more people over to play and started flushing out different sounds, and the band just grew.” Clack is the catalyst for much of the visual presentation now associated with Dark Meat. He cites Robert Rauschenberg’s performance art and past involvement with “anarchy theatre people” as primary influences. “I was just really into free expression that takes place in public spaces and not being afraid to really stretch out your imagination — not hold that in. It was just about having fun and getting out of your head.” The music itself is difficult to classify. I guess that’s what you’d expect from a band influenced

by Black Flag’s Greg Ginn, Sandy Denny, and free-jazz composer Albert Ayler. “We want to take people away from their dayto-day lives and really get them to start thinking about what’s inside, whether it be good or bad,” said Clack. Right now, Clack is listening to Drakkar Sauna, who he descr ibes as if they would be backing up Shel Silverstein or as “heavy, tripped-out, free form noise stuff ” from Japan. The song writing of Dark Meat is done largely by McHugh; but, as you’d expect from a band of this size, the creative process is largely communal and reflects the personalities of each member of the group. “Everybody is just kind of feeding off of each other. That’s sort of what our music is about. It’s just about our friendships.” The cover of Dark Meat’s first album, Universal Indians, channels a ’60s commune, similar to the way the band functions as a unit. Even money

is shared and put into the band — no one goes without anything they might need. They also happen to travel in a 15-person van. “It really works. You’ve got to get along, so everybody kind of pushes out the little ego things, kind of loses their natural form of self and just realizes they’re part of this thing.” Bringing back the psychedelic aura of the Olivia Tremor Control show, Dark Meat enjoys a good audience that likes to dance — freely. “We ju st t r y to g o for a f u l l sen sor y experience, to turn it into this really interactive thing. We’re kind of just barely steering the ship. If you want to cover yourself in body paint and look crazy, do it.” Summer nights are made for this kind of stuff. So strip down, paint on, and head over to Mike ’n Molly’s, 105 N. Market St., on June 27, say around 8 p.m. — I’ll be hiding in the bushes flashing pictures. Hah, just kidding.

CONCERT REVIEW:

The Show Must Go On Tour ALYSSA VALE • STAFF WRITER

On Tuesday, June 12, Canopy Club, 708 S. Goodwin, hosted the kick-off of “The Show Must Go On Tour.” The lineup featured Chicago band Powerspace, who opened the concert, followed by Brighten, From First To Last, and ended with the post-hardcore and mainstream friendly Hawthorne Heights. The main event, Hawthorne Heights, may be what brought the fans, but the introduction is what got the crowd excited. My experience at concerts may not be worldly but is cultured enough to say that opening bands are not what most people come for. For the stragglers who decided to attend this concert later than 7:30 p.m., you missed the show. Powerspace began their short set in a mad frenzy of excitement, and the energy of the small and timely crowd was only a

PHOTO COURTSEY OF JUNEROCK.COM

EDITOR’S PICKS:

mirror of their performance. Powerspace is a lesser known band that has only just recently signed with indie record label Fueled By Ramen. Their first full length album, The Kicks Of Passion, is set to hit stores July 31. But for now, their claim to fame is still “Right On, Right Now,” a song featured on their last EP and likely to return on their new album. This song gained the crowd’s respect, but that’s not to say by any means that it was their only good song. I asked the sometimes complicated question of how the band would describe their sound. What I got was a mixed and comic answer from a couple of happy-go-lucky boys just barely out of their teens. Lead singer Alec Cyganowski began by saying, “Um, hmm ... intergalactic ...”

“Dino-core!” guitarist Tom Schleiter finished, an amused grin on his face. While I’m not sure what they meant by their description, I can refer you to their MySpace page (myspace.com/powerspace), which portrays a rock/pop and new wave band. For now, Powerspace is unsure of what tour they’ll be on next or what their future holds, but they are sure of one thing — where they want their first album to take them. “Straight to the top!” said Cyganowski, who is hopeful. I am, too. Let’s face it. They won me over. Powerspace finished their stretch, and, as if the element of surprise wasn’t existent enough, Cyganowski ended their last song with a backflip — an interesting way to conclude their set at a concert that really was completely backwards.

roots, yet still reminiscent of punk-rock at times — it sounds crazy, but it works. Manu Chao, as heard this past weekend in Tennessee, is highly influenced by his Spanish and French roots, and can be considered anything from funky reggae to pop rock (with some sophistication, I assure you). Personally, I would say some of his stuff is just so-so, but when he does get it, he gets it good. Apparently, a new album is to be expected from Manu Chao this fall, and you can hear (for

free!) his new hit “Welcome to Paradize” on his Web site. The song is colorful, to say the least. Finally, I feel that no World Music selection would be complete without the Granddaddy of them all, Ravi Shankar. The Essential of Ravi Shankar is utterly complete in his sparkling, singing citar, while modestly appealing. I fall asleep to it on most nights, and on these nights, I not only sleep well, but I dream well, too. It must be magic.

WORLD MUSIC

CAITLIN CREMER • MUSIC EDITOR

This week in the world of music, I would like to draw your attention to, well, World Music. First and foremost, my favorite at the moment is a group hot from Brazil, by the name of Brazilian Girls. Their latest album, Talk to la Bomb, is filled with funky beats and off the wall lyrics. Their music ranges in classification from some reggae, some pop, but mostly electronic. Love it. The following artist I particularly enjoy, The High Llamas

sounds from the scene

(made in England), have some retro ’60/70s rock influence, yet still make everything they do seem fresh by their electronic take on what once was Steely Dan’s Aja. Also, their music is light-hearted and by the end of a song, I’m just waiting for one of them to say cheerio, unfortunately, it never happens ... Next on the list is Tarika. Their most recent album, Beasts, Ghosts, and Dancing with History, is FILLED with energy. Their buoyant, yet tightknit melodies are derivative of their Madagascan

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WELL, THERE ARE NO NON-FICTION NOVELS. EVERYTHING HERE THATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOT A NOVEL IS NON-FICTION.

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cu sound revue MIKE INGRAM I=J?JC'&

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Cameron Mcgill And What Army HIPPUS CAMPUS 5.30-7.30 PM

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FREE OUTDOOR

STREETFEST!

The Taste of Chain Restaurants of CU Returns! Watery Domestic, the band fronted by married couple Seth and Rachel Hubbard, has a new, self-titled EP available at live shows and through the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MySpace page (myspace.com/ waterydomestic). The band has gained quite a bit of popularity in the last year, being chosen to play the Great Cover Up (and covering local band Headlights), along with playing several great shows. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll anchor tonightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show at the Canopy Club, 708 S. Goodwin, playing with Coco Coca, The International Theatre of War, Imaginary Numbers, Adam K, and Bloomington band Ohtis. The show starts at 8 p.m. and is only $5, which math wizards everywhere will tell you is less than one dollar per band. I checked â&#x20AC;&#x201D; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right. Also in Urbana, the Iron Post, 120 S. Race St., will run with a 9:30 p.m. start time for an Ear Doctor show. No word on the cover, but it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be too much, and it will be worth it to catch a very good experimental jazz outfit. Across the stripe, Cowboy Monkey, 6 E. Taylor St., will hold a funkier aff air with Chicago Afrobeat Project (picking up new fans with every show) and local band Mhondoro (specializing in the music of Zimbabwe) at 9 p.m. with music going all night â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $6 gets you in. Aroma CafĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly music series, 118 N. Neil St., will continue on tonight as well with sets from Megan Johns and David Newbould. 8 p.m., no charge. CU native son Cameron McGill will make another welcome stop in Champaign on Friday â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this time playing with his full band (Cameron McGill & What Army) and the string quartet the Quartet Offensive. This should make for a very interesting set from the songwriter who is sitting on two new records. Expect to hear several new songs along with some older material. Openers include local band Darling Disarm, fronted by Kayla Brown (and feature the amazing lead guitar chops of this writer);

Chicago-based w.w.lowman; and Columbia, Mo. band Caulfield and the Magic. Show time is 9:30 p.m. with a $7 cover charge. Elsewhere on Friday, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a free show from John McMahon at the Embassy Tavern in Urbana, 114 S. Race St. (7 p.m.), and Corn Desert Ramblers at the Iron Post for $5 (9:30 p.m.), or you can join angry teenagers from around the state at the Canopy Club for the shit-fest that is Senses Fail with From Autumn To Ashes and Inept. Speaking of shit-fests, this weekend brings us another Taste of Champaign-Urbana. Let us all stagger through the heat to see which chain restaurants have paid a ridiculous amount to serve up bad food to a crowd of people who have apparently never seen a Dominoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get me wrong â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I love the idea of the Taste â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the execution that has been increasingly horrendous in the last few years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great that they showcase a good amount of local music in various tents, giving many acts some deserved exposure, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t excuse what has happened to the food selection. Apparently, the price and the hassle involved in having a tent has just become too much for most local eateries, which seems to be against the whole point. Last year, the number of chain places outnumbered the actual local shops. Luckily, there are still a few bright spots that keep hanging in there â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as of last year, Curtis Orchard still had a huge space where you could load up on apple donuts; One World Pizza showed that specialty pizza doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop at BBQ chicken; and Dippinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dots, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ice Cream of the Futureâ&#x20AC;?, is still available in the here and now. Drop by West Side Park, 400 W. University Ave., this weekend and see for yourself if the people in charge actually got their shit together this year. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there, you can catch many local bands live like elsinore (Saturday, 3 p.m.) and Dennis Stroughmatt (Saturday, 4:30 p.m.) for free. Following their Taste of CU performance, elsinore will move over to the Cowboy Monkey for a show with openers Death Ships and Chicago-based band The Johns. Start time is 10 p.m. with a $5 cover.

Mhondoro makes another appearance this week with a 6 p.m. performance at the Iron Post on Saturday. They will be followed by a late show with Big Grove Zydeco. Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big news is the reunion show for Imaginary Posse at Mike â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Mollyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 105 N. Market St. The show will be in the beer garden, weather permitting, and the Chemicals will open. Go time is 8 p.m. Champaign-to-Rochester, N.Y. transplant Keith Harden will return to town again this weekend, and as usual heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be playing a few shows. Catch him at the Iron Post on Sunday evening (8 p.m.) on the patio. The Champaign location of Biaggiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant, 2235 S. Neil St., has taken the reins from Silvercreek as a fi ne dining establishment that offers live music in an intimate setting. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve begun a biweekly series (on Tuesdays) featuring local musicians playing on the patio. Ryan Groff played the fi rst night to a full space; and this week, Kayla Brown and little old me will be playing from 6-8 p.m. The next time you stop by Biaggiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, check out their summer schedule to see if there is a performer or two that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see. The shows are free apart from the whole eating dinner thing. Tuesday nights bring back Guitar Hero to the giant projector screen at Cowboy Monkey from 5 to 10 p.m. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right, you can play Guitar Hero down at the front of the stage in front of an eight-foot screen with the music pumping through the house system. Pretty awesome and free. Local indie-popsters, Headlights, along with the Beauty Shop and Shipwreck, will lend their sizeable draws to a show for new Nicodemus Agency band Dark Meat (a huge group featuring members of Neutral Milk Hotel and Elf Power) on Wednesday night at Mike â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Mollyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. See what all the fuss is about at 8 p.m. in the beer garden. Next week: Ian Shepherd returns with a new band, and artists come together for a great cause â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Invisible Children. Mike Ingram can be reached at forgottenwords@gmail.com

SPIN IT ROUND, FLIP IT AND REVERSE IT

The Great Outdoors and Eight Dollar Beers BRIAN MCGOVERN

:K:GNIJ:H96N

GUITAR HERO NIGHT

â&#x20AC;˘ STAFF WRITER

Summer in Chicagoland has proven fruitful thus far. I learned to walk around with my mouth closed with the unpredictability of cicada fl ight patterns coincidentally at the same time, for instance. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always taken full advantage of the great live music. Last weekend I went to the Taste of Randolph, one of the million neighborhood festivals in and around the city, where I got to see New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Walkmen. One of my favorite bands, The Walkmen played a great set fi lled with old and very new material; crowd favorite currently untitled, referred to as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Moon,â&#x20AC;? showed a lot of promise for their next record. The highlight of the afternoon wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any performance on stage but the drunk dude next to my friend, RJ, and I. Designer jeans and pointed toe leather boots complemented his dirty, sleeveless University of Michigan T-shirt perfectly. The look was brought together by his 10 year post-collegiate beer belly and Lance Armstrong sunglasses. Overall he had an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about the bike/I miss my frat,â&#x20AC;? vibe going on.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Man bra, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting up with you guys,â&#x20AC;? he slurred as he pushed up to the guard rail where we stood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You guys, these guys are going to rock.â&#x20AC;? Suddenly the place started to smell like Kamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on a Thursday night and I got caught up in the most ridiculous music-related conversation Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had in a long while. Without any sort of logical transition, he started talking about how much Pearl Jam embodied Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n Roll (fi st in the air). Tolerating this 30-somethingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant I brought up how I was seven when their fi rst big single came out and hoped the conversation would fi zzle from there. When I think of the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s, I like to think of Pavement and Modest Mouse, not who I consider was the gateway for Puddle of Mudd and Co. to destroy radio. Maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the jean shorts and disgusting hair but I could never get totally into grunge. It might also be because old sunburned dead beats like to bust out lighters when they hear â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jeremy.â&#x20AC;? Unsatisfied with his failed attempt to connect with youth, he moved on to Rhymefest (?!) and The Roots and then came to my two least favorite bands in the world; Red Hot Chili Peppers and Tool. Moments before this all happened, RJ and I talked

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about how I only seem to have music conversations with people that really like Tool and how frustrating it is. They wear the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toolâ&#x20AC;? shirt, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shower, they have weird soul patches. As much as I love totally inaccessible time signatures and deadly amounts of pretension, Tool is not my thing and this guy was not having it. A wasted guy with little knowledge in a particular subject is a surprisingly unpersuasive arguer. After losing the battle of Tool, he thought he could convince me that â&#x20AC;&#x153;THA PEPPERS MANâ&#x20AC;? were a great band. When someone doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like a band because all their songs sound the same and someone else likes them for the same reason you get a heck of a conversation. After a series of â&#x20AC;&#x153;yeah man, no manâ&#x20AC;? exchanges, the concert started. In the end, I enjoyed the experience. From neighborhood block parties to f lea markets and street festivals, drunken people always seem to entertain more than the live music and deep fried food ... sigh ... I miss college. Brian McGovern is really good at disliking things and can be reached at brianmcgo@gmail.com

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EARTH IS THE GREATEST PLANET IN THE WHOLE WORLD!

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FEATURED EVENTS

THIS WEEK AT

The Lion in Winter Ostensibly, the family of Henry II has gathered together to celebrate the Christmas of 1183 at a castle in Chinon, France. In reality, each family member is there to promote his or her own interests in determining who should rule England. This classic comedy/drama has served as a magnet to attract great actors to the roles of Henry II and his estranged wife, Queen Eleanor—everyone from Peter O’Toole and Katharine Hepburn to Patrick Stewart and Glenn Close to Summer Studio favorites Anne Shapland Kearns and Steven M. Keen. Saturday, June 23 at 8pm; Thursday, June 28 at 7:30pm; Sunday, July 1 at 7pm; Thursday, July 5 at 7:30pm; Sunday, July 8 at 7pm; Tuesday, July 10 at 7:30pm; Friday, July 13 at 7:30pm; Wednesday, July 18 at 7:30pm; Sunday, July 22 at 7pm; Tuesday, July 24 at 7:30pm; Friday, July 27 at 7:30pm Studio Theatre Tuesday-Saturday: $18 / SC & Stu 15 / UI 10 Sunday: $15 / SC & Stu 12 / UI 10 Bus Stop By William Inge Peter Reynolds, director Pulitzer-Prize-winning playwright William Inge’s classic comedy about the vicissitude of love and life is played out in one day at a remote Kansas diner. A group of disparate and somewhat desperate travelers are held hostage by a raging blizzard. During their journey together, some find compassion, some find understanding, and some even find love.

K R A N N E RT C E N T E R F O R T H E P E R F O R M I N G A RT S

Th Jun 21

Sa Jun 23

Su Jun 24

Krannert Uncorked 5pm, free

Illinois Summer Youth Music

Pasta, aka The Carmone Brothers Italian Food Products Corp.’s Annual Pasta Pageant 7pm, $10-$15

Bus Stop 7:30pm, $10-$18 Summer Solstice Celebration 9:30pm, free Starlab opens at 4:30pm Supported by the College of Fine and Applied Arts.

Senior Chorus 10am, free Senior Orchestra 12pm, free Senior Concert Band 1:30pm, free Senior Symphonic Band 3pm, free

Fr Jun 22

At Smith Memorial Hall: Advanced Piano Camp 10am, free

Bus Stop 7:30pm, $10-$18

Musical Theatre 2pm, free The Lion in Winter 8pm, $10-$18

Thursday, June 21 at 7:30pm; Friday, June 22 at 7:30pm; Wednesday, June 27 at 7:30pm; Saturday, June 30 at 8pm; Saturday, July 7 at 3pm and 8pm; Thursday, July 12 at 7:30pm; Sunday, July 15 at 7pm; Tuesday, July 17 at 7:30pm; Friday, July 20* at 7pm; Saturday, July 21* at 7:30pm; Thursday, July 26 at 7:30pm; Sunday, July 29 at 7pm *Benefit performance

U of I Summer Jazz Band 7:30pm, $2-$6 Pasta, aka The Carmone Brothers Italian Food Products Corp.’s Annual Pasta Pageant 7:30pm, $10-$18

Tuesday-Saturday: $18 / SC & Stu 15 / UI 10 Sunday & Matinee: $15 / SC & Stu 12 / UI 10

333.6280 8 0 0 . K C PAT I X

Patron Season Sponsors Dolores and Roger Yarbrough

Marquee performances are supported in part by the Illinois Arts Council— a state agency which recognizes Krannert Center in its Partners in Excellence Program.

Intermezzo Breakfast, lunch, supper, dessert 7:30am-3:30pm on non-performance weekdays 7:30am through performances on weekdays 90 minutes before and through performances on weekends

Th Jun 28

Interlude Cocktails and conversation 90 minutes before and through performances Now open at 4pm Thursday and Friday!

Krannert Uncorked with Kevin Hart Jazz Quintet 5pm, free

The Promenade Gifts, cards, candy, and more

We Jun 27 Bus Stop 7:30pm, $10-$18

The Lion in Winter 7:30pm, $10-$18

Studio Theatre

sounds from the scene

Tu Jun 26

Enjoy Krannert Center to the fullest!

10am-6pm Monday-Saturday One hour before to 30 minutes after performances

Corporate Power Train Team Engine

40˚ North and Krannert Center, working together to put Champaign County’s culture on the map.

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The Art of Being SYD SLOBODNIK â&#x20AC;˘ STAFF WRITER

CBOE THPPEXJOBWFOVF

d e k c i W

Turn it up!

If there is any question from doubting theatre goers why one of the longest running shows in Chicago has found its home at the Ford Center for the Performing Arts Oriental Theatre, one only has to see Stephen Schwartz and Winnie Holzmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remarkably entertaining Wicked. Based on the novel by Gregory Maguire, with music and lyrics by Schwartz, Wicked is the imaginative reworking of the back story of The Wizard of Oz. It details the lifelong friendship and confl icts between the misunderstood Elphaba, the Wicked Witch of the West, and Glinda, the Good Witch. What is the secret to Wickedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phenomenal theatrical magic? The musical is a visual theatrical spectacle with strong central characters familiar to all audiences who have seen the cultural iconic fi lm, but it also weaves an intriguing visceral narrative that creatively restructures the known charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; motives. Elphaba is not an evil person, and instead we learn that she has been victimized by her appearance and the circumstances of her life. Wicked is a story of female empowerment and self-realization. The musical features central characters who are female and whose goals and aspirations directly affect the plot and storytelling structure. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about friendship, competition, jealousy, cattiness and reconciliation. The fi rst act fi nale, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Defying Wicked collage by Amelia Moore. IMAGES COURTESY OF WICKEDTHEMUSICAL.COM Gravity,â&#x20AC;? features Elphaba in fl ight discovering her full powers just before sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s invited to meet the great Wizard of Oz. Women and girls of all ages will enjoy this show. Wicked is an appealing tale of wish fulfi llment with moments of heartbreak and love. Anyone who enjoys good fairytales will be attracted to how Wicked tells the story of Elphaba wishing to be understood for the person she is and hoping to fi nd the love of the handsome Fiyero, who unfortunately has promised himself to Glinda. Toward the end of the fi rst act, Elphaba painfully realizes her wish for love may never come true in the touching song, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Not That Girlâ&#x20AC;?. Wicked also offers a thoughtful consideration of the issue of prejudice and why people seem to misunderstand and treat those who are different with malice. The completely green Elphaba is shunned initially by her father for her odd appearance, and later she becomes an outcast in school. Because Oz forbids his animals to speak and wishes to confi ne most to cages, Elphaba champions the cause of her learned professor who is a goat. Finally, Wicked is an effective example of musical comedy by the creative talent of six-time Tony Award nominee Stephen Schwartz and directors Joe Mantello (a two-time Tony winner) and Wayne Cilento. People who remember Schwartzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s songs from â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s shows like Pippin and Godspell, to his work in animated fi lms like Pocahontas and Hunchback of Notre Dame, will thoroughly enjoy Wickedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memorable tunes like â&#x20AC;&#x153;No One Mourns the Wicked,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Popularâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Defying Gravityâ&#x20AC;?.

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For those who have yet to discover the magic of Wicked its present production continues in an open ended run at the Ford Center for the Performing Arts Oriental Theatre, 24 West Randolph Street in Chicago. Ticket information can be found at the Broadway in Chicago Ticket Line at (312) 902-1400 or online at www.wickedthemusical.com/chicago.

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Erin Mackey as Glinda and Dee Roscioli as Elphaba in the Chicago company of Wicked. PHOTO COURTESY OF JOAN MARCUS

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stage, screen & i n b e t w e e n

MOVIE REVIEWS

PARIS, JE T’AIME JEFF GROSS • STAFF WRITER

R

Paris, Je T’Aime (Paris, I Love You) is one feat of a f ilm. It’s a bold collection of short films that dare to tackle the complex, multifaceted concept known as love in variously different ways. And what better way to discuss love across the world than to gather worldwide talent and set it in the city of love? Paris, Je T’Aime is a collection of 18 short films from 18 different writers/ directors that range in style, talent, and fame. From Vincenzo Natali (Cube) to Alfonso Cuaron (Children Of Men) to Wes Craven (A Nightmare On Elm Street), a variety of actors/actresses — including Elijah Wood, Natalie Portman and Steve Buscemi (is it me, or is he in every movie?) — come together to make an incredible movie. Given that there are 18 shorts in the film — and I’m only allotted 300 or so words — it’s difficult to review the film at a micro-analytical level. As an overall product, however, the film gets a solid three stars from me. The brief but meaningful shorts provide insightful, metaphorical explanations and descriptions about love. Some specific shorts that stood out were those of directors Vincenzo Natali, The Coen Brothers, Gus Van Saint, Alexander Payne, Isabel Coixet, and Sylvain Chomet. Chomet’s piece (one about two French mimes) was by far the best short in the collection. It was pure avant garde style and humor, much in the vein of Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Alas, not all of the shorts are of as high of a quality as the aforementioned ones. A few are just obnoxiously pretentious while some are just plain boring. The first few shorts in particular are quite, for a lack of a better word, bad. Don’t let the film’s slow start turn you away, however, as the shorts quickly get much better. It’s a perfect date film with plenty of that romantic crap. It’s also a good one for all you artsy folks out there.

Acting is a piece of cake when you have the hypnotizing talent of the cast of Paris, Je T’aime. PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.ROTTENTOMATOES.COM.

FANTASTIC FOUR: RISE OF THE SILVER SURFER CLIFF WHITE • STAFF WRITER

DOA: DEAD OR ALIVE PAUL PRIKAZSKY • STAFF WRITER

PG-13

There is a strong correlation between the amount of clothing worn in DOA: Dead or Alive and the movie’s level of intelligence — and that’s next to nil. It’s new-age exploitation for someone like Quentin Tarantino, who has probably already seen it twice. This kind of smut typif ies Showtime on demand, but at the multiplex? Give me a break. Based on a video game, or next month’s issue of Maxim, DOA features Jaime Pressly, Devon Aoki and Holly Valance as scantily clad heroines evoking various degrees of ass-kickery, jiggling their way through a martial arts tournament on a mysterious island — who cares? Bikinis... DOA is a male masturbatory fantasy. If you’re into girl-ongirl, stylized violence, and lack of substance, you could do a lot worse. Disregarding any male’s carnal instincts, there’s not a single redeeming quality to be found. Guilty pleasure? Sure. It’s escapist entertainment at it’s finest, and maybe that’s the biggest letdown. Leaving the cinema and not coming home to Jaime Pressly decked out in Daisy Dukes is a downer and makes the experience a little bittersweet. But in reviewing DOA I’ve wasted too much breath and used a dozen words that much of the cast and crew have and probably will never hear or be cognizant of. People beating the hell out of each other is more entertaining on UFC. If it’s porn that you want, download it. At least that’s free — or so I hear. INTRO | A ROUND TOWN | L ISTEN, HEAR | THE HOOPLA | STAGE , S CREEN &

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Johnny Blaze (Chris Evans) loses some oxygen in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer. PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.ROTTENTOMATOES.COM.

Jamie Pressly’s beauty goes to waste in one of the worse horror movies in history, DOA: Dead or Alive.” PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.ROTTENTOMATOES.COM

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PG

Amidst a summer already cluttered with blockbusters, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer is the little sci-fi adventure that could. Only midway through June, Fantastic Four marks the third comic book movie and fourth big budget sequel of the year, and it doesn‘t disappoint. All of the stars of the first film, Ioan Gruffudd (Reed Richards), Jessica Alba (Sue Storm), Chris Evans (Johnny Storm), and Michael Chiklis (Ben Grimm), return and are in great form. Following in the footsteps of the original Superman film, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer does not attempt to be anything more than family-friendly, escapist fun. While fans may have their reservations following the original Fantastic Four film, this one takes all the right steps with only a couple forgivable misfires. Opening with a shot of monstrous smoke which chars an entire planet until it looks like a blackened piece of barbeque, Fantastic Four: RSS builds anticipation in the audience without cheapening the revelation at the end. Unlike some superhero comic book movies, this one allows the characters to have real lives and problems without overly dramatizing them to fit some political agenda or metaphor. The complexity of the family dynamic is what takes center stage. Families have problems. Some members want to move away, some feel they are not given enough consideration, some are oblivious to the problems at all — which causes more problems. The movie does not offer any solutions to the problems other than trying to talk about what people want and why. Then, they go off to fight the Silver Surfer, the military and the supervillain Dr. Doom (Julian McMahon). Even though there are movies available for small children or adults, for a clear-cut, young adolescentaccessible fantasy, you’ll be hard-pressed to find anything out there that’s better. sounds from the scene


15

kim rice & ross wantland DOIN’ IT WELL

the stinger

CALLING ALL TEENS

Join the campaign for comprehensive sex ed.! Teens can play a powerful role in standing up for their health needs and educating each other. Locally, the Teen Awareness Group, a group of trained teenage peer educators, provides individual and group presentations about topics like birth control, STIs and healthy relationships to local schools and organizations. The impact is powerful: peers who would not otherwise receive this information are educated on options regarding decision making around sexual activity, birth control and medical care. They are taught skill building techniques to help with their refusal skills and assertiveness and are equipped to ultimately make decisions that are right for them. With supervision, training and room to apply this information to their own environments, the peer educators become highly effective in their roles. In addition, teen educators are incredibly knowledgeable about how informed their peers are on sexual health issues; they are very aware of what kind of education needs to happen. This kind of teen-led model is really important if we are going to provide sex education that is both medically accurate and ultimately useful for those receiving it — teens.

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FIGURING IT OUT As advocates for accurate sex education, we are often confronted with questions about what kind of sex education is appropriate for children and adolescents. Generally, there is a fear that sex education — usually within junior high or high school — would be too advanced, morally inappropriate or replace the role of the parent. There’s also a dual assumption: “Children I know aren’t going to have sex, and those who are having sex aren’t children I know or care about.” Therefore, the question of sex education seems moot; it doesn’t impact our lives. For those of us who were adolescents once, we should know better! Although some teens are not sexually active, most teens are experimenting sexually in some way. In addition, all children and teens are sexual individuals. Unfortunately for most of us, we had to figure out sexuality without assistance from educators, parents or other adults. How awesome would it have been if we were provided with information that would have helped us understand sex and make decisions that matched our values? According to the Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health (ICAH), 83 percent of Illinois residents believe that students in this state should receive information about birth control and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Almost 90 percent of Illinois residents believe that teens should not be sexually active, but they should know how to practice safer sex. In another study, ICAH found that 66 percent of sex education teachers do not teach about how to use condoms. Over half of these teachers didn’t even provide information about where to find birth control or sexual health-related resources. TEENS SPEAKING UP “Adults” have fought for quite awhile over

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what is appropriate sex education for adolescents. Just recently, abstinence-only education — which is what it sounds like: abstinence and more abstinence — received an increase in funding from Congress. (You may remember the recent report released by the government that found that abstinence-only education was not an effective form of sex education.) However, the voices that we haven’t been hearing from (mostly because adults aren’t listening) are the voices of teens. Teens should be dictating what their health curricula teaches them, if for no other reason than because these classes are specifically for them. For the past three years, the Campaig n for Comprehensive Sex Education (CCSE) has been working with community leaders, parents, teens and school representatives to promote medically accurate and comprehensive sex educat ion in loca l schools. Last year, the Urbana School Board approved a health curriculum which drew heavily upon existing comprehensive sex education curricula. For the fall, CCSE is planning to host a sex education resource fair to give parents, teachers, chi ldren, adolescents and other interested individuals an opportunity to hear what sex education could look like in CU, resources for talking with kids about sex and information about how we can all advocate for age-appropriate, comprehensive sex education in our community. TEENS WE NEED YOU! Do you enjoy our column? Are you interested in sexual health? Are you bored this summer? Then join us in sex education initiatives happening here in CU! CCSE is in the beginning stages of planning the comprehensive sex ed. resource fair for the fall. Because comprehensive sex education affects teens, you are a necessary voice in this group. Join us at CCSE’s upcoming planning meetings; meet new people; learn more about sexuality; and help us plan the sex education resource fair. SEX 411: BE A PART OF COMPREHENSIVE SEX EDUCATION FOR CU! • Planning meetings for CCSE will be held on July 2 and July 18 at 5:30 p.m. in the 2nd floor meeting room at Planned Parenthood of East Central Illinois — 302 E. Stoughton, Champaign. All are welcome. • For more information on CCSE, contact Jen Cunha at jcunha2@uiuc.edu

Kim Rice and Ross Wantland are professionals in the field of sexuality and violence prevention. Write to them at buzzdoinitwell@yahoo.com B ETWEEN | CLASSIFIEDS | THE STINGER | CU CALENDAR


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buzz weekly

HE HAS AN 80-FOOT TARANTULA.

J u n e 21

J u n e 2 7 , 2 oo7

free will astrology JUN 21 —JUN 27 ARIES

March 21 – April 19

We’re almost halfway through 2007. It’s time to take inventory of how well you’re capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities. So let me ask you, Aries: Have you been making reconnaissance missions into previously forbidden territory? Are you seeking adventures beyond the borders of your known world? I hope so. I hope you’re blowing your own mind on a regular basis, both by exposing it to ideas it has never dared to entertain and by seeking out exotic experiences it has no precedents for.

T A U RU S

May 21 – June 20

We’re almost halfway through 2007. It’s time to take inventory of how well you’re capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities. So let me ask you, Gemini: Are you working hard to heal the indecisiveness that has dissipated your energy in the past? I hope so. You’ve never had a better chance to unify your divided mind than you have now; you will continue to be the beneficiary of unprecedented help from cosmic forces whenever you make concentrated efforts to coordinate your diverse desires. I urge you to invoke all your ingenuity as you seek out the magic that will make you a virtuoso of variety.

CANCER

June 21 – July 22

How well are you capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities, Cancerian? Now that we’re almost halfway through 2007, let’s take an inventory. I’m hoping that six months from now, you’ll look back and make the following declaration: “I can’t believe I’m saying this, but this year I realized in many colorful ways that limitations are my friends. The obstructions I faced eventually forced me to become far more resourceful than I’d ever been before. The wastefulness I uncovered showed me how important it is to shed my trivial wishes and focus intensely on my top priority desires. The confusions I encountered taught me valuable secrets about how to master my emotions and dissolve my superstitious fears.”

LEO

Aug. 23 – Sept. 22

How well are you capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities, Virgo? Now that we’re almost halfway through 2007, let’s take an inventory. I’m hoping that six months from now, you’ll look back and say the following: “This was the year I came all the way home. It was a turning point when I learned to speak with my own voice instead of trying to speak with the voices of everyone who’s ever been important to me. In 2007 I found my power spot, my mother lode, my sacred ground. For the first time, I have a deeply felt certainty that I belong here on this planet; I belong here in my life; I belong here in this community and this mission and this body.”

LIBRA

S AG I T TA R I U S

Nov. 22 – Dec. 21

CAPRICORN

Dec. 22 – Jan. 19

AQUA R I U S

Jan. 20 – Feb. 18

Now that we’re almost halfway through 2007, it’s time to assess how well you’re capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities. So let me ask you a few pointed questions. Have you been reinventing yourself from the ground up at least once a week? Have you been shedding old shticks and learning new tricks? How relentlessly have you committed yourself to the arts of liberation? There’s still a lot of time to become even more receptive and responsive to the steady stream of wake-up calls that life is sending your way. For the next six months, you’ll have cosmic luck on your side whenever you actively court the fertile blessings of future shock.

We’re almost halfway through 2007. Let’s take inventory of how well you’re capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities. Are you exorcising the ghosts that have messed with you for so long? Have you been wrapping up all unfinished business and resolving every ambiguous pain-in-the-ass that has sapped your energy? I hope so. By your next birthday, I’m rooting for you to finally graduate from the lessons you’ve been studying for years. Then you’ll be primed and receptive for the fresh teachings that will begin flowing your way in 2008.

How well are you capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities, Aquarius? Now that we’re almost halfway through 2007, let’s take an inventory. I’m hoping that six months from now, you’ll look back and say something like the following: “I’m pleased that this year I’ve met many new people and expanded my network and reached a bigger audience. I’m ecstatic that I have deepened my connections with pragmatic idealists who share my core values. And I’m proud that I have honed my message and product so well that I’m having a more profound influence than ever before.”

July 23 – Aug. 22

How well are you capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities, Leo? Now that we’re almost halfway through 2007, let’s take an inventory. I’m hoping that six months from now, you’ll look back and say the following: “This was the year I learned how to play and have fun on a higher level. I resurrected everything I knew about playing and having fun as a child, and applied it to my life as an adult. I liberated my imagination in the bedroom and in the workplace; I gave myself permission to seek out amusement and delight as if they were the holiest motivations of all. I cavorted and joked and fooled around as if my dreams depended on it.”

VIRGO

Oct. 23 – Nov. 21

Now that we’re almost halfway through 2007, it’s time to assess how well you’re capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities. So let me ask you a few questions. Have you been working hard to increase your value? I don’t just mean economically, although it’s true that this is the best time in over a decade for you to make more money and launch long-term plans for financial growth. But I hope that you’re also adding to your worth in every way you can imagine, like by getting the training and new skills that will make you irresistible to future employers, lovers, and collaborators; and by purifying your motivations and clarifying your ethics and bolstering your integrity.

April 20 – May 20

We’re almost halfway through 2007. Let’s take inventory of how well you’re capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities. Are you becoming a better judge of character? Have you cultivated your skill at reading people’s energy and understanding what motivates them? I hope so, because 2007 should be the year you generate big benefits for yourself by bringing out the best in your allies and cohorts. Whenever you catalyze their potentials, the universe will in turn conspire to catalyze your potentials.

GEMINI

SCORPIO

PISCES

Feb. 19 – March 20

How well are you capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities, Pisces? Now that we’re almost halfway through 2007, let’s take an inventory. I’m hoping that six months from now, you’ll look back and say something like the following: “To my astonishment, this was the year I beat 70 percent of my fear of success and dissolved 80 percent of my tendency to sabotage my ambitions. Not only that. To my great satisfaction, I shed 70 percent of my martyr complex, lost 75 percent of my fascination for glamorous suffering, and smashed 85 percent of my perverse attraction to the victim archetype. This was one of the Best. Years. Ever.” Homework To check out my expanded audio forecast of your destiny for the second half of 2007, go to http://RealAstrology.com.

Sept. 23 – Oct.22

We’re almost halfway through 2007. Let’s take inventory of how well you’re capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities. I hope you’ve realized by now that although you’ve always been a pretty good communicator, there’s room for you to become even better. For instance, you can learn to be much better at saying what you really mean instead of what you think people want to hear, yet without sacrificing your natural tact. You can also become more adept at staying true to yourself while still being sensitive to other people; you can increasingly find that you don’t have to lose touch with what you really feel as you empathetically tune in to what everyone else feels.

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J u n e 2 7 , 2 oo7

buzz weekly • 17 WANT TO SELL THAT GREEN VELVET COUCH OF YOURS? CALL BUZZ CLASSIFIEDS AT 337-8337 | DATEXXXXXX, 2003 buzz

DJANGO DINGO FANDANGO.

PHONE: 217 - 337 - 8337 PHONE: 217/337-8337 DEADLINE: 2 p.m. Tuesday DEADLINE: 2 p.m. Tuesday for the next Thursday’s edition.

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• PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD! Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337. We cannot be responsible for more than one day’s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. • All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement, at any time. • All employment advertising in this newspaper is subject to the City of Champaign Human Rights Ordinance and similar state and local laws, making it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement which expresses limitation, specification or discrimination as to race, color, mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. • Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment. • All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual oientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, or the fact that such person is a student. • This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal oppportunity basis.

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APARTMENT INSPECTORS NEEDED Large property management company on campus looking for part-time apartment inspectors. Good hourly wage plus paid training. Must have car. Training starts beginning of June. Apply in-person today at 303 E. Green St., Champaign.

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The Illini Media marketing department is looking for interns to start with us this summer and continue into Fall. You’d be helping develop fun events, represent IM units at “around town” events and participating in Quad Day. E-mail dawn@illinimedia.com for more info.

Illini Media is seeking part-time student Web developers to assist in creating a new rich media site. Applicants will have the ability to craft a unique site using the latest Web standards. A good understanding of PHP and MySQL (or similar) is required but previous development experience is not. Positions open now. Apply immediately via e-mail to Troy Stanger at stanger@illinimedia.com and outline your experience. Current UIUC students only.

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Looking for a fun summer job? Come work for the Daily Illini On-Air Division! Gain broadcasting experience while helping with our radio newscasts on WPGU 107.1FM. Contact Editor in Chief, Joe Lamberson at editor@dailyillini.com for more info!

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#64*/&440114 PART-TIME ON-CALL ADVOCATE Catholic Charities Champaign has an immediate opening for a PartTime On-Call Youth Advocate in the Youth Intervention Program. Responsibilities include on-call response to families in crisis, direct contact with youth, completion of paperwork, linkages and referrals within Champaign, Ford, and Iroquois County. Position requires high school diploma, reliable transportation, and good driving record, ability to pass DCFS and criminal background checks, and schedule flexibility. Preference given to applicants with two years of college or related experience. Submit resume, no later than June 29, 2007, to Dawn Cluver, Catholic Charities, 1315A Curt Drive, Champaign, IL 61826. EOE.

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105 E. Clark & 105 E. White, C. Aug 2007 Attractive modern lofts. D/W, disposal, window a/c, ceiling fans, patio/balconies, laundry, parking, 2nd Floor skylights. Rent from $370 to $475/mo. $50/month to furnish. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

1405-1407 W. Kirby, C. Aug 2007. Attractive Colonial building, on bus line. One bdrm apts starts at $415/mo. Large 2 bdrm corner apts approx 800 sq. ft. $460/mo. Interior 2 bdrm apts from $440/mo. $50/mo to furnish. Central A/C, carpet, laundry, parking avail. Apts shown 7 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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606 W. HEALEY, C Aug 2007. 1 bdrm apts close to campus. Carpet, electric heat, window a/c, free parking. Rents from $400/mo. $50/mo to furnish. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

508 S. Mattis, C Aug 2007. One of Champaign’s finest apartment complexes featuring a beautiful courtyard. 1 bdrm apts at $475/mo. On bus line with Central A/C, Gas Heat, Laundry facilities, Patios or Balconies, Covered Parking. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 217-356-1873 www.barr-re.com

705 W. CHURCH, C Aug 2007. Very attractive apts located near downtown. On bus line. Large apts. Balconies or patios. Two bdrms from $470 to $495/mo. One bdrms from $435/mo. To furnish $50/mo. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

706 S. WALNUT, U. Aug 2007.1 bdrms from $500/mo. 2 bdrms from $530/mo. Central A/C, Laundry. Furnish, Parking $50/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

Courtyard on Randolph

713 S. Randolph, C. Now leasing for August. Furnished/ Unfurnished. Spacious 2 and 3 bedrooms starting at $630. Close to campus and downtown. Water, Direct TV and parking included. Balcony, laundry and seasonal pool. (217)352-8540 www.faronproperties.com

Aug 2007. Huge 1 bdrm apts. Window A/C, Ethernet available. Parking $40/mo. Rents from $445/mo. to $505/mo. Furnish $50/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com Large 4 bedroom duplex. 2,000+ sq. ft. Central Air. Natural woodwork, hardwood floors throughout. 710 W. Nevada. Leal School District. $1600/mo. 493-3446, 359-2072.

DEADLINE:

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611 W. Church St., C. Beautiful 2 BR. in security locked building. Laundry facilities. Heat, hot water, sanitary garbage included. Parking spot in lit off-street parking. Extra storage, dishwasher, C/A. Sound & fire proof. No pets. Available August 1st. Applications taken, $640/mo. 649-7409.

Aug 2007. 1 bdrms near Engineering campus. Wall A/C, Parking. Rent $435/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

106 E. Stoughton, C

1107 S. EUCLID, C Aug 2007. 1 bdrms Near Armory, IMPE & Snack Bar. Window A/C, Laundry, Ethernet avail. Rents from $410/mo. to $430/mo. Parking $50/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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'VSOJTIFE Furnished 1 & 2 bedroom near John & Second $450/mo., Healey & Third $375/mo., Studios on Healey and First $335/mo. Available Fall 2007 Call 356-1407 3rd and Clark Leasing for August ‘07. Beautiful furnished 3 bedroom 1 bath, and 4 bedroom 2 bath apartments at 3rd and Clark. Nicest on campus $700$1,000/mo. Ted 766-5108.

Avail Aug 2007. Large efficiencies close to Beckman Center. From $350/mo. Parking $35/mo. Window A/C, carpet, Ethernet avail. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

508, 510, & 512 E. STOUGHTON, C Aug 2007. Huge 2 bdrms. Close to Engineering & C/S. A/C, Laundry, ethernet avail. Parking $55/mo. Rent from $545/mo to $750/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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103 E. DANIEL, C Aug 2007. Close to Frat park. Efficiencies from $450/mo. Ethernet avail. Central A/C, storage units, laundry. Parking $60/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

5th & HEALEY, C. August 2007 JUST REMODELEDTOP TO BOTTOM!!!! The BEST LOCATED EFFICIENCIES & 1 BEDROOMS on campus- period. Here’s the best part: Efficiencies $400/mo. & 1 bedrooms $585/mo. Parking avail. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

609 W. MAIN, U. Aug. 2007. 2bdrm apts from $540/mo. 1 bdrm apts from $485/mo. Parking optional, central A/C, Carpet, Laundry, Ethernet avail. Shwon 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com LANDO PLACE 707 South 6th, C. Large 1 BR apt for August. Includes water and trash removal. On-site Laundry. Secured building. Local phone service and ethernet. From $600/mo. CAMPO RENTAL AGENCY 344-1927

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THE NEVADAN

JOHN RANDOLPH ATRIUM APTS PRICES SLASHED!! ABSOLUTELY BEST DEAL ON CAMPUSPERIOD

Avail Aug 07 2 Br-1 bath, Designer Furniture Package with Queen Size Sleigh Beds, Walk-in 2 person Shower in bathroom, Hardwood Floors & Ceramic Tile, Vaulted Ceilings & Skylights, Walk-in Closets, Washer/Dryer & Dishwasher, Covered Parking, Buzzer Entry, Glass Front Beer/Wine Fridge, High Speed Internet Avail. Please call for information. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

Features included: Washer/Dryer & Dishwashers in each unit Great Furniture Package Covered Parking Available Beautiful Interior & Exterior Design

105 E Green, C Aug 2007. Studio apts at First & Green. Wall a/c units, laundry, ethernet avail. From $320/mo to $340/mo. Parking $50/mo. Shown 6 days/week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

807-809 W. ILLINOIS U. Aug 2007. 1 Bdrms corner of Lincoln & Illinois. Window A/C, Laundry, Ethernet avail. Rent $560/mo. Parking $45/mo Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE.INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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702 W. WESTERN, U. Aug. 2007 1 bdrm, Window A/C, Carpet/Tile Floors, Laundry, Parking avail. Rent from $545/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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ARBOR APARTMENTS, C. Aug 2007. 1 bdrms at Third & Gregory across from Snack Bar. Window A/C, Laundry, Ethernet avail. Rents from $440/mo to $470/mo. Parking $50/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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JOHN & LOCUST, C Aug 2007. Huge one bdrms, Ethernet avail, Window A/C. Rents from $380/mo to $420/mo. Parking $20/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

509 W. MAIN, U Aug 2007. 1 bdrm apts. From $410/mo to $440/mo. Laundry, Window A/C , Parking $35/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

OWNER PAYS FOR GAS, ELECTRIC, & WATER!! 4 br/4bath (Your own private bath!!) from $335/person (Included utilities!!) Individual Leases Avail- Rent your own room from $345/mo (Included Utilities!!) Roommate program Available 9 1/2 Month Lease Available Semester Leases Available BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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Aug 15. Large 1 BR apartment near Westside Park, C. Water, parking, D/W, laundry. $455/mo. 384-1925 CAPSTONE SPECIAL 1 month free plus $100 gift card on select units. Call 217-367-7368.

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410 W. High St. U Large 1 BR and spacious 2 BR and 3 BR apartments in older home next to campus. Laundry and parking provided. 450, 690, 725/mo. Avail. 8/1. 217-778-2322

New building near John and First. Just opened, 1 BR, unfurnished, includes W/D, dishwasher, stove, refrigerator, $700/month, Available Fall 2007. Call 356-1407.

2 Bedroom, unfurnished. Parking included. Security building. Washer/dryer on site.

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404 S. Urbana Roland Realty 217-328-1226 www.roland-realty.com

135 W. CLARK, C Aug 2007. One bdrm apts close to Christie Clinic. Hot water heat, window a/c, laundry, parking avail. Rents from $315 to $330/mo. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com Available August Clean, quiet, 1 bedroom apartment in older house near downtown Champaign. Hardwood floors, original woodwork. $450/mo + utilities. 367-5157

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Downtown/ Old Town Champaign Renting for July/ August 2007. 800 W. Church- 2 BR $470 507 W. White- 2 BR $530 406 W. Washington- 1 BR $445 511 W. University- 1 BR $420 205 S. Lynn- 1 BR $450 508 W. Hill- 1 BR $415 515 W. Washington- 1 BR $420 403 W. White- 1 BR $440 711 S. Randolph- 1 BR From $390 605 W. University- 1 BR From $390 811 W. Hill- 1 BR From $390 Faron Properties 352-8540 www.faronproperties.com

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Aug. 2007. Classic building-across from Jimmy John’s on Lincoln Ave. Hardwood floors, Laundry. Ethernet avail. Shown 6 days/wk. 1 BR +Sunroom $595/mo(UF) 1 BR Den $595/mo(UF) Parking $50/mo BARR REAL ESTATE, INC. 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

511-513 S. ELM, C Aug 2007 Corner of W. Green & Elm in quiet attractive building with locked security entrance. Large 2 bdrm apts with approx 800 sq. ft. Free covered parking, laundry in building, Cenreal A/C, Gas Heat, Carpet. On bus line. Rent starts at $535/mo. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE,INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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808 S. LINCOLN, U.

610 S. STATE, C. Avail Aug 2007. Beautiful 5 Bdrm house on busline near campus. 2 full kitchens, laundry, hardwood floors, garage, w/d. $1300/mo UF or $1500/mo F. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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512 W. GREEN, C

402 N. Prairie

Roland Realty 217-328-1226 www.roland-realty.com

SOUTHWEST PLACE APTS, C Aug 2007. 2 bdrm Duplexes, Townhouses and 1 bedrooms. Carpet, gas heat, central a/c, Some units have w/d’s in units, w/d hook-ups, or laundry in bldg, garages, dishwashers, disposals, patio/balconies, parking. 1 bdrm from $480/mo. 2 bdrms from $595 to $695/mo. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com Avlb 8/5 Duplex near Hessel Park, C. Includes parking, laundry, water, trash. No pets. $560 mo. 356-0017

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Aug 2007. Double security brick building in excellent location. Large 2 bdrm apts with approx 850 sq. ft. Parking, Central A/C, Carpet, Laundry facilities. On bus line. Shown 6 days a week. Rents $530/mo. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com Upscale 1 and 2 bdrm. apartments in SW Champaign. W/D hookups, D/W, walk-in closets, outside storage, some with FP. Property has a pool, tennis court, fitness center, laundry, walking trails around lake, much more. Call immediately, limited availability. *Sign a12 mo.contract during June and recieve a W/D in your apartment.* 356-2533

703 W. CHURCH, C Aug 2007. Close to downtown in quiet location on bus line. 1 bdrms start at $435/mo & 2 bdrms start at $465/mo. Patio/balconies, Central A/C, Gas Heat, Carpet, Laundry in building. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

PRICES SLASHED!! LINKSVIEW, SAVOY Aug 2007. Located on 9th hole of UI Golf Course. 2 bdrm 900 sq ft. Each apt has own garage storage unit, 2 balconies/patios, dishwashers, disposals, w/d hookups. From $595/mo to $625/mo + parking. Shown 6 days a week. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

301-303 1/2 W. GREEN, U Avail Aug 2007. 1 & 2 bedroom units in quiet Urbana neighborhood close to Urbana Library and downtown. Rents from $500/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

722 S. BROADWAY, U. Aug 2007. 1 bdrm apts close to Campus. Window A/C. Rents $440/mo. Shown 6 days/wk. BARR REAL ESTATE, INC 356-1873 www.barr-re.com

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Furnished 4 bedroom houses on campus near Stoughton and Fifth. Call 356-1407. 1512 Ogelthorp, U. 3- 4 BR/ 2 Bath, Near Campus. Rent $1100. 344-0674. One, Two, and Three bedroom houses, condos, and duplexes. Reduced pricing. 637-0806 4 BDRM 402 W. Elm, U. 2 Bath, Complete Remodel, Built 1853. All New Roof, Windows, High Energy, Efficient Furnace, Central Air, Appliances, Golden Tee, Pool Tables, Kegerater, Wired, Furnished. $1600/mo. 493-3446 jimdobie@insightbb.com

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107 S. Birch, Urbana August ‘07, beautiful furnished 4 bedroom, 1 bath, off-street parking, air, laundry excellent. $1350/mo. Ted 766-5108. Large 4 BR, W/D, off- st. parking available now and Aug. $1400. Real Estate Professionals 417-5539 403 W Springfield, Urbana

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Townhouse, two bedrooms, one and half bath. All appliances, including W/D. Directly on bus line. $620/mo. 217-637-0975

300.4

530

Available Now Single rooms for women. Clean, kitchen and laundry facilities, close to campus, located on busline. $245-$265/month.Utilities included. Wireless internet recently added. 367-4824.

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1 bedroom 3 bedroom 11/2 bath house, quiet and clean, (847 )3125447 1 BR in spacious 2 BR furnished apt. close to campus. Bus lines close or parking space available to rent. Pets allowed and laundry on site. $294/mo + half electric. 309368-3102. Furnished BR in house, on busline, $325/mo + utilities, 217-369-0605. On Campus, 309 E. John. Rooms in large shared Christian house. $300$395/month. 217-344-0484. www.suttonplaceuiuc.org. One Bedroom Available in brand new 2 bedroom house on North Prospect. Female roommate wanted. $375/mo, utilities included. 217-390-6438.

300.."5&8"/5&% 550 Roommate needed for Fall 3 Bedroom apartment $242/month - Illinois and Lincoln goldnbrg@uiuc.edu

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300.."5&8"/5&% 550 Male roommate needed to share deluxe furnished 4 BR house at 316 W. John. $350/month + utilities. Ted 766-5108 Roommates wanted for Fall. Share deluxe furnished 3 or 4 bedroom apartment at 3rd and Clark. From $250 per month. Ted 766-5108.

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Robeson Meadows West. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath, Hardwood, ceramic/slate tile, Granite counters, Jenn-air range, large deck. Awesome neighborhood park. $329,900. http://76.163.113.3/ 398-2008 Agent owned.

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PARKING SPACES WANTED Illini Media is looking for parking spots available for the Fall Semester close to our building at 512 E. Green Street, Champaign. Please contact Sarah at 337-8315 or email sarah@illinimedia.com with any information.

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'PS4BMF Furnished 5-room home for sale in West Champaign. Full basement. Enclosed porch. Garage. Air conditioned. Convenient location to bus lines and shopping. Contact Jim Welch (217) 369-1866 (cell).

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cu calendar

TRY GOING TO EVENTS MARKED BY THE LOGO. COME ON, YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO.

C = Champaign, U = Urbana Submit to Calendar online at www.cucalendar.com/submit.php

THU. JUN 21 Live Bands “Welcome to Tolono”- World Premier Happy Hour [Join the “Welcome to Tolono” cast for Happy Hour with a live performance by the Tractor Kings. Meet the cast and learn about the “Welcome to Tolono” project and Station Theatre benefit.] Esquire Lounge, C. 6pm Jake Stimmel Trio Cover, Iron Post, U. 6pm David Newbould [A critically acclaimed performer/ songwriter whose songs have appeared on major network shows and DVDs including “Party of Five” and “Joan of Arcadia.”] Aroma Cafe, C. 8pm Watery Domestic [With Ohtis, Coco Coca, The International Theatre of War, Imaginary Numbers, and Adam K.] 18+, $5, Canopy Club, U. 8pm Soul Fish, Jeremy Harper Free, Rose Bowl Tavern, U. 9pm Chicago Afrobeat Project, Mhondoro, Rhythm Success 19+, $6, Cowboy Monkey, U. 9pm Ear Doctor All ages, Iron Post, U. 9:30pm Concerts Krannert Uncorked [The best beverages of the area, tasted free of charge, and live music.] Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, U. 5pm Summer Solstice Celebration [Jazz tunes related to summer and the heavens. Stargazing also available.] Free, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, U. 9:30pm DJ DJ / Gentlemen’s Club [Nothin’ but Rock.] Silver Bullet Bar, U. 8pm Revive: Chris O [House music, $5 strawberry-champagne martinis, $4 22 oz Blue Moons, $3 Dr. McGillicuddy shots.] Free, Barfly, C. 10pm Karaoke Liquid Courage Karaoke [Come and enjoy karaoke every Thursday.] The Office, U. 10pm Film “Away From Her” [Daily Showtimes: 4:30pm, 7pm, 9:30pm. Saturday/Sunday: 2pm.] Boardman’s Art Theatre, C. 4:30pm Festivals 5th Annual International JR Aero Tow [Scale-model soaring enthusiasts and the general public are welcome.] Monticello/Piatt County Airport, 10am Workshops Helping Hands [Big Brothers and Sisters, part of the Carle Expectant Parent Series.] Carle Foundation Hospital, C. 4pm R.A.D. Class [Rape Aggression Defense Course. Basic Course is available for women of all ages. Attendance at all 4 sessions is necessary to complete the program. The $10 registration fee is refundable upon completion of the third class. Call to register: 3834060.] Carle Foundation Hospital, C. 6pm

FRIDAY, JUNE 22

Recreation Free Tai Chi and Shaolin Kung Fu Classes [The classes are open to all ages and are sponsored by the US Midwest Kung Fu Association and Song’s Kung Fu Academy.] West Side Park, C. 6:30am Cardio-Kickboxing Yoga at KAM [Krannert Art Museum hosts a weekly yoga class.] Free, Krannert Art Museum, U. 12pm Comedy Zoo Improv Troupe [Improvisational comedy performed every third Wednesday. Zoo Troupe performs an entertaining combo of short and long form sketches. The troupe includes members that have trained at Second City and Improv Olympic in Chicago. See www. ironpost.com for times (usually 6 or 7 pm).] The Iron Post, U. Theater “Ragtime” [CUTC’s second area-wide student production. The story presents the tapestry of New York area life in the first decades of the 20th century. Based on the acclaimed and popular E.L. Doctorow novel, Ragtime tells the intricate story of four New York families — each indicative of that time in American history and highlighting some of the downsides of following the American Dream. Tickets: $17 adults, $15 seniors and students, $6 children.] Parkland Theater, C. 7pm “Bus Stop” [Summer Studio Theatre presents this Broadway classic starring Santana Vermeesch and Drew Shirley. Tickets are available through the Krannert Center Box Office.] Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, U. 7:30pm “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” by Tennessee Williams [“Cat” was written in 1955 and is, perhaps, Williams’s most poignant work. It tells the story of a Southern family in the midst of calamity. The show is masterfully put together by director Jude Love. Reservations can be made by calling 384-4000.] Station Theatre, U. 8pm Art Exhibits “Allerton Legacy” [Open until daily til dusk. Garden tours can also be arranged if you call 333-2127.] Allerton Park, Monticello. 9am “An Architect Collects” [Robert D. Kleinschmidt and A Lifetime of Fine Arts Acquisitions. Find day-to-day museum hours at www.kam.uiuc.edu.] Krannert Art Museum, U. 9am New Acquisitions [Showcase of the most recent donations and purchases to the world of culture at UIUC.] Krannert Art Museum, U. 9am Parkland Digital Media Student Exhibition [Student work from the graphic design and 3-D animation programs.] Parkland Art Gallery, C. 9am “Victorian Entertainments: We Are Amused” [Summer exhibit at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.] Main Library, 10am “Luminescence”

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[Photography by Brock Peoples. Also featured, the Peruvian art of Olga Flores and new furniture by Ambiance at Home.] Heartland Gallery, U. 10am “Poetry of Images” [Recent painting by Raheel.] Cinema Gallery, U. 10am Gallery Opening: “Art As Remedy” [Gallery Opening for Skip Sams and David Nolan. Skip will be showing his 2 dimensional oil pastels and acrylics and David will be showing his 3-D assemblages.] Wind Water and Light, C. 6pm Museums “A Whole ëNother Game: Baseball in Central Illinois from the 1860s to the 1970s” [Visit this years special exhibit featuring the history of area baseball from its beginnings during the Civil War through the Eastern Illinois League teams of the 1970s. Museum hours: 10am-5pm Mondays through Saturdays in June, July and August.] Early American Museum, Mahomet.

FRI. JUN 22 Live Bands Billy Galt Sings the Blues [Straight from the Blues Deacons, Billy plays at Blues Restaurant every Tuesday & Friday, from 11:30am2:30pm.] Blues, U. 11:30am Jeff Helgesen Quartet Free, Iron Post, U. 5pm Hippus Campus Free, 19+, Cowboy Monkey, C. 5:30pm Keith and Kathy Harden [Acoustic Duo.] Alto Vineyards, C. 6pm Senses Fail [With Autumn to Ashes and Inept.] $16.50/$20 at the door. Canopy Club, U. 7:30pm The Impalas Free, Hubers, C. 8pm Country Connection $1, Rose Bowl Tavern, U. 9pm Cameron McGill and What Army, w.w.lowman, Darling Disarm (Kayla Brown/Mike Ingram), Caulfield and the Magic $7, 19+, Cowboy Monkey, C. 9:30pm Corn Desert Ramblers $5, Iron Post, U. 9:30pm Concerts “Got Cello?” [Champaign-Urbana Symphony presents a benefit recital for the new Mills Breast Cancer Institute. Adults $10/$5 Children. Grace United Methodist Church, U. 7:30pm DJ Visions & Vibrations [Video/DJ.] Free, Radmaker’s Billiard and Sports Bar, Tolono. 9pm Country Night w/ DJ Stifler [Line dance lessons 9pm-10pm.] $5, 19+, Highdive, C. 9pm DJ Mertz [House, funk, electro.] Free, Boltini Lounge, C. 10pm DJ Mambo Italiano. [House music.] Free, Ko Fusion, C. 11pm Dancing Contra Dance [Singles, couples, groups and families

WCIA3 Entertainment Tent Wailhounds [Enjoy this band’s self-styled brand of music called “Psychedelic Groovy with a Blues-Based Sound”]. West Side Park, 5:00-6:30 p.m. Underwater People [Known for their rich harmonies and party-like atmosphere, this band specializes in playing high-energy covers with their own unique twist.] West Side Park, 7:30-9:00 p.m. News-Gazette Entertainment Tent Wes John Trio [Songs ranging from finger picking pseudo-folk to edgy, dark pop will leave crowds wanting more.] West Side Park, 5:00-6:00 p.m. Jake La Botz [Recognized as one of Chicago’s finest blues artists, La Botz has been thrilling audiences for years with his inspired performances on vocals and acoustic guitar.] West Side Park, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Hillbilly Jones [One part Elvis and one part Johnny Cash with various spoonfuls of Stray Cats, Merle Haggard, and The Beatles mixed in — this group will make you get up and dance!] West Side Park, 8:00-9:00 p.m.

June 22-24

Blue Number Nine [These musicians will keep audiences entertained with gritty, yet polished, funk with a strong ‘70s influence.] West Side Park, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Children’s Stage Ginger Lozar [Using volunteers from the audience, this puppeteer will entertain you with a fun and educational show!] West Side Park, 12:00-1:00 p.m. Andrew Anderson [Andrew’s wonderful illusion show is full of fun, gags and of course — illusions!] West Side Park, 1:30-2:30 p.m. and 6:00-7:00 p.m. Marilyn Price [Marilyn weaves a finely crafted performance filled with storytelling, puppetry and wisdom. From traditional folktales to original works, Marilyn captivates audiences of all ages with her irresistible wit and detail.] West Side Park, 3:00-4:00 p.m. Cowboy Randy [Come see this real cowboy trick rope and yodel!] West Side Park, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Lynne Clayton [Lynne brings freshness and vitality to her tales of wonder, fantasy and the spiritual journey.] West Side Park, 7:30-8:30 p.m. SUNDAY, JUNE 24

SATURDAY, JUNE 23 WCIA3 Entertainment Tent Chicago Expressions [These veterans of the Chicago music scene will show you the time of your life playing jazz, swing, and blues from the ‘20s, ‘30s and ‘40s.] West Side Park, 11:301:00 p.m. Tons ‘O’ Fun band [Whether you’re into fantastic vocals, super-tight percussion or screaming horns, this band will bring you to your feet!] West Side Park, 2:00-3:30 p.m. Blues to Go with Bobbie Wilsyn [These talented blues musicians will keep you on your toes with their spontaneous performances!] West Side Park, 4:30-6:00 p.m. Old Plank All Stars [This band features the sound and instrumentation of the great American pre-rock and roll string bands, which means no amps just lots of pickin’ and singin’.] West Side Park, 7:00-8:30 p.m. News-Gazette Entertainment Tent Doxi [This energizing trio plays an eclectic mix of styles that forges a new sound of acoustic funk, pyrotechnic bass and unique drumming.] West Side Park, 12:00-1:00 p.m. Dayna Malow [Enjoy this talented country artist who has performed with such stars as Black Shelton, Garry Allen and Mark Willis.] West Side Park, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Elsinore [Voted “Best Live Band” at the 2006 CU Local Music Awards, Elsinore will intrigue audiences with its Americana-folk-rock sound.] West Side Park, 3:00-4:00 p.m. Dennis Sroughmatt and Creole Stomp [This group brings the excitement and “joie de vivre” of Louisiana Creole, Cajun and Zydeco music to the stage for the enjoyment of audiences of all ages.] West Side Park, 4:30-5:30 p.m. No Secret [Featuring classic rock form the ‘60s and ‘70s, this band guarantees a rockin’ good time!] West Side Park, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

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WCIA3 Entertainment Tent Steve Arvey & West Side Heat [As a world traveler, Steve has performed his music all over the world. There is never a dull moment on stage as he shifts through the various styles of popular rock and blues.] West Side Park, 12:30-2:00 p.m. Mick Ducker Group [When this band takes the stage their mission is clear: energetic, good-time music with the sole purpose of getting people up on their feet!] West Side Park, 3:004:30 p.m. News-Gazette Entertainment Tent Craig Russo Latin Jazz Project [This band is a fresh mix of outstanding jazz soloists, rich Afro-Cuban inspired rhythms and unique arrangements of jazz standards.] West Side Park, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Mike and Amy Finders [Often called a “refreshing brand of frontier prairie blues,” this duo blends acoustic bluegrass, folk and country styles with award-winning original songs.] West Side Park, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Modern Cowboyz [These guys have shared the stage with Tim McGraw, Tricia Yearwood and Kenny Chesney by playing a mix of traditional and top 40 country.] West Side Park, 3:304:30 p.m. Children’s Stage James Morgan [As part of his show James likes to involve the audience with “Name that Tune” games, stories and more!] West Side Park, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Jammies [A different kind of children’s band featuring original music plus storytelling, spelling, counting and lots of dancing!] West Side Park, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Boneyard Creek Cloggers [A lively and entertaining form of traditional Appalachian dance.] West Side Park, 3:30-4:30 p.m.

sounds from the scene


are invited to come dance to live music every 1st and 3rd Friday of the month. All dances are taught (walked-through) prior to dancing. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a pair of clean, softsoled shoes to protect the wood floor. www.prairienet.org/contra/.] Phillips Recreation Center, U. 8pm

Film “Can’t Stop the Serenity” [Screening of “Serenity.” All proceeds will go to Equality Now, which works to end violence and discrimination against women and girls around the world.] $8, Boardman’s Art Theatre, C. 10pm

Karaoke Liquid Courage Karaoke [Come and enjoy karaoke every 2nd and 4th Friday.] American Legion Post 71, U. 8pm

Recreation Environmental Education Center Open [Explore interactive displays, see live animals, and enjoy natural history exhibits at the Environmental Education Center. Join nature center staff and volunteers for guided nature hikes at 1 pm. Admission to the center and for the hike is free. For more information, call 896-2455.] Homer Lake, 10am

Recreation Lifetime Fitness Program [Join us every weekday morning. No cost for Rec Center members.] Campus Recreation (CRCE), U. 6am Family Fun Family Fun Night [Enjoy healthy, fun activities, including open gym, board games and much more for little ones and parents.] Savoy Recreational Center, 5pm Family Fun Happy Hour [Free food from 5pm-7pm. Arcade games, pool tables and more.] Radmaker’s Billiard and Sports Bar, Tolono. 5pm Poetry / Readings VOICE [Poetry and fiction reading. Held the 3rd Thursday of each month.] Bread Company, U. 7:45pm

SAT. JUN 23 Live Bands Mhondoro $3, All ages, Iron Post, U. 6pm Music Among the Vines: Dennis Stroughmatt and L’Esprit Creole [Lively Cajun, Zydeco and Creole music. Food and drinks will be available.] Alto Vineyards, C. 7:30pm Dan, Bob & Joni Free, Hubers, C. 8pm Keith Harden [Solo acoustic.] Pages for All Ages, Savoy. 8pm Imaginary Posse Reunion: Imaginary Posse, The Chemicals 21+, Mike ‘n Molly’s, C. 8pm Feudin’ Hillbillies [Old and new country.] Radmaker’s Billiard and Sports Bar, Tolono. 9pm Angie Heaton Mike ‘n Molly’s, C. 9pm Hatechamber w/ Special Guests Butt Ugly $5, Canopy Club, U. 9pm Elsinore, The Johns, Death Ships $7, 19+, Cowboy Monkey, C. 9:30pm Big Grove Zydeco All ages, $3, Iron Post, U. 9:30pm Concerts Illinois Summer Youth Music [Schedules vary for this all-day event.] Free, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, U. 10am DJ DJ Tim Williams [Remix of top-40, house, techno, dance-pop, disco, 80’s and hip-hop.] $5, Highdive, C. 10am Chris O [House.] Free, Boltini Lounge, C. 10pm Dancing Tango Crash Course + Dance [Tango Crash Course with Ron & Susana, 7:30-9:30 pm, followed by tango social dancing until 12:30 am. Cost: $5/$10 with lesson. Info: tango.society@gmail.com, www. centraltango.com.] Phillips Recreation Center, U. 7pm Karaoke Liquid Courage Karaoke [Come and enjoy karaoke every Saturday.] Geo’s, U. 9pm

sounds from the scene

Theater “The Lion in Winter” [Summer Studio Theatre presents Steven M. Keen and Anne Shapland Kearns in this Broadway classic. Tickets are available through the Krannert Center Box Office.] Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, U. 8pm Volunteer ReStore Volunteer Orientation [Habitat for Humanity seeks volunteers for our ReStore. Volunteers assist in all store duties, including customer service, pricing and displaying, pick ups, deliveries and cashiering. All proceeds go to building more homes in Champaign County. Please contact Courtney at 355-6460 extension-116 or email volunteer@cuhabitat.org.] Habitat for Humanity, 9am

SUN. JUN 24 Live Bands Keith Harden [Solo acoustic covers.] Iron Post, U. 8pm Crystal River Free, Rose Bowl Tavern, U. 9pm DJ Salsa Sundays with DJ Bris [Lessons 7pm-8:30pm, then open dancing.] Free, 19+, Cowboy Monkey, C. 7pm Lectures/discussions Try Y: Adults Read Young Adult Favorites Book Club [Spend the summer enjoying current favorites that are fun for all ages. Read any of the Meg Cabot “Princess Diaries” series and come to chat about the books or the movies.] Urbana Free Library, 2pm Recreation Boat Rentals [Paddleboats, kayaks and rowboats will be available every Sunday through Labor Day Weekend. There is no charge but donations are requested. For more information, call 586-3360.] Lake of the Woods Forest Preserve, Mahomet. 1pm Theater “Pasta” [Summer Studio Theatre presents the “Carmone Brothers Italian Food Products Corporation in the Pasta Pageant,” starring Dallas Street and Matthew J. Hutchinson. Tickets are available through the Krannert Center Box Office.] Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, U. 7pm

MON. JUN 25 Live Bands Jazz Jam w/ MRS Trio Cover, Iron Post, U. 7pm We Are The Fury, Olympia, Moros Eros, Seldan

$6/$8 at the door, 18+, Canopy Club, U. 8pm Open Mic Night with hosts: Brandon T. Washington and Mike Ingram Free, 19+, Cowboy Monkey, U. 10pm

Taste of CU Highlight

Dancing Belly Dance Choreographed Routine Class [Learn to combine movements and sequences together into a beautiful choreographed belly dance routine. All are welcome! Mondays, $40/6 weeks. See www.DanceClubUrbana. com for map, bus and other info.] Independent Media Center, U. 8pm

Craig Russo Latin Jazz Project

Workshops Acoustic Guitar Workshop [Doyle Dykes is a frequent guest on the Grand Ole Opry and is taking to the road to share his remarkable talent in concerts and guitar workshops all over the country. Free admission.] C.V. Lloyd Music Center, C. 7pm

Sunday, June 24. West Side Park, 12:30-1:30 p.m.

TUE. JUN 26

The best of both worlds when Latin meets jazz! The Craig Russo Latin Jazz Project is a fresh mix of outstanding jazz soloists; rich, AfroCuban inspired rhythms; and unique arrangements of jazz standards. The group features the very best regional musicians, drawing heavily on the rich music community in Champaign-Urbana and the University of Illinois.

Live Bands Biaggiís on the Patio Series: Kayla Brown and Mike Ingram [Reservations are going fast.] Free, Biaggi’s Ristorante, C. 6pm Bugtussle No cover, Rose Bowl Tavern, U. 9pm 56 Hope Road [$2 Long Islands.] No cover, Canopy Club, U. 9pm Corn Desert Ramblers [Featuring Bob Watson on dobro and Russ Clark on bass.] Free, Rose Bowl Tavern, U. 9pm Concerts U of I Summer Jazz Band [Lead by Chip McNeill. $6 general admission, $5 seniors/kids, $2 students.] Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, U. 7:30pm Dancing Subversion [Weekly industrial, EBM, electro dance night at the Highdive in downtown Champaign. Now featuring DJ Vermis and DJ Evily. $2 cover, $1 drafts.] +19, Highdive, C. 10pm Karaoke Karaoke with Randy Miller Free, Bentley’s Pub, C. 9:30pm

WED. JUN 27 Live Bands Donnie Heitler [Solo piano.] The Great Impasta, C. 6pm Irish Traditional Music Session Bentley’s Pub, C. 7pm End Times Trio Iron Post, U. 7pm Nicodemus Agency Showcase: [The Beauty Shop, Dark Meat, Headlights, Shipwreck.] Mike ’n Molly’s, C. 8pm Wednesdays in the Void [The Montauk Project, The Third Flight, Marseilles, Jetwan.] Free, 18+, Canopy Club, U. 9pm Jeremy Harper [Acoustic covers and originals.] Free, 19+, The Phoenix, C. 9pm DJ Tango Dancing: DJ Joe Grohens Free, 19+, Cowboy Monkey, C. 7:30pm Disco Phil [Disco, funk and soul.] Free, Boltini Lounge, C. 10:30pm Karaoke Dragon Karaoke [Paul Faber hosts karaoke.] Embassy Tavern, U. 9pm Liquid Courage Karaoke [Come and enjoy karaoke every Wednesday night.] Geovantis, C. 10pm

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buzz weekly

MUST GO FASTER.

J u n e 21

J u n e 2 7 , 2 oo7

jonesin CROSSWORD PUZZLE “Hi, Steaks”--see if you can make the cut. by Matt Jones Across 1 French friends 5 Key for punctuation 10 1990s MTV show that played electronica 13 Card dealer’s hat 15 Bookstore section 16 Dove noise 17 Follow 18 Liqueurs used in “sour” cocktails 20 Norris or Woolery, after one too many buffets? 22 Help breaking into a puzzle 23 Avenge 24 Financier’s study: abbr. 26 Knack for detail 27 Riot squad canister 30 They may have hot springs 33 Farmer’s concern 35 Simple sandwich 36 Serving of ice in a beer hall drink? 40 Openly gay 41 “You may have a ___” 42 Have ___ in one’s knowledge 43 Robert De Niro’s film studio 45 Watchdog’s warning 47 Vichyssoise ingredient 48 Parent’s reason, with “because” 52 Fisher of “Wedding Crashers” 54 Outfit worn while pole dancing? 57 Movie with a red pill and a blue pill 59 Japanese martial art with bamboo swords 60 Suffix for mountain 61 Animal life 62 Wanda of “Evan Almighty” 63 “___ I?” 64 Coffeehouse freebie 65 Georgia and Armenia, once: abbr.

Down 1 Assert 2 College student’s other focus 3 Subscription unit 4 Most solid 5 Former Iranian rulers 6 Rich soil part 7 Colorful desktop 8 How some people play 9 Uno + due 10 What many thespians claim got them hooked 11 Night sight 12 Submit to a forum 14 Place on the fluff cycle again 19 “Mighty” superhero in 1987’s “Adventures in Babysitting” 21 Gnarls Barkley member ___-Lo 25 Beer buy 27 Promote 28 Jessica of the “Fantastic Four” series 29 Dance move 30 Stain 31 Rain hard 32 The big guns 33 Type of pet that only needs water 34 Libertarian ___ Paul 37 Fencing sword 38 Aspiring musician’s dream status 39 Security badges 44 Smile from ear to ear 45 Grammy genre since 1991 46 They may be calculated 48 Russian-born swimsuit model Sheik 49 Time to wake up, for many 50 Fails to float 51 Purchase 52 Couple, in the tabloids 53 Stadium near LaGuardia Airport 55 Test answer with a 50/50 shot 56 Fix a salad 58 Div. for the Dolphins

Solutions on pg. 16

Thursday June 21st $4 Mojitos $5 Specialty Martinis

Friday June 22nd $5 Red Bull + Vodka $3 Jagermeister

Saturday June 23rd $10 Buckets (5 Bottles) -Miller Lite -Miller Chill -MGD -High Life $14 Corona Buckets (5 Bottles)

120 N. Neil 352-9756

INTRO | A ROUND TOWN | L ISTEN, HEAR | THE HOOPLA | STAGE, S CREEN &

IN

B ETWEEN | CLASSIFIEDS | THE STINGER | CU CALENDAR

sounds from the scene


Buzz Magazine: June 21, 2007