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Ryan Petersen | Cornell University | B. Arch ‘15


INDIVIDUAL

GROUP

ELECTIVE

RYAN PETERSEN

CORNELL UNIVERSITY | B.ARCH ‘15 208.409.1462 rdp79@cornell.edu 8132 W. Arapaho Ct. Boise, ID 83714

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HOTEL

MUSEUM

10-13

CAROUSEL

14-17

18-23

TOWN HALL

24-26

SHELTER

MATRIX

SPRING 2011

04-09

FALL 2011

SPRING 2012

28-33

FALL 2012

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SWITCHBACK HOTEL DESIGN V PROFESSOR: DANA CUPKOVA FALL 2012 LOCATION: ITHACA, NY

The Switchback Hotel is a project that introduces a public infrastructure that both mediates the topographic character of Ithaca but also creates a link to the commons that further attracts more of the city’s inhabitants to the downtown area that would normally be wary because of the slope. A voronoi system was used to generate spatial clustering around a switchback that cut through the site in Grasshopper, which in turn produced the overall formal organization of the building but not its formal appearance. The project was then designed manually while still maintaining the logic and parameters that were derived from the grasshopper script. What is produced is a project whose form is the derivative of a script that mediates the slope, but its appearance is more of a result of its context.

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5min walk (Downtown Ithaca)

10min walk (Downtown Ithaca)

15min walk (Downtown Ithaca)

5min walk (Site)

10min walk (Site)

15min walk (Site)

I analyzed the city’s topographical variation by mapping an ideal walking time (represented as the circles in the diagram above) compared to the actual walking time from a certain point. This analysis led my focus to be on the mediation of slope, using the example of the termite dwelling and switchbacks as precedents. 6

Topographical Analysis (above), Switchback mediation (above), Termite dwelling mediation (right), Switchback script variations (facing page, top), Spacial voronoi through site section (facing page, bottom), Spatial voronoi models (facing page, right)


POINT DENSITY VARIATION

Point Density Variation

ANGLE VARIATION

Switchback Angle Variation

UV DENSITY VARIATION

UV Density Variation

VORONOI RADIUS VARIATION

Voronoi Radius Variation

Voronoi Through Site Section

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Plan 3.5-4 (above), Diagrammatic wall section showing louver variation (right), Ground plan and site plan (right), Longitudinal section (bottom), Renderings and 3d print model (facing page)

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SANCTUARY:

MUSEUM FOR ROD SERLING DESIGN III PROFESSOR: VINCE MULCAHY FALL 2011 LOCATION: BINGHAMTON, NY

Sanctuary is a design for a museum honoring Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling. The location of the project was in Binghamton, NY, Serling’s hometown and inspiration for many of the stories from his acclaimed series. In his time the city was very much an idealistic, American suburbia, a sort of “pleasantville.” Binghamton has since become nothing more than a ruin of vacant buildings, empty lots, and rubble. Based on this, I imagined my museum would be more than a collection of memorabilia but would in turn preserve the memory of the Binghamton of Rod Serling’s day. I approached the project through analyzing the sections of Morphosis’ San Francisco Federal Building and Le Corbusier’s Firminy Church. These analysis produced variations and extrapolations within the context of our site, which were then physically modeled across the length of the site. My project creates an escape, where people can relive the glory of America’s once great city. I covered the site with a forest (real, and crystalline) because of the inherent spiritual connection that forests conjure. The museum’s form was inspired by a church to enhance the spiritual effects associated with a sanctuary. The Museum for Rod Serling is not just a memorial to a television pioneer and his work, but also to the city that was the impetus for such unparalleled imagination.

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Study models (left), Section of Firminy (left), Section of San Francisco Federal Building (above, Section iterations (below), Plans and sections (facing page, top), Final model (bottom, facing page)

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THE LAST CAROUSEL: BAIRD DESIGN COMPETITION DESIGN III PROFESSOR: VINCE MULCAHY FALL 2011 LOCATION: BINGHAMTON, NY

The last carousel embodies a recollection of fragmented memories. When one approaches it, they seek to piece together the episodes and images of their past represented by the carousel animals scattered around the central enclosure. It is all that remains of a childhood memory, a memorial to the innermost thoughts of the mind that hold the memories that we strive to keep. It is in this state that the carousel is dead, only accessible as a window to the past. The floods that brings death and destruction to Binghamton is what breathes the breath of life into the memory. Like the flow of running water, the carousel will be in continuous motion so long as there is always a steady presence of water underneath the carousel. The motion is powered by water interacting with an oar-like propeller which rotates in respect to the flow of water creating a continuous cycle. This motion is the memory, yet it remains distant to those nearby, inhibiting interaction with the functioning carousel. It cements the idea that a carousel is only a memory and something that cannot be relived.

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Rendering of Carousel in stasis (top), Pieces forming image (above), Section (above), Rendering of static carousel (facing page, above), Rendering of flooded carousel in movement (facing page, bottom)

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SHEAR TOWN HALL DESIGN IV PROFESSOR: ALEX MERGOLD SPRING 2012 LOCATION: OWEGO, NY GROUP MEMBERS: RACHAEL TSENG ROSS AMATO The Shear Town Hall is a group project for a new town hall in Downtown Owego, NY. The town hall is foremost a beacon, an iconic image of a city and a landmark to visitors. The modern town hall of Owego is not just a center for business and politics, but for the community at large. It is the focal point of its landscape, thus its pointed form represents the integration of the traditional town hall tower typology and modernity. The building contains three essential spacial voids: tunnel, cave, and the atrium. The tunnel provides a direct passage between the street and the riverwalk behind the building, while the atrium penetrates the overall form, carrying light into the heart of the site, and dividing up the buildings programs. The many spaces of the town hall behave similar to caves, funneling individuals from low-ceilinged areas to larger monumental spaces. The repetition of the townhouses on street side is incorporated into the project by expressing the concrete form with vertical strips, whereas the range of materials express on the other side of the building mimic the collage of balconies and materials on the riverwalk side of the townhouses. In order to maintain the controlled, open atmosphere of the building’s spaces, the structure consists of closely spaced longitudinal beams.

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(given site)

primary vs. secondary

simple dynamic

shifted focus

shearing volumes

breaking off (ground)

central void (1st)

sealing secondary (2nd)

UP

DN

UP

UP

DN

shifted dynamic

splitting volumes

sealing primary (3rd)

DN

UP

UP

DN

resource center

lifting beacon (roof)

DN

archive

pub

reception shop & information

DN

public platform

DN

public recess area

UP

meeting hall

UP

meeting hall (balcony) storage/ kitchen UP

public recess area

pub daycare daycare office UP

meeting hall balcony

public platform

outdoor playground

mayor’s office

office balcony

community classroom UP UP

DN

DN

UP

20

DN

UP

DN

ground

DN

first

UP

second

third


roof

Longitudinal sections (above), Cross section (left), Plans (left, facing page), Plan diagram (facing page, middle), Town hall typology diagram (facing page, top)

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Although all aspects of the project were developed as a group we were each tasked with producing certain parts. For my contribution I constructed the building’s sections throughout the design process. I was also in charge of creating the experiential qualities of the project, namely the materialized section and renderings.

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Rendering from bridge (above), Structural Model (left), Rendering from Front Street (facing page, top), Building systems diagram (facing page, left), Rendering from river walk (facing page, bottom)

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BUS SHELTER:

YORK DESIGN COMPETITION FIRST PRIZE DESIGN II PROFESSOR: DAGMAR RICHTER SPRING 2011 LOCATION: CORNELL UNIVERSITY GROUP MEMBERS: ROSS AMATO VINNIE PARLATORE This two week group charette proposed a bus shelter at the bottom of Cornell’s Libe Slope. This site is a transitional zone between the learning environment of Central Campus, and the residential dorms of the West Campus, which houses the universities upperclassmen. We envisioned a treatment to the landscape that would provide spaces that accommodated this transition. The project consists of a series planes that lie on three separate grids, each mapping a common direction of movement on the slope. These planes were gradually angled more as one approached West Campus, and as the three grids overlapped the planes collided to enclosures. Instead of a singular building demarcated as a bus shelter, we believed that the site should be made up of a series of shelters that coincide with typical travel throughout the site.

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Study models (left), Libe Slope circulation analysis (above), Grid overlay diagram (right) Rending from the top of the Slope (facing page), 1/16� Scale model and detail model (facing page), Rendering from the bottom of the slope (bottom)

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DEGENERATION/REGENERATION OF ECM BIO-INSPIRED MATERIALS AND DESIGN PROFESSOR: JENNY SABIN FALL 2011 GROUP MEMBERS: MARIA STANCIU SEAN KIM

The central focus was to investigate the process of degeneration in the cellular structure of diseased cells. The basis of our exploration was derived from Kaori Ihida-Stansbury’s research on the use of scaffolding to repair the extracellular matrix (ECM) of lung cells afflicted with pulmonary hypertension (PAH). In her research, she provided two images, one showing the ordered bundles of structure in a normal artery matrix, and the other portrayed the chaotic, frayed structure of a PAH matrix. What we found intriguing was that there was no evidence showing the stages that the ECM undergoes as it deteriorates from a healthy to a diseased cell and our intent was to identify structural relationships in the different bundle environments and establish parameters that would account for the degeneration. Our exploration consisted developing a script in Grasshopper that could accurately demonstrate how the degeneration might occur. This was accomplished by populating circles at various heights with points and interpolating them, then both rotating and increasing the radius of the circle to demonstrate how the bundle fibers of the ECM might digressed from a uniform order to the chaotic randomness of an inflicted matrix. We also employed physical modeling to identify the parameters of the digital model that could not be met to the physical constraints of an actual built form.

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Cut 1

NORMAL MATRIX

Cut 2

Cut 3

Cut 4

Cut 1

DISEASED MATRIX

Our analysis of the images concluded that the ECM is composed of a series of bundled fibers that twist around one another, which are in turn composed of smaller bundles that rotate around one another. Although in a normal cell there is no uniform shape within each bundle structure/ substructure, there is however an order present between the elements that allows for a unified composition of non-uniform bundles. The PAH cell lacks this order, with the ends of the bundles spraying outward, creating larger spaces between each element that identify with the cell expansion that is associated with hypertension.

Cut 2

Cut 3 Bundle Cross-Section Analysis (left), Interior Bundles of ECM matrices(facing page, top), Isolation of Thread in Bundle (facing page, bottom)

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NORMAL MATRIX

DISEASED MATRIX

One large “bundle”

Different colours = Smaller bundles within the larger bundle

Tubes within the coloured groups

= Threads

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Iteration 1

Iteration 2

Iteration 3

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Each circle contains points within, which rotate at the circle’s individual rate. Each circle becomes a zone of influence which in turn, rotates about the center point.


Our research did not conclude in the discovery of how cells actual degenerate but provided an educated speculation as to how this degeneration might occur. In our physical exploration we encountered problems in creating a system that could be both easily controlled, and complex enough to portray the different scales of rotational relationships. This was because we lacked control of interior control points, and their proximity to one another. These control points are what attributed to the densification of the bundle. From this observation, we believe that if a system can be enacted to order these interior control points, then structural failure may be preventable.

Physical models (left,above), Final script animations of diseased bundle (facing page, top), Diagram of control point displacement (facing page, bottom)

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Ryan Petersen Architecture Portfolio