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TABLE OF CONTENTS About Us

2

History of Lomography

4

Interview with Muid Latif

6

Black And White Photography

14

Events

22

Pin-Hole Photography

32

Editor’s Pick

36

Lomography Review

42

Lomography’s Golden Rules

46

Lomography in the Philippines

50

Lomo on Location 54 The Death and rebirth of Polaroid 66 Famous Polaroid Photographers

68

Pinhole Photography

74

Article: Underwater Photography 78


TABLE OF CONTENTS About Us

2

History of Lomography

4

Interview with Muid Latif

6

Black And White Photography

14

Events

22

Pin-Hole Photography

32

Editor’s Pick

36

Lomography Review

42

Lomography’s Golden Rules

46

Lomography in the Philippines

50

Lomo on Location 54 The Death and rebirth of Polaroid 66 Famous Polaroid Photographers

68

Pinhole Photography

74

Article: Underwater Photography 78


about us LCA is the first magazine in Asia dedicated to give the reader a glimpse of how it is in the Lomography World. areas in lomography. From it’s history, to techniques, and down to current photographers who have mastered the arts of lomo.

Charlene Enaje - Art Director Stephen Silvestre - Editor-in-chief Dominique Cheng - Copywriter

4

ABOUT US

ABOUT US

5


about us LCA is the first magazine in Asia dedicated to give the reader a glimpse of how it is in the Lomography World. areas in lomography. From it’s history, to techniques, and down to current photographers who have mastered the arts of lomo.

Charlene Enaje - Art Director Stephen Silvestre - Editor-in-chief Dominique Cheng - Copywriter

4

ABOUT US

ABOUT US

5


WHAT IS LOMOGRAPHY? Lomography began with a fateful encounter in the early 1990s when a group of students in Vienna, Austria, stumbled upon the Lomo Kompakt Automat – a small, enigmatic Russian camera. Mindlessly taking the shot from the hip, and sometimes looking through the viewfinder, they were astounded with the mindblowing photos that it produced – the colours were vibrant, with deep saturation and vignettes that framed the shot – it was nothing like they had seen before! Upon returning home, friends wanted their own Lomo LC-A, igniting a new style of artistic experimental photography that we now know as Lomography! Following the mania that ensued upon the introduction of Lomography, they flew to St. Petersburg to work out a contract for the worldwide distribution of this fantastic little camera. Soon, the 10 Golden Rules was set up as a guide to this analogue movement, followed by exhibitions, world congresses, parties, installations, collaborations, and events. New products, films, and accessories were developed, and Lomography.com served as the communication hub for Lomographers worldwide. At the same time, Lomography Gallery Stores were put up worldwide. Today we are a globally active organisation dedicated to experimental and creative visual expression, a playful combination of lo-tech and hi-tech, and a cultural institution involved in commercial photographic and design company. We are dedicated to the unique imagery and style of analogue photography, and will continue to contribute to its development!

6

HISTORY OF LOMOGRAPHY

HISTORY OF LOMOGRAPHY

7


WHAT IS LOMOGRAPHY? Lomography began with a fateful encounter in the early 1990s when a group of students in Vienna, Austria, stumbled upon the Lomo Kompakt Automat – a small, enigmatic Russian camera. Mindlessly taking the shot from the hip, and sometimes looking through the viewfinder, they were astounded with the mindblowing photos that it produced – the colours were vibrant, with deep saturation and vignettes that framed the shot – it was nothing like they had seen before! Upon returning home, friends wanted their own Lomo LC-A, igniting a new style of artistic experimental photography that we now know as Lomography! Following the mania that ensued upon the introduction of Lomography, they flew to St. Petersburg to work out a contract for the worldwide distribution of this fantastic little camera. Soon, the 10 Golden Rules was set up as a guide to this analogue movement, followed by exhibitions, world congresses, parties, installations, collaborations, and events. New products, films, and accessories were developed, and Lomography.com served as the communication hub for Lomographers worldwide. At the same time, Lomography Gallery Stores were put up worldwide. Today we are a globally active organisation dedicated to experimental and creative visual expression, a playful combination of lo-tech and hi-tech, and a cultural institution involved in commercial photographic and design company. We are dedicated to the unique imagery and style of analogue photography, and will continue to contribute to its development!

6

HISTORY OF LOMOGRAPHY

HISTORY OF LOMOGRAPHY

7


INTERVIEW

Creativity knows no bounds with artist Muid Latif. Part of Malaysia’s Digital Art legacy, Latif is renowned for his unique visual artwork that incorporates traditional SE Asian design vv which has been installed and exhibited across his home country. Active in progressing the local and international art communities, Latif is also deservedly Malaysia’s Behance’s Ambassador. Get to know Latif after the jump!

with

MUID LATIF 8 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

9


INTERVIEW

Creativity knows no bounds with artist Muid Latif. Part of Malaysia’s Digital Art legacy, Latif is renowned for his unique visual artwork that incorporates traditional SE Asian design vv which has been installed and exhibited across his home country. Active in progressing the local and international art communities, Latif is also deservedly Malaysia’s Behance’s Ambassador. Get to know Latif after the jump!

with

MUID LATIF 8 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

9


When I first discovered how to use the SuperSampler it provided such an adventurous feeling – to feel animated and carefree. That’s when and why I started to adore Lomography because you don’t depend on any viewfinder, you get more spontaneous results, and sometimes it challenges you to be creative. 2. Of your Lomographs, pick your favourite and explain what’s going on in it.

One of my favorite shot was the “Lomorika! Holga Session” because it was my first session using the Holga 120 and the memories take me back to how complicated it was to look for 120mm film roll around town. Also, the photo was taken using double exposure with two different occasions and venues. One, as you’ll see clearly, is my Sergeant Keroro figurine collection placed on the shelves of my bedroom and the other shot was of the pinups and posters that hang on my office wall back when I was working in Cyberjaya,

Malaysia.

3. Just as Lomography.asia strives to promote Artists and goings on in the world of Art in Asia, you too strive to highlight S.E. Asian art in your work. Can you tell us more about your inspirations/artist’s statement?

We live in a place with such rich culture that for generations has been represented beautifully by our ancestors through art which is a milestone to our local social and economic growth. It’s a strong reason why I felt the need to be a part of it where I take the opportunity to rediscover and restore what most people used to treasure and continue to harness it so that the younger generation can be inspired from it. No matter how advanced our culture or society becomes, we must always stick to our roots so that we can uphold our unique identity. 4. What is it like being apart of the art scene in Malaysia and what’s it like in general for that matter?

Penang, Malaysia Field: Web/ Graphic Design & Digital Art 10 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

It’s been a privilege to be a part of the Malaysian art scene and to contribute to it in different areas such as new media art or digital art. We have the Art Expo Malaysia that runs annually to support artistes,

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1. You’re keen on the Lomography SuperSampler – what about it tickles your fancy?

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

11


When I first discovered how to use the SuperSampler it provided such an adventurous feeling – to feel animated and carefree. That’s when and why I started to adore Lomography because you don’t depend on any viewfinder, you get more spontaneous results, and sometimes it challenges you to be creative. 2. Of your Lomographs, pick your favourite and explain what’s going on in it.

One of my favorite shot was the “Lomorika! Holga Session” because it was my first session using the Holga 120 and the memories take me back to how complicated it was to look for 120mm film roll around town. Also, the photo was taken using double exposure with two different occasions and venues. One, as you’ll see clearly, is my Sergeant Keroro figurine collection placed on the shelves of my bedroom and the other shot was of the pinups and posters that hang on my office wall back when I was working in Cyberjaya,

Malaysia.

3. Just as Lomography.asia strives to promote Artists and goings on in the world of Art in Asia, you too strive to highlight S.E. Asian art in your work. Can you tell us more about your inspirations/artist’s statement?

We live in a place with such rich culture that for generations has been represented beautifully by our ancestors through art which is a milestone to our local social and economic growth. It’s a strong reason why I felt the need to be a part of it where I take the opportunity to rediscover and restore what most people used to treasure and continue to harness it so that the younger generation can be inspired from it. No matter how advanced our culture or society becomes, we must always stick to our roots so that we can uphold our unique identity. 4. What is it like being apart of the art scene in Malaysia and what’s it like in general for that matter?

Penang, Malaysia Field: Web/ Graphic Design & Digital Art 10 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

It’s been a privilege to be a part of the Malaysian art scene and to contribute to it in different areas such as new media art or digital art. We have the Art Expo Malaysia that runs annually to support artistes,

fbsnsnsnfsgnsgnbfghjklmhgfdsdfbsbfsdfbdfsgdbsgbsb

1. You’re keen on the Lomography SuperSampler – what about it tickles your fancy?

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

11


the sake of being commercial. I get to be me when I do pro-bono work because this is where people entrust me with my creativity in order to make a campaign more effective. 6. What’s the Malaysian E-Art movement, and how do you and your contemporaries factor into it?

E-Art Movement in Malaysia was first introduced by the father of digital art, Ismail Zain, in the late ‘80s and I’m grateful to it to have been able to meet inspiring e-art members like Hasnul Jamal Saidon, Niranjan Rajah, Wong Hoy Cheong, Kungyu Liew and others. They are the reason why I want to strive to be a better digital

art galleries, and independent groups including entrepreneurs for them to gain more opportunities, exposure, and a commercial presence in the art scene. 5. You’ve been involved in a number of pro-bono projects where your time and skills as an artist are what’s donated. Clearly these are things that are close to your heart. How do you feel being able to do what you love and at the same time helping the community? I always feel that contributing my skills and efforts in fostering the art community also helped me push the envelope further, to lead by example in that we can still be pure in doing what we love for the art’s sake without fear of red tape that could destroy the value of art for

12 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

artist, to empower myself and others with how much we have achieved. Having said that, I wish the digital art movement in Malaysia will be given more attention and acceptance, commercially. 7. What was your first exposure to analogue/film photography? Do you have some unique hobbies you’d like to share with our readers?

My first exposure to analogue photography was back in the mid ‘90s. I joined the school photography club but wasn’t really good at all. I used to love disposable cameras with cool artwork as well as instant and film cameras. Till this day I look highly upon those who still carry around analog cameras. I don’t carry cameras like I used to though my sister, Abby, does it all the time as she’s an analog photography lover. I love photos that

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

13


the sake of being commercial. I get to be me when I do pro-bono work because this is where people entrust me with my creativity in order to make a campaign more effective. 6. What’s the Malaysian E-Art movement, and how do you and your contemporaries factor into it?

E-Art Movement in Malaysia was first introduced by the father of digital art, Ismail Zain, in the late ‘80s and I’m grateful to it to have been able to meet inspiring e-art members like Hasnul Jamal Saidon, Niranjan Rajah, Wong Hoy Cheong, Kungyu Liew and others. They are the reason why I want to strive to be a better digital

art galleries, and independent groups including entrepreneurs for them to gain more opportunities, exposure, and a commercial presence in the art scene. 5. You’ve been involved in a number of pro-bono projects where your time and skills as an artist are what’s donated. Clearly these are things that are close to your heart. How do you feel being able to do what you love and at the same time helping the community? I always feel that contributing my skills and efforts in fostering the art community also helped me push the envelope further, to lead by example in that we can still be pure in doing what we love for the art’s sake without fear of red tape that could destroy the value of art for

12 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

artist, to empower myself and others with how much we have achieved. Having said that, I wish the digital art movement in Malaysia will be given more attention and acceptance, commercially. 7. What was your first exposure to analogue/film photography? Do you have some unique hobbies you’d like to share with our readers?

My first exposure to analogue photography was back in the mid ‘90s. I joined the school photography club but wasn’t really good at all. I used to love disposable cameras with cool artwork as well as instant and film cameras. Till this day I look highly upon those who still carry around analog cameras. I don’t carry cameras like I used to though my sister, Abby, does it all the time as she’s an analog photography lover. I love photos that

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

13


9. You’ve quite a legacy, being the first digital artist in the locale to perform a live digital art show. What’s it like, utilizing the most contemporary of mediums to tell the story of traditional design such as Batik? Is this conflicting, complementary, and what’s the reception like from your audience?

are grainy and not overly cross process. A part from that, I am an avid Transformers vintage action figure collector. Besides that, I love to collect Marvel and Image comics from the early ’90s like Uncanny X-Men, Wolverine, Avengers and Green Lantern. 8. Share some of your notable graphic artwork and tell us about the inspiration behind, and techniques used on, these selected pieces.

It will definitely have to be my Oriental Art Series which I originally developed back in 2007. The oriental art series is my most notable work incorporating all genres, and the artworks featured in this set were exhibited both online and offline, from art galleries and the KTM Commuter train to backdrop of corporate launches and mobile phone cases! The inspiration behind it is to make every single element look organic using great color play, from pastels to more vibrant colors. I conducted a lot of research to arrive at

14 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

It was one of the overwhelming achievements during my career lifetime. I was so privileged and humbled to be given such an opportunity. I’m not sure if other digital artists see this as something unique. I was trying to make sure I created spontaneous digital

ased

good subjects which are birds, jellyfish, flowers and buildings. I usually illustrate freehand (manually) in my sketch book using a marker pen or pencil then I scan it. Later, I digitalize it with Adobe Illustrator and play around with the color swatch to set the mood and theme.  

art whilst following the orchestra. The two things I had in mind were praying hard NOT to have the Adobe Photoshop (software) on my Macbook crash while creating my live digital art and to ensure I synchronized my artwork with the Orchestra’s musical arrangement while keeping to the tempo till the end of the session. I was so happy to create something so prompt, spontaneous, interesting, and historical. 10. What’s in store for the near future? Any other “firsts” being planned? Let us know where to find you! I’m concurrently releasing new series of digital artwork focusing on Digital Space Painting, the most recent being Hijrah Jiwa ke Marikh. I’m about to release an eBook called “Mekarnya Cinta Reka” (Blossoming of Design), an autobiography detailing my journey as a digital artist-designer. I will be distributing it for free under the Creative Commons License. I want people to know more about the life behind a digital artist and new media designer, what can empower and inspire people to be better, productive, and become an inspiring artist or creative person. It will be up on my website by end of first quarter of 2013.

Thanks Muid!

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

15


9. You’ve quite a legacy, being the first digital artist in the locale to perform a live digital art show. What’s it like, utilizing the most contemporary of mediums to tell the story of traditional design such as Batik? Is this conflicting, complementary, and what’s the reception like from your audience?

are grainy and not overly cross process. A part from that, I am an avid Transformers vintage action figure collector. Besides that, I love to collect Marvel and Image comics from the early ’90s like Uncanny X-Men, Wolverine, Avengers and Green Lantern. 8. Share some of your notable graphic artwork and tell us about the inspiration behind, and techniques used on, these selected pieces.

It will definitely have to be my Oriental Art Series which I originally developed back in 2007. The oriental art series is my most notable work incorporating all genres, and the artworks featured in this set were exhibited both online and offline, from art galleries and the KTM Commuter train to backdrop of corporate launches and mobile phone cases! The inspiration behind it is to make every single element look organic using great color play, from pastels to more vibrant colors. I conducted a lot of research to arrive at

14 INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

It was one of the overwhelming achievements during my career lifetime. I was so privileged and humbled to be given such an opportunity. I’m not sure if other digital artists see this as something unique. I was trying to make sure I created spontaneous digital

ased

good subjects which are birds, jellyfish, flowers and buildings. I usually illustrate freehand (manually) in my sketch book using a marker pen or pencil then I scan it. Later, I digitalize it with Adobe Illustrator and play around with the color swatch to set the mood and theme.  

art whilst following the orchestra. The two things I had in mind were praying hard NOT to have the Adobe Photoshop (software) on my Macbook crash while creating my live digital art and to ensure I synchronized my artwork with the Orchestra’s musical arrangement while keeping to the tempo till the end of the session. I was so happy to create something so prompt, spontaneous, interesting, and historical. 10. What’s in store for the near future? Any other “firsts” being planned? Let us know where to find you! I’m concurrently releasing new series of digital artwork focusing on Digital Space Painting, the most recent being Hijrah Jiwa ke Marikh. I’m about to release an eBook called “Mekarnya Cinta Reka” (Blossoming of Design), an autobiography detailing my journey as a digital artist-designer. I will be distributing it for free under the Creative Commons License. I want people to know more about the life behind a digital artist and new media designer, what can empower and inspire people to be better, productive, and become an inspiring artist or creative person. It will be up on my website by end of first quarter of 2013.

Thanks Muid!

INTERVIEW: MUID LATIF

15


BLACK+WHITE lomography

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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BLACK+WHITE lomography

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

BLACK AND WHITE LOMOGRAPHY

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EVENTS 24

EVENTS

Upcoming events in the lomogrAphy world that you wouldn’t want to miss out on! EVENTS

25


EVENTS 24

EVENTS

Upcoming events in the lomogrAphy world that you wouldn’t want to miss out on! EVENTS

25


hicag

store.c

m

phy.co

ogra o@lom

Spinner 360 Chicago Boat Tour WHEN: June 30, 2013 ; 11:30 AM - 4:00 PM WHERE: Chicago Lomography Store, and the Chicago River COST: $30

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EVENTS

EVENTS

27


hicag

store.c

m

phy.co

ogra o@lom

Spinner 360 Chicago Boat Tour WHEN: June 30, 2013 ; 11:30 AM - 4:00 PM WHERE: Chicago Lomography Store, and the Chicago River COST: $30

26

EVENTS

EVENTS

27


Unveiling of a Brand New Analogue Construction Join us for the Unveiling of a Brand New Analogue Construction at Lomography Gallery Store Singapore! Put on your hard hat and get ready to party - No fancy attire required; we are looking for Mr. and Ms. D.I.Y! Wear your most original builder’s outfit, join the party and you could win our brand new construction! Construction begins Thursday, 13 June 2013 at 7 pm! WHEN? Thursday, 13 June 2013, 7 pm to 9 pm WHERE? Lomography Gallery Store Singapore RSVP shopsingapore@lomography.com Think you have the finesse and enough sauce in ya to be a master sandwich artist? Take part in our Sandwich Slam happening live at the party and build us the most finest sandwich you can “mustard” and you might just walk away with our brand new construction… And of course, beers to chug down with your edible creations! Lomography Gallery Store Singapore 295 South Bridge Road, #01-01 Singapore 058838 T: (65) 6223 8850 shopsingapore@lomography.com 28

EVENTS

Open Daily 12 am – 9 pm

EVENTS

29


Unveiling of a Brand New Analogue Construction Join us for the Unveiling of a Brand New Analogue Construction at Lomography Gallery Store Singapore! Put on your hard hat and get ready to party - No fancy attire required; we are looking for Mr. and Ms. D.I.Y! Wear your most original builder’s outfit, join the party and you could win our brand new construction! Construction begins Thursday, 13 June 2013 at 7 pm! WHEN? Thursday, 13 June 2013, 7 pm to 9 pm WHERE? Lomography Gallery Store Singapore RSVP shopsingapore@lomography.com Think you have the finesse and enough sauce in ya to be a master sandwich artist? Take part in our Sandwich Slam happening live at the party and build us the most finest sandwich you can “mustard” and you might just walk away with our brand new construction… And of course, beers to chug down with your edible creations! Lomography Gallery Store Singapore 295 South Bridge Road, #01-01 Singapore 058838 T: (65) 6223 8850 shopsingapore@lomography.com 28

EVENTS

Open Daily 12 am – 9 pm

EVENTS

29


EXHIBITION: MAN’S RUIN BY RICHARD HEEPS Richard Heeps’ seductive, highly-saturated colours and sophisticated pictorial structures demonstrate a true love and empathy for this subject matter – be it cool, descriptive interiors, still life or landscape. His distinctive style pushes the limits of lens-based photography without the need for digital manipulation. FIRST THURSDAY OPENING (OPEN TO PUBLIC)

WHEN: July 4 2013 to July 26, 2013 ; 6 – 9pm GALLERY HOURS WHERE: Lomography Gallery Store East London 117 Commercial Street London, E1 6BG

TELEPHONE: 02074260999 EMAIL: eastlondon@lomography.com

30

EVENTS

EVENTS

31


EXHIBITION: MAN’S RUIN BY RICHARD HEEPS Richard Heeps’ seductive, highly-saturated colours and sophisticated pictorial structures demonstrate a true love and empathy for this subject matter – be it cool, descriptive interiors, still life or landscape. His distinctive style pushes the limits of lens-based photography without the need for digital manipulation. FIRST THURSDAY OPENING (OPEN TO PUBLIC)

WHEN: July 4 2013 to July 26, 2013 ; 6 – 9pm GALLERY HOURS WHERE: Lomography Gallery Store East London 117 Commercial Street London, E1 6BG

TELEPHONE: 02074260999 EMAIL: eastlondon@lomography.com

30

EVENTS

EVENTS

31


“POST ACID”

DIY Dip-Dye Ombre Totes with Olivia August 13 2013, 3PM-5PM

lomo DIY Redscale Film + Camera Workshop & DIY Dip-Dye Ombre Totes

32

EVENTS

events

Are you a big fan of tote bags and ardent tote-rs like us? Come bask in our love for this quintessential item as we show you how to transform an ordinary cloth carrier into a #totesamaze bag for all your sundrenched walkabouts and escapades – we be trippin’!

“SAIL TO THE REDSCALE SUN”

DIY Redscale Film + Camera Workshop August 13 2013, 3PM-5PM

June’s known for scorching days and lotsa sun – perfect for experimenting with Redscale i.e. shooting on film that’s exposed from the wrong side for sepia to fiery tones! In this 2-part workshop, we’ll teach you how to create your very own Redscale film from regular film, with an option for you to pick any Lomography camera to shoot your Redscale film on!

EVENTS

33


“POST ACID”

DIY Dip-Dye Ombre Totes with Olivia August 13 2013, 3PM-5PM

lomo DIY Redscale Film + Camera Workshop & DIY Dip-Dye Ombre Totes

32

EVENTS

events

Are you a big fan of tote bags and ardent tote-rs like us? Come bask in our love for this quintessential item as we show you how to transform an ordinary cloth carrier into a #totesamaze bag for all your sundrenched walkabouts and escapades – we be trippin’!

“SAIL TO THE REDSCALE SUN”

DIY Redscale Film + Camera Workshop August 13 2013, 3PM-5PM

June’s known for scorching days and lotsa sun – perfect for experimenting with Redscale i.e. shooting on film that’s exposed from the wrong side for sepia to fiery tones! In this 2-part workshop, we’ll teach you how to create your very own Redscale film from regular film, with an option for you to pick any Lomography camera to shoot your Redscale film on!

EVENTS

33


by Noriko Ohba

PIN HOLE

PHOTOGRAPHY

“The reason why I like pinhole photography is that my curiosity is always stimulated. I always find the process of making the photo exciting. The time spent creating pinhole photos heals me. When I am looking at subject with my camera, I learn the sense that I am talking with myself. I think more so, when I’m taking flower and the plant pictures.” I like the connection that this Japanese pinhole photographer has with her Zeroimage pinhole camera. Her photos are just what you’d expect to see when using that beautiful wood pinhole camera. It is my pleasure to feature this artist as this April’s pinhole photographer. 34

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

35


by Noriko Ohba

PIN HOLE

PHOTOGRAPHY

“The reason why I like pinhole photography is that my curiosity is always stimulated. I always find the process of making the photo exciting. The time spent creating pinhole photos heals me. When I am looking at subject with my camera, I learn the sense that I am talking with myself. I think more so, when I’m taking flower and the plant pictures.” I like the connection that this Japanese pinhole photographer has with her Zeroimage pinhole camera. Her photos are just what you’d expect to see when using that beautiful wood pinhole camera. It is my pleasure to feature this artist as this April’s pinhole photographer. 34

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

35


Pinhole photography is lensless photography. A tiny hole replaces the lens. Light passes through the hole; an image is formed in the camera. Pinhole cameras are small or large, improvised or designed with great care. Cameras have been made of sea shells, many have been made of oatmeal boxes, coke cans or cookie containers, at least one has been made of a discarded refrigerator. Cameras have been cast

36

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

in plaster like a face mask, constructed from beautiful hardwoods, built of metal with bellows and a range of multiple pinholes. Station wagons have been used as pinhole cameras – and rooms in large buildings. Basically a pinhole camera is a box, with a tiny hole at one end and film or photographic paper at the other. Pinhole cameras are used for fun, for art and for science.

Designing and building the cameras are great fun. Making images with cameras you have made yourself is a great pleasure, too. But in serious photography the pinhole camera is just an imaging device with its advantages and limitations, special characteristics and potentials. By making the best of the camera’s potential great images can be produced. Some of the images could not have been produced with a lens.

Pinhole images are softer – less sharp – than pictures made with a lens. The images have nearly infinite depth of field. Wide angle images remain absolutely rectilinear. On the other hand, pinhole images suffer from greater chromatic aberration than pictures made with a simple lens, and they tolerate little enlargement. Exposures are long, ranging from half a second to several hours. Images are

exposed on film or paper – negative or positive; black and white, or color. Pinhole optics, by the way, are not only used in photography. There is one animal in nature which uses a pinhole for seeing – the mollusk Nautilus. Each eye has an accommodating aperture – the aperture can enlarge or shrink. In this drawing, originally taken from a book published by Arthur Willey in 1900, the eye is the oval opening.

The basic optical principles of the pinhole are commented on in Chinese texts from the fifth century BC. Chinese writers had discovered by experiments that light travels in straight lines. The philosopher Mo Ti (later Mo Tsu) was the first – to our knowledge – to record the formation of an inverted image with a pinhole or screen.

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

37


Pinhole photography is lensless photography. A tiny hole replaces the lens. Light passes through the hole; an image is formed in the camera. Pinhole cameras are small or large, improvised or designed with great care. Cameras have been made of sea shells, many have been made of oatmeal boxes, coke cans or cookie containers, at least one has been made of a discarded refrigerator. Cameras have been cast

36

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

in plaster like a face mask, constructed from beautiful hardwoods, built of metal with bellows and a range of multiple pinholes. Station wagons have been used as pinhole cameras – and rooms in large buildings. Basically a pinhole camera is a box, with a tiny hole at one end and film or photographic paper at the other. Pinhole cameras are used for fun, for art and for science.

Designing and building the cameras are great fun. Making images with cameras you have made yourself is a great pleasure, too. But in serious photography the pinhole camera is just an imaging device with its advantages and limitations, special characteristics and potentials. By making the best of the camera’s potential great images can be produced. Some of the images could not have been produced with a lens.

Pinhole images are softer – less sharp – than pictures made with a lens. The images have nearly infinite depth of field. Wide angle images remain absolutely rectilinear. On the other hand, pinhole images suffer from greater chromatic aberration than pictures made with a simple lens, and they tolerate little enlargement. Exposures are long, ranging from half a second to several hours. Images are

exposed on film or paper – negative or positive; black and white, or color. Pinhole optics, by the way, are not only used in photography. There is one animal in nature which uses a pinhole for seeing – the mollusk Nautilus. Each eye has an accommodating aperture – the aperture can enlarge or shrink. In this drawing, originally taken from a book published by Arthur Willey in 1900, the eye is the oval opening.

The basic optical principles of the pinhole are commented on in Chinese texts from the fifth century BC. Chinese writers had discovered by experiments that light travels in straight lines. The philosopher Mo Ti (later Mo Tsu) was the first – to our knowledge – to record the formation of an inverted image with a pinhole or screen.

PIN HOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

37


There are two people in every photograph: the photographerandthe viewer.Theimp o rta n t t h i n g is not the camera but the eye.

editors

pick “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” – Robert Capa

38 EDITOR’S PICK

EDITOR’S PICK

39


There are two people in every photograph: the photographerandthe viewer.Theimp o rta n t t h i n g is not the camera but the eye.

editors

pick “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” – Robert Capa

38 EDITOR’S PICK

EDITOR’S PICK

39


There are two people in every photograph: the photographerandthe viewer.Theimp o rta n t t h i n g is not the camera but the eye. era but the eye. Taken by vici with a Nikon FE loaded with Kodak Ektachrome Lumiere 100X film.

40 EDITOR’S PICK

EDITOR’S PICK

41


There are two people in every photograph: the photographerandthe viewer.Theimp o rta n t t h i n g is not the camera but the eye. era but the eye. Taken by vici with a Nikon FE loaded with Kodak Ektachrome Lumiere 100X film.

40 EDITOR’S PICK

EDITOR’S PICK

41


There are two people in every photograph: the photographerandthe viewer.Theimp o rta n t t h i n g is not the camera but the eye. Taken by fotoglove with a Lomo LCA+ RL loaded with FUji Velvia 100F Flim in Singapore.

42 EDITOR’S PICK

EDITOR’S PICK

43


There are two people in every photograph: the photographerandthe viewer.Theimp o rta n t t h i n g is not the camera but the eye. Taken by fotoglove with a Lomo LCA+ RL loaded with FUji Velvia 100F Flim in Singapore.

42 EDITOR’S PICK

EDITOR’S PICK

43


+ F A N DIA CAMERA

REVIEW

BY EPIC EDIT

TECHNICAL STUFF

The Diana F+ includes a detachable flash, which makes it useable as an indoor camera—it’s relatively slow aperture will make most indoor use difficult, even with very fast film. If yoWu use color negative or black and white film, you’ll have some room to guess exposures based on the aperture logos—ISO 400 speed is an appropriate estimate for the settings, as it generally has a good amount of wiggle room with the exposure. If you’re planning on shooting with slide film you’ll have to be a bit more cautious, and a light meter is recommended there—for best results, take a reading first and then load the appropriate film speed based on the conditions you’re under.

INTERESTING STUFF

The most interesting aspect of the Diana+, to me, is the fact that it’s so basic. Once you open it up to load the film, you basically see a big empty space. You think to yourself “where’s all the… stuff?” I mean, there’s really nothing to it. You’ve got a piece of plastic as a lens, then a plate with a few holes in it for the aperture, then a simple little mechanism for the shutter. Other than that, you’ve got a couple of spots to hold the film spools, and a little window to look through. This is all very interesting because the camera also uses medium format film, which is typically used in higher-end cameras. But this coupling of simple technology with medium format film goes back to the days of the original Diana camera.

44 LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

45


+ F A N DIA CAMERA

REVIEW

BY EPIC EDIT

TECHNICAL STUFF

The Diana F+ includes a detachable flash, which makes it useable as an indoor camera—it’s relatively slow aperture will make most indoor use difficult, even with very fast film. If yoWu use color negative or black and white film, you’ll have some room to guess exposures based on the aperture logos—ISO 400 speed is an appropriate estimate for the settings, as it generally has a good amount of wiggle room with the exposure. If you’re planning on shooting with slide film you’ll have to be a bit more cautious, and a light meter is recommended there—for best results, take a reading first and then load the appropriate film speed based on the conditions you’re under.

INTERESTING STUFF

The most interesting aspect of the Diana+, to me, is the fact that it’s so basic. Once you open it up to load the film, you basically see a big empty space. You think to yourself “where’s all the… stuff?” I mean, there’s really nothing to it. You’ve got a piece of plastic as a lens, then a plate with a few holes in it for the aperture, then a simple little mechanism for the shutter. Other than that, you’ve got a couple of spots to hold the film spools, and a little window to look through. This is all very interesting because the camera also uses medium format film, which is typically used in higher-end cameras. But this coupling of simple technology with medium format film goes back to the days of the original Diana camera.

44 LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

45


t n e r e f f i

d o l s a c i s p ' “ It your ty than

C L ITA

DIG

A R E AM

F ’t even fully deF U T AL S ty, I can ou s e e

N the creativi our hands, y tly. O I T A n y R NSPI uch a kick in iana+ is in otosdiffere

I

is s the D ake ph amera . When rently. You t s d r This c o It’s w fe it with mera! act dif a e u c o ib r Y e . c y s rentl som it can y awe differe ll s d a g n e r in a th , you mera, + is a or $50 tal ca Diana i F ig e . d h ld t l r a o n, any r typic n ew w ra to clusio u e n y l o o m e y c t a c n le In tha stuff. comp t this ferent their ugg es s to a h s e t i y y so dif e w l e r t u crazy defini en yo a little would ally op t I e . t g i o beat ting t can’t r wan e h p a gr photo

46 LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

47


t n e r e f f i

d o l s a c i s p ' “ It your ty than

C L ITA

DIG

A R E AM

F ’t even fully deF U T AL S ty, I can ou s e e

N the creativi our hands, y tly. O I T A n y R NSPI uch a kick in iana+ is in otosdiffere

I

is s the D ake ph amera . When rently. You t s d r This c o It’s w fe it with mera! act dif a e u c o ib r Y e . c y s rentl som it can y awe differe ll s d a g n e r in a th , you mera, + is a or $50 tal ca Diana i F ig e . d h ld t l r a o n, any r typic n ew w ra to clusio u e n y l o o m e y c t a c n le In tha stuff. comp t this ferent their ugg es s to a h s e t i y y so dif e w l e r t u crazy defini en yo a little would ally op t I e . t g i o beat ting t can’t r wan e h p a gr photo

46 LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

LOMOGRAPHY REVIEW

47


1

Take your camera anywhere you go.

Your LOMO LC-A compact and fast and becomes an integral part of your body and soul. It touches photographic spheres that other cameras can’t: unexpected, spontaneous sudden moments;; the most vibrant parts of life! Open your eyes and always have your LOMO LC-A with you.

2

Use it anytime - day and night.

You don’t only perceive in sunshine, daytime, on holidays and on Aunt Frida’s birthday, do you? So keep shooting in any environment, every day and every night, be aware, and create yourself, your being, your design. Shoot restlessly and give your memory a kick in the ass with your lovely, crap, beautiful, artistic and silly Lomographs.

48 GOLDEN RULE

GOLDEN RULE

49


1

Take your camera anywhere you go.

Your LOMO LC-A compact and fast and becomes an integral part of your body and soul. It touches photographic spheres that other cameras can’t: unexpected, spontaneous sudden moments;; the most vibrant parts of life! Open your eyes and always have your LOMO LC-A with you.

2

Use it anytime - day and night.

You don’t only perceive in sunshine, daytime, on holidays and on Aunt Frida’s birthday, do you? So keep shooting in any environment, every day and every night, be aware, and create yourself, your being, your design. Shoot restlessly and give your memory a kick in the ass with your lovely, crap, beautiful, artistic and silly Lomographs.

48 GOLDEN RULE

GOLDEN RULE

49


3

Lomography is not an interferance in your life, but part of it.

There’s no chance of relationship phobia: the LOMO LC-A is what you’ve always wanted in life; your new best friend, drinking buddy, spiritual leader and lover all at the same time. You work with the camera, you drink with the camera, you sleep with the camera. Lomography becomes a natural and communicative habit of your life, just like talking, walking, eating, thinking, laughing and loving.

4

Try the shot from the hip.

A normal photographer’s point of view – looking through the viewfinder - is somehow always physically finite; it’s limited to somewhere between 1.1 metres and 2.2 metres above ground. But what happens down below and up above, from a dog, cat, baby, bug, slug, bird and insect perspective? Don’t hide behind your camera; break free from nonsensical conventions.Try the shot from the hip to experience absolutely free and boundless dimensions of sight.

50 GOLDEN RULE

5

Approach the object of the lomographic desire as close as possible.

An essential part of your Lomographic existence is to get right to the bottom of things and investigate the world from the inside. Get in contact with your subject and build up a relationship.

6

Don’t think (wiliam firebrace)

Your brightest and clearest insights are always your very first impressions. They happen in-between moments of sensual, visual perception where information is delivered from your senses to your brain and remains unfiltered. Milliseconds later it’s already too late: your big, clumsy and party-pooping melancholic reasoning has put an end to the fun and divided your former beautifully pure perception into boring concepts, abstractions, ideas and problems. That’s life, sorry... Not! loving.

GOLDEN RULE

51


3

Lomography is not an interferance in your life, but part of it.

There’s no chance of relationship phobia: the LOMO LC-A is what you’ve always wanted in life; your new best friend, drinking buddy, spiritual leader and lover all at the same time. You work with the camera, you drink with the camera, you sleep with the camera. Lomography becomes a natural and communicative habit of your life, just like talking, walking, eating, thinking, laughing and loving.

4

Try the shot from the hip.

A normal photographer’s point of view – looking through the viewfinder - is somehow always physically finite; it’s limited to somewhere between 1.1 metres and 2.2 metres above ground. But what happens down below and up above, from a dog, cat, baby, bug, slug, bird and insect perspective? Don’t hide behind your camera; break free from nonsensical conventions.Try the shot from the hip to experience absolutely free and boundless dimensions of sight.

50 GOLDEN RULE

5

Approach the object of the lomographic desire as close as possible.

An essential part of your Lomographic existence is to get right to the bottom of things and investigate the world from the inside. Get in contact with your subject and build up a relationship.

6

Don’t think (wiliam firebrace)

Your brightest and clearest insights are always your very first impressions. They happen in-between moments of sensual, visual perception where information is delivered from your senses to your brain and remains unfiltered. Milliseconds later it’s already too late: your big, clumsy and party-pooping melancholic reasoning has put an end to the fun and divided your former beautifully pure perception into boring concepts, abstractions, ideas and problems. That’s life, sorry... Not! loving.

GOLDEN RULE

51


LOMOGRAPHY IN THE

Philippines

After seeing th eincredible photographs; relatives, and strangers on the streets all demanded LOMO cameras of their own! The Lomographic Society was soon founded in Vienna, with the aim of spreading the message of LOMOGRAPHY throughout the gllobe, including The Philippines.

Pictures are what Lomography is all about. Nothing compares to the feeling of visually diviing into a pool of shining, new, sweet-smelling lomographs. My pictures, your pictures, pictures of the world, pictures of fleeting moments, secret passions, boring, bro-ha, left toes, blurred nothings. Simply everything. Lomography collects, treasures and presents all of this.

52 LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

53


LOMOGRAPHY IN THE

Philippines

After seeing th eincredible photographs; relatives, and strangers on the streets all demanded LOMO cameras of their own! The Lomographic Society was soon founded in Vienna, with the aim of spreading the message of LOMOGRAPHY throughout the gllobe, including The Philippines.

Pictures are what Lomography is all about. Nothing compares to the feeling of visually diviing into a pool of shining, new, sweet-smelling lomographs. My pictures, your pictures, pictures of the world, pictures of fleeting moments, secret passions, boring, bro-ha, left toes, blurred nothings. Simply everything. Lomography collects, treasures and presents all of this.

52 LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

53


Lomography Embassy Manila and Trilogy Alabang Town Center held the first seminar for the newbie lomographer last February 23, 2013 at Trilogy ATC. The speakers were Edgar Alberto from Lomography Philippines and Erick Cusi from Digprint. The speakers talked about the beginnings of Liomography, the different cameras and films and creative tips on how you can have fun shooting with your camera. Lomography Philippines also shared on how you can meet other lomographers and share your photos through the online community website. www.lomography.com. At the end of talk, we gave away films and a fisheye Baby camera to those who were able to answer our triva questions. Attendees were able to interact and ask questions with the speakers. Digprint gave away discount vouvhers to all attendees.

54 LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

55


Lomography Embassy Manila and Trilogy Alabang Town Center held the first seminar for the newbie lomographer last February 23, 2013 at Trilogy ATC. The speakers were Edgar Alberto from Lomography Philippines and Erick Cusi from Digprint. The speakers talked about the beginnings of Liomography, the different cameras and films and creative tips on how you can have fun shooting with your camera. Lomography Philippines also shared on how you can meet other lomographers and share your photos through the online community website. www.lomography.com. At the end of talk, we gave away films and a fisheye Baby camera to those who were able to answer our triva questions. Attendees were able to interact and ask questions with the speakers. Digprint gave away discount vouvhers to all attendees.

54 LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

LOMOGRAPHY IN THE PHILIPPINES

55


LO MO on location 56

LOMO ON LOCATION

TOKYO

LOMO ON LOCATION

57


LO MO on location 56

LOMO ON LOCATION

TOKYO

LOMO ON LOCATION

57


TOKYO

58

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

59


TOKYO

58

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

59


THAILAND

60

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

61


THAILAND

60

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

61


62

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

63


62

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

63


HONG KONG

64

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

65


HONG KONG

64

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

65


VIETNAM 66

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

67


VIETNAM 66

LOMO ON LOCATION

LOMO ON LOCATION

67


The Story of the Death (and Rebirth) of Polaroid Film

dea

In 2008, Polaroid discontinued a product which seemed to be pretty much obsolete in the digital age: instant film. Except that it wasn’t obsolete at all. A lot of people still liked taking Polaroid photos, and found things in the medium which digital couldn’t match.

th

One of them was Dr. Florian Kaps, an Austrian fan who missed Polaroid film so much that he spearheaded an effort to buy a shuttered Polaroid factory in the Netherlands and restart production.

an

d

the

The actual Polaroid Corporation may be a shadow of its once-great self, but thanks in large part to the Impossible Project, the hobby of Polaroid photography is in its best shape in eons, and more and more people seem to be discovering it, including some folks who are too young to remember the era when Polaroid was everywhere. You can even buy vintage Polaroid cameras and new Impossible film from Urban Outfitters.

h t r bi

The Impossible film, incidentally, is for the Polaroid cameras that use “integral” film — the sort that pops out of the camera automatically and develops before your eyes. Other Polaroid cameras, using earlier technology, are known as “packfilm” models, and Fujifilm never stopped making film for them. I own and use both sorts of cameras, and have at least as much fun with them as any modern photographic instrument I own. The cameras still work great, and you can’t use one in public without people stopping, marveling and asking “You can still get film for that?”)

re

of pol 68 DEATH AND REBIRTH OF POLAROID

aro

id. DEATH AND REBIRTH OF POLAROID

69


The Story of the Death (and Rebirth) of Polaroid Film

dea

In 2008, Polaroid discontinued a product which seemed to be pretty much obsolete in the digital age: instant film. Except that it wasn’t obsolete at all. A lot of people still liked taking Polaroid photos, and found things in the medium which digital couldn’t match.

th

One of them was Dr. Florian Kaps, an Austrian fan who missed Polaroid film so much that he spearheaded an effort to buy a shuttered Polaroid factory in the Netherlands and restart production.

an

d

the

The actual Polaroid Corporation may be a shadow of its once-great self, but thanks in large part to the Impossible Project, the hobby of Polaroid photography is in its best shape in eons, and more and more people seem to be discovering it, including some folks who are too young to remember the era when Polaroid was everywhere. You can even buy vintage Polaroid cameras and new Impossible film from Urban Outfitters.

h t r bi

The Impossible film, incidentally, is for the Polaroid cameras that use “integral” film — the sort that pops out of the camera automatically and develops before your eyes. Other Polaroid cameras, using earlier technology, are known as “packfilm” models, and Fujifilm never stopped making film for them. I own and use both sorts of cameras, and have at least as much fun with them as any modern photographic instrument I own. The cameras still work great, and you can’t use one in public without people stopping, marveling and asking “You can still get film for that?”)

re

of pol 68 DEATH AND REBIRTH OF POLAROID

aro

id. DEATH AND REBIRTH OF POLAROID

69


David Hockney ANDY WARHOL

ANSEL ADAMS

WALKER EVANS

d i o r a l o p famous

s r e h p a r g o t o h p

70 FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

David Hockney, Imogen + Hermiane Pembroke Studios, London 30th July 1982

FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

71


David Hockney ANDY WARHOL

ANSEL ADAMS

WALKER EVANS

d i o r a l o p famous

s r e h p a r g o t o h p

70 FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

David Hockney, Imogen + Hermiane Pembroke Studios, London 30th July 1982

FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

71


ANSEL ADAMS, YOSEMITE FALLS (1979 )

72 FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

WALKER EVANS, ABANDONED HOUSE (CA. 1793-1974)

FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

73


ANSEL ADAMS, YOSEMITE FALLS (1979 )

72 FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

WALKER EVANS, ABANDONED HOUSE (CA. 1793-1974)

FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

73


ANDY WARHOL, ANDY SNEEZING (1987)

74 FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

ANDY WARHOL, DEBBIE HARRY (1980)

FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

75


ANDY WARHOL, ANDY SNEEZING (1987)

74 FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

ANDY WARHOL, DEBBIE HARRY (1980)

FAMOUS POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHERS

75


Last week marked the much-anticipated Asian debut of the world’s premier international art fair, Art Basel. The renowned art fair, already a prominent annual event in its namesake home city in Switzerland as well as Miami, has now branched out to Hong Kong, establishing a dialogue between art collectors, artists, dealers, curators, critics and art lovers from an Asian perspective for the first time. From May 23-26, 2013 the global art establishment flooded the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC) that played host to the first Art Basel event in the city.

76 ART BASEL HONG KONG

©2013 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki. Co., Ltd., All Rights Reserved Courtesy Galerie Perrotin

Art Basel Hong Kong

Hong Kong is said to have got its name from the smell of incense stored in warehouses by the waterfront. Nowadays in “the fragrant harbour” the dominant smell is that of money, and it’s a perfume most residents find highly agreeable. There was a certain tang in the air last week, as the increasingly successful Hong Kong Art Fair, now in its sixth year, was rebranded as Art Basel Hong Kong. Beyond its spiritual attributes, art has always played a prominent role in the beautification of money. It was, therefore, only a matter of time until Hong Kong realised there was one lucrative market it had yet to explore. With vast new fortunes being made on the mainland, and the great desire of China’s millionaires to have all the good things enjoyed by their western counterparts, Hong Kong has become a natural destination for enterprising art dealers. ART BASEL HONG KONG

77


Last week marked the much-anticipated Asian debut of the world’s premier international art fair, Art Basel. The renowned art fair, already a prominent annual event in its namesake home city in Switzerland as well as Miami, has now branched out to Hong Kong, establishing a dialogue between art collectors, artists, dealers, curators, critics and art lovers from an Asian perspective for the first time. From May 23-26, 2013 the global art establishment flooded the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC) that played host to the first Art Basel event in the city.

76 ART BASEL HONG KONG

©2013 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki. Co., Ltd., All Rights Reserved Courtesy Galerie Perrotin

Art Basel Hong Kong

Hong Kong is said to have got its name from the smell of incense stored in warehouses by the waterfront. Nowadays in “the fragrant harbour” the dominant smell is that of money, and it’s a perfume most residents find highly agreeable. There was a certain tang in the air last week, as the increasingly successful Hong Kong Art Fair, now in its sixth year, was rebranded as Art Basel Hong Kong. Beyond its spiritual attributes, art has always played a prominent role in the beautification of money. It was, therefore, only a matter of time until Hong Kong realised there was one lucrative market it had yet to explore. With vast new fortunes being made on the mainland, and the great desire of China’s millionaires to have all the good things enjoyed by their western counterparts, Hong Kong has become a natural destination for enterprising art dealers. ART BASEL HONG KONG

77


The Art Basel

Hong Kong

Image courtesy of Google images

Review

78 ART BASEL HONG KONG

Wang Huaiqing, Chinese Emperor - 2, 2008-2013, Oil on canvas, 200 x 135 cm -

ART BASEL HONG KONG

79


The Art Basel

Hong Kong

Image courtesy of Google images

Review

78 ART BASEL HONG KONG

Wang Huaiqing, Chinese Emperor - 2, 2008-2013, Oil on canvas, 200 x 135 cm -

ART BASEL HONG KONG

79


Of all the different types of photography showcased on this magazine underwater photography is probably one of the most difficult to practice. It requires a very specialized equipment and the knowledge of some advanced techniques to get a perfect picture. You need to get the correct exposure, accurate focus, controlled movement of your subject and a pleasing color balance; you also have to deal with low light. Underwater photos offen suffer from loss of color and contrast when taken at a significant depth. Such photos are always adjusted with color balance to help offset the blueish tint of the water.

80 ART BASEL HONG KONG

ART BASEL HONG KONG

81


Of all the different types of photography showcased on this magazine underwater photography is probably one of the most difficult to practice. It requires a very specialized equipment and the knowledge of some advanced techniques to get a perfect picture. You need to get the correct exposure, accurate focus, controlled movement of your subject and a pleasing color balance; you also have to deal with low light. Underwater photos offen suffer from loss of color and contrast when taken at a significant depth. Such photos are always adjusted with color balance to help offset the blueish tint of the water.

80 ART BASEL HONG KONG

ART BASEL HONG KONG

81


82 ART BASEL HONG KONG

ART BASEL HONG KONG

83


82 ART BASEL HONG KONG

ART BASEL HONG KONG

83


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