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Westminster Record

April 2017 | 20p

#WeStandTogether

Ready for Mission

Our New Reader

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10,000 Reasons

Flame 2017 saw almost 10,000 young people coming together to interact and celebrate their faith. Flame Congress is a joint production between the Catholic Youth Ministry Federation, and the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales. Fr Dermott Donnelly, chair of CYMFed and the director of youth services in

the Diocese of Hexham and Newcastle encouraged all present to enter ‘the vibrancy and hope that … a new experience of Jesus brings’. Cardinal Vincent delivered a message from Pope Francis, who hoped that Flame 2017 would ‘foster a greater zeal’ to ‘blaze trails that open up new horizons capable of spreading joy’.

Cardinal Charles Bo of Myanmar explained the political and religious situation in his country, as well as inspiring the young people present to be courageous in making a difference in their own societies and beyond. The highlight of Cardinal Bo’s speech was the interactive use of the poem: ‘It depends on whose hands it’s in’.

Solidarity with and welcoming refugees was a key theme in many elements of the event. This was emphasised by the presence of a 30ft boat that carried 37 people, from North Africa to Lampedusa, fleeing violence and war. During the afternoon Liturgy, Cardinal Vincent offered prayers for the estimated

10,000 refugees that have drowned whilst attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea. He then blessed Boat TO6411 as ‘a symbol of hope for people in despair … a symbol of new beginnings … a symbol of safety and a symbol of all our journeys, as one family, united in God’s love.’


Editorial

Westminster Record | April 2017

Westminster Record – Contact us The Victory of Christ is Life Editor Mgr Mark Langham Archbishop’s House, Ambrosden Avenue SW1P 1QJ Managing Editor Marie Saba 020 7798 9031 Inhouse writers Martha Behan 020 7798 9030 and Hannah Woolley Photos Mazur/Catholicnews.org.uk Design Julian Game To order copies contact Andrea Black 0161 908 5327 or email andrea.black@thecatholicuniverse.com Print management and distribution by The Universe Media Group Ltd.

May publication dates Editorial deadline: 18 April 2017 Listings email: communications@rcdow.org.uk News and stories call 020 7798 9030 Email: communications@rcdow.org.uk Advertising deadline: 21 April 2017 To advertise contact Carol Malpass 0161 908 5301 or email carol.malpass@thecatholicuniverse.com Produced by the Communications Office of the Diocese of Westminster. News and articles published in the Westminster Record do not necessarily represent the views of the Diocese of Westminster, unless specifically stated otherwise. Appearance of advertisements does not imply editorial endorsement.

abound in the response of so many ordinary people, who responded instinctively to help the wounded and dying. There have been many acts of witness, and Masses and prayers for the victims. We mourn all of them, but we are touched especially by the death of Aysha Frade, whose children attend one of our diocesan schools. At times like this, prayer can cross boundaries of nation, race and religion, and strengthen our determination to hold high the As we gaze upon the brutalised figure of Jesus upon the Cross, one values of tolerance, friendship and charity. Cardinal Vincent took part of our thoughts has to be, What in an inter-denominational prayer causes people to hate so much? It service outside Westminster Abbey, is a question that many of us have asked in recent days, following the and the Mayor of London hosted a vigil in Trafalgar Square, while a horror of the Westminster terror moving shrine set up at Notre attack. At the root of all fear is Dame de France in Leicester Place insecurity, a feeling that the expressed the solidarity of the existence of a particular person or people of France with those of society undermines my own London. identity. Fear encompasses an The victory of Christ is life, inability to distinguish diversity and we affirm our confidence this from threat, so that doing things in month with reports about youth: a different way becomes an the remarkable Flame ’17 unbearable challenge to my view Congress, and vocations stories. of the world and of myself. That, in We are an Easter people; our hope the end, is why Jesus, who had is undimmed. only done good, was murdered on Calvary. In this light, Cardinal Vincent has reminded us that, just as such attacks display the worst of human sinfulness, grace and goodness

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For more news from around the diocese throughout the month

Seven Sisters make the front page!

The group, from Ware Carmelite Monastery, had been to a meeting for enclosed religious orders where they were addressed by Cardinal Vincent Nichols. A group of around 50 sisters from around the diocese gathered on Thursday, 10th March to discuss guidelines about their way of life issued by Pope Francis last year. The guidelines and the conference were both called Vultum Dei Quaerare (Seek the Face of God). It was the first time such a meeting had ever been held Commuter Ben Patey took the photograph when he saw what he thought were seven nuns as he travelled home from work. The photo went viral that afternoon and was featured on the front page of The Times the following day. Sister Francesca, a Poor Clare, said the meeting was ‘wonderfully successful’. Page 2

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Praying for Peace in London: #WeStandTogether Met Police to stand together in a visible commitment to work for the common good. On Thursday, 23rd March, faith leaders met with representatives of the Government and Metropolitan Police to affirm their intent to work together for peace and for the good of all Londoners. Representing the Catholic Church at the meeting was Bishop John Wilson who said: 'We pledged our willingness to not allow terrorism to polarise our society. We talked about practical ways in which we can witness to unity, symbolically standing together outside Scotland Yard to give a common witness in rejection of any kind of violence or hate crime in the name of religion.' He added: 'Many people are still shocked by what has happened. Both religious and non-religious alike, want to express their common humanity by standing in solidarity with each other in the face of terrorism. There is great

admiration for our police and emergency services and deep gratitude for the many acts of heroism and kindness shown by members of the public.' On the same day, the Presidents of Churches Together in England, issued a statement expressing 'sincere condolences to the bereaved families and friends of those who lost their lives in the terrorist attack'. They prayed 'for the healing of those injured, and for the wellbeing of our society in which all seek after and promote the common good in a spirit of love for our fellow human beings'. and they prayed 'too for Parliament, the police and the emergency services who responded with such bravery, professionalism and compassion, and who continue to support all those affected by this terrible attack'. On Friday, Cardinal Vincent joined Archbishop Justin Welby, Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis, Sheikh Khalifa Ezzat, Sheikh Mohammed al-Hilli and

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On Wednesday, 22nd March, a lone terrorist drove a car at high speed into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, crashing the car into the railings around the Palace of Westminster, and then stabbed a police officer in the grounds before he was finally shot. Four victims died and at least 50 people were injured, some with ‘catastrophic’ injuries. The attack was over in 82 seconds. The victims included PC Keith Palmer, college worker Aysha Frade who was on her way to collect her children from school, American tourist Kurt Cochrane who was on the last day of a visit to London with his wife as they celebrated their 25th anniversary, and Leslie Rhodes from Clapham who died a day later. Following the attacks, there was an overwhelming response from Londoners of all walks of life pledging solidarity and friendship. Faith leaders from all traditions joined together with government representatives and

Sheikh Qari Asim in a prayer vigil in Westminster to pray for the victims and for London as the capital looks forward to the future. At the vigil, Cardinal Vincent said that Londoners have shown that they will never be cowed by terrorism: 'No person and no event will drive a wedge between us, together we will prevail.'

The Archbishop of Canterbury explained: 'We have all of us come together because it is a moment of sad reflection but also a moment of determination for our nation together. In standing here, we represent the three Abrahamic faith communities, all equally committed to a peaceful future.'

Cardinal Vincent Asks for ‘Compassionate Solidarity’

On 23rd March, Cardinal Vincent sent the following message to priests and people of the diocese: 'Yesterday’s attacks in Westminster have shocked us all. The kind of violence we have seen all too often in other places has again brought horror and killing to this city.

Pope Francis Expresses ‘Prayerful Solidarity’ Pope Francis sent a message to Cardinal Vincent assuring the 'nation of his prayers' following the terror attack in Westminster on 22nd March. The message, communicated via the Holy See's Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, commends those who died to the loving mercy of Almighty God as Pope Francis 'invokes divine strength and peace upon their grieving families'.

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for the victims of the attacks, especially those who had died. Cardinal Vincent spoke of the darkness experienced by those who suffer and mourn. ‘We know this experience,’ he said. ‘It’s very immediate and very painful for some today.’ He added that it is Jesus who is ‘the light of the world, the light that shines in the darkness of the world, the darkness of grief and sin, a light by which we learn to take just the next step’. In the counsel of St Paul to ‘be like children of the light’, the Cardinal said that ‘we have a task to discover what the

Lord wants of us in any particular situation, and to be like children of the light means to do our best with kindness and compassion and courage’. As the Apostle admonishes that we should ‘have nothing to do with the futile works of darkness’, so the Cardinal urged that for Christians, this means that we must ‘have nothing to do with talk of hatred or retaliation; have nothing to do with bitterness, or scorn, or mockery, or gossip, or all that undermines who we are individually and together as children of a common Father’.

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'I know you will lead people in prayer, especially for those who have lost their lives and those who have lost someone they love. Pray for Aysha Frade, killed by the car on Westminster Bridge. Her two children attend St Mary of the Angels Primary School. Pray for them and for their father. And please remember the young French students who have been injured. 'We remember too all who have been injured, and those who care for them. 'We pray in particular as well for Keith Palmer, the police officer who died, and for his family, thanking God that so many show such brave dedication to keeping our society safe. 'Let our voice be one of prayer, of compassionate solidarity, and of calm. All who believe in God, Creator and Father of every person, will echo this voice, for faith in God is not a problem to be solved, but a strength and a foundation on which we depend.' On Sunday, 26th March, Cardinal Vincent offered a Mass at Westminster Cathedral

Faith leaders at prayer vigil in Westminster on Friday, 24th March

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Notre Dame de France At Notre Dame de France, the French church in Leicester Place, a shrine was created in honour of the victims. Visiting the parish on 23rd March, Bishop Nicholas Hudson was deeply touched by the response of the community that has itself felt the shock and sorrow of terrorist attacks in Paris and Nice. 'I met Fr Pascal, Parish Priest, who asked me to assure the diocese of the sympathy of all French Catholics who worship at Notre Dame de France; and that they hold us in their prayers, most particularly Aysha Frade and her family who mourn for her,' he said. Page 3


Westminster Record | April 2017

Ash Wednesday in Rite of Election the Diocese

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‘Remember you are dust and unto dust you shall return’ was heard around the diocese on Ash Wednesday, 1st March, as Catholics flocked to Mass to receive ashes on their foreheads and thus begin the season of Lent. All Masses at Westminster Cathedral were very well attended, and the queues for confession were full throughout the day. Cardinal Vincent was the principal celebrant at the

In his welcome, Cardinal Vincent said, ‘Today is a day of great thanksgiving – thanksgiving for the gift of Faith and the generous response of our catechumens and candidates.’ In his homily, the Cardinal spoke of the light of Christ, symbolised by the Paschal candle, and the ‘desire to receive the light of Christ more fully, to let it shine more brightly in our lives and in the way we see and look around us’. He spoke of this light as ‘helping us to see ourselves with a greater honesty’, explaining that ‘we become much more appreciative of the beauty of God and the wonder of his creation, and the dignity of every human being’.

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5.30pm Mass. His homily focused on the call to grow in holiness through prayer, fasting and almsgiving. After the homily, the choir accompanied the imposition of ashes with the singing of Allegri’s Miserere. In addition to parish churches and schools, Ash Wednesday Masses were held in a variety of locations, such as hospital and hospice chaplaincies, and university and college chaplaincies. The university chaplaincies were particularly well-served, with Bishop Nicholas Hudson celebrating the 5.30pm Mass at Newman House, the Catholic chaplaincy at the University of London, where some 300 students attended Mass throughout the day, Bishop John Sherrington celebrating the lunchtime Mass at the LSE Faith Centre, and Bishop John Wilson celebrating the evening Mass at Brunel University.

560 people from 110 parishes gathered at Westminster Cathedral on 4th and 5th March to celebrate the Rite of Election and call to continuing conversion, a key milestone in the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA). Cardinal Vincent presided over the liturgy, along with Bishops John Sherrington, Nicholas Hudson, Paul McAleenan and John Wilson, and many Deans from the diocese. During the Rite of Election the Cardinal declared 256 catechumens to be ready and to have been chosen by the community, as the Elect, to go forward to prepare for the Sacraments of Initiation of Baptism, Confirmation and First Holy Communion at Easter. During the call to continuing conversion, 304 candidates who are already baptised Christians, were affirmed by their sponsors and the assembly. The Church recognises their desire to complete their initiation in order to be received into full communion with the Catholic Church.

The light of Christ, he added, also shows us our darkness. During this journey of Lent, he said, we should ‘embrace the light of Christ, to let it shape and reshape our lives in his light, and to be his missionaries in our world today’. During Lent, these Elect and candidates will continue their preparations to receive the Sacraments of Initiation at Easter. Please keep them all in your prayers.

Prayers for Pope on Anniversary

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Jumbulance Blessing

More pilgrims with special care needs will be able to travel to Lourdes on pilgrimage after an additional Jumbulance was blessed by Cardinal Vincent on 25th February. The Jumbulance, a coach-sized ambulance, will accommodate those pilgrims who are unable to fly and require constant medical care. Page 4

The blessing took place after a Mass of Thanksgiving at Westminster Cathedral which welcomed staff and supporters from ACROSS, the charity providing the Jumbulance who specialise in transport for pilgrims needing special care. The dedication of the Jumbulance comes at an

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appropriate time, the day before a pastoral letter was read in parishes in the diocese in which Cardinal Vincent reflected on the diocesan season of prayer entitled ‘Called to Serve the Sick’ which is intended as a continuation of the Year of Mercy. This season of prayer continues until the diocesan Lourdes pilgrimage in July.

Cardinal Vincent has written to Pope Francis offering prayers and thanks on the fourth anniversary of the Holy Father’s election as Bishop of Rome and 265th successor of St Peter on 13th March. In his letter, the Cardinal says: ‘I write on behalf of the Catholic Community in England and Wales, and I am sure of many more, to offer you our prayers and congratulations as you reach the fourth anniversary in this time of your service to the Apostolic See. ‘We thank God that the Holy Spirit guided the Church in the process of your election and that the same Holy Spirit guides and supports you day by day. We thank God for the

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richness of the gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit, which are the hallmarks of your ministry: joy and peace, patience and kindness, faithfulness, wisdom and mercy. ‘Holy Father, we thank you for the steadfast way in which you uphold the teachings of Christ and the Church, presenting them in deed and in word with a freshness and directness, which draws the attention of the world. We pray that God will give you strength and courage to continue this great ministry from which we all draw such encouragement. ‘I assure you, Holy Father, of the love, the esteem and the whole-hearted support of us all. ‘Please, Holy Father, give us your blessing as we give you our love.’

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Towards a cure for brain tumours Bishop John Wilson met two North London Catholic families, who lost loved ones to brain tumours, at an event at Speaker’s House to highlight the underfunding of the disease during Brain Tumour Awareness Month. Alison Phelan of St Joseph’s parish in Wealdstone passed away from a brain tumour just three weeks before her eighth birthday in 2001. Since then her parents and extended family have set up Ali’s Dream, a member charity of national charity Brain Tumour Research, to fund research into childhood brain tumours. To date the charity has raised in excess of £900,000. Sue Blasotta from St Monica’s parish in Palmers Green died in 2011, aged 42, just six weeks after being diagnosed with a highly aggressive and lethal brain tumour. Her father, David

Taylor, set up In Sue’s Name, which, in partnership with Brain Tumour Research, has launched a campaign to raise £1 million to fund research at its Centre of Excellence at Queen Mary University of London. Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow, longstanding patron of the charity Brain Tumour Research, opened the State Rooms of Speaker’s House to patients, families, scientists, clinicians and supporters as they campaigned for change and for additional funding for research to improve treatments for the 60,000 people (according to the charity brainstrust) living with a brain tumour in the UK. Bishop John said: ‘It was touching to meet the families of Ali and Sue and to hear their stories. It is a testament to their faith that they have turned the devastation of their loss into a force for good for other young

people by working to raise awareness of this form of cancer and campaigning for better funding for research to save lives.’ Alison’s grandfather, Colin Hinton of the Church of Our

Lady and St Thomas of Canterbury parish in Harrow, who attended the event along with his son Chris and daughter-in-law Jan from Watford, said: ‘Our faith in God has helped to keep us strong

through many dark times, as well as the comfort that one day we will be reunited with Ali in Heaven, so it was particularly special to have Bishop John at the Speaker’s House event this evening.

Diocese of Brentwood celebrates 100 years

On 22nd March, a Mass in thanksgiving for the centenary of the founding of the Diocese of Brentwood was celebrated at the Cathedral of St Mary and St Helen in Brentwood. Cardinal Vincent joined Bishop Alan Williams sm of Brentwood and Bishop Roger Crow of the Anglican Diocese of Colchester, in remembering the victims of the attacks in Westminster that had occurred earlier in the day. In his homily, Cardinal Vincent gave thanks for past generations, saying, ‘as we celebrate the centenary of the

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Bishop of Chelmsford, was also read out, in which he referred to the friendship and partnership that exists between the two dioceses, which uniquely share the same boundaries: ‘I believe God has laid upon us a particular responsibility to walk together and work towards that Christian unity that is Christ’s prayer for his Church.’ The Mass took place on the centenary of the appointment by Pope Benedict XV of Mgr Bernard Ward as Titular Bishop

of Lydda and Apostolic Administrator of the new of Diocese of Essex. Mgr Ward was consecrated by Cardinal Bourne in Westminster Cathedral on 10th April 1917. The Diocese of Brentwood was formally erected on 20th July 1917 and Bishop Ward was named the first Ordinary. He was enthroned on 7th November of the same year. At the centenary Mass, Bishop Alan wore the mitre and carried the crozier of Bishop Ward.

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who rebuilt the churches and schools of the diocese after the war, and promoted the practice of the faith. He said these memories ‘must help us in our responsibility for the continued flourishing of the Catholic faith in this part of the world’. ‘In all our efforts to further that mission, faith finds a most eloquent expression when it is grounded in the real circumstances of life,’ he added. He recounted the many heroic examples of priests, religious sisters and lay people ‘in the face of daily challenges’. He said that, following their example, ‘we must heed, with Diocese of Brentwood, we look the utmost seriousness, this call to our grandparents in faith. to the practical witness to faith We look to them with gratitude if we are to succeed in our for all that they have done in efforts at conversion, at establishing this diocese, and in spreading the Good News, for nurturing the faith of Catholics the next hundred years’. in East London and in Essex’. After Communion, a He chose this moment to message from Pope Francis was pay particular tribute to the read out, in which the Holy Petre family (represented at the Father prayed ‘that you may be Mass by Baron Petre, Lord drawn ever more deeply into a Lieutenant of Essex), whose loving relationship with the members have made a Eternal Word made Flesh and significant contribution to the experience anew the original diocese and the Church over freshness of the Gospel’. the centuries. A message from Bishop The Cardinal recalled too Stephen Cottrell, the Anglican the successors to Bishop Ward Follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/RCWestminster

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Westminster Record | April 2017

St Thomas More Choir’s Wembley Performance

Students Face off in Public Speaking Challenge by Dennis Cooper

On Wednesday 8th March, as part of the Voice in a Million 2017 (VIAM) Schools Concert, members of the St Thomas More Catholic School Choir put on an outstanding performance of the smash-hit song the ‘Colour Purple’ from the Broadway musical of the same name. The SSE Arena, Wembley, was filled with thousands of parents and pupils from schools from across the country. Isobel AwaahDuah, in Year 10, was the star of the song as the lead vocalist. Voice in a Million was founded in 2009 by husband and wife Robert and Jo Garofalo. It is committed to raising awareness of fostering and adoption in the UK. As Robert and Jo explain, ‘Through the accessibility of music we aim to bring to the public’s attention the importance of adoption and fostering children

of all ages. Millions of children need “forever homes” and we must never lose sight of this goal. Adoption is love to a child in care.’ One of the organisers commented that the St Thomas More Choir was one of the best school choirs ever to take the stage at a VIAM event. Ben Gaughran, Head of Music at St Thomas More, said, ‘For weeks, everyone in the choir has been working hard towards this performance and on Wednesday it all came together and we are so proud of them all. The performance was flawless and totally confident.’ Daniel Ellis, a Year 7 pupil, said: ‘Everything was very overwhelming for me. There were so many children and parents there. The excitement was hard to take in all at once. I felt so proud being on the stage because it was such a

Harmonious Sounds at St Benedict’s School

The widely acclaimed professional a capella group, Voces8, visited St Benedict’s Ealing on 14th March, to work with the school’s choirs, Ealing Abbey choristers and pupils from local primary schools. The day culminated with an uplifting concert showcasing what pupils had learned. Voces8 began the concert with music by Byrd and Rachmaninov before the youngest singers took to the stage to perform American and British folk songs, dazzling the audience with their enthusiastic singing in two and three parts. The St Benedict’s Consort Choir Page 6

then joined Voces8 to sing Stanford’s Beati quorum via and Evening Prayer by the contemporary Norwegian composer Ola Gjeilo, with the Ealing Abbey choristers singing his setting of Ubi caritas and Parson’s Ave Maria. The children’s delight at what they had achieved was clear for all to see. St Benedict’s Headmaster Andrew Johnson said: ‘It was a great privilege to have Voces8 with us. Their perfectly blended voices, expressive and committed singing, as well as a sense of fun, was hugely inspiring for everyone.’ Participating schools included Christ the Saviour Primary Ealing, Little Ealing Primary, Mount Carmel Primary Ealing, North Ealing Primary, St Gregory’s Primary Ealing and St Benedict’s Junior and Senior Schools.

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Vincent Masterson, a Sixth Form student at Cardinal Newman Catholic School, Luton, won this year’s public speaking challenge hosted by Nicholas Breakspear Catholic School, St Albans Vincent gave a four-minute presentation on ‘should some people be barred from voting’. His persuasive reasoning and skilled delivery convinced the judges to award him first place, ahead of Tyra Andrews of St Anne’s Catholic High School for Girls, Enfield, who spoke on ‘the pros and cons of the internet’. The winner of the provincial competition will now go forward to the national final to be held in Manchester in September of this this year

Students from Nicholas Breakspear Catholic School, St Alban’s, Cardinal Newman Catholic School, Luton, St Ignatius College, Enfield, and St Anne’s Catholic High School For Girls, Enfield took part in this year’s event, with other students from these schools forming part of a large audience of eager listeners. The judges were Denis Murphy, Provincial President of Province 14 of the Catenian Association, Dr Erin O’Rourke, Public Engagement Officer, External Relations, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, and John Davis, Director of the national Catenian Association. Commenting on the quality of speeches, Denis Murphy,

chair of the judging panel, praised all the students for taking part, for being so knowledgeable about their chosen subject and for making the task of picking a winner so difficult. He congratulated all the schools involved for taking part. This is the second year that the competition has taken place and, based on the interest this year, 2018 is expected to be an even bigger event with twice the number of entrants anticipated. Province 14 of the Catenian Assoc comprises 12 individual circles and stretches from London in the South to Bedford and Milton Keynes in the North and Bishop Stortford in the East.

Winner Vincent Masterson, pictured with other speakers and judges, is fifth from the left.

Super Science Fair at St Benedict’s Young scientists at St Benedict’s, Ealing got to work in British Science Week, conducting over 40 different experiments at their annual Science Fair. The science labs buzzed with scientific discovery as all pupils in Year 8 presented their fascinating projects to hundreds of children from local primary schools, and St Benedict’s Junior School. Visitors quizzed them about their research into such things as what woodlice choose to eat, how laughter reduces pain and how to make invincible bubbles. Other investigations asked which fruits demonstrate the most voltage, which planet is most likely to

be habitable by different life forms, and how quickly different foods are broken down by the hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The pupils, aged 12 and 13, had chosen the subjects of their research, devised experiments, and carefully recorded their results and

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conclusions. They all enthusiastically explained their methods and findings, and offered some hands-on participation, to the delight of the Year 5 visitors! A prize was awarded to the best project, which set out to discover ‘which foods contain the most glucose’.

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Improving Learning Outcomes Teaching and support staff from the Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School, Newman Catholic College, St Mary’s University, St Vincent’s Primary School and Our Lady and the Visitation Primary School Greenford came together on Monday 20 February for a cross-school event entitled ‘Improving learning outcomes across all school groups’. Hosted by the Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School, the day featured a wide range of expert speakers sharing their best practice across a broad array of educational themes. Over 150 participants at different stages in their teaching careers were able to consider and discuss a range of professional development, ranging from the best use of new data to support learning,

On 2nd March, a joint Mass was held to celebrate the continuing partnership between Newman Catholic College and Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School. The main celebrant was Bishop John Sherrington (pictured with Heads, Chairs of Governors and members of Student Councils of both schools).

through to innovative techniques for cultivating creativity in the classroom. Feedback from the event was

Love in Action at St Paul’s Caritas Westminster has been encouraging parishes to participate in its ‘Love in Action’ engagement programme. This revolves around an introduction to Catholic social teaching as a means to identify and respond to needs in communities. Over the last three weeks, Caritas development workers have been running interactive workshops for Year 9 students at St Paul’s Catholic College in Sunbury. Students were introduced to the work through six principles of Catholic social teaching: dignity, community, preferential option for the poor,

dignity of workers, solidarity and peace, and care for creation. Each theme involved an interactive activity and a link to the work that Caritas is doing in that area. We were really impressed at how well the students engaged in what can be quite difficult topics, from human trafficking to the issue of loneliness and isolation. At the end of each session, we asked what they would take away and an action that they could make, and their responses have been very thoughtful. To find out more visit www.caritaswestminster.org.uk

extremely positive and shows how Cardinal Vaughan and its partner schools continue to spearhead outstanding teaching and learning across west London and beyond.

‘Little Shop of Horrors’ St Edmund’s Breaks Fundraising Record Comes to Life St Edmund’s College broke all its previous fundraising records by raising £20,260 for Mary’s Meals, a charity which provides a daily meal for chronically poor children in a place of learning. Our donation will feed 1,457 children for a year. The College’s Charity Week raises money each year for a chosen charity and, over the last five years, the school has donated a staggering £94,000 to worthy causes. Students and

For three nights from 9th to 11th March the Questors Theatre, Ealing, was taken over by man-eating plants and dazzling performances in this year’s school production of ‘Little Shop of Horros’ staged by St Augustine’s Priory students. The monochrome set and costumes, spectacular singing and the homemade Audrey II man-eating plants tied together a moving and hilarious production. In cross-curricular cooperation, the carnivorous plants cared for by the St Augustine’s Priory Science

staff worked hard to raise funds through many varied activities held at break and lunch times from Colour Runs, staff Pie Face, cake sales and car washes. The Headmaster, Mr Paulo Durán, said, ‘I am so proud of all the students and staff, supported by our parents, who worked tirelessly to raise this amazing amount. Through their efforts so many children will now eat a meal at school every day, something which we take for granted.’

Department journeyed down to the Questors Theatre in their terrarium and planted themselves in the foyer, waiting patiently for unsuspecting prey. One audience member commented on the growth of the Audrey II plant using Junior girls as puppeteers, saying it was ‘a stroke of genius’, while alumnae who attended were awed at the confidence and professionalism of the actors. All the girls involved in the production, whether working backstage or acting on stage were accomplished in delivering a marvellous theatrical spectacular!

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Engaging in Hope Filled Action Over 60 Anglican and Roman Catholic representatives from 25 dioceses gathered at Lambeth Palace in March for Friends of the Holy Land’s second national diocesan coordinators conference, focusing on the importance of pilgrimage, particularly the experience of ecumenical pilgrimage, and the growth and success of FHL since its foundation in 2009. The charity traces its origins back to the grass roots actions of a small group of returning pilgrims, led by Cardinal Vincent Nichols, so moved by the plight of their fellow Christians they had to act. Since then it has generated an income of over £3.1 million and directly supports 2,000 Christian families living in the Holy Land. The Rt Revd Dr John Inge, Bishop of Worcester, said: ‘The strength of FHL shows how God can grow significant initiatives out of the smallest things. FHL helps us in our role as Christians to bring hope in what can appear to be a hopeless situation.’

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Peter Rand, FHL’s Vice Chairman and Executive Trustee, who is about to make his 20th visit to the West Bank and Israel said: ‘Our achievements in the seven short years of our existence have been significant. We have a Bethlehem-based Holy Land

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Committee who are our eyes and ears in the West Bank. Unlike many charities working in this area, we are registered with the Palestinian National Authority as an NGO, and have our own local Palestinian bank account. This means we can swiftly transfer money to support Christian families and projects in our key areas of education, employment, health and housing.’ He added: ‘FHL supports Christians wherever they live in the Holy Land. These include Christians in the hard-pressed yet resilient communities of

Gaza, West Bank Christians facing a life of water shortages and restricted travel, and Iraqi Christian refugees in Jordan forced to flee for their faith. I have recently met with some very poor Christian migrant groups in Tel Aviv and Jaffa to see how FHL might support them.’ Dean Hosam Naoum of St Georges Cathedral in Jerusalem thanked FHL for their ecumenical effort in supporting the ‘Living Stones’ of the Holy Land and urged those attending to engage in ‘hope filled action’

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by working together through FHL to support vulnerable Christians living in the Holy Land. He reminded delegates that ‘Christian emigration deprives our churches and communities when the Holy Land needs our loving service of transformation. Religion should be part of the solution and not the problem; transforming the love of power to the power of love.’ To find out more about the work of FHL please visit http://www.friendsoftheholyla nd.org.uk

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Contemporary Arts Exhibition on the Resurrection of Christ

A contemporary arts exhibition, featuring works on a range of stages of the history of Salvation culminating in the Resurrection, and showcasing works by Andrew White, Francis Hoyland, Marcia Scott, other well-known artists and up-and-coming figures, will take place over two weekends in Eastertide. It will be held at the Hurtado Jesuit Centre in Wapping, during Easter Week, from the 21st to the 23rd of April. The following Bank Holiday weekend it will be held in Farm Street Church in Mayfair, from 28th April to 1st May. Private viewings of the works with talks by Andrew White and Francis Hoyland on the ‘Vocation of a Christian Artist’ will be held on 21st and 28th April. The show is open to the public and free on the other dates. The event unites people from different Christian denominations and artistic backgrounds. For many Christian artists their endeavours can seem quite isolated. This exhibition reveals an existing Christian artistic community as Andrew White explains: ‘It’s great to hear of fellow artists so desiring to express their faith through God’s gift and trust him on this journey.’ Penny Warden, whose Stations of the Cross hang in Blackburn Cathedral, and who

will be exhibiting commented: ‘This is the first exhibition of this size of Christian art since Presence in 2004 held at St Paul’s Cathedral.’

The exhibition is a collaboration between the Hurtado Centre and a group of painters at the St Patrick’s Art Studios based nearby. The exhibition offers a way into Christian spirituality through the arts, which have the power to express something of Christianity’s richness and depth. Br Stephen Power SJ, Director of the Centre, said: ‘This is a great opportunity for Christian artists to deepen the spiritual life of our society. I am delighted that we have been able to organise one of the few modern opportunities of this kind.’

Accompanying Young People to Respond to Christ’s Call In an address at a symposium on accompanying young people, Cardinal Vincent explained that Europe is not just the European Union. The Council of European Episcopal Conferences (CCEE) includes all countries of the continent and, perhaps especially for the majority of young Europeans, the experience of living in Europe is not easy, is not comfortable, and is not stable for those who have arrived in Europe from the East. In a homily given at Mass later the same day, the Cardinal said, ‘we remember that our task is always to help [young people] discern the will of God for them, the greatness to which our loving Father is summoning them’. He added that this required ‘being open to the Holy Spirit, of wanting, in humble obedience, to discern the promptings of that Spirit and to respond, step by step, to that challenging call’. Speaking of life as a gift of the Holy Spirit, he said: ‘We who receive life as a gift, find the fulfilment of our lives when we give our lives as a

gift, a gift made in faithfulness and love.’ He noted that the task of those who have pastoral care of young people, is to ‘strive to understand the dynamic of the Holy Spirit at work in young lives, and to understand our part in serving that dynamic’. The symposium, which was organised by the CCEE, took place in Barcelona from 28th to 31st March, and brought together 275 experts in the pastoral care of young people, schools and universities, and vocational and catechetical work, from the Bishops’ Conferences of Europe, and accompanied by 32 bishops. It had as its theme the accompaniment of young people to enable them to respond freely to Christ’s call.

On Sunday 26th February Cardinal Vincent Nichols visited the Church of the Transfiguration in Kensal Rise to celebrate Mass and awarded papal medals to three parishioners. Lydia Ogundimu, Gina Ponzoni and Susan Carberry were awarded the Bene Merenti for many years of devoted volunteering to the parish. Lydia and Gina spend hours each week looking after the church and the sacristy, locking and unlocking the church, preparing for Mass, taking care of the sacred vessels and visiting the sick. For 23 years, Susan has volunteered as the parish administrator until her retirement in December.

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Page 9


Westminster Record | April 2017

Living Flame of Faith many young people from all over the UK in one place. Indeed, it is a treasure to be nurtured, protected and used wisely. Deep at the heart of this event, amidst all the lights and sounds, there is a call for every person there to recognise their own dignity and worth. Deep at the heart of social justice, equality, mercy and compassion for our fellow man we must first become aware of our own dignity and worth. We can change our world so long as we are all attentive not just to the needs of our society, but the need of all of us for Christ; and a room full of 10,000 people can raise the roof so long as we teach each other to invite Christ under the roof of our own hearts. We can’t spread the flame unless we draw near to the fire ourselves first. For this reason, it cannot be emphasised enough how poignant it is to be able to adore Christ in the Most Blessed Sacrament in Wembley Arena itself. Sitting in a small folding chair amongst thousands of others, we gazed at Christ. On a stage that has been shared by the likes of Abba, Tina Turner, Prince and Bob Dylan sits the King of Kings. The silent, inexplicable, unsurpassable, unfathomable Creator of the universe, quietly speaking to thousands of hearts. Flame offers this incredible and unique space for the faithful to remember who they are, and for our youth to have a short moment of silence (which was almost impeccably observed by all) to let God speak.

zest, sincerity, thirst, something that those of us slightly older in years might do well to note. In a society struggling to find its moral compass and identity, Flame can be that which reignites the spirit of youth. When asked once about who the laity are, Cardinal Newman answered, ‘the Church would look foolish without them’. So too we might ask: ‘Who are the youth?’ and the reply might be: ‘The Church would look inert without them.’ This is the unique and valuable treasure of having so

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

On Saturday 4th March, 10,000 young Catholics came together at Wembley Arena for Flame ‘17. This was a day of celebration, a day to fan the flame of the faith of the universal Church and to spark into motion dynamic living witnesses to the faith. As the crowds gathered, the flow of our red Westminster Youth Ministry t-shirts started to fill the entrance steps and anticipation grew. Flame this year focused on the social injustice and shortcomings of our world, where many risk their lives, leaving their homes to seek a better life from the terror they have fled from. Speakers ranged from Cardinal Bo, a Salesian priest and leader of the Church in Myanmar, whose country is struggling to emerge from its troubled past and to establish its own democracy, to the environmental ethical concerns and social teaching of Fr Augusto Zampini. What seems to be most expressive at the heart of Flame, however, is a steady and increasing resonance of joy, life and energy of our youth. We can all have joy, but the unique charism of our young people is a distinctive eagerness, wonder,

When the lights go down, when the stage is empty, when the music fades, we recognise that the call for young people is (just as it is for people of all ages and walks of life) to take up the cross and follow Christ, to come alive in faith, to live a life to the full, and ultimately become saints. Flame is that chance to catch that Holy Fire of God, to dive in and drink deep of his life-giving waters, to rise up again with renewed hearts and walk out the steps of the stadium as little burning lights. The gift of Flame this year was to help us recognise the inadequacies of our world and what we might do in order to alleviate this, but the final liturgy is the source and summit of how we might be able to achieve this. Only with Christ, nourished by his Eucharistic food, can we truly be a Church alive on ‘God’s great dance floor’ as Cardinal Vincent Nichols so vividly called it, adding that we are also on a construction site. We are indeed a work in progress, under construction. One can only imagine what can become of our youth should they take the nourishment and tools given to them at such an event. Let us all pray for our youth, and for each other, that we might respond to that call to commit ourselves to follow Christ, to serve the needy, to build a society with building blocks that frame a civilisation of love and though the constant and reckless abandon of self-giving.

Page 10

To find out more about the Youth Ministry and experiences of our young people at: dowym.org.uk.

© Lawrence Lew OP

Director’s Spotlight

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

by Dominic Cunliffe

Westminster Record | April 2017

Rome Memories by James Kelliher

This June Westminster Youth Ministry is going to Rome for what is sure to be a fantastic weekend pilgrimage to the heart of our Catholic faith. This will be my fifth time and it’s fair to say that each trip has offered a unique and exciting adventure. When I first visited Rome, it was with my mum and we explored the beautiful Vatican City and saw some of the other sites, such as the Colosseum. The second time I went, I was with a small group led by a priest who took us to a papal audience and showed us many of the great churches of Rome, such as the Basilica of St John Lateran (pictured) with its stunning statues. The third time was for the canonisation of Pope John Paul II, where I camped for a few days with friends from Brazil and Poland and witnessed the incredible moment when Pope Francis declared his predecessor a saint. The fourth time in Rome, overlooking the city from the top of St Peter’s Basilica, I proposed to the woman who is now my wife. The reason I mention these personal stories is that I’d like any young person reading this to know what an incredible city Rome is. There is so much to see and do, and I haven’t even mentioned things like the great weather and food! Oh man, the ice cream… So if you’re free for the weekend, why not come and join us, and let the Eternal City inspire you. See photos of youth events at: http://flickr.com/ photos/catholicwestminster

Phil Ross, Youth Ministry Director

My mum used to say to me from time to time that it’s important to ‘count your blessings’, and I think Lent is the perfect time for me to reflect on my mum’s words. In my role as Director of Youth Ministry and Director of SPEC I am blessed to have a role that allows me to work alongside a rich variety of people and affords me the opportunity to be involved in an amazingly diverse range of projects. Both the youth service and SPEC are doing fabulous work right now and the teams are certainly on fire. I am lucky to have such strong teams around me; they make me look good!

Here’s a standard weekend for me although maybe not that typical! The youth service helped over 1,000 young people from the schools and parishes of our diocese attend Flame ’17 at Wembley Arena in March, all wearing Westminster red tshirts. The photos are testament to the fantastic time they all had. To be there to witness such happiness is a joy in itself, accepting that the noise of enjoyment echoing around the arena, especially for those of us of advanced years, was bewildering at times. I felt compelled to stand and then sit and then stand again at times, a bit like the Okey cokey to exceptionally loud Christian music. I think I enjoyed myself. And whilst all this Flame ’17 joy at Wembley was overflowing, the builders at SPEC began moving into a high gear ready for the demolition of our garages. I literally had to hot foot from Wembley to Pinner to ensure that, hardhat and high-vis jacket in place, we had a clear car park ready for the work to commence.

The SPEC campus is looking like the real deal now and it’ll be ready by early May; that sounds very soon to me right now but I’m doing my utmost to remain calm! On the very same Saturday, a completely separate set of builders also chose to move into high gear and worked all day on the refurbishment of one of SPEC’s wooden cabins. A new roof, new floor, fresh insulation and a whole range of other key elements are on the agenda, and the builders are certainly doing a fine job; it will be ready in early April. The cabin will become a centre for Art and Music. Sunday saw me hop to Heathrow to do some SPEC pick-ups from Terminal 3 only to find out that there were twohour delays in the customs hall; these things happen I guess. Safe to say that by Sunday evening I wished that my Lent ‘no alcohol’ wasn’t my principal observance. Yes, Mum, I do count my blessings and I have a job that allows me to do that every day. I know how lucky I am.

SPEC Ready for Mission by Phil Ross

The SPEC campus is now really taking shape and the schools and parishes of the diocese will have a special venue for their retreats beginning the next academic year. We’re now on the final elements of this complex project. Many people remember the Waxwell estate as the Grail and remember fondly the ladies of the Grail Community who owned the estate from 1947 until SPEC moved in a few years ago. We’re working carefully to honour their legacy and hope they will attend the re-opening ceremony this summer. As Bishop Nicholas Hudson explains, ‘The good women of the Grail will be delighted to see how Waxwell Farm continues to serve the Church’s mission in this dramatic way.’ The rejuvenated and extended estate is set in seven acres of garden acting as a Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/doywm

Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Twitter at: twitter.com/dowym

beautiful backdrop for our important work. The gardens bring peace, calm and space. On the estate is the refurbished round building, called the Rotunda, a conference venue capable of seating 120 people, with a full projector system and WiFi. There is the fully-refurbished cabin set in a tranquil spot in the middle of a wooded glade, with two rooms, one dedicated to art and the other to music, but it’s also perfect for a period of calm contemplation. The extended garden will gradually develop into a nature trail and we are blessed to have many species of tree and plant in every corner for students to identify. We already have our rosary walk. Of course, the centrepiece of the campus is our new residential complex, a magnificent building designed with today’s students in mind. The Ark can sleep 90 people, with all bedrooms, bar the minidorms, being en-suite. We have a full commercial kitchen, a refectory and multiple furnished break-out rooms, along with two large presentation suites. Our mission is to form the young people of the diocese, to accompany them on their life journey through adolescence, and our extended estate will provide us with the best facilities for this work. Our schools and parishes look to us for retreats for 33 weeks of the year. In the remaining 19 weeks, we are able to open the estate to other groups. Each independent element of the estate can be hired and this includes accommodation in the Ark. If you would like to hear more about our work, if you would like to consider helping us financially with a donation, or if you want to enquire about the venue for a future hire then please do get in touch.

Follow us on Instagram at: @dowym

Chaplain’s Corner

Fr David Reilly, Diocesan Youth Chaplain In school recently, I was speaking to pupils about the forthcoming celebration of Holy Week and Easter. They were excellent students who already knew and understood the pre-eminence of these sacred days at the heart of the Church’s faith and life. As a child, I told them, I was amazed and encouraged by days of the ‘Great Week’. For young people, as altar servers or musicians, we can receive so much from this special time. I encouraged them all to participate as best as they could in the celebrations at church this Easter. The Paschal Mystery is at the heart of our faith in Jesus Christ. This is the mystery of his passion, death and rising from the dead. Whenever we celebrate the sacraments and the liturgy, we are celebrating Christ’s Paschal Mystery. However, in a very special way, we celebrate the last days of his life on earth and his resurrection from the dead each year during Holy Week and Easter. For Christians, these days mark our own ‘Pasch’ or ‘Passover’ which is a mysterious participation in the Pasch or Passover of Christ himself, who passed from death to life. This year for many young people, Holy Week and Easter fall at the end of the Easter holidays. However, we should not let that deter us from entering fully into the celebration of these special days. From Palm Sunday through to Easter Day itself, we are all invited, through the liturgy, to make a magnificent and dramatic journey with Christ, and with him, learn obedience through suffering (Hebrews 5.8). Let us accept this invitation to ‘pass over’ with him. Page 11


Westminster Record | April 2017

Living Flame of Faith many young people from all over the UK in one place. Indeed, it is a treasure to be nurtured, protected and used wisely. Deep at the heart of this event, amidst all the lights and sounds, there is a call for every person there to recognise their own dignity and worth. Deep at the heart of social justice, equality, mercy and compassion for our fellow man we must first become aware of our own dignity and worth. We can change our world so long as we are all attentive not just to the needs of our society, but the need of all of us for Christ; and a room full of 10,000 people can raise the roof so long as we teach each other to invite Christ under the roof of our own hearts. We can’t spread the flame unless we draw near to the fire ourselves first. For this reason, it cannot be emphasised enough how poignant it is to be able to adore Christ in the Most Blessed Sacrament in Wembley Arena itself. Sitting in a small folding chair amongst thousands of others, we gazed at Christ. On a stage that has been shared by the likes of Abba, Tina Turner, Prince and Bob Dylan sits the King of Kings. The silent, inexplicable, unsurpassable, unfathomable Creator of the universe, quietly speaking to thousands of hearts. Flame offers this incredible and unique space for the faithful to remember who they are, and for our youth to have a short moment of silence (which was almost impeccably observed by all) to let God speak.

zest, sincerity, thirst, something that those of us slightly older in years might do well to note. In a society struggling to find its moral compass and identity, Flame can be that which reignites the spirit of youth. When asked once about who the laity are, Cardinal Newman answered, ‘the Church would look foolish without them’. So too we might ask: ‘Who are the youth?’ and the reply might be: ‘The Church would look inert without them.’ This is the unique and valuable treasure of having so

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

On Saturday 4th March, 10,000 young Catholics came together at Wembley Arena for Flame ‘17. This was a day of celebration, a day to fan the flame of the faith of the universal Church and to spark into motion dynamic living witnesses to the faith. As the crowds gathered, the flow of our red Westminster Youth Ministry t-shirts started to fill the entrance steps and anticipation grew. Flame this year focused on the social injustice and shortcomings of our world, where many risk their lives, leaving their homes to seek a better life from the terror they have fled from. Speakers ranged from Cardinal Bo, a Salesian priest and leader of the Church in Myanmar, whose country is struggling to emerge from its troubled past and to establish its own democracy, to the environmental ethical concerns and social teaching of Fr Augusto Zampini. What seems to be most expressive at the heart of Flame, however, is a steady and increasing resonance of joy, life and energy of our youth. We can all have joy, but the unique charism of our young people is a distinctive eagerness, wonder,

When the lights go down, when the stage is empty, when the music fades, we recognise that the call for young people is (just as it is for people of all ages and walks of life) to take up the cross and follow Christ, to come alive in faith, to live a life to the full, and ultimately become saints. Flame is that chance to catch that Holy Fire of God, to dive in and drink deep of his life-giving waters, to rise up again with renewed hearts and walk out the steps of the stadium as little burning lights. The gift of Flame this year was to help us recognise the inadequacies of our world and what we might do in order to alleviate this, but the final liturgy is the source and summit of how we might be able to achieve this. Only with Christ, nourished by his Eucharistic food, can we truly be a Church alive on ‘God’s great dance floor’ as Cardinal Vincent Nichols so vividly called it, adding that we are also on a construction site. We are indeed a work in progress, under construction. One can only imagine what can become of our youth should they take the nourishment and tools given to them at such an event. Let us all pray for our youth, and for each other, that we might respond to that call to commit ourselves to follow Christ, to serve the needy, to build a society with building blocks that frame a civilisation of love and though the constant and reckless abandon of self-giving.

Page 10

To find out more about the Youth Ministry and experiences of our young people at: dowym.org.uk.

© Lawrence Lew OP

Director’s Spotlight

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

by Dominic Cunliffe

Westminster Record | April 2017

Rome Memories by James Kelliher

This June Westminster Youth Ministry is going to Rome for what is sure to be a fantastic weekend pilgrimage to the heart of our Catholic faith. This will be my fifth time and it’s fair to say that each trip has offered a unique and exciting adventure. When I first visited Rome, it was with my mum and we explored the beautiful Vatican City and saw some of the other sites, such as the Colosseum. The second time I went, I was with a small group led by a priest who took us to a papal audience and showed us many of the great churches of Rome, such as the Basilica of St John Lateran (pictured) with its stunning statues. The third time was for the canonisation of Pope John Paul II, where I camped for a few days with friends from Brazil and Poland and witnessed the incredible moment when Pope Francis declared his predecessor a saint. The fourth time in Rome, overlooking the city from the top of St Peter’s Basilica, I proposed to the woman who is now my wife. The reason I mention these personal stories is that I’d like any young person reading this to know what an incredible city Rome is. There is so much to see and do, and I haven’t even mentioned things like the great weather and food! Oh man, the ice cream… So if you’re free for the weekend, why not come and join us, and let the Eternal City inspire you. See photos of youth events at: http://flickr.com/ photos/catholicwestminster

Phil Ross, Youth Ministry Director

My mum used to say to me from time to time that it’s important to ‘count your blessings’, and I think Lent is the perfect time for me to reflect on my mum’s words. In my role as Director of Youth Ministry and Director of SPEC I am blessed to have a role that allows me to work alongside a rich variety of people and affords me the opportunity to be involved in an amazingly diverse range of projects. Both the youth service and SPEC are doing fabulous work right now and the teams are certainly on fire. I am lucky to have such strong teams around me; they make me look good!

Here’s a standard weekend for me although maybe not that typical! The youth service helped over 1,000 young people from the schools and parishes of our diocese attend Flame ’17 at Wembley Arena in March, all wearing Westminster red tshirts. The photos are testament to the fantastic time they all had. To be there to witness such happiness is a joy in itself, accepting that the noise of enjoyment echoing around the arena, especially for those of us of advanced years, was bewildering at times. I felt compelled to stand and then sit and then stand again at times, a bit like the Okey cokey to exceptionally loud Christian music. I think I enjoyed myself. And whilst all this Flame ’17 joy at Wembley was overflowing, the builders at SPEC began moving into a high gear ready for the demolition of our garages. I literally had to hot foot from Wembley to Pinner to ensure that, hardhat and high-vis jacket in place, we had a clear car park ready for the work to commence.

The SPEC campus is looking like the real deal now and it’ll be ready by early May; that sounds very soon to me right now but I’m doing my utmost to remain calm! On the very same Saturday, a completely separate set of builders also chose to move into high gear and worked all day on the refurbishment of one of SPEC’s wooden cabins. A new roof, new floor, fresh insulation and a whole range of other key elements are on the agenda, and the builders are certainly doing a fine job; it will be ready in early April. The cabin will become a centre for Art and Music. Sunday saw me hop to Heathrow to do some SPEC pick-ups from Terminal 3 only to find out that there were twohour delays in the customs hall; these things happen I guess. Safe to say that by Sunday evening I wished that my Lent ‘no alcohol’ wasn’t my principal observance. Yes, Mum, I do count my blessings and I have a job that allows me to do that every day. I know how lucky I am.

SPEC Ready for Mission by Phil Ross

The SPEC campus is now really taking shape and the schools and parishes of the diocese will have a special venue for their retreats beginning the next academic year. We’re now on the final elements of this complex project. Many people remember the Waxwell estate as the Grail and remember fondly the ladies of the Grail Community who owned the estate from 1947 until SPEC moved in a few years ago. We’re working carefully to honour their legacy and hope they will attend the re-opening ceremony this summer. As Bishop Nicholas Hudson explains, ‘The good women of the Grail will be delighted to see how Waxwell Farm continues to serve the Church’s mission in this dramatic way.’ The rejuvenated and extended estate is set in seven acres of garden acting as a Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/doywm

Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Twitter at: twitter.com/dowym

beautiful backdrop for our important work. The gardens bring peace, calm and space. On the estate is the refurbished round building, called the Rotunda, a conference venue capable of seating 120 people, with a full projector system and WiFi. There is the fully-refurbished cabin set in a tranquil spot in the middle of a wooded glade, with two rooms, one dedicated to art and the other to music, but it’s also perfect for a period of calm contemplation. The extended garden will gradually develop into a nature trail and we are blessed to have many species of tree and plant in every corner for students to identify. We already have our rosary walk. Of course, the centrepiece of the campus is our new residential complex, a magnificent building designed with today’s students in mind. The Ark can sleep 90 people, with all bedrooms, bar the minidorms, being en-suite. We have a full commercial kitchen, a refectory and multiple furnished break-out rooms, along with two large presentation suites. Our mission is to form the young people of the diocese, to accompany them on their life journey through adolescence, and our extended estate will provide us with the best facilities for this work. Our schools and parishes look to us for retreats for 33 weeks of the year. In the remaining 19 weeks, we are able to open the estate to other groups. Each independent element of the estate can be hired and this includes accommodation in the Ark. If you would like to hear more about our work, if you would like to consider helping us financially with a donation, or if you want to enquire about the venue for a future hire then please do get in touch.

Follow us on Instagram at: @dowym

Chaplain’s Corner

Fr David Reilly, Diocesan Youth Chaplain In school recently, I was speaking to pupils about the forthcoming celebration of Holy Week and Easter. They were excellent students who already knew and understood the pre-eminence of these sacred days at the heart of the Church’s faith and life. As a child, I told them, I was amazed and encouraged by days of the ‘Great Week’. For young people, as altar servers or musicians, we can receive so much from this special time. I encouraged them all to participate as best as they could in the celebrations at church this Easter. The Paschal Mystery is at the heart of our faith in Jesus Christ. This is the mystery of his passion, death and rising from the dead. Whenever we celebrate the sacraments and the liturgy, we are celebrating Christ’s Paschal Mystery. However, in a very special way, we celebrate the last days of his life on earth and his resurrection from the dead each year during Holy Week and Easter. For Christians, these days mark our own ‘Pasch’ or ‘Passover’ which is a mysterious participation in the Pasch or Passover of Christ himself, who passed from death to life. This year for many young people, Holy Week and Easter fall at the end of the Easter holidays. However, we should not let that deter us from entering fully into the celebration of these special days. From Palm Sunday through to Easter Day itself, we are all invited, through the liturgy, to make a magnificent and dramatic journey with Christ, and with him, learn obedience through suffering (Hebrews 5.8). Let us accept this invitation to ‘pass over’ with him. Page 11


Westminster Record | April 2017

Inside the Hospice: Being lifted up by Fr Peter-Michael Scott When Bishop Paul McAleenan visited the hospice one of the patients thought I had brought my dad to work. Admittedly they were short-sighted and not wearing their glasses but they said I had obviously inherited Bishop Paul’s ability to comfort and give hope, that I was good at lifting people up. In the parable of the Good Samaritan the injured man is lifted up and placed on his rescuer’s mount and taken to the inn. It is the action of being ‘lifted up’ which is very beautiful, and can be interpreted in many ways. Patients often ‘lift me up’ by their insights. Recently I went to

see a patient who was dying and she spoke about receiving the Eucharist as being visited by eternity. She said that, in Holy Communion, Jesus would undoubtedly have to bring heaven with him, a whole company of saints, relatives, and friends. For her, receiving the Eucharist was giving her confidence to ‘let go’ to join that large assembly. For me, this insight made me conscious that when I receive Communion I am very close to Jesus and to my parents and to all those I love who have died. The Good Samaritan ‘lifted up’ the beaten man onto his horse and accompanied him to the inn. The injured man did

not have to make the journey on his own. Often ‘lifting up’ a terminal patient is about reassuring them that they will not be alone. St Joseph’s makes every effort to ensure family, friends and staff can stay with patients as they are dying. God is the same: he does not leave us by ourselves. As death begins to draw near we must allow our hearts to be ‘lifted up’ by the words of Jesus to the good thief at his crucifixion: ‘today you will be with me in paradise’, that the company of heaven will be imminent. Please pray for the patients, staff and volunteers of St Joseph’s Hospice.

Paediatric Chaplaincy: Sharing God’s Embrace by Anne-Marie O’Riordan

‘Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.”’(Mt 19.14) It is an enormous privilege to enable a child to encounter God in the midst of their suffering. In my experience prayer often starts as a simple conversation in which the deep needs of the sick child resonate with the unspoken needs of parents and family members. In all encounters, I try to see children with God’s eyes and enable them to feel God’s great love. No matter how young I affirm their dignity and worth. I tend to begin my prayers by giving thanks for the child and the blessing of their life, conveying prayerfully how God sees and cherishes this child. I acknowledge the brokenness of this world which is not as it should be. Nonetheless, in the mystery of Creation I try to help families and their children become aware of a loving God who is greater than their pain and suffering, who can be trusted despite their circumstances. It can be difficult to enable children to relate to God personally using words alone. Therefore, I try to harness the Page 12

power of children’s imagination. Just as Jesus spoke in parables using strong narrative images, symbols and pictures can convey meaning simply. I have often used the image of the Good Shepherd and introduced this parable in a simple way by encouraging them to imagine themselves as the lamb Jesus goes in search of and carries to safety on his shoulders. When relating to older children I find it helpful to open with general chit chat. It’s important to take the time to establish some trust and then ask them what they would like to say to God. Whenever possible, give children a voice. My role also involves sacramental duties such as emergency baptisms, giving Communion, and occasionally I have been asked to lead memorial services. For the most part, however, this role is about relationships. As a paediatric chaplain you need to be willing to meet people where they are and inhabit the hidden, in-between spaces: those grey, paradoxical and mysterious places which do not offer easy nor clear-cut answers. Christ touched the wounds of the afflicted. He entered

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into their suffering and chaplains are called to do the same. I try not to be afraid to accompany parents as they enter the darkness and pain of their situation. Sometimes prayers and words are insufficient. Being patient and willing to take the time to listen and not fill in the silence can help parents and children to express themselves or simply feel held by God. Sometimes I am involved in helping a child come to terms with their imminent death. In my experience, children accept that they are dying earlier than family members, often holding out until parents are ready to say goodbye. Children like honesty and they respond best when the truth is given to them straight but with kindness. Finally, to my surprise I have discovered that this ministry works both ways. Children emanate a light all of their own which has touched my heart many times. I have learnt so much from children. Even in the crucible of their sickness, the light of Christ shines very brightly. Anne Marie O’Riordan is chaplain at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Proclaim the Good News by Deacon Adrian Cullen, Evangelisation Coordinator

April truly is the time to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ! Easter has arrived and we, the Easter People, are no longer in the power of death, but look now to everlasting life. It is a message that we must share. Jesus greets the joy of Mary Magdalene with the command: ‘go and tell my brothers that I go before them to Galilee’. In our joy, we too must take that message to others: that Jesus goes before us to our heavenly Father, to an everlasting joy that all who follow Jesus will one day share. Although the light of the Resurrection now replaces the darkness of Calvary, many people we encounter each day still live in shadow. As missionary disciples of Jesus, we are to bring his light to them. We do this through the continuing process of Proclaim Westminster by which we tell the Good News to those who have not heard it, or have forgotten it. Through the Good News of Easter, people have their lives renewed, just as the coming of spring renews nature.

Each spring we rediscover the joys of nature’s new birth, which never fails to give us hope for the coming year. Likewise it is the constant retelling of the Easter story, for some it will be the first time they hear it, that will bring hope to those we meet. Pope Francis in Evangelii Gaudium tells us how ‘we have rediscovered the fundamental role of the first announcement or kerygma’. He goes on to say that the ‘first proclamation must ring out over and over: Jesus Christ loves you; he gave his life to save you; and now he is living at your side every day to enlighten, strengthen and free you’ (EG 164). This message is at the heart of Proclaim Westminster that touches on every part of parish life, Catholic communities, and individuals: that Jesus loves us, and that he invites us to share his life. Through Proclaim Westminster, parishes share the message of Easter through a wide range of initiatives and activities. Some have developed wonderful liturgies that help worshippers glimpse the mystery of the Eucharist, that thanksgiving for the Risen Christ. Other parishes have looked at how they can be more welcoming through active and joyful hospitality, as they greet friends and strangers to Sunday Mass.

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Many have been running small groups, learning more about their Lord Jesus, and how they can become more faithful disciples. While in other parishes the role of charity has been, and continues to be, expanded, showing the mercy of God through practical and loving care for those in need. For all the command is there: to go and tell my brothers and sisters that ‘I go before them’. These initiatives are supported by Parish Evangelisation Teams, which, led by the Parish Priest, help to develop their call by Pope Francis to form ‘missionary parishes’. Spring is a good time of year to show what already goes on in the parish, and encourage others to get involved. At St Matthew’s, Northwood, the parish held a Proclaim Fair to show parishioners and visitors the range of activities that already happen in the parish. Liz Duggan reported that: ‘Our parish fair was very successful, many parishioners attended and all groups from the parish participated. There was a great sense of community and teamwork. Each parish group had a stand and were promoting their group’s work, ranging from CAFOD, Catholic Children’s Society, Mary’s Meals, CCR prayer group, UCM, Choir, Sunday School, and the Big Breakfast Team.’ Of course, every day and every season is a good time to proclaim. For example, in May we will see a global prayer movement for evangelisation, ‘Thy Kingdom Come’, resources for which are being sent out to parishes. In June there is the Spirit in the City festival which proclaims the Good News in the heart of London. More information will be available on the diocesan website. Whatever the season, we are called to share the Easter message of joy to all, and to continue Proclaim Westminster.

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On 25th February, Confirmation groups from Acton and East Acton parishes joined together for a 10k sponsored walk in aid of Acton Homeless Concern. The walk takes place annually, uniting the two parishes and raising important funds for a local cause.

For more information please visit www.greatgettogether.org

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Respecting the Dignity of Workers

by John Coleby The dignity of workers is a central pillar of Catholic Social Teaching. Work gives us purpose, dignity, and the ability to provide for our families and communities. In the UK the number of jobless people is at an all-time low, but the number of ‘in work’ poor people are at a high. It’s not work per se, but dignified work which the Church speaks to in its teachings. As far back as 1850 Leo 13th was saying: ‘The following duties . . . concern rich men and employers: Workers are not to be treated as slaves; justice demands that the dignity of human personality be respected in them, ... gainful occupations are not a mark of shame to man, but rather of respect, as they provide him with an honourable means of supporting life. It is shameful and inhuman, however, to use men as things for gain and to put no more value on them than what they are worth in muscle and energy.’ (Rerum Novarum 1850) As recently as 2015 Pope Francis, developing the Church’s teaching, states:

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‘Work should be the setting for this rich personal growth, where many aspects of life enter into play: creativity, planning for the future, developing our talents, living out our values, relating to others, giving glory to God. It follows that, in the reality of today's global society, it is essential that "we continue to prioritize the goal of access to steady employment for everyone," ... Work is a necessity, part of the meaning of life on this earth, a path to growth, human development and personal fulfilment. Helping the poor financially must always be a provisional solution in the face of pressing needs. The broader objective should always be to allow them a dignified life through work’. (Laudato Si’ 2015) Caritas Westminster is developing a social innovation and business centre in Wembley. The centre will act as an incubator and accelerator for social entrepreneurs developing business ideas with social outcomes. Entrepreneurs will be drawn from marginalised communities and will receive support as well the opportunity to test their ideas for up to 12 months.

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In addition the centre will establish preparation for work and skills training programmes for people who, for one reason or another, may find it difficult to negotiate the employment market. To complement the above we will develop our own social enterprise businesses in order to provide training and employment to the same groups, which could include people with disabilities, ex-prisoners, people recovering from mental health problems and people coming out of homelessness. We will be looking for mentors from the business community to help establish our programmes and commercial activities. So watch this space For further information contact JohnColeby@rcdow.org.uk

Tea and coffee with peace of mind

Caritas Volunteers In March 2017, Caritas Westminster launched the Caritas Volunteer Service. The service brings together volunteering opportunities from parishes, schools, and organisations to create a onestop-shop for volunteering within the Catholic Community. Pope Francis calls us not to ‘be observers of life, but get involved’. Volunteering is a great way to live out our faith, and to get involved in the local community. As well as

benefiting those who are being served, volunteering can also provide additional skills, opportunities to meet new people, and has even been shown to improve health! To search for volunteering opportunities please visit the website: www.caritaswestminster.org.uk /volunteer and register for a free account To find out more about posting volunteering roles on the site, please contact Verity Sykes at caritasvol@rcdow.org.uk.

To further the diocese’s commitment to ethical trading and ending human slavery, the diocese has collaborated with Waitrose to supply refreshments to its offices in line with these commitments. Waitrose is part of the John Lewis Partnership who are working specifically on improving supply chains to ensure they are slavery-free and that raw materials are sourced ethically and sustainably. To mark the occasion, staff gathered for a coffee morning to learn more about the work of Fairtrade and organisations working within the diocese such as Caritas Bakhita House, a refuge for victims of human trafficking, and Caritas St Joseph’s, which supports adults with intellectual disabilities. This is one of many small steps we can take to reduce our impact on the world around us and to be responsible stewards of creation. Follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/RCWestminster

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Telco at 20

They were here 20 years ago. They are here 20 years later.

by Bekele Woyecha

Fantastic Fan Supports Manchester United and Cafod’s Work in Africa! Sophie Constable, from Holy Family Church in Welwyn Garden City, has generously auctioned a Manchester United shirt signed by 16 players to raise money for CAFOD. The winning bid was a fabulous £500, which will be used to support communities affected by severe drought in Ethiopia. As a member of United’s Disabled Supporters’ Association (MUDSA), Sophie, 26, who has been an altar server at Holy Family for 18 years, was lucky enough to attend MUDSA’s Christmas party at Old Trafford. Sophie encouraged players to sign a United shirt she’d bought, offering them some of her homemade Christmas Puttini bonbons in return; Anthony Martial declared that they were ‘delicieux’! Describing her experience meeting the players, Sophie said: ‘It was definitely exciting, I was really happy. I loved meeting all of them. My favourite is Paul Pogba, and I also like Zlatan Ibrahimovic.’ Instead of keeping the shirt herself, Sophie auctioned it to raise money for a community in Ethiopia which her parish supports. Sebeya in northern Ethiopia is dry and arid having suffered greatly from the current drought, the worst in Ethiopia for decades. CAFOD works in the area with its partner Adigrat Diocese Catholic Secretariat (ADCS), running schemes that focus on soil and water conservation, and irrigation. Sophie said: ‘I wanted to do this because it’s about putting other people before yourself and because I love Africa so much.’ In March CAFOD launched its East Africa Crisis Appeal. Over 16 million people across South Sudan, Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia are affected by severe

drought and in urgent need of food. Sophie’s generosity and solidarity with our brothers and sisters in Africa will hopefully inspire others in the Catholic community to give generously. The Holy Family CAFOD Group in Sophie’s parish gives ongoing support to Sebaya in Ethiopia through CAFOD’s Connect2 Scheme. The scheme enables parish groups to form a direct link with a community in one of five countries. The special connection involves not just fundraising but exchanging news and seasonal greetings with the parish’s Connect2 community, and also praying for each other throughout the year. Other than Ethiopia, the communities which parish groups can ‘connect2’ in this special way through CAFOD are in Peru, Brazil, El Salvador and Cambodia. Whilst Connect2 Ethiopia focuses on soil and irrigation projects, Connect2 Brazil supports communities in São Paulo to campaign for homeless families to have safe housing. Connect2 Peru supports local partner Warmi Huasi to provide skills-building and training for children in the Lomas de Carabayllo area of Lima. To find out more about CAFOD’s Connect2 Scheme please visit www.cafod.org.uk/Connect2, or call CAFOD’s Westminster Volunteer Centre on 0208 449 6970. To donate to CAFOD’s East Africa Crisis Appeal go to www.cafod.org.uk/eastafrica, or call 0303 303 3030. CAFOD is immensely grateful for Sophie’s generosity, and for the dedication of the Holy Family CAFOD Group which has been supporting CAFOD’s work in different parts of the world for over thirty years!

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Twenty years ago there was an organiser called Neil Jameson, who had as many face to face meetings as possible in East London. He had no hidden agenda; it was all about getting the East End organised. ‘Organising was what East London needed most in those days as it does now,’ says Bishop Paul McAleenan, who was Parish Priest of St Scholastica’s in Clapton and is now Auxiliary Bishop of the Diocese of Westminster. Bishop Paul was there 20 years ago at the founding assembly and he has come back to join the 1,000-strong delegates to celebrate the 20th anniversary of The East London Citizens Organisation (TELCO). The founding assembly took place at York Hall in Bethnal Green and it felt great for many, including Rev Paul Regan, Mgr John Armitage, who was cochair of the founding assembly, Dr Muhammad Bari, and many other veterans to come back to the same hall on Thursday 9th March to witness history unfolding. It was an opportunity to see democracy in action; an opportunity to see unity in diversity; an opportunity to showcase what civil society can do to address the challenges it faces in an organised way; an opportunity to see civil society holding the state and the market to account; but also an opportunity to rebuild and reenergise the East End and start yet another march towards securing social justice through organising. ‘Divisions in our societies across the West seem to be deepening. Yet we are here this evening to recognise TELCO as an organisation which has built bridges, not walls, explained Rev Paul Regan. Organising needs patience, endurance, tenacity, leadership, and it should be fun. That was what we saw on 9th of March. At the heart of this anniversary were the organisers and community leaders who worked hard to make sure everything was in place. Nothing was left to chance and every eventuality was considered. It needed meticulous planning and readiness with proper fall-back positions. That

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is why we had organisers like Emmanuel, Yasmin, Caitlin and Daniel, Bernadette Harris of TELCO, John and Naomi Clifton of the East End, Angus Ritchie, and many other veteran leaders who worked meticulously to plan this wonderful occasion. After all it is about organising. Organising is not about them; rather, it is about US together. Neil Jameson, the Founder and Executive Director of Citizens UK, paid tribute to all who made the long journey with TELCO: ‘Our member institutions are our greatest asset and our leaders are the glue which hold everything together. Here is to 20 more years of power, action and justice’. Kudos to all who made the founding of TELCO a success 20 years ago. Kudos to all who have travelled the long journey together. Kudos to all who contributed and made the day historical. Kudos to the kids, the young, the seniors and all who made it to the assembly. Organise, organise and organise. It was the call then; it is the call now. Keep organising, keep marching together and of course keep winning. Empowered are the organised! It all began with the need for a pedestrian crossing in Clapton. The parish of St Scholastica’s, along with other Catholic parishes, Christian communities, and others of all faiths and none in Hackney and Tower Hamlets, banded together to form TELCO, to campaign for local needs, especially for some of the most marginalised people in East London. Among their landmark victories was obtaining a fair wage for cleaners in Canary Follow us on Instagram at: @rcwestminster

Trade Justice by Barbara Kentish

There was good cause for celebration during Fairtrade Fortnight this year as there are now 95 parishes out of 214 in our diocese signed up to Fairtrade. Supporting Fairtrade gives producers from small farms and cooperatives a fair price for their goods, and a chance to improve their lives. Justice and Peace held two gatherings, at St Anselm and Cecilia, Holborn, and Our Lady Immaculate and St Andrew, Hitchin, on the theme of ‘Free Trade and Fairtrade: Towards trade justice in the Post-Brexit era’. Mary Milne and Emilie Schultze from the charity Traidcraft explained how important it is that Britain continue to work with developing countries to ensure they are represented on the international trade scene.

Traidcraft supports growers and producers develop their goods and communities. It is currently running a card campaign to encourage us to contact our MPs about justice for small farmers who produce Fairtrade goods. Marion Hill, a ‘Fairtrade trader’ from Haverstock Hill parish, kindly ran a stall offering their goods. If your parish has not signed up, do get in touch for a pack explaining what is needed. Wharf, first for those employed by the management of the estate, and then for those who worked directly for the banks. Their campaign eventually turned into a movement to pay the Living Wage in London and the rest of the UK. Since then, they have also campaigned for a Living Wage Olympics, better access to jobs for locals, and affordable housing schemes. Today, TELCO is part of CitizensUK, which boasts among its membership groups from all faiths and none, and continues to work for some of the most marginalised people in society. Page 15


Westminster Record | April 2017

Our Reader Tells His Story Recently at Allen Hall Seminary Bishop John Sherrington admitted two seminarians into the Ministry of Reader. Tim Mangatal (left) is from the Diocese of Westminster. Vocations Promoter Canon Stuart Wilson spoke to him about what this special day meant for him.

Canon S: Tim, you received the Ministry of Reader on Saturday 11th March 2017. Can you tell us a bit about this ministry? Tim: The Ministry of Lector, or Reader, is one of two ministries (Acolyte being the other) established by Pope Paul VI in 1973, previously referred to as the ‘minor orders’ within priestly formation. These ministries can be seen as milestones on the road to priesthood and are generally conferred by a bishop. Canon S: And what did it feel like to receive this ministry? Tim: To receive the Ministry of Reader was very affirming especially in light of my vocation. I found it particularly pertinent that I was scheduled to read at Mass the following week, having just been instituted days before. Moreover, I believe that I have been entrusted to proclaim the Word of God: a ministry in service to God and his Church. Canon S: I think quite a lot of people have met you, Tim, but can you tell us a little about yourself? Tim: I was born in Ealing, West London and attended local Catholic primary and secondary schools: The Rosary in Heston and St Mark’s in Hounslow. From there I went to pursue a degree in Theology at St Mary’s in Twickenham. After graduation I spent a year at the diocesan retreat centre, SPEC. This was both formative and instrumental in aiding my discernment to priesthood. It is a year that I personally recommend if you are trying to Page 16

discern your vocation whether that is marriage, single life, priesthood or religious life. Canon S: Why do you think God is calling you to be a priest? Tim: To know for certain whether God is calling you to be a priest is not something which one arrives at with great ease or clarity, not especially at my stage in formation. On the contrary, it requires daily discernment until the day of ordination. However, I know I am to serve God and his Church is some capacity and, after careful consideration, I believe at present that this is as a priest. Canon S: What is seminary like? Is it what you expected? Tim: Seminary is demanding. It requires your all: academically, spiritually, pastorally and humanly. Although there is a structure and rhythm to the house, no day is the same, which can be either refreshing or disconcerting if you are a creature of habit. But the six years in seminary provide ample opportunities for growth and development which continues throughout ministry. Seminary is not what I was expecting and this is often the case with most things in life. I expected to meet austerely pious men highly versed in the scriptures and theology; instead I met ordinary men aware of their frailty and unworthiness to be called to priesthood, men who desire to serve God and are open to discerning their vocation whatever this may be. The latter often produce the best priests for they are open to God’s grace.

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Canon S: How do your friends and family feel about you being a seminarian? Tim: My family and friends are generally happy that I am training for the priesthood, and they have supported and encouraged me every step of the way. Canon S: Do you think there are young men in our parishes who might be called to priesthood? What would you say to them? Tim: In short, yes! I would say first and foremost: ‘Do not be afraid’. It is normal to feel overwhelmed and possibly confused as to why you might think God is calling you. I would definitely take this to prayer and engage at first locally. By that I mean talk to your friends and family about priesthood, perhaps ask if they could envisage you as a priest. After that I recommend talking to your Parish Priest or a priest that you feel comfortable to discuss this with and if you still feel at peace, take a leap of faith and contact the Vocations Promoter. Always remember, God cannot move a parked car! Canon S: Tim, I have known you for a good few years but I have learnt things from our interview that I didn’t know before. I am very grateful to you for giving us for sharing with us. I suppose I ought to say on behalf of our readers how grateful we all are for your willingness to answer the Lord call and discern the calling to priesthood. I look forward to the day of your ordination. I hope you, dear reader, have enjoyed getting to know a little more about our new reader and his life at the seminary.

Two instituted to Ministry of Reader Bishop John Sherrington instituted two men to the Ministry of Reader at Allen Hall Seminary on Saturday, 11th March. One of the men is Tim Mangatal is a seminarian from our own Diocese of Westminster. In the homily, Bishop John invited the men to follow the example of the Lord: ‘Just as Jesus offered himself continually in prayer and love to his Father, so we are called to imitate him in faith and reveal our love in action,’ explaining that the scriptures give us a ‘way of seeing’ which helps us to ‘conform ourselves more closely to Christ.’ He noted that ‘when we open and pray the scriptures, our world should be turned upside down as the values of the kingdom of God shatter and clash with many contemporary, cultural values.’

And he invited the men ‘to share your love of Christ and the scriptures with others, ‘to read the word of God in the liturgical assembly, to help others to read well, and to instruct children and adults in the faith so that they may celebrate the sacraments worthily’. He reminded them that they ‘are called “to meditate assiduously on sacred Scripture” and “to acquire that increasingly warm and living love and knowledge of Scripture” that will make you more perfect disciples of the Lord’. He enjoined them to ‘commit yourself to pray the scriptures daily; it is part of your daily bread’ and to ‘share it generously with others’. The men continue their formation for the priesthood.

To find out more about Vocations please contact Canon Stuart Wilson Office: 0207 739 5620 Mobile: 07515 065 696 email: vocationspromoter@ rcdow.org.uk web: www.rcdow.org.uk /vocations/news/ Follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/RCWestminster

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Westminster Record | April 2017

Reflections on the Year of Mercy

The Year of Mercy was a great blessing for all. It provided each of us with the opportunity to reflect on what mercy means to us and on how we demonstrate mercy towards others. Michael George, a parishioner of St Michael’s, Ashford, has written a book of reflections inspired by the Year of Mercy. The book, written from his perspective as Headteacher of St Hugh of Lincoln Catholic Primary School in Woking, is designed continually for the grace of to be a prayerful legacy from celibacy. Bishop Nicholas the Year, reflecting on the underscored that, because corporal and spiritual works of celibacy is seen as counter mercy. The book contains a cultural, it is a sign and means foreword, written by Bishop of proclaiming the good news. Richard Moth, Bishop of The concelebrants included Arundel and Brighton. the British Jesuit Provincial, All proceeds from sales of the Fr Dermot Preston SJ, the new book are being donated to an formation assistant Fr urgent medical fund that has Nicholas King SJ, and the been set up to support a parent former formation assistant and of two children at St Hugh of current Socius Fr Paul Lincoln School. Nicholson SJ who had been Copies of the book, priced at responsible for the men’s £4.00, are available from St Hugh training as Jesuits. of Lincoln School (01483 480441).

Eight Jesuits Ordained to Diaconate Thomas Idergard, Swaninathan Krishnamurti, Roy Alex Kuzhimannil, Sandeep Lakra, Alphonse Lepcha and Mikael Schink have all been living and

studying in London for the last three or more years before becoming deacons. While reflecting on the Gospel chosen for the day, Bishop Nicholas encouraged the eight candidates to get to know Christ the Good Shepherd intimately in order to be effective preachers of the Gospel. ‘Get to know the shepherd and he will make you into a shepherd after his own heart,’ he said. The deacons were also encouraged to pray

© Jesuits Britain

On Saturday 25th February, Bishop Nicholas Hudson ordained eight Jesuits to the diaconate at St Ignatius, Stamford Hill. Anthony Paul Appu, Nilan Fernando,

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Westminster Record | April 2017

In Memoriam: April

St Isidore: 4th April

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Archbishop Luigi Barbarito RIP

St Isidore was born in Cartagena, Spain, around 560. He comes from a strong heritage; his two brothers, Leander and Fulgentius, and his sister Florentina are also canonised. Isidore succeeded his brother Leander to become Bishop of Seville. His episcopate occurred during a time of great change in Spain. The country was evolving and developing following two centuries of barbaric rule under the Goths. During this time, Isidore converted many Goths to Christianity and completely eradicated the heresy of Arianism (that Christ is distinct from and subordinate to God). He placed great emphasis on the importance of education, introducing the study of Greek and Hebrew, and was the first to introduce Aristotle to the West. His influence in this area was far-reaching and shaped the educational life of the Middle Ages. Isidore compiled a summary of universal knowledge, an encyclopaedia including ancient and modern learning totalling twenty volumes. This opus was titled Etymologia meaning the study of origins. This was intended to Page 18

give people access to everything they might need to know about the world, a tool very similar to our use of the internet. Consequently, Pope St John Paul II declared Isidore to be patron saint of internet. Isidore was the last of the ancient Christian philosophers and of the great Latin Church Fathers. In 688, the fifteenth Council of Toledo paid tribute to him with these words: ‘The extraordinary doctor, the latest ornament of the Catholic Church, the most learned man of the latter ages, always to be named with reverence, Isidore.’ A prayer before we use the internet: Almighty and eternal God, who created us in thy image and bade us to seek after all that is good, true and beautiful, especially in the divine person of thy only-begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, grant we beseech thee, that, through the intercession of Saint Isidore, bishop and doctor, during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to thee and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter. Through Christ our Lord. Amen

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The Most Rev Luigi Barbarito, GCVO, GCGCO, Apostolic Nuncio Emeritus to Great Britain, died on 12th March, aged 94. Archbishop Barbarito was born in Atripalda, Italy on 19th April 1922. He was ordained a priest in 1944 and was appointed titular Archbishop of Fiorentino in 1969. Between 1969 and 1997 Archbishop Barbarito served in the Holy See’s diplomatic service. On 21st January 1989, Pope St John Paul II appointed Archbishop Barbarito as Apostolic Pro-Nuncio to Great Britain. He became Apostolic Nuncio to Great Britain on

13th April 1993, and served in this post until his retirement on 31st July 1997. During his time in the United Kingdom, he became Dean of the Diplomatic Corps as the longest-serving foreign diplomat to the Court of St James’s and was made a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order (GCVO) by HM The Queen in 1996. During his career, he was also a member of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints and wrote many books explaining and reflecting on the location and situation of the Church in time. May he rest in peace.

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Fr Francis Kenney (1987) Fr Peter Dunn (1974) Fr Robert Holmes-Walker (2010) Fr Albert Parisotti (1970) Fr David Evans (1989) Fr John Keep (2002) Fr Ronald Cox (1994) Fr Thomas Hookham (1998) Fr James Wooloughan (2003) Fr Gerard Meaney (2010) Mgr Canon John MT Barton (1977) Fr Brian Laycock (2004) Fr John Bebb (1975) Bishop James O’Brien (2007) Fr John Mills (1975) Fr Anton Cowan (2016) Fr Albert Davey (1987) Fr Michael Hendry (1994) Fr Clement Tigar (1976) Mgr Canon Lancelot Long (1978) Fr Bernard McGuinness (1978) Canon Lionel Dove (1971) Fr Joseph McEntee (1978) Canon Harold Winstone (1987) Fr Patrick Smyth (1978) Canon Reginald Fuller (2011) Fr Herbert Crees (1974) Fr Robert Tollemach (1998) Fr John Robson (2000) Canon Frank Martin (2002) Canon Clement Rochford (1978) Fr Derek McClughen (1991) Canon Francis Hegarty (2004) Fr Stanley Harrison (1973) Mgr John F McDonald (1992) Canon John Longstaff (1986) Fr Michael Moriarty (1996)

St Francis of Assisi Catholic Ramblers’ Club meets every Sunday for walks around London and the Home Counties. Contact by email: antoinette_adkins2000@yahoo .co.uk, call 020 8769 3643 or check out the website: www.stfrancisramblers. ukwalkers.com

New Catholic Union Director Nigel Parker has been appointed Director of the Catholic Union of Great Britain and the Catholic Union Charitable Trust. This is a new part-time position designed to increase the effectiveness of the Catholic Union and to enhance its relationships with Parliamentarians, providing a Catholic voice in public affairs and working for the common good. Nigel is a barrister and has served as a legal adviser at the Foreign and Commonwealth

Office, from which he retired early in 2015. He has extensive experience of public international law, EU and English law, diplomacy and public affairs. Nigel has been a Life Member of the Catholic Union for many years. He joined the Council of the Catholic Union in 2015 and was elected Chairman of the Parliamentary and Public Affairs Committee in 2016. The Catholic Union of Great Britain was founded in 1870. Its primary objective is to

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champion the spiritual, moral and social teaching of the Catholic Church in the public sphere. It makes representations to Parliament, the Government, regulatory bodies and the media.

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Events & Calendar

REGULAR EVENTS Westminster Record | April 2017

Liturgical Calendar - April

If you have an event, please email: communications@rcdow.org.uk

Prayer Groups SUNDAYS

Taizé at St James, Piccadilly W1J 9LL every third Sunday 5pm. Call 020 7503 5128 for details. Tyburn Benedictines Monastic afternoon Every first Sunday 2-5pm Martyrs’ Crypt, Tyburn Convent, 8 Hyde Park Place W2 2LJ. Westminster Cathedral Young Adults meet socially after the 7pm Mass on Sundays and then at the nearby Windsor Castle pub. For further details please contact: westminsteryoungadults@gmail.com

MONDAYS

Mothers’ Prayers at St Dominic’s Priory, Haverstock Hill NW5 4LB Mondays 2.30-3.30pm in the Lourdes Chapel. All are welcome.

TUESDAYS

Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament Tuesdays 6-9pm concluding with Benediction at Newman House, 111 Gower Street WC1E 6AR. Details 020 7387 6370.

Prayers for London at the Shrine of Our Lady of Willesden Tuesdays 7.30pm. Organised by the Guild of Our Lady of Willesden, Nicoll Road NW10 9AX. Our Lady of Walsingham Prayer Group First Tuesday of the month 2.30pm to 4.15pm in the Chapel of St George and the English Martyrs in Westminster Cathedral. Details: antonia@walsingham.org.uk

Vocations Prayer Group Second Tuesday of the month 8pm at 47C Gaisford Street NW5 2EB. Taizé at St James’, Spanish Place, W1U 3UY every first Tuesday of the month at 7pm. Email: penny28hb@aol.com or just come along.

WEDNESDAYS

Wednesdays on the Wall (WOTW) Every first Wednesday of the month. 6pm at All Hallows on the Wall, 83 London Wall EC2M 5ND. A short service of prayer and reflection at 6pm, coffee at 6.45pm followed by discussion. Corpus Christi Contemplative Prayer Group for Young Adults Wednesdays from 7pm at Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB. For further details please contact corpuschristipg@yahoogroups. co.uk.

Our Lady, Untier of Knots, Prayer Group of Intercession meets every third Wednesday at St Anselm & St Cecilia, Lincoln’s Inn Fields. Parish Mass at 6pm followed by Prayer Group until 8.45pm. Rosary, Adoration, Silent prayer and Divine Mercy Chaplet. Email: Antonia antonia4161@gmail.com.

1 Sat

THURSDAYS

Jesus Christ the Fullness of Life Every first Thursday of the month. Young adults from all Christian denominations pray and share a meal. Details www.jcfl.org.uk. NFG Prayer Group meet weekly at 8pm for praise and worship followed by a social. Monthly a DVD is watched followed by a time of sharing. Held in St Mark’s Room, Christ the King Church N14 4HE. Contact Fr Christophe: christophe.brunet@chemin-neuf.org. Soul Food A Catholic charismatic prayer group for young adults meets Thursdays 7-9pm at St Charles Borromeo, Ogle Street W1W 6HS. Details at www.soulfoodgroup.org.

St John Paul II Prayer Group Every second Thursday of the month 7-8pm, Mass, Adoration and Prayer at Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB.

FRIDAYS

Divine Mercy Prayers and Mass Every first Friday 2.30-4.30pm at Our Lady, Mother of the Church, 2 Windsor Road W5 5PD.

Westminster Cathedral Charismatic Prayer Group meet every Friday 7.30pm Prayer, Praise and Teaching. First Friday is a healing Mass. For details, please call 020 8748 2632. Queen of Peace Prayer Group at Our Lady of Lourdes Church, Acton. Every Friday evening after 7pm Mass. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, a homily, recitation of the Holy Rosary and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy. All welcome

SATURDAYS

Taizé at Notre Dame de France 5 Leicester Place WC2H 7BX at 7.15pm. Call 020 7437 9363.

Lent feria

2 Sun

+ 5th SUNDAY OF LENT

3 Mon

Lent feria, Fifth Week of Lent

4 Tue

Lent feria (St Isidore, Bishop & Doctor)

5 Wed

Lent feria (St Vincent Ferrer, Priest)

6 Thu

Lent feria

7 Fri

Lent feria (St John Baptist de la Salle, Priest); Friday abstinence

8 Sat

Lent feria

9 Sun

+ PALM SUNDAY OF THE PASSION OF THE LORD

10 Mon

MONDAY OF HOLY WEEK

11 Tue

TUESDAY OF HOLY WEEK

12 Wed

WEDNESDAY OF HOLY WEEK

13 Thu

MAUNDY THURSDAY

14 Fri

GOOD FRIDAY

15 Sat

HOLY SATURDAY

16 Sun

+ EASTER SUNDAY OF THE RESURRECTION

17 Mon

MONDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF EASTER

18 Tue

TUESDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF EASTER

19 Wed

WEDNESDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF EASTER

20 Thu

THURSDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF EASTER

21 Fri

FRIDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF EASTER

22 Sat

SATURDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF EASTER

23 Sun

+ SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER (DIVINE MERCY)

24 Mon

ST GEORGE, Martyr, Patron of England (transferred)

25 Tue

ST MARK, Evangelist

26 Wed

Easter feria, Second Week of Easter

27 Thu

Easter feria

28 Fri

Easter feria, or St Peter Chanel, Priest & Martyr, or St Louis M Grignion de Montfort, Priest; Friday abstinence

29 Sat

ST CATHERINE OF SIENA, Virgin & Doctor, Patron of Europe

30 Sun

+ 3rd SUNDAY OF EASTER

Young Adults Mass with an Ignatian twist

Every Sunday at 7pm. Church of the Immaculate Conception, 114 Mount Street W1K 3AH. Contact: yam@mountstreet.info or visit www.pathwaystogood.org Mass at Canary Wharf Held on Tuesdays at 12.30pm at 2 Churchill Place E14 5RB. Organised by Mgr Vladimir Felzmann, Chaplain to Canary Wharf Communities. Details www.cwcc.org.uk.

St Albans Abbey Fridays at 12 noon. Mass in the Lady Chapel of St Albans Abbey AL1 1BY. Members of the Westminster LGBT Catholic Community are specially welcomed at the following Sunday Mass at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, and invited to our parish hall afterwards for tea/coffee, when there is also an opportunity to learn of pastoral help available: 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month, 5.30pm. EXTRAORDINARY FORM MASSES

Sundays: Low Mass 9.30am, St James Spanish Place W1U 3QY. Low Mass 9am, The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP. Low Mass 5pm, St Bartholomew, St Albans AL1 2PE. Low Mass 5.30pm, Shrine of Our Lady of Willesden, NW10 9AX.

Mondays: Low Mass 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP Mass 6.30pm Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB.

Fridays: Low Mass 7.45am St Mary Moorfields, 4/5 Eldon Street EC2N 7LS.

Young People: That young people may respond generously to their vocations and seriously consider offering themselves to God in the priesthood or consecrated life.

Low Mass 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP. Low Mass 6pm St Etheldreda, Ely Place EC1N 6RY. First Friday only. Low Mass 6pm St John the Baptist Church, King Edward's Road E9 7SF. First Friday only.

John Paul 2 Foundation 4 Sport

Low Mass 6.30pm Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB. Second Friday only.

Mgr Vlad Felzmann, CEO of John Paul 2 Foundation 4 Sport (JP2F4S), can enable your parish to start, and run, its own Parish Sports Club (PSC) for young people. For more information, please email vladimirfelzmann@ rcdow.org.uk. Follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/RCWestminster

Deaf Community Mass First Sunday of the month 4.30pm at Westminster Cathedral Hall, Ambrosden Avenue SW1P 1QW.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays: Low Mass, 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP.

Praying with Pope Francis: April 2017

Follow us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/diocese.westminster

Other regular Masses

Saturdays: Low Mass 12.15pm, St Wilfrid’s Chapel, The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP. Low Mass 4.30pm, Side Chapel, Westminster Cathedral SW1P 1QW. Second Saturday only.

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Page 19


Westminster Record | April 2017

Westminster Cathedral and the Secular

Yet this removal is not a matter of ‘escaping the world’. For urban churches in Europe, especially large cathedrals, continue to serve a variety of purposes even while Mass is unfolding. Crowds of people continued to enter the cathedral, escaping to one of the side chapels to light a candle. Throughout the liturgy, there was never really a moment of total silence. A low-level din of activity continued throughout Mass as the men and women of the city of London (and really the world) offered themselves to the living God in nearly every way possible. This constant activity, nonetheless, was not due to a lack of reverence. Men and

women kneeled in Eucharistic devotion during the Mass. They kissed the feet of Our Lady of Westminster, a late medieval statue that escaped the tragic iconoclasm of the English Reformation. They prayed novenas in side chapels, asking that God act here and now in their lives. The activity in the cathedral was not frenetic, not a matter of mere movement, but of deep devotion to God that could not be limited to a single form of piety. There was something especially poignant about this rich devotional tapestry in the context of an incomplete cathedral, in a country where Catholics once had to practice their faith in secret. If you’ve

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

After a rather dreadful travel delay, I arrived in London early on a Sunday morning. When my cross-examination by British customs agents was complete (an inquiry in which I had to emphasize that I liked my job and was not trying to secure a rogue faculty position in the UK), I found my way to my hotel in central London. Checked in and no longer smelling like I had been on a plane for 10 hours, it was time to get to Mass at Westminster Cathedral for the Second Sunday of Lent. From my hotel, I wandered down toward Buckingham Palace. Since it was nearing noon, the streets were full of tourists longing to get a sight of the Queen (and then make their way to Big Ben), runners completing their Sunday morning rites, and a fair number of men looking to set up shop in a pub for the afternoon. The crowds thinned as I got closer to Westminster Cathedral, the bells ringing out of the massive, neo-Byzantine (and still incomplete) building. I’ve always been partial to churches in urban areas. Entering Westminster, you find yourself escaping the hustle of the city, joining with countless unknown worshippers of all races, of all languages, of all levels of religious engagement. Entering the church removes oneself from the saeculum, the ordinariness of city life.

Published by The Diocese of Westminster, Archbishop’s House, Ambrosden Avenue, London SW1P 1QJ. Printed by Trinity Mirror, Hollinwood Avenue, Chadderton, Oldham OL9 8EP. All rights reserved.

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Follow us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/diocese.westminster

But Westminster Cathedral isn’t a program. It isn’t a bureaucracy or a best practice. It’s not an idea or an ideology. It’s a space where divine love is made present for the person. It’s a space where one can freely adore the living God (or fall asleep or wander around). It is an incarnation of Catholic faith in a particular place, an embodiment that makes it impossible for England to forget that God is love. That there are people throughout the world who are not secular. Who still organise their entire lives around the Word made flesh.

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

by Timothy O’Malley

Page 20

ever been to Westminster Cathedral, you know that the luminous mosaics of the space give way to dark brick. The apse is still incomplete (and perhaps may always be). Yet in this cathedral-on-the-way, one discovers a rich practice of faith. You almost forget that the space in not finished. Westminster Cathedral, including its incompleteness, functions as a symbol of the state of Catholicism in late modernity. Of Catholicism in a secular age. The church was packed with visitors, with those who simply want to see the architecture of the space, with worshippers, with families trying to pray, with homeless men and women escaping the rain outside. It was a space that attracted men and women of all kinds, taking them up into the Eucharistic love of God (whether they were there for that reason or not). It is an unpretentious Catholicism that exists in the midst of a city whose cultural memory of its religious past has declined. But this space fights against this forgetfulness, reminding men and women that they are created for divine worship. It was not a Catholicism that was to be rigidly imposed. There was a freedom of practice that you often fail to find in American Catholicism either on the right or on the left. The Mass itself was sung and included English hymnody and music from Taizé. The priest wore a fiddleback chasuble and used copious amounts of incense. All the prayers of the Mass were chanted in English. No one minded that Mass was ‘interrupted’ with devotional practice taking place in side chapels. Every way that you could be Catholic…the cathedral allowed it. Perhaps we Americans have something to learn from Westminster Cathedral. Americans love programs of evangelization, organisational structures and best practices that marshal the forces of the Church for the sake of evangelization. Americans have a thin notion of Catholic identity, often reducible to their preferred understanding of the Church.

Spaces and places matter in Christianity precisely because of the Incarnation. Human history, including my own, is to be taken up into the narrative of divine love that is the Church. Westminster Cathedral, and the many spaces like it throughout the world, may be the best medicine against the secular that we have. Timothy O’Malley is Director of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy and Editor of Church Life.

This article was originally published in the Church Life Journal on 13th March 2017. Reprinted with the author’s permission

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Westminster Record April 2017  
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