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FEBRUARY 2013

| VOL. 7 | ISSUE 2


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>>editor’s note

A Return to the ‘Dear Old Golden Rule’ Days ADDRESS 94 W. Castle St., Suite #B Stockton, CA 95204 PHONE 209.932.9252 TOLL FREE 1.888.289.0521 FAX 1.866.298.0408 WEB www.SpanosParkMonthly.com PUBLISHER Shawn Crary EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Mitzi Stites Managing Editor Alan Naditz Staff Writer & Copy Editor Gene Beley Contributing Writer Bernadine Chapman-Cruz Contributing Writer Paul Grant Contributing Writer Francis Novero Contributing Writer Gayle Romasanta Contributing Writer CREATIVE DEPARTMENT Shawn Crary Art Director Louie Ambriz Junior Graphic Designer, Photographer & Web Development Matt Vincent Graphic Designer & Web Development SUPPORTING STAFF Cameron Crary Circulation Alec Fielding Circulation MARKETING DEPARTMENT Noel Fielding Advertising Director Rachel Castillo Marketing Consultant Lisa Griffith Marketing Consultant Memri Johnson Marketing Consultant Boo Mariano-Junqueiro Marketing Consultant Crystal Salvador Marketing Consultant ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE/PAYABLE Ernie Gallardo Office Manager CONTACT US To submit advertisements & artwork artwork@bigmonkeygroup.com To submit press releases editor@bigmonkeygroup.com

“School days, school days, dear old golden rule days.” Growing up, school was such a huge part of my life. This was the time when I was able to discover what type of person I was and wanted to be. Friendships were made, hearts were broken, there were a lot of school activities and oh, yes, even a little studying got done. We all attended the local neighborhood schools. I would walk with my friends to and from school – first elementary school, then on to middle school, and finally the walk to the bus stop for high school. If we were lucky enough, we could take the family car once we received the allimportant driver’s license. School was a lot simpler then. Schools had a lot to offer students. Along with high school core classes, there were more elective classes and extracurricular activities for students. There seemed to be something for everyone. There were music classes, several foreign languages to learn and various art classes. When it came to taking electives, there was a lot to choose from. Class size was something we never had to worry about. In elementary school and junior high, the class size never went over 24 or 25 students; in high school the class size wasn’t over 30. There was the occasional person picking on other people, but never bullying like the type going on today. I took for granted how good I actually had things. I was in eighth grade when the first rumblings of budget cuts came about. I am sure there were always budget cuts, but this was the first time I felt it affect me. Classes were going to be cut. My junior high planned to eliminate home economics and shop class. I remember going to the school board meeting with many other students and teachers to see if they were really going to cut these classes. I even got up and talked about how important these classes were to the students. Those same two little words, budget cuts, hit me hard when I was a senior in high school. I was in music as well as on drill team. During this year, the school district needed to cut its budget in a big way – very much like in the movie, “Mr. Holland’s Opus.” Luckily, though, they didn’t get rid of all of the arts; small cuts were made in all departments. This allowed the schools to keep everything. Several fundraisers helped keep things going. When my own children were ready to start school, I enrolled them in the local community school and did my share of volunteering like so many of our readers do. As my children learned their ABCs, I received an education on how much schools have changed over the years. By the time my oldest reached second grade, my eyes opened to a lot of things. There weren’t a lot of extra classes for the older students, the number of children per classroom had increased and bullying was almost a daily occurrence. Now, I know that there is no perfect school anywhere, and you may love the school that your child attends. That’s great news. Our children are our No. 1 priority and we, as parents, are always striving to make them the best that they can be. Our feature story this month is on Charter schools. You will get an inside look at a few of them and see how they work. Many of you may be surprised at what these schools offer. They offer students a variety of classes and subjects to study. Does your child love animals and farming? There is a charter school that focuses on that. What about music, sports and health? There are schools that specialize in those fields as well. It’s true that not every school is a fit for every child. It’s also true that public schools still have a lot to offer our kids. But one of our goals as a parent is to help our children succeed in life, and that can begin with their school years. Mitzi Stites | Managing Editor | editor@bigmonkeygroup.com

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The Spanos Park Monthly magazine is published once a month and direct-mailed to over 5,500 homes in and around the Stockton communities of Spanos Park East and West. An additional 1,000 copies are distributed in high-traffic areas. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of the contents in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher is not responsible for the accuracy of copy or comments submitted to Big Monkey Group LLC., and/or Spanos Park Monthly magazine. Comments may be edited for clarity and length. ©2013 BIG MONKEY GROUP LLC

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>>feature story

A Chartered Course

A Local Parent Investigates San Joaquin County Charter Schools By Paul Grant Contributing Writer

R

ecently, my wife and I tried to get our sevenyear-old son into one of the local private charter schools. To say we were unsuccessful was an understatement: his name was selected 238th out of 240 applicants, with only 60 openings available. I had been told at the time that this was not unusual, and that his chance of enrolling in any of the public charters was slim at best.

In December, during an interview for another story, San Joaquin County Superintendent of Schools Mick Founts mentioned the countyoperated charter school network, something I knew nothing about. With our youngest son also starting public school this year, I thought it was time to do some research into the county charter schools. I must say that I was surprised and impressed by the breadth and scope of the program, and also with the young people that I met who attend these schools. On the drive out to the first of the schools, Dr. Founts had plenty of time to fill me in on the history of the charters. Venture Academy, the first county’s charter, was started to support local homeschooling for elementary-aged students. Parents needed assistance with resources and testing, and the academy could monitor the student’s progress as it related to state standards. As parents began to request more services, the school was eventually operating four days a week. Middle school and high school students were added, and Venture became a traditional five-day-a-week school. As Fount’s philosophy of “finding a place for every student” solidified, new academies were added within

San Joaquin County’s public charter schools find a way to always keep students laughing and learning. the Venture Academy framework that focused on different areas of academics and interests. My tour started with Venture Academy’s agriculture school, Historic Durham Ferry. This was an “academy within the academy,” where students grades 6 through 12 could focus on agriculture, ecology, animal husbandry and agriculture technology. All classrooms had laptop computers for every student, which I soon realized was common throughout the charter system. Muddy boots are left at the door while students study in the classroom, then on again to ride horses or work with a large collection of South African Boer goats. Freshman Claire Allen walked me through the Boer goat program, which starts every morning with standard farm chores like feeding, cleaning stalls and administering medicine. She showed me the goats that she cares for personally, including one she had recently assisted in giving birth to a litter (or “tower,” for goat aficionados) of eight “kids.” Claire introduced me to her show

goat Gypsy, and I asked her what impresses the judges the most about a goat. “You want a lot of mass, but for [young female goats], you also want a feminine neck,” she told me. “Gypsy doesn’t have the best neck, but I’m breeding her to a buck that will bring the feminine neck in to her kids.” Claire and the other students who work with animals make a commitment that goes well beyond school hours, as most students volunteer to feed and clean on weekends and through the summer. There’s no doubt this school is only for hardcore farm enthusiasts, and all of the students I saw looked like they were in just the right place. Back at Venture Academy Family of Schools headquarters, I toured through Ventureland Academy, the school for kindergarten through sixth grade. The classrooms were clean and comfortable, but there were some obvious differences compared to the school my children attend. These include a massive rock climbing wall and a woodshop so automated that Mar-

lowe Burgess, the shop teacher, built an entire project in the five minutes that we spent together. As he moved from the jig saw to the drill press to the router, he explained that he, like some others, wore several hats at the Academy, including managing the rock wall and working with the independent study students. I admired the seascape merry-go-round he had just created, and moved on. I quickly saw that the academies within the Venture group offer a focus for almost any student. At Delta VISTA, 9th through 12th graders surround themselves with science, technology, and medicine. Nine advanced placement courses are offered, and students can earn up to 32 college semester units in a program that partners with Grand Canyon University. Foundations Academy is a Visual and Performing Arts program for students who want to focus on drama, language arts, or social studies. The Academy of Innovation and Inquiry, also called Brainworx, offers more perContinued on page 6

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>>feature story Area Public Charter Schools Aspire APEX Academy (209) 466-3861 Aspire Benjamin Holt College Preparatory Academy (209) 955-1477

Academy of Business, Law and Education (209) 478-1600 California Connections Academy at Ripon (503) 877-8144

Excel Academy Collegiate Sports and Health Science Preparatory School (209) 227-2300 Great Valley Academy (209) 824-5400

Aspire Langston Hughes Academy (209) 943-2389

California Pacific Charter School North Central CA (855) 225-7227

Joe Serna Jr. Charter School (209) 331-7809

Aspire Port City Academy (209) 943-2389

California Virtual Academy at San Joaquin (866) 339-6790

Manteca Unified Vocational Academy (209) 858-7460

Aspire River Oaks Charter (209) 956-8100

Delta Charter School (209) 830-6789

New Jerusalem School (209) 835-2597

Dr. Lewis Dolphin Stallworth Sr. Charter School (209) 943-0353

Nightingale Charter School (209) 933-7260

Escalon Charter Academy (209) 838-3591

One.Charter Academy of Visual and Performing Arts (209) 468-9079

Aspire Rosa Parks Academy (209) 944-5590 Aspire Vincent Shalvery Academy (209) 931-5399

Continued from page 5 sonalized programs with one-on-one attention, and students can complete up to 20 college credits. I loved the names of two academies: the New Energy Academy and the Clean Transportation Technologies Academy. In my opinion, these are critical emerging technologies and I feel better about the state of modern education when I hear that high school students have the opportunity to engage in the science and debate of creating a cleaner future. Central to all of the academies is the Da Vinci Center for Innovative Learning. While not an academy itself, any Venture Academy student may take classes here. The mainstays here are science, technology, engineering, digital arts and math. As I walked in the door, I saw students using a 3-D printer to create working machines from computer drawings (if you haven’t heard of a 3-D printer, you should Google it – they are amazing!). These students were learning about rapid prototyping, an advanced manufactur6 | FEBRUARY 2013 | spanos park monthly magazine

Pacific Law Academy (209) 933-7000

Stockton High (209) 933-7365

Pittman Charter School (209) 933-7496

Stockton Unified Early College Academy (209) 933-7370 ext. 1450

Rio Valley Charter School (209) 368-4934 San Joaquin Building Futures Academy (209) 468-9246 Stockton Collegiate International Elementary (209) 390-9861 Stockton Collegiate International Secondary (209) 390-9861 Stockton Health Careers Academy (209) 933-7360

ing process that also involved laser-cutting cardboard models and learning advanced 3-D modeling software. In the robotics lab, Jim Bock supervises the building and programming of robots for land, sea and air. In the media center, students produce their own movies and the posters to promote them. Everywhere you turn at the Da Vinci Center, you see something incredibly cool. This was where I wish I had gone to school! The Venture Academy of Schools is just one of the four charters operated by the county. My next visit was to the Building Futures Academy, a construction technology school for at-risk young adults ages 18-26. Here, I saw older youth learning masonry, electrical, woodwork and framing, sheetrock, insulation, plumbing, and many other skills. I didn’t get to stop in at the One Academy, but I learned from Dr. Founts that it is a visual and performing arts school for 7th to 12th graders, specializing in art, dance, design, film, acting, writing, music and theater. My last stop was Excel Academy, a brandnew school with a focus on collegiate sports and health science. While athletics is a major

TEAM Charter School (209) 462-2282 Tracy Learning Center Three sites Discovery Charter School I Millennium Charter School l Primary Charter School (209) 831-5240 Velocity International Science & Technology Academy (209) 622-1900 Venture Academy Family of Schools (209) 468-5940

focus, this academy also touts itself as being highly focused on the curriculum, with the goal that every student will succeed academically in college. I toured the new gym, which is under construction but still very impressive, with two full-size basketball courts. There are 150 students enrolled this first year, and a limit has already been set at 300. Inside the school, I wondered if it would seem like a really competitive environment, but the vibe was more energetic and friendly. Again, technology was everywhere and the students used iPads for textbooks. I was told that in addition to athletic training, students take four classes a semester: one sports-related and three on other academic subjects. This is definitely only a school for students who want to push themselves as athletes, but for those who fit that description, it seems like a haven. Overall, I was very impressed by the county charter schools, particularly the Venture Academies. Most kids can learn and thrive at a standard public school, but I think the charters are a great option for kids who want to channel their talents and energy in a more-focused direction.


Spanos Park

STOCKTON’S PREMIERE COMMUNITY | WWW.SPANOSPARKBROKER.COM

spanos park monthly magazine | FEBRUARY 2013 | 7


>>around spanos

Area School Information Bear Creek High School There is a School Site Council meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 19. Manlio Silva School Monday, Feb. 4 through Thursday, Feb. 7 is “Take Your Family to School Week.” Manlio Monday is Monday, Feb. 4. Wednesday, Feb. 6 is College Wear Day and Movie Night. On Thursday, Feb. 7, there is a Zun Zun Assembly. The See’s Candy Sell is Tuesday, Feb. 19 through Wednesday, March 6. “Spirit Day: Purple

Passion/Shark Tank Quarter 3” ends on Friday, Feb. 22. Lodi Unified School District Information Schools will be closed on Friday, Feb 8 to observe Lincoln’s Birthday and on Monday, Feb. 18 for Washington’s Birthday. There is a Common Planning Day (K-12 minimum day) on Wednesday, Feb. 13 and an Assessment Collaboration (K-6 minimum day) on Wednesday, Feb. 27.

Costa Named New SJCOE Assistant Superintendent Ron Costa has been selected to fill the vacant position of Assistant Superintendent of Educational Services at SJCOE, the office announced. Costa brings extensive experience in teaching, site administration, and district administration. He is currently superintendent of Escalon Unified School District. Prior to this position, Costa was assistant superintendent at Riverbank Unified School District. He also served as principal at Rio Altura School in Riverbank Unified School District. He graduated from the University of California at Davis with a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Sciences and Management. He received his teaching credentials from Chapman University. Costa Ron Costa completed his Master of Science in Educational Administration from National University, and received his Administrative Credential from California State University, Stanislaus. “I am excited to have someone with [Costa’s] experience and passion as a part of our leadership team,” said SJCOE Superintendent of Schools Dr. Mick Founts. “He is a solid instructional leader who balances management with a deep love of all youth. It is a great honor to welcome Ron to our SJCOE family.”

Share the Gift of Love with a New Spanos Park Home For the month of December, 68 homes were for sale, 38 were pending, 31 sold and 13 expired, withdrew or cancelled. For properties sold, the average days on the market were 62, median square footage price was $103.73, median sold price was $192,000 and median size was 2,314 square feet. Properties currently available are $135,000 to $475,000. For more market information, call RE/MAX Gold Broker Sheree Cox at (209) 451-2600. Current market data taken from Metrolist. 8 | FEBRUARY 2013 | spanos park monthly magazine

Festive Crab Feed Defying Muscular Dystrophy will host its second Annual Mardi Gras Crab Feed on Friday, March 1, at the Stockton Ballroom. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for no-host cocktails, with dinner served at 7 p.m. The organization’s goal is to raise $50,000 for Vecttor Treatment clinical trials (an innovative treatment) in the fight against Muscular Dystrophy. The founder’s family members, Todd Harrison and Dave Gould, have been using this treatment for two years with astonishing results and they feel compelled to make it available for others across the nation. The crab feed’s evening festivities include entertainment; a silent auction; a raffle for prizes such as a touch-screen laptop, a flat screen TV, and a video gaming system; as well as a sit-down meal of crab, pasta, bread and salad catered by Seafood Express. Brisket will be available as a substitute for crab. General seating tickets are $45 per person and reserved general seating tickets known as the “Jester Table” can be purchased for $50 per person, in groups of eight or more at $400 minimum. Business sponsorship tables and opportunities are also available, ranging from $250 to $1,000. For more information about the Mardi Gras Crab Feed, contact Cathy Gould-Harrison at (209) 598-0471 or charrisondmd@ymail.com.

More Than Books at the Margaret Troke Library Free Basic Computer Class for Beginners. These classes are designed to help new computer users get comfortable with technology. No signup or registration needed. Classes meet on Fridays throughout the month from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Students are welcome to bring their own laptop or personal device. Plan to arrive at least 15 minutes before 3 p.m. to allow time to find parking and set up. Homework Helpers for K-Fifth Grade. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., the Margaret Troke Branch Library presents “Homework Helpers.” Come to the library, where our volunteers can guide you. Homework Helpers assist children in kindergarten through fifth grade with math, reading and science. All students should bring their homework assignments with them. This is a free program that is on a first-come, firstserved basis. Troke Mystery Book Club. The Troke Mystery Book Club will meet on Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 4:30 p.m. to discuss Valentine’s Day-themed mysteries. Visit

the Troke Branch Library to check out a copy of the books for this club. Preschool Story Time. Come join the fun every Tuesday for this age-specific story time. There will be finger plays, stories and songs. Nametags will be handed out at 10 a.m. and story time will start at 10:15 a.m. sharp. Free Beginning Line Dancing. Come get your line dance on Saturday, Feb. 16. Have fun, meet new people, and get a great workout. Anne Hines, library volunteer and line dancing instructor at Oak Park Senior Center, will teach you to line dance while getting some great, fun exercise. No registration needed. Wear comfortable clothes and bring a bottle of water with you. Math Smart Tutoring for Grades 6-12. Math Smart Tutoring is a free drop-in program for any San Joaquin County 6th-12th grade students struggling with mathematics. Tutors help with basic math, algebra, geometry and higher-level math when needed. No signup necessary. Math Smart Tutoring is available Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.


>>community briefs Something Sweet at the Haggin

Valentine Pops with Broadway Tenors

Sugar Hearts, and Sacramento artists Rob-O and Imelda Martinez visit the Haggin Museum again for a fantastically sweet and creative activity: decorating molded sugar hearts with colorful icing and adornments. This event is Saturday, Feb. 9. Seatings are 1:30 p.m. and 2:15 p.m. Each session is limited to 15 students each, available on a firstcome, first-served basis. Activities are included with price of regular admission ($8 adults; $7 seniors 65 and up; $5 for youths age 10-17 and students with school ID; free to museum members and children under age 10 accompanied by an adult) and all materials are provided. No reservations are required; just come have fun! For more information, call (209) 940-6315 or email education@hagginmuseum.org.

Three of Broadway’s leading men join the Stockton Symphony for an evening of the most beautiful music written for the Broadway stage. Enjoy your favorite songs from “Chicago,” “The Lion King,” “Phantom of the Opera,” “Guys and Dolls,” “Brigadoon,” “West Side Story” and more. Your favorite valentine is going to love this performance! There are two chances to experience the music: on Saturday, Feb. 9 at 6 p.m., and Sunday, Feb. 10, at 2: 30 p.m. Both performances are in the Warren Atherton Auditorium, San Joaquin Delta College, 5151 Pacific Ave., Stockton. Tickets are $22 to $60 per person. For more information, call (209) 951-0196.

Classic Cinema at its Best Fox 40 and Friends of the Fox presents “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” on Friday, Feb. 15 at the Bob Hope Theatre. Brick, an alcoholic ex-football player, drinks his days away and resists the affections of his wife, Maggie. His reunion with his father, Big Daddy, who is dying of cancer, jogs a host of memories and revelations for both father and son. This 1958 film stars Elizabeth Taylor and Paul Newman. Tickets are $4 to $8 per person; additional fees apply. For more information, call (209) 373-1446.

Backyard Access Requested

Blues Legend King to Perform at Hope Theatre B.B. King will perform his unique sound at the Bob Hope Theatre on Wednesday, Feb. 27 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets start at $39.50 per person and can be purchased at the Bob Hope Theatre box office, (209) 3731700, or at www.stocktonlive.com. Since the 1950s, there has been only one “King of the Blues” – Riley B. King, affectionately known as B.B. King. Since he began recording in the late 1940s, he has released more than 60 albums. Many are considered blues classics, like 1965’s “Live at the Regal” and 1976’s collaboration with Bobby “Blue” Bland, “Together for the First Time.” King’s singing is richly melodic, both vocally and in the “singing” that comes from his guitar. In King’s words, “When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille.”

In 2009, the City of Stockton committed to televising approximately 750 miles of sewer lines throughout the city before the end of 2014. The video inspection will identify blocked or damaged pipes and determine areas that need preventative maintenance or repair. This preventative maintenance will reduce the number of sewer backups or spills within the city. Half of the work is done, but inspectors need your assistance to complete the project. Some of the pipes are in easements on private property. The easements allow city workers to access the pipes for maintenance and repair activities. The Municipal Utilities Department (MUD) will alert owners before entering. If no one is home, a door hanger will be left. MUD crews work diligently to make sure they leave the property in the same condition they found it. You can help MUD work crews stay on schedule by allowing them access to the sewer lines in easements on your property. If you have any questions, call MUD at (209) 937-8700. spanos park monthly magazine | FEBRUARY 2013 | 9


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>>411 in 209

WHEN

Feb. 22-24: 51st Almond Blossom Festival in Ripon

HOW

to Celebrate Valentine’s Day

Celebrate Valentine’s Day weekend with your sweetheart in Lodi Wine Country on Feb. 9 and 10 during Lodi’s Wine and Chocolate Weekend. Travel from winery to winery while taking hosted activities such as wine and chocolate pairings, live music, barrel tasting and cellar tours. There are more than 40 participating wineries, so please visit the wineries page for the full list of activities. There will be plenty of award-winning wine to keep your taste buds and significant other very happy. Tickets now on sale. One ticket is valid for Saturday and Sunday. For more information, visit the Wine and Chocolate website at www.lodiwineandchocoloate.com.

WHERE

The Manteca Senior Center

Join in on the Third Annual Mayors Committee Chili Cook-off on Sunday, Feb. 24. Tickets purchased prior to the event will get six tastings for $5. These tickets can be purchased at the Manteca Convention & Tourist Bureau, 1422 Grove Ave., or by calling (209) 823-7229. Tastings are 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. There will also be chili judging, raffle prizes and vendors. Proceeds benefit arts in the Manteca Mayors Committee on the Arts, which is comprised of 20 different clubs.

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WHAT

This event features a Queen Coronation, Lion’s Club spaghetti dinner, carnival at Mistlin Sports Park, Diaper Derby, Fun Run and Almond Blossom Parade. The event is sponsored by the Ripon Chamber of Commerce. The parade is on Circles Historic Ripon/Main Street and Fourth Street. The festival includes crafts and food booths, plus a carnival, in Ripon’s Mistlin Sports Park on River Road and North Ripon Road. The dinner and dance will be at the Ripon Community Center, 334 W. Fourth St. For more information, visit www.riponchamber.org.

Bits of Love— New Jewelry Line

Lodi-based screenwriter and marketer Cheryl Laughlin and her boyfriend, Caleb Porter, have launched a jewelry line called “Bits of Love.” Laughlin has worked on local film sets, commercials, and marketing for 20 years, while also breaking through with her screenwriting. Porter has worked in the printing industry for the past 20 years. They combined their love of print and design to create high-quality rings and fun packaging for Bits of Love. Their first solid sterling silver rings in size seven have the words “Bold, Love, and Hope,” with beautiful gemstones in the center. Online prices for the rings are $110 each and include free shipping. The new line of jewelry is also available at Lodi’s City Girl upscale fashion store, 14 W. Pine St., Stockton. Bits of Love will contribute a percentage of profits to Street Poets Inc., a non-profit, poetry-based peace-making organization. For more information or to place an order, go to http://bitsoflovestyle.com.


>>tips from the pros

Working Out With Your Partner By Lurysol Olivera

W

orking out with your significant other can be fun. But you have to try to remember through all workouts to encourage each other and always keep it positive. Here are some great exercises you can incorporate with your partner in your workout.

Single-leg partner chest pass. Stand facing your partner, each of you balancing on one leg. Keep your abdominals contracted and your body erect and stable. Pass a medicine ball (or similar-sized item) back and forth to each other using a basketball chest pass. Continue for 30 to 60 seconds on each leg. Partner shuffle drill. Stand facing your partner. Shuffle for about 10 feet, going one way, while simultaneously tossing a medicine ball back and forth to your partner. Repeat, going the opposite direction. Continue for 60 to 120 seconds. Lunge and chest pass to partner. Start by standing tall with perfect posture, facing your partner. Lunge forward as you throw the medicine ball to your partner using a chest pass. Your partner will catch the ball while performing a backward lunge. Repeat, lunging forward and backward. Remember to push off the front leg and be sure that your front knee stays over your front foot while lunging. Continue for 30 to 60 seconds each side. Partner side swing pass. Stand side-by-side about 2 feet from your partner. Maintain perfect posture and keep your abdominals contracted throughout the entire exercise. Keep your arms straight and swing the ball from the outside of your body to the inside; then toss the ball to your partner. Your outside leg will pivot as you rotate across your body. Your partner catches the ball and repeats the exercise. Continue for 30 to 90 seconds each side. V-sits with rotation and pass to partner. Sit on the floor about 1 to 2 feet away from your partner with your knees bent. Sit upright with perfect posture, abdominals contracted tightly throughout the entire exercise. Start by holding the medicine ball into your chest. Now you and your partner recline back a few inches while maintaining perfect posture. Hold that position as you both rotate one way and then the other. Return to the starting position and, once you’re upright, throw the ball to your partner. Your partner will catch it, and you’ll both repeat the exercise. Repeat for 30 to 90 seconds. Squat and overhead press throw to partner. Start by standing 5 to 6 feet away from your partner. Hold the medicine ball at chest level. Using an overhead press, toss the ball to your partner. Stay square to your partner. Your partner should catch the ball in an overhead position. Be sure to keep your abdominals contracted, your chest out and up, and your shoulders back and down. Continue for 30 to 90 seconds.

Lurysol Olivera with fitness partner and financée Vicente Alaniz. PHOTO BY LOUIE AMBRIZ

>>important spanos contacts Spanos Schools and Library Bear Creek High School....................................................................................... 953-8234 Creekside School.................................................................................................. 953-8285 Delta Sierra Middle School.................................................................................... 953-8510 Elkhorn School..................................................................................................... 953-8312 Julia Morgan School.............................................................................................. 953-8454 John Muir School.................................................................................................. 953-8106 Mc Auliffe Middle School...................................................................................... 953-9434 Manlio Silva Elementary School............................................................................ 953-9302 Plaza Robles Continuation High School............................................................... 953-8068 Wagner Holt School.............................................................................................. 953-8407 Margaret K. Troke Branch Library......................................................................... 937-8221

General Interest Elk Horn Golf Course ........................................................................................... 474-3900 Post Office............................................................................................................. 957-5436 Spanos Park West HOA........................................................................................ 932-9252 Reserve At Spanos Golf Course .......................................................................... 477-4653 Spanos Park Monthly magazine ........................................................................... 932-9252

City of Stockton Abandoned Vehicles ............................................................................................. 937-8354 Allied Waste ......................................................................................................... 466-3604 Animal Control....................................................................................................... 937-8274 Anti-graffiti Program............................................................................................. 937-8040 Excessive Noise - Parties/Social Gatherings....................................................... 937-8377 Non-functioning Street Light................................................................................. 937-8411 Stockton Police Department Non-emergency...................................................... 937-8377 Stockton Police Department Narcotics Unit........................................................ 937-8422 Code Enforcement ............................................................................................... 937-8813

Connect Online

Lurysol has been a trainer for 11 years and has owned Combine Fitness for 2 years. The studio is located at 1419 W. Fremont St., right under I-5 in Stockton. Studio number is (209) 463-2326 and her cell phone number is (209) 606-9795.

City of Stockton ....www.stocktongov.com County of San Joaquin...............................................................www.co.san-joaquin.ca.us Lodi Unified School District........................................................................www.lodiusd.net Stockton Libraries.............................................................................................ww.lib.ca.us Spanos Park Monthly magazine ................................................. www.spanosmonthly.com spanos park monthly magazine | FEBRUARY 2013 | 15


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Spanos Park Monthly magazine  

Stockton's community magazine for the residents of Spanos Park East and Spanos Park West

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