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Front Cover By: #icaretoday

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ARCTIC FIRES

ROTARY FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE

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BRICK BY BRICK

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DEFORESTATION

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PLASTIC REDUCING TIPS

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WELCOME The WAVE, our local magazine reaching out to the world. Our team at Rotary Club of Wyndham Harbour are proud to offer this free magazine. The WAVE keeps our readers up to date with our local as well as international projects. We are determined to make a change in the world. The first step is through awareness, even though we all have challenges to meet in our own lives. There are many people that are far worse off than ourselves and we should accept that the smallest sacrifice will transform into the largest of benefits for the recipients. Please take the time to read The WAVE, so that we can all become more aware of what can be achieved when we all do something for the communities that need it most and more importantly realise the difference that our small contribution makes.

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Artwork: Ferdi Rizkiyanto | Art Director, Digital Artist | #ferdirizkiyanto | ferdi-rizkiyanto.blogspot.com THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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CLIMATE CHANGE

Source: rotary.org/en/why-climate-change-issue-rotary

Rotarians understand that the whole world is their backyard. They see the effects of climate change in communities they care about, and they haven’t waited to take action. Tackle the problem the way they always do: coming up with projects, using their connections to change policy — and planning for the future.

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Article By Diana Schoberg

THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

HOW ROTARIANS ARE ALREADY FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE Rotarians are doers. Show them a problem and they look for solutions. But a global problem such as climate change might seem daunting to even the most resourceful Rotary member.

A coalition of researchers and scientists led by environmentalist and writer Paul Hawken mathematically molded the climatic and economic impact of potential solutions to learn which ones would yield the best results for people and the planet. The list, compiled in a 2017 book called Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming,“ included some surprising possibilities, such as educating girls, promoting family planning, and assisting farmers. As it happens, all of those align with Rotary’s areas of focus.

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Source: rotary.org/en/climate-change-what-rotarians-are-doing-now

Break that complex problem down into smaller pieces, however, and you find there are many things Rotarians can do — and are already doing, with help from The Rotary Foundation.


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Source: rotaryclub.shop/home-decor/658-14021-surfing-canvas-wall-art-prints.html

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ARCTIC FIRES AND SEA ICE MELT United Nations report claims that dramatic Arctic fires and sea ice melt, show need for urgent climate action. “Exceptional and prolonged” temperatures in Siberia, have left parts of the Arctic warmer than sub-tropical Florida, and fuelled “devastating” wildfires for a second consecutive year, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said also of rapidly decreasing sea ice along the Russian polar coast.

“Some parts of Siberia have again topped 30 degrees Celsius – so it’s been warmer in Siberia than…many parts of Florida”, said WMO spokesperson Clare Nullis at a press conference in Geneva. “We’ve had exceptional and prolonged heat for months now and this has fuelled devastating Arctic fires; and at the same time we’re seeing rapidly decreasing sea coverage along the Arctic coast”, she continued, noting that their estimated total carbon emissions since January are the highest in 18 years, when the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service of wildfires began. The development follows an astonishing reading of 38°C in the Russian town of Verkhoyansk on 20 June.

Source: news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1068961

According to the UN agency, temperatures in Siberia have been more than 5C above average from January to June, and in June up to 10C above average.


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Fire Starter Data from Wednesday showed 188 probable points of fire in Siberia, according to Roshydromet, with blazes particularly intense in Russia’s Sakha Republic and Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, in the far northeast of Siberia. Both areas have experienced much warmer conditions than usual in past months. Russian authorities have also declared that there is an extreme fire hazard throughout the Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug – Yugra which is in western Siberia, WMO reported. Wildfire smoke contains pollutants including carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, volatile organic compounds and solid aerosol particles, the UN agency said in a statement, which noted that Arctic wildfires emitted the equivalent of 56 megatonnes of carbon dioxide in June, compared to 53 megatonnes in June 2019. “We’re seeing, you know, dramatic satellite images, which show the extent of the burns surface; the fire front of the northern-most currently active Arctic wildfire is less than eight kilometres from the Arctic ocean – this should not be happening,” Ms. Nullis said.

Accelerating ice retreat along the Arctic Russian coast in the spring, has accelerated since late June, leading to very low sea ice extent in the Laptev and Barents Seas, WMO also warned. “The Northern Sea route appears to be nearly open”. it added. Changes to weather at the poles will likely affect other more distant and populated places too, Ms. Nullis cautioned, thanks to a phenomenon known as “teleconnections”. Arctic Spillover These are observed in weather events including El Nino, where cold and dry air reaches places that are more used to seeing warmer, wetter conditions. “In general, the Arctic is heating more than twice the global average”, Ms. Nullis said. “It’s having a big impact on local populations and ecosystems, but we always say that what happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic, it does affect our weather in different parts of the world where hundreds of millions of people live.”

Highlighting new climate research published in the journal Nature Climate Change pointing to irreversible threats to the Arctic ecosystem, the WMO spokesperson said that “polar bears - which as we all know is a symbol of climate change - could be nearly extinct by the end of the century”, if sea ice continues to shrink at current rates.

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Source: news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1068961

Polar bear extinction accelerating land surface temperatures in Siberia in June 2020 were hotter than average for the same period from 2003-2018. Land surface temperatures in Siberia in June 2020 were hotter than average for the same period from 2003-2018. , by NASA Earth Observatory


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CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS The Polar Museum Tromsø Norway describes Climate Change Impacts.

Less snow and stronger ice melting generate more light and heat in the ocean, leading to thinner ice. This process in combination with heat from ocean currents coming from the south determines how much sea ice melts. A low – pressure area characterized by humid, warm air masses winds its way around the Arctic. These air masses can break out of the low-pressure belt, with consequences for the climate in the southern regions. Consequently, the Arctic Ocean and its seasonal ice zone are linked to climate changes in the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean and on land. For instance, recent temperature records in Svalbard are likely linked to Arctic winds now being warmer due to less sea ice and more open water.

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Source: The Polar Museum Tromsø Norway

Source: visittromso.no/polar-museum

Open water absorbs light and heat, while ice reflects light and heat back into the atmosphere. Thereby, ice plays such an important role in the Arctic warming and affects the weather and climate elsewhere on earth. The amount of reflected light converted into heat is determined by the surface area, texture and colour of the ice. Dry snow reflects the most, but as the snow becomes wetter or melts the degree of reflection declines.


THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

Source: The Polar Museum Tromsø Norway

Source: visittromso.no/polar-museum

The land masses and sections of the continental shelf surrounding the Artic Ocean differ greatly between regions. This regionality combined with different types of sea ice (old or more recent drift ice), river drainage from land and the varying depths of the ocean creates different types of ecosystems. Given this diversity of Artic Ocean ecosystems and the ongoing changes, there is limited knowledge about the ecology in the drift ice zone. Far greater knowledge is required to understand and manage the ecology of the Artic Ocean, and to understand the importance the Arctic has for the global climate. As the location and size of the ice-covered area varies so dramatically from season to season, the entire area alternating between ice-coverand open water it is referred to as a seasonal ice zone.

Through extensive research the participants of the Artic Seasonal Ice Zones (Artic SIZE) research programme aim to improve our knowledge of the region of the world most affected by climate change – the Artic Ocean and the Artic drift ice zone. For practical reasons, the programme is focusing on the European part. However, the researchers participating in Artic SIZE also have a circumpolar perspective and are working closely with researchers from around the world to interpret the results from a PanArctic perspective. This means that they perceive the Arctic as a circumpolar area consisting of a Mediterranean Sea surrounded by large land masses.

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Source: oceancrusaders.org/plastic-crusades/plastic-statistics

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rotaryclub.shop/home-decor/517-kills-germs-portable-handheld-uv-disinfection-lampTHE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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Source: rotaryclub.shop/home-decor/657-13958-geometric-ocean-waves-print.html THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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JUKURRPA DESIGNS Late last year I launched Jukurrpa Designs, a collection of frames inspired by Australian Aboriginal Artwork. The feedback I’ve received on the designs has been fantastic so far but getting to this point was a very long journey.

The concept behind Jukurrpa Designs became a little more solid after another project. My wife comes from a remote village in the middle of Indonesia where they have these batik designs that, like Australian Aboriginal artwork, have a lot of colours and intricate details. I designed some sunglasses named after my wife “Suli” with this art on the temples, and people love them. Jukurrpa Designs as it is today started about three years ago. A lot of Aboriginal artwork is very protected, so it was very hard to start it due to all the companies (middlemen) and license agreements you need to deal with. A few companies that we contacted gave prices were just way too much, and that was for just the samples, it began to look impossible for us to do. At one stage myself and my business partner Anthony were going to give up. 28

Fortunately, we were eventually able to directly sign a licensing agreement with a community named Warlukurlangu Aboriginal Artists. It is in Yuendumu near Alice Springs. We work directly with them and use any of their artwork for a fee under a long term license agreement, whilst also giving back a royalty of 10% of all sales. That‘s shared amongst both the artists and the community for various projects, like a dialysis machine and a swimming pool. It’s a pretty good community, and they license a lot of the artwork out for other things like scarves, ties, mugs and teapots. When I designed the frames, I wanted to link the artwork with the patient and the Aboriginal artist. When the patient buys the frame they also receive a microfibre cloth that has the full original Aboriginal Artwork on it, as well as a card that shows a picture of the Aboriginal Artist who painted the artwork and a brief story about the artwork. The full story is on our website since some are quite long. The frame, cloth and card fit neatly into a customised Jukurrpa Designs spectacle case.

Source: .jukurrpadesigns.com.au

Developing frames with Australian Aboriginal artwork has been an idea at the back of my mind for some time now. I‘ve always loved the artwork, even when I was younger and back in Ireland. I used to watch a lot of Australian programs, like the Bush Tucker Man and since arriving in Australia about 17 years ago you can see the artwork on many products.


THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

Source: .jukurrpadesigns.com.au

I went through between 60 and 80 designs before settling on the 8 we chose. If the artwork is too big, it’s hard to put it on a temple since it’s such a small area. You can’t just take a painting and put it on a temple if it doesn’t reflect the actual artwork as a whole, so it takes time. For the first 8 designs released, I have tried to have a good mix, not just put all the designs on the front, as for some people this is too much, so having the artwork on the temple, softens the frame somewhat. The next 4 designs, due for release in NOV 2020 will have some Men’s designs as well, as some people are also asking me to design, but it takes time to find the right paintings. I also wanted to keep the frames affordable; they’re between $240 and $260 in store and $299 through our website. We’re using the best materials to produce them as well, in line with the valued artwork, including Mazzucchelli acetate from Italy, Japanese titanium, and joints and screws from a company in Germany called OBE, which is one of the best in the world. As mentioned the first collection has eight designs but planning to release another 4 in NOV 2020 and another 4 Mid 2021. Further down the road perhaps a sunglasses and kids range.

I really just love everything that surrounds the designs. The Aboriginal people behind it, giving back and helping, and also the colours, designs and stories behind them. I see a lot of similarities between Ireland and the Aboriginal history. In Ireland we also have a long history with mythical stories and great characters as well. I have had great support from many optical stores throughout Australia and the public email me every day asking where they are stocked. So, I’m hoping more stores will get on board and stock this beautiful range, not only from a business point of view, but to share with their patients these amazing artworks, stories and designs about the Australian Aboriginal culture and history. Thanks for the awareness. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Name: Murray O‘Keeffe Qualifications: UK Dispensing Optician FBDO Workplace: Jukurrpa Designs, eyesaBOve Position: Founder, Managing Director, Designer Location: Brisbane Years in profession: 31 www.jukurrpadesigns.com.au

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Source: .jukurrpadesigns.com.au

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Source: .jukurrpadesigns.com.au

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CLIMATE CHANGE IS ESTIMATED TO CAUSE 250,000 MORE DEATHS EACH YEAR BETWEEN 2030 – 2050

Source: icrc.org/en/what-we-do/climate-change-conflict

@ICRC

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BREATHE OUT

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Source: rotaryclub.shop/home-decor/656-13892-blue-ocean-beach-waves-canvas-prints.html

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Source: # eclecticpear | news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1069151 THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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Source: # eclecticpear | news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1069151

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Source: # eclecticpear | news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1069151 THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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Source: # eclecticpear | news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1069151

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Source: # eclecticpear | news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1069151 THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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Source: # eclecticpear | news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1069151

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floatingthreads.com.au

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FLOATING THREADS I met a childhood friend, Josephine Jakobi whom I had not seen for almost fifty years. It was at my father’s funeral two years ago we were reunited. She had become a well known and recognised local artist working with textiles and the environment. She encouraged me to become involved in a local arts group, “FLOAT”, whose focus is around the picturesque waters of Lake Tyers. I was born at Lake Tyers Beach and grew up on the family farm, attended Toorloo Arm Primary and Bairnsdale High School, studied life drawing at Canberra School of Arts along with various other courses including design, fabric embellishment, water colour, oil painting, and creative arts. My passion for textiles commenced at a young age using my mothers treadle sewing machine to sew and create. I have always enjoyed working with natural fibres such as linen, silk, wool and cotton, finding the fabric to be my inspiration. “FLOATING THEADS” has come to fruition thanks to the encouragement of local artists and “FLOAT”, funded by Creative Arts Victoria. It has also been a way of remembering my father, who passed away at the age of 90, having lived his entire life at Lake Tyers where not a week went by without him being on the Lake, fishing it’s serene waters or exploring its arms and inlets.

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I have tried to capture the Lake he loved so much and it’s natural beauty by using linen fabric, earthy colours of brackish brown, seaweed green and Marimekko fabric, which I have titled “Lake Tyers Linen”. For me, this fabric encapsulates the Lake’s spirit; it’s soil, sand, reeds, water, and the sky above. Its been a wonderful journey. I would like to acknowledge and express my gratitude to the following; Sue Anderson, Ros Bowen, Andrea Lane, Sue Fraser, Gary Plumley, Gary Yelen, Marlou Rees, and photographers Pollyannar Love and Frank Flynn for their support, encouragement and assistance.


Source: floatingthreads.com.au

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“Each design holds the essence of the Lake’s natural environment as it rises and falls with each season, flowing gently and freely“.

“I find the Lake to be truly inspirational in so many ways“. -------------Marlene Rees

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Source: floatingthreads.com.au

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“I choose to work with natural fibres, quality fabrics that are often sourced from Japan and Finland. Each unique garment displays an effortless simplicity, is minimal, free flowing and comfortable to wear“. -------------Marlene Rees

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Source: floatingthreads.com.au

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“My signature on each garment is the stone sourced from the sands of Lakes Tyers. Each stone meticulously chosen for its colour, size and shape to compliment the garments, thus giving the wearer their own piece of Lake Tyers“. -------------Marlene Rees

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Source: floatingthreads.com.au

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READY TO SERVE

www.rotaryclubofwyndhamharbour.org.au

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rotaryclub.shop/home-decor/678-14660-environmentally-friendly-reusable-mesh-bag.html THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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Source: #icaretoday

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Artwork By: #icaretoday

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Source: Susan Freinkel: rotary.org/en/welcome-to-plasticville

MILLION TONS AMOUNT OF PLASTIC THAT ENDS UP IN THE EVERY YEAR

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AROUND YOU COULD

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Source: rotaryclub.shop/home-decor/658-13970-surfing-canvas-wall-art-prints.html

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Source: rotaryclub.shop/home-decor/654-13811-super-heroes-toilet-poster-canvas-wall-art.html THE WAVE | ISSUE 2: SEPTEMBER 2020

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SAVE TREES

Source: rotary.org/en/riseley-says-trees-show-commitment

“In some way, planting trees speaks to all of the areas of focus. Research has shown that trees are good for economic and community development – they increase property values. Planting a tree promotes peace simply by giving people a place to sit in the shade and contemplate the world. Trees are good for disease prevention and treatment, because the world is a healthier place with more trees to produce oxygen and absorb carbon dioxide. You can make a case for trees relating to all our areas of focus“. “There are parts of the world where deforestation has caused significant damage. It’s not within the bailiwick of Rotary to redress that; we just don’t have the capacity. But we’d like to demonstrate the importance of having trees in our communities and the difference that they make to us“. Ian H.S. Riseley

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DEFORESTATION REMAINS A CONCERN, NEW UN REPORT REVEALS!

The finding comes in its latest Global Forest Resources Assessment report (FRA 2020), which aims to turn the tide on deforestation, or the conversion of forest to other uses such as agriculture. The wealth of information on the world‘s forests is a valuable public good for the global community to help facilitate evidence-based policy formulation, decision-making and sound investments in the forest sector,“ said Maria Helena Semedo, the FAO Deputy Director-General.

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The global total forest area stands at some 4.06 billion hectares but continues to decrease, according to the report. FAO estimates that deforestation has robbed the world of roughly 420 million hectares since 1990, mainly in Africa and South America. The top countries for average annual net losses of forest area over the last 10 years, are Brazil, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Indonesia, Angola, Tanzania, Paraguay, Myanmar, Cambodia, Bolivia and Mozambique. However, there is good news as the rate of forest loss has declined substantially over the past three decades. The annual rate of deforestation was estimated at 10 million hectares between 2015-2020, compared with 12 million during 2010-2015.

Source: news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1068761

Some 178 million hectares of forest has been lost worldwide over the past three decades, the rate of loss has declined substantially during this period, said the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).


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The area of forest under protection has also reached roughly 726 million hectares: nearly 200 million more than in 1990. Still, there is cause for great concern, according to FAO.

Source: news.un.org/en/story/2020/07/1068761

Senior Forestry Officer Anssi Pekkarinen, the report’s Coordinator, warned that global targets related to sustainable forest management are at risk. “We need to step up efforts to halt deforestation in order to unlock the full potential of forests in contributing to sustainable food production, poverty alleviation, food security, biodiversity conservation and climate change while sustaining the production of all the other goods and services they provide”, he said.

The UN agency believes forests are at the heart of global efforts to achieve sustainable development that benefits both people and the planet. Protecting forests is critical as millions worldwide depend on them for their livelihoods or for food. Forests also contain thousands of different tree, mammal and bird species, among other life forms, and they help mitigate the impacts of climate change. Therefore, information about forests, such as the report, play a vital role in conservation.

Forests: for people and the planet The FRA report has been published every five years since 1990. For the first time ever, it contains an online interactive platform with detailed regional and global analyses for nearly 240 countries and territories. “These newly released tools will enable us to better respond to deforestation and forest degradation, prevent biodiversity loss and improve sustainable forest management“, said Ms. Semedo, the FAO deputy chief. 67


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VOLUNTEER Rotary is a global network of volunteers. Its work begins in the community, where opportunities for service are ample and accessible. If you’d like to volunteer, an important first step is to consider your availability and interests: 1. How much time can you invest in volunteer service? 2. Do you want to volunteer regularly or just for special events? 3. Are you available during the day, in the evening, or on weekends? 4. What skills, interests, and experiences do you offer? 5. Are you drawn to a specific issue or cause? If you would like to volunteer please visit our website: www.rotaryclubofwyndhamharbour.org.au

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#icaretoday

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Artwork By: #icaretoday


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NEWS FLASH “Much of the plastic we’ve produced is with us still. Humans could disappear from the earth tomorrow, but many of the plastics we’ve made will last for centuries“.

Source: Susan Freinkel: rotary.org/en/welcome-to-plasticville

Susan Freinkel

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Whilst there is some hope on the horizon with the employment of more sustainable resources, as the artisans are moving towards the implementation of newer techniques, their ability to grow and obtain certifications are difficult due to the lack of general education. The higher capital cost of setting up a modern processing plant dampens the industry’s ability to create more jobs. Partnership for Action on the Green Economy (PAGE), aims to assist workers with developing more equitable rights, earn a higher income whilst simultaneously reducing pollution during the production process and thus working towards a greener and more prosperous economy. Uruguay is home to the making of bricks for their livelihood, as part of the United Nations collaboration with the Uruguayan Government, both are aiming to reduce pollution, whilst preserving jobs. The negative implications of the environment in Uruguay are high and have long lasting effects on the protected species of trees. Between September and April a manufacturer of bricks can produce an average 30,000 bricks per month. This is the equivalent to building at least 1,500 new houses and having enough to supply businesses, kilns, factories, plus more. While it may be difficult for Uruguay to break the cycle of artisanal producers in making the traditional bricks using water, soil, clay, sand, and organic matter such as horse dung this all poses harmful effects for the environment. The local environment is suffering due to this mass production of bricks which can produce bricks seven times faster than an artisan producer. 74

Uruguay’s proud men and women all contribute to making an honest living and have for many decades been involved in Artisanal brick making as a way of life and a tradition. Both homes and businesses have been built with traditional bricks. Locals have invested their lives within this profession and they are proud of what they have created. “PAGE’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development supports nations and regions in reframing economic policies and practices around sustainability to foster economic growth, create income and jobs, reduce poverty and inequality, and strengthen the ecological foundations of their economies” – PAGE. While PAGE’s aim is beneficial for the future of the environment, this collaboration needs to be an effort of the world as a whole by not singling out countries with low emissions and applying pressure on cultures to change their traditional ways of living. The remainder of the world is overpopulated; over compromised with emissions.

Sources: news.un.org/en/story/2020/08/1069772 | rotary.org/en/binish-desai-young-inventor-eco-friendly- bricks-comes-full-circle

BRICK BY BRICK


Sources: news.un.org/en/story/2020/08/1069772 | rotary.org/en/binish-desai-young-inventor-eco-friendly- bricks-comes-full-circle

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Let us work with countries that have an advanced education, funds and resources to make a lasting effect on the environment for generations to come. More research needs to be conducted in order to establish who actually owns these brick factories.

INDIA

Binish Desai started his journey as a former Rotary Youth Exchange student, inventor, and entrepreneur known as the “Waste Warrior” earned him a spot on Forbes’ 2018 list of Asia’s Top Social Entrepreneurs. Today Desai is giving back through a Rotary Club and helping his community in India. It all started in school when he found his fate through chewing gum which stuck to his pants from under a desk. After peeling it off and wrapping it in paper enlighten him to an idea that would be a recyclable phenomenon – being bricks made from chewing gum and wastepaper.

Desai began creating bricks, from these resources and after eight months, he had manufactured 4,000 bricks where Desai built several buildings in India including a watchman‘s tower and toilets. An immensely proud Desai began to expand his vision further Desai further developed a micro-social enterprise called Eco Lights Studio. It employs women in rural India to make lamps, clocks, jewellery, and other products from industrial waste. These women work from home and run their own schedules “We call them women entrepreneurs, not women workers,” says Desai “The main idea is not just to create employment, but also to uplift these women,” says the Waste Warrior. “It’s always been my goal to help someone in need” -Desai

Desai persuaded a local paper mill and agreed to haul off the mill’s paper waste and also persuaded a chewing gum manufacturer to give him it’s off cut waste. 75


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BECOME A MEMBER For more information please visit our website: www.rotaryclubofwyndhamharbour.org.au

If you would like to advertise in this magazine, please email us at: info@rotaryclubofwyndhamharbour.org.au

We acknowledge contribution of content extracted from the following resources: www.rotary.org | www.icrc.org | news.un.org

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THE WAVE - ISSUE 2 CLIMATE CHANGE  

Rotarians understand that the whole world is their backyard. They see the effects of climate change in communities they care about, and they...

THE WAVE - ISSUE 2 CLIMATE CHANGE  

Rotarians understand that the whole world is their backyard. They see the effects of climate change in communities they care about, and they...

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