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Volume 2, Issue 1 January 2013

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Round up

1

Forecasting

1-2

Playing

2-5

RFA BC

5

Runs Roads

5

Our Mission

6

Regional Round Up with Chair John R. Kettle

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elcome to 2013! With the start of a new year comes budget preparation at the RDCK. The Board will be discussing its priorities, strategies, projects and expenditures over the next few months, as our budget must be finalized by March 31 st, 2013, as mandated by the Province of BC. As your elected officials, our job is to represent you. Therefore, we want and need to hear from you. Please attend a meeting and provide input during the budget process. As a local government, we respond to your needs and desires for services.

RDCK for You 6-7 Archives

8

Chair Back

8

Rural Matters 8 Going Green 9 Hot Spot

10

Heroes

10-11

Referendum

11

Volunteers

12

Stewardship

12-13

Water Wise

13

Traps

14

Health Matters 14-15 WKBRHD Brd 15 WKBRHD Mtg 15 Power

16

The Trust

16-17

Grant Writing 17-18 RDCK Grants 19 Bulletin Brd

20

OCP—Area E 21 Directors

22

Contact Us

22

Please see the article on pages 6 and 7 to get an idea of the services the RDCK delivers to our residents. Upcoming budget meeting times will be listed at www.rdck.bc.ca and on our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ rdcentralkootenay?ref=ts&fref=ts Here at the RDCK, Board and Staff are excited and privileged to continue serving you the best we can. We are proud of our region and our role in it.

Forecasting the Future RDCK gets important new software

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he RDCK has embarked on a major software implementation project that will improve efficiencies and reduce risk to the organization.

In November 2011, the Board directed staff to outline a process to modernize the district’s financial software program. The existing software had been identified as outdated and unable to meet the organization’s current and future needs. Such software is vital to its everyday operation. “We cannot function properly without these systems—they are necessary in order for us to meet our legislative requirements and deliver services to our residents,” said Board Chair John Kettle. Continued...


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Forecasting the Future...continued “The implementation of this project is one of the Board’s top priorities,” said Kettle. In February 2012, the Board allocated $750,000 from surplus funds for the project. Since then, staff have assessed the RDCK’s needs, consulted with vendors, and secured contacts with two software companies: Unit4 and Tempest for Agresso and Prospero software systems. These companies will supply software modules that will enable staff to better process the following functions: core financial functions, payroll, human resources reporting, building inspection record keeping and GIS (mapping) integration. Staff are currently being trained to use these new programs. “So far, the successful initial phase of the implementation of this large and challenging project is because of the strong teamwork and focus of the dedicated and professional staff here at the Regional District of Central Kootenay,” said David Oosthuizen, Manager of Information Technology and the project’s lead. The first phase—building reports and cash receipting—will go live by the end of January. By the summer of 2013, the core financial modules will be implemented. The remainder of the project (human resources and payroll functions) will be complete by the end of 2013. A. Winje

Playing on the Job

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or Verona Walker, the Castlegar Recreation Centre isn’t just her place of employment, it’s her second home. “I grew up in the rink,” she says, quickly admitting that she can barely skate. Walker is the Recreation Supervisor, a position she’s held since 2007. But her career with the RDCK began in 1975 when she was just 16, making her the organization’s matriarch. Her first job was as a summer playground coordinator, which was a perfect gig for the athletic girl from Kinnaird. She came back the next summer to take payments at the Bob Branson outdoor pool, which no longer exists. www.rdck.bc.ca

Verona Walker - Recreation Supervisor of the Castlegar & District Recreation Center.


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After graduating university with a Bachelors degree in Physical Education and a teaching certificate, Walker came back to the Castlegar Rec Centre as a program coordinator in 1981 and has “been here ever since.” At the time, Walker was only one of two employees in the centre, yet the job afforded her the flexibility she required as a mother of three. Her kids grew up in the facility, taking pre-school classes, learning to skate, and playing hockey in the arena. Her eldest son went on to attend university in the States on a hockey scholarship. Walker may not be able to skate, but she knows her way around the ice. Her brother Steven Bozek played in the NHL for Los Angeles, Vancouver, Calgary and San Jose. Her brother-in-law Gordie Walker was also a professional hockey player with the LA Kings and New York Rangers. Walker’s husband Danny coached hockey in Castlegar for many years while Verona was president of the minor hockey association. “I’m the Ice Queen,” she jokes. Walker’s warm smile and easy laugh give away her passion for this place and her role in it. “A rec centre is kind of the face of the community,” she says. And Walker’s has been the face most recreation users have become accustomed to over the past 30 years. Back in the ‘80s, Walker delivered recreation programs to the outlying areas around Castlegar. She taught aerobics classes at Robson, Tarrys and Blueberry

schools, wearing leotards and a sweatband while channeling Olivia NewtonJohn. The closure of those two latter schools signified a shift in program delivery for the centre, particularly after the construction of the aquatic and fitness centres in 1990. The rec complex now serves as a hub, a kind of “one-stop shop” as Walker puts it. After 30 years at the Rec Centre, she now sees the kids she instructed bringing their children into the facility. As she talks about the resurgence of young families using the centre, a group of youngsters runs past her open door, laughing uproariously. “Most people who come in are in a good mood,” Walker chuckles. That’s a lot of happy faces, given that nearly 55,000 people per year visit the aquatic centre alone. The current demographic of users also reflects a growing number of seniors visiting the complex. Like the Creston and Nelson recreation centres, Castlegar implemented the

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Volume 2, Issue 1

Playing on the Job...continued “Golden Guest” program this past September which celebrates fitness and healthy living. Users aged 80 and over receive free memberships to the facility. So far, over 20 people have signed up. Walker is amazed at the seniors’ fitness levels and vitality. “I sometimes feel like I have to check their ID,” she marvels. She does admit that staff have had a few awkward moments when a couple of older swimmers arrived on the pool deck having forgotten to put their suits on. It’s talking about staff that causes Walker to really blush--with pride, as her colleagues are more like family to her. “Lots of staff have been here 20-plus years; that says something about the RDCK,” says Walker. Walker believes people make an organization; that philosophy has led her to mentor numerous kids who have worked at the centre. Many of those former staff have gone on to become doctors, lawyers and other professionals. She speaks affectionately about “rink rats” as well as the parties staff hold to keep morale high and bond as a team. “We live what we work,” she says. “We come here everyday and just play.” It’s been play and hard work: Walker has helped organize a number of events, including the Seniors and Summer Games. This May, the Castlegar Complex will host the Recreation Facilities Association of BC’s annual conference. Walker has seen the centre evolve from a two-person show to the multi-program complex it is now. Back in 1989, Walker and her boss Pat Metge were debating whether to invest in computers. “I can remember using the Gestetner to produce our program guides,” she recalls, making the motion of using a meat grinder to show how the antiquated machine worked. Now leisure guides and program enrollment are online, making program delivery much faster and easier. Still, “recreation is always changing,“ says Walker who emphasizes that the community will drive change. She suggests that fitness facilities should be expanded, a project she would like to head up before she retires. Walker has already planned her farewell party but she’s unlikely to take to the couch and surf channels when she retires. She sees golfing, curling and traveling in her future. www.rdck.bc.ca


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“Or, maybe I’ll come back here and work as a fitness instructor and put those spandex leggings on again.” A. Winje

Castlegar to host Recreation Conference

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he Recreation Facilities Association of BC’s annual conference will be held in Castlegar from May 14—17 at the Community Complex. Sessions include:           

Energy efficiency Green technology Heat recovery Recycling programs Refrigeration systems Health & Wellness Aging infrastructure Proactive Asset Management Utilizing Technology Human Resources Facility Issues Bull Pen

For more conference fees, registration form and more information, please visit http://www.rfabc.com/conferen.html

*The purpose of the Recreation Facilities Association of British Columbia (RFABC) is to promote general interest, education, safe operating standards, professionalism and support among recreation facility operators, Commission and Board members in the successful operations of arenas, auditoriums, community centres, swimming pools, stadiums, parks and other recreation facilities.

Who Runs the Roads? We receive a lot of enquiries about road maintenance. The RDCK does not maintain roads and highways. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure maintains highways; streets and roads within municipalities are the jurisdiction of that village, town or city.

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Our Mission

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he mission of the Regional District of Central Kootenay is to provide area residents and communities with services, governance and representation in a manner that supports the economic, social and environmental goals of the region.

What does the RDCK Do for You?

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he RDCK is a local government, meaning that it responds to locally desired needs for services.

The cost of such services is recovered from the residents who benefit from them. Here is a list of some of the services the RDCK delivers:      

General Government Administration Emergency Preparedness Services - 7 Services Grant-in-Aid Other General Government (Rural Areas) Building Inspection Bylaw Enforcement

www.rdck.bc.ca


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                       

Planning Economic Development - 9 Commissions Fire Protection - 23 services Dyking (Goat River) Animal Control - 6 services Untidy and Unsightly Premises - 5 areas Street Lighting - 7 services House Numbering - 11 areas Waste Management - 3 sub regions Cemetery – 5 areas Insect Control Sterile Insect Release Advisory Planning Commissions - 9 Commissions Recreation Commissions - 10 Commissions Recreation Facilities 3 ice arenas 2 indoor pools 12 outdoor pools Ice Arena Grant-in-Aid - 2 services Museum Regional Parks - 7 sub regions Library Grant-in-Aid - 6 services Television Grant-in-Aid - 3 services Transit - 6 services

As the Board of Directors enters budget deliberations, it requests input from the public, whom the RDCK is designed to serve. Public consultation meetings will be held throughout the RDCK in February. Please check your local paper and the RDCK website for times and locations. The RDCK is your government. Have your say!

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From the Archives

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he RDCK is comprised of 11 electoral areas and 9 municipalities. But there was a time when we had a 10th municipality. That lost municipality was Kinnaird, which amalgamated with Castlegar on January 1, 1974. For three months, the “new” community was known as the City of Castlegar—Kinnaird until residents were allowed to vote on a name for the new municipality. Of 999 votes cast, 825 were for Castlegar. So, the City of Castlegar as we know it came into being on March 1, 1974. Photo courtesy of the Selkirk College Regional Archives.

Chair back at the Table

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irector Hans Cunningham of Area G was acclaimed Chair of the Rural Affairs Committee for 2013. This will be Cunningham’s second term as chair.

“I think the Committee has progressed towards making our meetings faster, more customer and director-friendly, and have started down a path towards seeing our jobs as directors become more efficient, effective, empowered and fun,” said Cunningham. Director Cunningham said he appreciated his fellow Directors’ support and was looking forward to continuing to tackle rural issues. Hans Cunningham—Rural Affairs Committee Chair

Rural Matters Electoral Area Directors will attend a forum in Richmond from February 19—20th to discuss topics of importance to rural areas in BC. Our Directors will raise the following issues of importance in our region:

www.rdck.bc.ca

Product Stewardship - Other Regional Districts’ responsibilities for consumer product packaging

Ministry of Transportation’s Lake Access Points


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Rural Seniors

Flooding/Diking

Exemptions for Water Systems

MIA Insurance Coverage

Road Maintenance Standards in the Province

Other Regional Districts’ Rural Official Community Plans

Federal/Provincial Governments - Lake Management Plans & Guidelines for Development

Provincial Emergency Services

Resource Roads – Who maintains them and can funding be allocated

Community Work Funds – Request the scope be expanded to include environmental issues

Forest Service Roads – How they are decommissioned and access to park

Gravel pits in residential areas

Fire Insurance Increases

Boundary Expansion

Rescue Society Coordination – What is the Regional District’s involvement

RCMP’s Responsibility for Animal Control

Fire Smart and Water Smart programs

Community Charter

Government Downloading to Rural Areas

Laws Regarding Accidental Trapping of Animals

Going Green

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he Board approved allocating Community Works funds for a domestic hot water boiler update at the Castlegar and District Community Complex and for electrical energy efficiency upgrades for Beasley and North Shore Fire Halls.

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Volume 2, Issue 1

The Hot Spot Safer in Tarrys

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arrys volunteer fire department members want to keep their neighbours safe, so they’re not stopping at just fire suppression.

The firefighters requested to become First Responders and have been granted Board approval. As First Responders, the firefighters will have the same level of training as BC Ambulance attendants. The firefighters must undergo 44 hours of training, as well as certification and licensing before they are able to deliver this life-saving service. Regional Fire Chief Terry Swan anticipates the process will take six months. “Very often, fire departments have the ability to be on-scene before ambulances,” said Regional Fire Chief Terry Swan. In case of emergency, having trained emergency personnel on site quickly could mean the difference between life or death. -A. Winje

Heroes Among Us

Robson-Raspberry Firefighter Saves Life, Receives Medal

left to right: Vern Campbell, Past Chair of the JIBC Foundation, Shawn Aasen, Cyril Ozeroff and Dr. Michel Tarko, President and CEO of the Justice Institute of BC at the December awards gala. Photo by Dave Roels www.rdck.bc.ca


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n RDCK volunteer firefighter has received a prestigious medal for helping to save the life of a young Robson man and for his service to his community.

Cyril Ozeroff, Deputy Fire Chief of the Robson-Raspberry Volunteer Fire Department, received the Foundation Heroes and Rescue Award from the Justice Institute of British Columbia at its December 2012 gala. “This unexpected honour was made even more special by the surprise presentation of the trophy by Shawn Aasen” said Ozeroff. Shawn is the young man whose life Ozeroff and his fellow firefighters helped save. Shawn Aasen was only 21 years old when he went into cardiac arrest on June 27, 2011. Ozeroff, Fred Vigue, Robb Graham, Troy Voros, Ian Winsor, Keith Watson and Jeff Grant were on the scene just minutes after receiving the 911 call. The First Responders applied CPR and defibrillation at the scene and while Shawn was transported to the Castlegar hospital. Shawn’s heart resumed beating on its own 50 minutes after stopping. He was later implanted with a pacemaker and defibrillator. Shawn is currently living in Robson and is “doing great.” As he accepted the award in Vancouver, Ozeroff acknowledged all of the volunteers involved in this life-saving incident and recognized the “invaluable support” they receive from their families which enables them to give so much to their communities. The award highlights the incredible dedication, training, professionalism and service of these firefighters. It is also the first time the Justice Institute has awarded a Heroes award to a volunteer firefighter. “In my view, it’s a tribute to all firefighters in the volunteer fire service,” said Ozeroff. The Robson-Raspberry Firefighters were previously presented with life-saving medals by Regional Fire Chief Terry Swan on behalf of the Regional District of Central Kootenay in a ceremony last spring in front of their colleagues, friends and the Aasen family. Shawn summed up the actions of his heroes best: “I am so thankful for them,” he said. -A. Winje

Referendum The Board directed staff to proceed to referendum on Kaslo and District Fire Protection Service Establishment Bylaw No. 2300, 2013 and Kaslo and District Fire Protection Service Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 2301, 2013. Stay tuned for more information.

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Volume 2, Issue 1

The Value of Volunteers

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t nearly every Board meeting, volunteers are appointed to RDCK commissions. These members of the public serve an important function by representing their neighbours on commissions that deal with parks, recreation, water, and economic development, for example. Their efforts help to make and keep our communities and the region strong. The RDCK is extremely grateful to these individuals for their dedication, service, time and passion. If you are interested in volunteering, please check The Communicator, our website or your local newspaper for future opportunities. The Board and Staff wish to congratulate and thank Ken Milner for his nearly 35 years of service on the Duhamel Commission of Management. Such a long tenure is an achievement that speaks to Mr. Milner’s incredible dedication. We wish Mr. Milner all the best on his retirement from the Commission. The RDCK thanks Jim Hamilton and Stan Baker, who have both retired from the South Slocan Commission of Management. Your contributions have been incredible and we are most grateful.

Slocan Lake Stewardship Society

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locan Lake is one step closer to getting its own management plan, which will guide the future care, protection and sustainability of the lake. After hearing a comprehensive report from Mary Therese DesCamp, President of the Slocan Lake Stewardship Society, on January 17th, the Board passed a resolution to make the Slocan Lake Management Plan a planning project for 2013. “Most lake management plans are done on lakes that are messed up; Beautiful photo of Bannock Point, Slocan Lake taken by Sue McMurtries we’re trying to get ahead of it so we’re not doing restoration,” said Ms. DesCamp. Formed in 2007, the Society has consulted the public, employed exhaustive methodology, delivered education programs, done scientific studies and raised $250,000 in grants to promote the creation of a management plan. Chief among the needs and concerns raised by lake area residents is the protection of water quality and the threat of lost biodiversity. Lake crowding, sale of Crown

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land, foreshore development and noise pollution were also identified as issues. The Board was impressed by the Society’s initiation and development of the project, as were representatives of the Columbia Basin Trust, who attended the meeting. "We are so proud to be this tiny little component of this amazing work," said Laurie Page, Vice-Chair of the CBT, which helped fund the Society’s work. Therese DesCamp summed up the Society’s efforts simply: “We just want to protect the lake.” -A. Winje

Water Wise

RDCK staff keep the flow on the go!

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outh Slocan residents are grateful to RDCK water utility staff members for fixing a broken water main and restoring water to the village this past summer.

“Thank you to all for a very long but effective and successful day of work on South Slocan’s broken water main on July 19th, 2012,” wrote Peter Wood, Chair of the South Slocan Commission of Management. Water Utility Technician Al Richardson responded to the call for help at just after 4 a.m. that morning, after having been out the night before attending to a low-water issue at the South Slocan plant. Utility Operator Dave Sharun also responded shortly after and the search began to find the reason for RDCK Utility Technicians Allan Richardson & Dave Sharun the empty water reservoir. Heavy spring rains resulted in excessive surface water, making the task of locating the leak difficult. However, the technicians, with assistance from Peter Wood and Utilities Manager Jason McDiarmid, finally pinpointed the problem. After the removal of three trees and an 18-hour day, the team successfully restored water to South Slocan village. “South Slocan residents are fortunate to have Peter Wood and Gary Niminiken on their commission; they supply so much of their time, labor, knowledge and equipment behind the scenes to keep the water system working ,” said Al Richardson. “All and all it was a great team effort!” -A. Winje http://www.facebook.com/rdcentralkootenay?ref=hl

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Volume 2, Issue 1

The Line on Traps

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he RDCK Board will tell request the Province of BC that it wants regulations concerning trap lines changed. After a dog was killed in a Conibear trap in his electoral area, Director Paul Peterson asked the Board to support a motion calling for the Province of BC to “investigate and legislate ways to prevent domestic animals from being injured in traps such as Conibear.” The Board passed the motion unanimously and will further ask the Province to ban trap lines in “recreational areas close to communities, rural area developments and residential clusters.” That resolution will now be taken to the Association of Kootenay Boundary Local Governments for discussion at its April convention.

Did you know…. That since 2002, the West Kootenay-Boundary Regional Hospital District has spent $25.1 million in capital investments at regional health facilities?

Health Matters

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our Director doesn’t just represent you on the Regional District of Central Kootenay Board; Directors also sit on the West Kootenay-Boundary Regional Hospital District Board (WKBRHD). The WKBRHD is responsible for providing funding for equipment, renovations and construction projects at health facilities throughout the district. The WKBRHD provides 40% of the costs, while the Interior Health Authority contributes the other 60%. Hospital Districts are legislated under the Hospital District Act. The WKBRHD has been in existence since January 1996. Its first Chair was Director John Voykin from Area I of the RDCK.

WKBRHD Mission Statement That the West Kootenay-Boundary Regional Hospital District Board of Directors’ mission is to determine local property taxpayers’ responsibility for health care matwww.rdck.bc.ca


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ters established by the Hospital District Act within the West Kootenay-Boundary Regional Hospital District’s authority.

Who is your WKBRHD Board? The West Kootenay-Boundary Regional Hospital District is the largest hospital district in BC. It is comprised of 17 Directors from the Regional District of Central Kootenay and 13 Directors from the Regional District of Kootenay-Boundary: Central Kootenay: Area A Garry Jackman Area D Andy Shadrack Area E Ramona Faust Area F Ron Mickel Area G Hans Cunningham Area H Walter Popoff Area I Andy Davidoff Area J Gordon Zaitsoff Area K Paul Peterson Castlegar Deb McIntosh Kaslo Greg Lay Nakusp Karen Hamling Nelson John Dooley New Denver Henning von Krogh Salmo Janine Haughton Silverton Kathy Provan Slocan Hillary Elliott

Kootenay-Boundary Area A Ali Grieve Area B Linda Worley Area C Grace McGregor Area D Irene Perepolkin Area E Bill Baird Fruitvale Larry Gray Grand Forks Brian Taylor Greenwood Barry Noll Midway Marguerite Rotvold Montrose Don Duclos Rossland Kathy Wallace Trail Robert Cacchioni Warfield Bert Crockett The Chair is Marguerite Rotvold of Midway. Acting Chair is Walter Popoff of Area H, RDCK.

WKBRHD Meetings WKBRHD meeting are open to the public and are held five or six times per year. Please visit http://rdck.bc.ca/hospitalboard/wkbr_hospital_district.html for meeting times, agendas and to read Spotlight, the newsletter of the WKBRHD.

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Power to the People

Have your say on the Columbia Power Corporation’s Strategic Plan.

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olumbia Power Corporation (CPC) wants your input on its proposed 2012—2017 Strategic Plan. The highlights of the plan are to optimize the performance of existing facilities, complete the Waneta Expansion, grow reinvestment in hydro generation, and continue to build relationships with local governments, stakeholders and communities. “There’s a pride in what's been accomplished so far and a willingness to explore other opportunities,” said Jane Bird, CEO of the Crown corporation. Bird and other representatives of Columbia Power attended the RDCK’s January 17th Board meeting to discuss the plan and some of the CPC’s current initiatives. With the support of BC Hydro, CPC will spend $6 million to build boat launches on the Arrow Lakes at Anderson Point, Nakusp and Edgewood. The CPC is also considering adding generation to the Duncan Dam and adding additional generating capacity to the Elko Dam. Ms. Bird also gave an overview of the CPC’s history and mandate. Since its inception in 1994, the company has developed three hydro power generation facilities and is working on a fourth (Waneta Expansion). CPC is primarily an engineering and project management company. After the completion of the Waneta Expansion, the CPC’s annual anticipated income will be $145 million. Approximately 1,200 jobs have been created by the corporation. To view and give input on the proposed strategic plan, please visit http:// www.columbiapower.org/ -A. Winje

The Trust of the People

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he Columbia Basin Trust visited the RDCK Board on January 17th to introduce Chair Greg Deck and Vice-Chair Laurie Page. “The Trust continues to support and promote collaboration and engagement with communities and residents to effectively manage our investments,” stated Chair Deck.

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The delegates also iterated the purpose of the CBT’s community-directed funding approach, which “is to find out what works best for communities.” For more information on the Columbia Basin Trust, please visit www.cbt.org. The Columbia Basin Trust is a legacy for all people of the Basin.

-A. Winje

The CBT Board of Directors. Paul Peterson, Director, Area K stands first from left. Chair Greg Deck is third from right and Vice-Chair Laurie Page is seated on rock.

Grant Writing

Learn how to move from idea to proposal Grant writing workshops offered by Columbia Basin Trust. This winter, CBT's community liaisons are hosting Developing and Funding Your Community Project Workshops in eight locations in the region. You'll cover topics like how to focus your project idea, develop a budget and write clearly. You'll also learn how to identify appropriate funders, and receive an overview of CBT's own granting programs. If you'd like more information, phone 1.800.505.8998 or email cbt@cbt.org to speak to a Community Liaison and learn about other workshop opportunities.

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Grant Writing...continued DEVELOPING AND FUNDING YOUR COMMUNITY PROJECT WORKSHOPS You must register to attend a workshop.

KASLO Thursday, February 7, 2013 7 to 9 p.m. Selkirk College RSVP to 1.250.353.2618

NAKUSP Monday, February 18, 2013 7 to 9 p.m. Selkirk College RSVP to 1.250.265.4077

NELSON Friday February 1, 2013 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Selkirk College RSVP to 1.250.352.6601 or 1.866.301.6601 OR Friday, February 22, 2013 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Selkirk College RSVP to 1.250.352.6601 or 1.866.301.6601

CASTLEGAR Friday, February 8, 2013 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Selkirk College RSVP to 1.250.365.1208 or 1.888.953.1133 OR Friday, March 8, 2013 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Selkirk College RSVP to 1.250.365.1208 or 1.888.953.1133

www.rdck.bc.ca


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RDCK Grants DISCRETIONARY

Town of Creston

Area A

Creston Pee Wee Rep Hockey Team Creston Valley Thunder Cats

Internal Transfer to $1,000 Environmental Services Dept. (offset tipping fees for clean-up projects)

Creston Valley Hospice Society

$500

$10,500

Area G

Internal Transfer to Service 788 $603

Salmo Supportive Housing Kootenay Lake Hospital Foundation

Area I

Area H

Area H

Kootenay Men’s Group Castlegar & District Recreation Complex Brilliant Cultural Centre Tarrys Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary Union of Youth Festival Glade Recreation Commission Pass Creek Fire Department Social Club Tarrys Fire Department Social Club Vision of Peace Youth Choir Cultural Interpretive Centre Pass Creek Community Hall Shoreacres Community Hall Glade Community Hall Tarrys Community Hall

$1,000

Area D Gar Creek Water Users Assoc.

Area B

$400

$250 $1,000

Nakusp Ski Club Association Slocan Riverwatch Society

$2,000 $500

Area K

$500 $500 $1,000

$9,000 $500

$750 $3,350

Arrow Slocan Lakes Community $1,000 Services

$1,000 $750 $250 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Area B Creston Valley Judo Club $1,000 Creston Valley Thunder Cats $1,000 Creston Valley Rod & Gun Club $500 Mt. Gimli, Valhalla Provincial Park Photo by Ran Zhang

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Bulletin Board STATUTORY HOLIDAYS—RDCK OFFICE CLOSURES February 11, 2013

CLOSED

March 29, 2013

CLOSED

April 1, 2013

CLOSED

BOARD MEETINGS February 28, 2013

9:00 a.m.

March 21, 2013

9:00 a.m.

COMMITTEE MEETINGS Rural Affairs Committee February 27, 2013

10:30 a.m.

March 19, 2013

9:00 a.m. (meeting is held on a Tuesday)

East Resource Recovery Committee March 7, 2013

9:00 a.m.

June 6, 2013

9:00 a.m.

West Resource Recovery Committee May 2, 2013

1:00 p.m.

August 1, 2013

1:00 p.m.

Central Resource Recovery Committee April 8, 2013

1:00 p.m.

June 6, 2013

1:00 p.m.

Meetings are held at the RDCK Office 202 Lakeside Drive, Nelson, BC

Public is welcome to attend. www.rdck.bc.ca


Volume 2, Issue 1

T h e Com m u ni c a t or

Public Reminder PUBLIC REMINDER Opinion Ballot for Electoral Area E Rural Official Community Plan 2260 A public opinion ballot is being conducted in the Blewett, Granite Road and Ymir/Perrier Road portions of Electoral Area E. Please be reminded that the return date for ballots is February 1st, 2013. Note that the date on the notification letter is incorrectly indicating the date as February 1st, 2012 in error. We apologize for any inconvenience. For residents of Area E outside of these areas, please note that additional comments and submissions can be made at anytime with regard to the community plan, including requests for land use designation changes. A second Public Hearing will be required and a Notice of Public Hearing advertising once determined. For further information and to review Bylaw 2260, please visit our website at: http://www.rdck.bc.ca/development/planning/projects/ area_e_land_use_planning.html Or contact the Planning Department at (250) 352-8162 or 1-800-268-7325

The View from Here RDCK employee Heather Zavagno in front of the MacBeth Icefield near Kaslo, BC. Photo courtesy of Heather Zavagno.

http://www.facebook.com/rdcentralkootenay?ref=hl

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Board of Directors Garry Jackman John R. Kettle Larry Binks Andy Shadrack Ramona Faust Ron Mickel Hans Cunningham Walter Popoff Andy Davidoff Gordon Zaitsoff Paul Peterson Lawrence Chernoff Ron Toyota Jimmie Holland Karen Hamling John Dooley Ann Bunka Ann Henderson Leah Main Hillary Elliott

Area A Area B (Chair) Area C Area D Area E Area F Area G Area H Area I Area J Area K Castlegar Creston Kaslo Nakusp Nelson New Denver Salmo Silverton Slocan (Vice Chair)

Regional District of Central Kootenay Box 590, 202 Lakeside Drive Nelson, BC V1L 7B8 Phone: (250) 352-6665 Toll Free: 1-800-268-7325

HOW DO YOU SEE THE KOOTENAYS?

If you have taken a photograph that represents life in the Kootenays and would like to share it with the RDCK in this newsletter, please submit your pic to info@rdck.bc.ca It might appear in our feature “The View from Here.” We’re on the web at www.rdck.bc.ca FRIEND us on

The Communicator is a monthly publication of the RDCK. Comments? Questions? Suggestions? Contact the editor at (250) 352-8166 or awinje@rdck.bc.ca

Editor/Writer: Anitra Winje

Designer: Angela Lund

Profile for Angela Lund

RDCK Newsletter - Volume 2, Issue 1  

RDCK Newsletter - Volume 2, Issue 1

RDCK Newsletter - Volume 2, Issue 1  

RDCK Newsletter - Volume 2, Issue 1

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