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Westminster Record

October 2017 | 20p

The Fight Against Modern Slavery

Strawberries and Cream for CAFOD

International School Award

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Lessons in Living and Dying by Monsignor Mark Langham

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The plain coffin, notably tall but bearing no decoration other than a cross, expressed well the dignified, non-fussy character of Cardinal Cormac. Previous Cardinals had lain in caskets lifted on lofty trestles, surrounded by ornate gilded candles, with tasselled scarlet hats expressing their princely rank. Cardinal Cormac, however, rested in simple state, surrounded immediately by his priests, and beyond them, the throng of faithful. It said so much about what he was to us in life, as Cardinal, as pastor, as fellow Christian; one who stood at the centre of our Catholic life in Westminster. Each priest I spoke to could remember a conversation with him, an encouraging word, a joke, with affection and gratitude. And how fitting that, in the end, he is buried not in some side

chapel but in the nave of the Cathedral amid his people, where he always wanted to be, close to those who will once more surround him and pray for him. Cardinal Cormac’s death came, in the end, suddenly. He did not linger in illness, and he went down quickly once he was in hospital; but during that short period he gave us a precious gift. His final published words are the mark of a Christian whose faith is strong, and give reassurance to all those who are troubled by the future, who face illness and death with uncertainty. From his hospital bed, the Cardinal reassured us all that he was at peace, and had no fear of what was to come. His prayerful encouragement recalled the serenity and acceptance with which Cardinal Hume faced his own death: both Cardinals have given us a

powerful lesson in how to die. Yet Cardinal Cormac was an expert in how to live. It is his very love of life that underlies the memories we most cherish: his ability to engage, to encourage, to delight the company. His stories revealed his sense of wonder, his jokes demonstrated his compassion, his concern showed his instinctive sympathy for others. This was his magisterium, his teaching to us: that we should love as God loves, widely, creatively, joyfully. This is his most important legacy (among so many others) that will surely define his leadership of our diocese. For this special edition of the Westminster Record, in recalling Cardinal Cormac we have sought to give a voice to members of the diocese, laity and clergy. We have tried to evoke his personality, and to recollect some of his initiatives, and accordingly have concentrated on homilies, memories, and impressions (the Cathedral Magazine Oremus will be published as a more visual record of Cardinal Cormac life and ministry, and of his funeral). There are many more reminiscences and stories – almost everyone who met the Cardinal has a cherished memory – but this special edition will, we hope, capture something of the spirit, and spirituality, of a much-loved leader, a devoted pastor, and a gentle father to his diocese.

Cardinal Cormac remembered: Obituary, homilies from the funeral rites and tributes to Cardinal Cormac: pp 2-3, 8-15


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Westminster Record | October 2017

Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor: 1932-2017

A portrait of Cardinal Cormac by aritist Michael Noakes, displayed in the Venerable English College in Rome.

Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, who became the tenth Archbishop of Westminster (2000-09), was born in Reading on 24th August 1932, the fifth son of Dr George MurphyO’Connor and his wife Ellen. His parents originally came from County Cork. He was educated at the Presentation College, Reading, and Prior Park College in Bath. During the Holy Year of 1950 he began to train as a priest for the Diocese of Portsmouth at the Venerable English College, Rome, where he joined his two brothers, Brian and Patrick. He later joked that the Rector, Mgr John Macmillan, needed some persuading since it was thought that two MurphyO’Connors in a seminary was quite enough. While in Rome he gained licentiates in philosophy and theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University and was ordained by Archbishop Luigi Traglia on 28th October 1956. On returning to his home diocese, he served as curate at Corpus Christi, Portsmouth (1956-63) and Sacred Heart, Fareham (1963-66). Then in 1966 he became Private Secretary to the Bishop of Portsmouth, Derek Worlock.

Murphy-O’Connor also served as Director of Vocations and helped establish the country’s first Diocesan Pastoral Centre at Park Place, Wickham. In September 1970 he went to Immaculate Conception, Portswood as Parish Priest, but at the end of 1971 returned to Rome as Rector of the Venerable English College, his alma mater. The years following the Second Vatican Council were challenging ones to be a seminary rector, with much uncertainty about the future and the constant need, as he later put it, to ‘broker a peace between the people who want to change everything and the people who want to change nothing’. Murphy-O’Connor proved to be a steady pair of hands and did much to boost student numbers and the College’s finances. As Rector he also hosted Archbishop Coggan of Canterbury during his historic visit to Paul VI (1977).  In 1977 Murphy-O’Connor was appointed third Bishop of Arundel and Brighton, a diocese covering Sussex and Surrey. He was consecrated on 21st December by his predecessor, Michael Bowen, who had become Archbishop of Southwark. The new bishop

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quickly became engaged in a round of parish and school visitations, opening up his large house at Storrington for special events and adopting the American ‘RENEW’ programme. This was inspired by his belief that the Church should be ‘experienced not as a faceless institution but as a community, a family, to whose life all its members contribute’ and involved the creation of ‘small communities’ in parishes. He later admitted: ‘Renew had mixed results, but I think we went some way to recapturing the basic concept of Christian community.’ From 1982 until 2000 Murphy-O’Connor was CoChairman of the Anglican and Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC), and ecumenism remained a cause close to his heart. Indeed, in 2000 he was awarded a Doctorate in Divinity by the Archbishop of Canterbury in recognition of his work for Christian unity.  On 15th February 2000 Murphy-O’Connor was appointed tenth Archbishop of Westminster, in succession to Cardinal Basil Hume. The following year, on 21 February 2001, he was created a Cardinal Priest. Among the other new cardinals created that day was Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the future Pope Francis, with whom he would enjoy a friendly relationship. The new English cardinal was given the prestigious titular church of Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, which not only contains the remains of St Catherine of Siena but also the tomb of Cardinal Philip Howard, great-grandson of the martyr St Philip Howard, whose shrine is at Arundel Cathedral.    As a cardinal, MurphyO’Connor was appointed to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, the Administration of the Patrimony of the Holy See, the Pontifical Council for the Study of Organisational and Economic Problems of the Holy See and the Pontifical Council for the Family. He also served on the Pontifical Councils for Culture and for Laity, and acted as secretary of Vox Clara. In

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April 2005 he participated in the Conclave that elected Benedict XVI. As archbishop of a denselypopulated and diverse diocese, Murphy-O’Connor took on various initiatives. In 2001 he began replacing Hume’s system of episcopal areas with four key areas of responsibility (Education, Clergy and Consecrated Life, Pastoral Affairs and Ecumenism and Interfaith relations), each one under the supervision of a different auxiliary bishop. He hoped this would serve to further unify the diocese. In September 2003 he launched At Your Word, Lord with a special Mass held at Wembley Arena. The previous November he had invited the diocesan clergy to discuss the programme at Butlins holiday camp in Bognor Regis, a location chosen because of its accommodation space.Based on the ‘RENEW’ programme he had followed in Arundel and Brighton, the three year process brought together thousands in small prayer groups and promoted a vision of the Church as ‘a communion of communities.’ It was followed by the publication in February 2006 of a ‘White Paper,’ Communion and Mission, which identified the priorities for the local Church in the twenty-first century: the call to holiness, the formation of adults and young people, small communities, priesthood and vocations and increased participation, collaboration and accountability.  Aware of the scourge of child abuse and having had personal experience of cases as bishop of Arundel and Brighton, he commissioned Lord Nolan to chair an independent review on child protection in the Catholic Church in England and Wales. This was a landmark document and led to the establishment of an independent office (COPCA) to oversee the protection of children and vulnerable adults. In order to consolidate this work, he also commissioned a review, conducted by Baroness Cumberlege, which led to the establishment of the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Service and the National Catholic Safeguarding Commission.  Follow us on Instagram at: @rcwestminster

As a cardinal and President of the Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales, MurphyO’Connor had to tackle many sensitive issues in the ‘public square’, providing a Catholic voice on issues as diverse as the war in Iraq, medical ethics and the 2006 Equality Act. He enjoyed good relations with the royal family and in 2002 not only read a prayer at the funeral of the Queen Mother but also preached before Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip at the Sunday service in Sandringham. He was privileged, too, to host the Queen and Prince Philip for lunch at Archbishop’s House, an historical highlight with regard to the place of the Catholic Church in British society. On reaching the age of seventy-five, Murphy-O’Connor submitted his resignation to the Holy See. He continued until his successor, Archbishop Vincent Nichols, was appointed on 3rd April 2009. Cardinal MurphyO’Connor became the first Archbishop of Westminster to retire, all his predecessors having died in office. He moved to a house on Duke’s Avenue, Chiswick and continued his work in Rome, taking up new posts on the Congregation for Bishops and the Congregation for the Evangelisation of Peoples. On a number of occasions he acted as papal representative to such places as Stockholm, India, Bangladesh and Trondheim in Norway.  In June 2010 he was named as the Visitor to the Province of Armagh in the aftermath of the Ryan and Murphy Reports on child abuse. After reaching his eightieth birthday in February 2012, many of his Roman commitments ceased and he participated in the conclave of 2013 as a non-voter.  Throughout his life, ‘Cardinal Cormac’ kept up a keen interest in sport (especially rugby and golf) and music; he was a talented pianist and occasionally performed at charity events and celebrations. His publications include The Family of the Church (1984), At the Heart of the World (2004) and a volume of memoirs, An English Spring (2015). He will long be remembered for his personal warmth, humour and persuasive leadership.  Page 3


Westminster Record | October 2017

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The Evening Standard joins the fight against modern slavery Archbishop Paul Gallagher (centre)

Panelists: (back row) Kevin Highland, John Studzinski, Antonio Zappulla, (front row) Julie Etchingham, Cardinal Vincent, Marcela Manubens and Yasmin Waljee

Earlier in September, the Evening Standard and its sister website The Independent launched a special investigation into modern slavery in the UK in partnership with Anti-Slavery Commissioner Kevin Hyland. The campaign gathers together a panel of experts from business, law, philanthropy, media and religious organisations, to ‘come up with proposals for combating slavery around the world’, which will be presented at the February Santa Marta Group conference at the Vatican. The campaign seeks to shine ‘a light on slavery in its [different] forms in the UK, showing readers what they can do to help and calling for specific action to fight the problem’. The first round table, chaired by Cardinal Vincent at the offices of the Evening Standard, began with a testimony from a survivor of human trafficking, highlighting the importance of giving a voice to victims. Page 4

In an accompanying article, Cardinal Vincent explained that the work of the Santa Marta Group, which began with a gathering of bishops and police chiefs from 20 countries in 2014, has the support of Pope Francis, who said to the Cardinal: ‘You make sure this keeps going because this is far more use than most of the meetings I have to go to.’ The group continues to grow, with more bishops, police chiefs and government representatives joining the fight. As the Cardinal explains, ‘with a mandate like that I am motivated, but at the heart of this are the victims of this cruel, cruel trade and we must always remember them and put them first’. This investigation has the support of the Prime Minster, who spoke at the UN on 19th September about the UK’s effort to combat modern slavery. As the Evening Standard editorial made clear, ‘this is a London problem but also a global phenomenon’. Cardinal Vincent has praised the campaign: ‘The Evening

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On 19th September, Archbishop Paul Gallagher, Secretary for Relations with States within the Holy See’s Secretariat of State, made the following intervention at a High Level Leaders Event at the United Nations.

Standard has a unique reach. One hope for this investigation, and this think tank, is that we can help to alert all sectors – finance, business, government, media – as well as people in London and more widely, so we can help consolidate a response. We need to let people know what to look for, how to report it and how they can avoid giving business to these criminals. A person’s dignity is tied up with their work. If work is demeaning or exploitative it eats away at the core of that person, and their human dignity. ‘ In our own diocese, Caritas Bakhita House operates as a safe house for women who have been victims of human trafficking and modern slavery. Caritas is also working with local and Metropolitan Police to educate individuals and parishes about the signs and effects of slavery and what they can do about it. If you would like to find out more please visit www.standard.co.uk/news/mo dern-slavery

The Holy See’s involvement in the fight against human trafficking and other forms of modern slavery is not new. Already in 1965, the Catholic Church strongly condemned as ‘infamies’ slavery, prostitution, the selling of women and children, and disgraceful working conditions where people are treated as instruments of gain rather than free and responsible persons. These phenomena ‘poison human society, debase their perpetrators’ and represent ‘a supreme dishonor to the Creator.’ The issue of trafficking in persons can only be fully addressed by promoting effective juridical instruments and concrete collaboration at multiple levels by all stakeholders, using multipronged strategies aimed to halt these heinous crimes, punish the criminals and assist victims. Pope Francis has made it clear that working to end forced labour, modern slavery and trafficking in persons is one of the defining priorities of his papacy. In this way, the institutions and organizations of the Catholic Church act in partnerships and collaboration with both the public and private sectors, including with government authorities. In particular, the Holy See and the Catholic Church collaborate with the British Government at various levels and in many initiatives in the effort to eradicate trafficking in persons. One such partnership is the Santa Marta Group, whose effectiveness lies in the close collaboration between law enforcement authorities and Church institutions, which rescue victims and accompany

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them in their rehabilitation to normal life. Experience has shown that many victims are wary of trusting law enforcement authorities, but that they confide their stories more easily to religious personnel, especially religious sisters, who can build their trust in the legal process and provide them safe haven and other forms of assistance. Thus, faithful to their specific nature, Catholic institutions and organizations have been on the front line in helping the victims, especially women and girls, to escape from situations of slavery and, with loving concern, patiently walk with them on the long road back to a life of freedom, both interior and exterior. Women religious, in particular, have been central to this work that often takes place in situations dominated by violence. They form networks at multiple levels to coordinate their efforts and share best practices and resources, thus maximizing their impact. The Political Declaration on the Implementation of the Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons, which will be adopted in the coming days, emphasizes ‘in the strongest terms possible the importance of strengthening collective action …to end trafficking in persons.’ The global nature of the crimes of forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking require from all of us a commensurate response of collaboration, fraternity and solidarity. We owe that response to the tens of millions of victims, who look to us with desperate hope for their emancipation and for a return to a life of dignity and freedom.

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Strawberries and Cream for CAFOD The CAFOD Group at Holy Family church in Welwyn Garden City, has recently raised over £275 by holding the seventh annual ‘Strawberry Tea’ event. Last weekend they raised a further £400 by holding a Barbeque for CAFOD. The brainchild of parishioner Sandy Leys, Sandy and her husband Bob have hosted the strawberry- themed event every year since 2000. The parish CAFOD group

donates strawberries and some of the group provide scones, both savoury and with cream and jam. For the seventh Strawberry Tea, around thirty people attended from the three Catholic churches in Welwyn Garden City. Bridie Nash, a CAFOD volunteer said:’ We serve everyone with a bowl of strawberries and cream on arrival then bring out the scones and of course make gallons of tea. We have only

Prayers for Victims of Parsons Green Bomb

Opening the Door in High Barnet

Following the terrorist act on a train at Parsons Green Underground Station on 15th September, Archbishop of Westminster Cardinal Vincent Nichols issued the following statement: ‘I am dismayed at yet another cowardly attack on innocent people, including young children, as they were commuting to work and school this morning. I pray for all who were injured in the blast and in the ensuing stampede, and for all who were affected by the incident. May God grant them and all Londoners peace and strengthen our resolve to stand against such evil acts.’ The Cardinal also praised the men and women of the emergency services who tended to the victims, and the residents and businesses near the station who offered them safety and comfort. ‘The generous actions of those who rushed to tend to the wounded and those who were in shock demonstrate all that is good in humanity as a small number seek to divide our society. We should all be alert, but remain calm.’ At 8:20am Friday 15th September, there was an explosion on a District Line train as it sat in Parsons Green station in South West London. The blast injured over 30 people, most of whom are suffering from burns. Two men have been arrested over the act of terror and Home Secretary Amber Rudd has urged the public to remain ‘alert, but not alarmed’.

On 3rd September, the feast of St Gregory the Great, Cardinal Vincent officially re-opened and consecrated the new altar of the Church of Mary Immaculate and St Gregory the Great in High Barnet. The afternoon began with a short procession, led by the Cardinal, Fr John McKenna and Deacon Anthony Curran, from the United Reform Church across the road, where the parish had been hosted for Mass during the building work, bearing the relic of St Pontian for the altar. At the front door of the new church John Ainslie made a short speech about the work that had been completed, and the importance of it to their community. Fr John then unlocked the door and invited everyone in to begin the Mass. The Cardinal began the homily to a packed church by remarking that the extension was not big enough! He thanked the vibrant community for coming out to celebrate this occasion and for their ‘witness of faith’ while the building work was going on. He explained that the ceremony of consecration speaks for itself. It

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had one wet year, so God is good to us considering our changeable summers.’ Thank you to all who give their time to raise funds for CAFOD’s life changing work overseas. Parishioners from WGC and Fr Norbert were also joined by Fr Manolo Jimenez who is in charge of the junior Seminary in Seville and seminarians Miguel Angel Prieto and Jose Maria Gomer des los Santos

is ‘vivid and dramatic’ and that we should keep our senses open to all that is happening. Referring to the Readings of the Mass, beginning with the Gospel, the Cardinal spoke about the importance of welcoming, even when we are afraid. ‘We must always open our door’. Jesus and Zachariah both did the ‘wrong’ thing.

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Zachariah was a tax collector and Jesus went to stay with him. The welcome they gave to each other, both spiritual and physical is embodied in this new church, which will welcome people off the high street. The Cardinal then alluded to the first reading, and the importance of people gathering to hear the word of God and to share food. This reading, he said, is especially important in light of the second reading. The second reading asks us to say ‘yes’ as Mary did and to ‘open ourselves to something beyond’ to come into the church and ‘be changed by the word and sacrifice of the Lord’. The relic placed in the altar was one of St Pontian, whose feast is on 12th August,

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following which the altar stone was inserted and two parishioners dressed the altar. It was a beautiful sight to witness the Cardinal raise the Eucharist toward the new crucifix in front of parishioners who had worked and prayed so hard for the new church. At the end of Mass Fr John gave a short speech thanking everyone involved with the build. He mentioned especially the neighbouring United Reform Church and the Hope Corner Community Centre which had hosted them for Mass during the building works. Fr John thanked in particular two parishioners who had put an extraordinary amount of work into the parish: John Ainslie and Rose Isaac were presented with a gift by the Cardinal.

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Heston and Isleworth Parishes Welcome Religious Orders On Friday 15th September the Diocese of Westminster signed agreements with two Religious orders for the care of two parishes: The Society of Divine Vocations (Vocationists) will assume pastoral care of Our Lady Queen of Apostles, Heston from 1st October, with Fr Luigi Morrone SDV being appointed Parish Priest and Fr Benedict Olelewe SDV appointed Assistant Priest. Representing the Vocationists at the signing in Archbishop’s House were Fr Antonio Rafael Do Nascimento SDV, Superior General and Fr Salvatore Musella SDV, Regional Superior.

The Society of the Divine Word

From L to R: Fr Antonio Rafael Do Nascimento SDV, Superior General; Cardinal Vincent Nichols; Fr Tim Lehane SVD, Provincial; Bp John Wilson; Mgr Martin Hayes, Vicar General

by Fr Kevin O'Toole SVD

The Society of the Divine Word (SVD), an international missionary congregation, was founded in 1875 by a German diocesan priest, St Arnold Janssen. Because of the political situation in Germany under Bismarck, he could not found the order in his own country, so the society had its humble beginnings in Venlo, Holland on the banks of the river Meuse. In the early 1930s, the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith in Rome entrusted the SVD with the spiritual care of an area in central India, whose capital was the city of Indore. India, of course, at that time was a British possession and, as all the priests and brothers working in the new mission were of German nationality, the Superiors felt the acute need of English missionaries to work there. The decision was, therefore, taken to start up a minor seminary in England to train young men to become missionaries and, after ordination, be assigned to work in India. A priest from the United States came to England to look for a property that was suitable to use as a minor seminary and a Dutch priest in Birmingham told him of a vacant manor house in the village of Hadzor, just Page 6

outside the town of Droitwich Spa. The house had become vacant upon the death of the last member of the Galton family. Priests and brothers from Germany became responsible for the conversion of the manor house into a residential college. The name of the Manor was changed to that of St Richard's College, Hadzor, because St Richard had been born nearby. The first two English SVD priests, educated in St Richard's, were ordained priests in the college chapel in 1941 by the Archbishop of Birmingham, the Most Reverend Leighton Williams. One was appointed to the staff of the college to teach English and the other to Ghana. Only in 1955 were three English priests asked to work in India and others soon followed. With the work of recruiting and training missionary priests well under way, an expansion of the work of the SVD in the UK was undertaken. In 1948, St David's College for late vocations was opened in Carrog, North Wales and in 1954, St Gregory's, Gateacre, Liverpool. In 1980 the society purchased a small monastery from the Capuchin Friars in Uddingston, Glasgow. After their initial studies, our English scholastics proceeded to St Mary's, Techny, near Chicago

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The Society of the Divine Word (SVD), meanwhile, will assume pastoral care of Our Lady of Sorrows and St Bridget of Sweden, Isleworth, with Fr Nicodemus Lobo Ratu SVD as Parish Priest, Fr Kieran Fitzharris SVD as Assistant Priest and Deacon Vitalis Barik SVD. Fr Tim Lehane SVD, Provincial represented the order at the signing of the agreement. Each of these orders has a rich charism which they are hoping to share with their parishes. Here, Fr Kevin O’Toole SVD and Fr Salvatore Musella SDV introduce the history of their respective orders.

for their study of philosophy and theology. Then, in 1967, the seven missionary congregations in England combined to open the Missionary Institute based in Mill Hill and St Edward's College, Totteridge. Two houses of residence were purchased for our SVD students, in Hendon and in Teignmouth Road NW2. Over the past few years, the number of seminarians decreased dramatically for missionary institutes, and today our house in Teignmouth Road remains the only residence of eight priests, some retired, some serving as hospital chaplains or engaged in higher studies. In 2004 the Bishop of Clifton entrusted the spiritual care of St Mary on the Quays, Bristol, to us.The wonderful opportunity of two SVD priests now being appointed to St Brigid's of Sweden, Isleworth, London is welcome news indeed.

The Vocationists

by Fr Salvatore Musella SDV

The Society of the Divine Vocations (Vocationists) is a religious order founded by Blessed Justin of the Trinity in 1920. Justin Russolillo, the founder of the Vocationists, was born in Pianura (Naples) in 1891 and, from the age of 11, showed signs of a vocation to the priesthood. At the time, families had to pay a fee for seminary formation and, the Russolillos who could not afford to pay, set on the case of seeking a benefactor; after some initial difficulties and refusals eventually they found a benefactor in the figure of a Baron living nearby. Justin was ordained to the priesthood on 20th September 1913; during the rite of the ordination, while prostrating, he vowed to God to serve him in fostering vocations especially among the poorest. Fr Justin was so determined to help the poor that his desire, determination

From L to R: Mgr Martin Hayes, Vicar General; Deacon Vitalis Barik SDV, Fr Luigi Morrone, SDV Parish Priest Heston; Fr Salvatore Musella SDV, Regional Superior; Fr Antonio Rafael Do Nascimento SDV, Superior General; Cardinal Vincent Nichols, Fr Tim Lehane SVD, Provincial; Fr Nicodemus Lobo Ratu SVD, Parish Priest Isleworth; Fr Kieran Anthony Fitzharris SVD, Assistant Priest Isleworth; Mgr John Conneely, Judicial Vicar Tribunal; Bp John Wilson, Fr Albert Escoto SVD, Rector of SVD House.

and concern are shown in this statement which remains the specific mission of his apostolate and that of his sons and daughters: ‘Poverty must never be an obstacle to following one’s vocation’. After a year, he began the first experiments of common life with some local boys in his paternal house. After some initial difficulties and the refusal of the Bishop and the diocese in supporting the work, in 1920, once appointed as Parish Priest in his native town, he began the foundation of what became the Vocationist order. The charism of the order is identifying and fostering vocations in life especially to the priesthood and religious life, with attention to the less privileged and has as its aim the promotion of the universal call to holiness while helping God’s people to follow their particular vocation. Some of the most significant ways this is accomplished is the gratitude with which every vocation is helped and the help and support rendered to those who are struggling and are betraying their vocation. The Vocationist mission is carried out in parishes, schools and in all those areas where, through catechesis and the preaching of the word of God, the call to holiness can be shared and lived. The Vocationist Mission in the UK began officially on 1st April 2008 with the opening of the first community in Holywell (North Wales) where the order was

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entrusted with the care of the parish and of the shrine of St Winefride. In 2012, the order opened a community in the Diocese of Birmingham, in Walsall, which to this day serves as a formation house for the brothers who are studying at Oscott College, and in 2016, a second community was opened in the same diocese in Stechford. The Vocationists are present in Italy, Brazil, USA, Argentina, Nigeria, Philippines, India, Colombia, Ecuador, Madagascar, Indonesia, UK, Chile, France, South Africa, Canada and Vietnam.

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Ealing’s Eco-friendly Landmark in London A brand new, eco-friendly, award nominated junior school building has opened at St Benedict’s, Ealing. It is super-sustainable - one of only a handful of ‘Passivhaus’ schools in the UK. The youngest pupils at Benedict’s School, Ealing have moved into their brand new junior school building this term. Nominated for the Royal Institute of British Architects award, this beautifully light and spacious facility has been hailed as an eco-friendly landmark for London. The new extension has been specially designed with nursery and pre-prep children in mind. Classrooms can be opened up to provide larger spaces for team teaching and shared learning. There are also plenty of small, cosy spaces for quiet activities and one-to-one teaching, a home economics room, and direct access to landscaped outdoor learning and play areas. All classrooms are south facing for good natural light and have fantastic views across to Ealing Abbey. It is also extremely ecofriendly, having been built to a set of energy requirements known as ‘Passivhaus.’ This is a sustainable construction method devised in

Scandinavia which maximises energy-efficiency. There are currently only a handful of schools in the UK built to this standard, making the St Benedict’s Junior School a landmark building for London. Passivhaus buildings have timber frames which are extremely air tight and superinsulated, and can be up to 96% more energy efficient than older school buildings. Air quality and temperature are maintained by using heat recovery ventilation -

different from conventional heating systems because fresh air from outside passes through a heat exchanger. This improves the air quality inside, maintaining good oxygen levels to help everyone stay alert. St Benedict’s Headmaster, Andrew Johnson, said: “The opening of our new junior school is another very exciting landmark in St Benedict’s history. The new classroom spaces are inspiring places for our youngest pupils to learn, providing the best possible start to their education here.”

Warm-hearted Community Wednesday 6th September saw the launch of the ‘St Augustine’s Priory Association’ at St Augustine’s Priory, Ealing. In the school Hall packed with parents, pupils and staff the Interim Headteacher, Marie-Helene Collins, introduced this new initiative bringing together past and present pupils, parents and staff in one association, a coming together of the community that is St Augustine’s Priory. An alumnae organisation has existed before but, as Mrs Collins said, ‘We are giving it new life and formalising it a little. For many of us here, perhaps current pupils and parents and more recent members of staff, it is new. This organisation will be inclusive of all members of the Follow us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/diocese.westminster

International School Award for CJMLC

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The Convent of Jesus and Mary Language College in Willesden has been awarded the British Council’s prestigious International School Award in recognition of its work to bring the world into the classroom. The school’s international work includes exchanges and joint projects with overseas schools, themed workshops celebrating key events and a focus on global issues aimed at raising students’ awareness. On receiving the news, new Headmistress Louise McGowan expressed her delight that the Convent of Jesus and Mary has been recognised for its outstanding and exemplary work in promoting modern languages: ‘In a global age it is essential that our young people are welleducated in international issues, that they embrace the opportunities that languages will open to them and, most importantly, that they are able to converse in a language other than English. All our girls are able to choose from a rich offer from French to Italian to Spanish. The work of our prestigious Language School

that runs Wednesday evening and Saturday morning classes has enriched the lives of so many people from the community with its offer of Italian and Portuguese. I congratulate my new colleagues and the students whose hard work and dedication made this award possible.’ Sir Ciarán Devane, CEO of the British Council, said: ‘The school’s fantastic international work has rightfully earned it this prestigious award. The International School Award is a great chance for schools to demonstrate the important work they’re doing to bring the world into their classrooms. Embedding an international dimension in children’s education ensures that they are truly global citizens and helps prepare them for successful lives and careers in an increasingly global economy.’ The award is now available worldwide in countries such as India, Sri Lanka, Egypt, Lebanon, Cyprus, and Pakistan. Around 5,500 International School Awards have been presented to successful schools in the UK since the scheme began in 1999.

St Augustine’s Priory community. We are broadening our alumnae group to honour all relationships that come together in our very happy school. Parents matter to us because they have invested in us in so many ways and we miss them as well as their children when their daughters leave us. Staff and governors and trustees who have given

their lives and talents also are recognised by this focus on relationships. The Association’s objective it to create a supportive community to foster friendship and interaction between past pupils, parents, staff and all stakeholders of the School showing that the school is a wide-ranging and warmhearted community.’

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Faith renewal through small communities by Canon Stuart Wilson

It was in 2002 that I was summoned to the presence of our then-Cardinal. I had been a parish priest for four years. That was all about to change. He told me he wanted me to head up a project for parish renewal. After 30 years working in parishes, I was to begin a new phase in my ministry. Cardinal Cormac was excited by the idea. He had done a previous project in Arundel & Brighton Diocese and he knew it would be challenging but it would be valuable and important for the future of our diocese. Working so closely with the Cardinal was a new experience for me. It proved to be an exciting and exhilarating one. What was proposed was that we would join up with an organisation called Renew International who were based in New Jersey, USA. They had great experience in doing these renewal programmes and had been at the centre of the one in the Cardinal’s previous diocese. Cardinal Cormac knew he had a lot of preparatory work to do in the diocese if the programme was to succeed. Convincing the clergy was the first task and I think it is fair to say it wasn’t easy. Many who will read this will remember Butlins Holiday Camp at Page 8

Bognor! It was certainly a new adventure and, in the best sense of the word, an ‘odd’ one. Wonderful speakers were brought together, Cardinal Danneels, Mons Tom Kleissler, to name a few, along with great daily liturgies in what at other times was the dance hall. Then there were those plenary sessions where the Cardinal told us what was in his mind and one or two told him what was on their mind! For the first time I came into contact with the pastoral skill of our Cardinal. He resolutely set out his agenda, listened to the arguments for and against, felt the frustration of some of the clergy, but in the end built up the good will of the great majority of us. We launched our programme. It was called ‘At Your Word Lord’. The title comes from words of Peter in St Luke’s Gospel when Jesus tells his followers to launch out the nets even though they had not caught anything all night. Peter’s words became ours as we launched out into the diocese: At Your Word Lord. The launch was spectacular. We booked Wembley Arena and Cardinal Cormac celebrated Mass in the presence of over 10,000 people. So began a programme of training for priests and people in the parishes. The Cardinal taught me and my team (Lindsey, Joe, Danny, Catherine and Sr Amadeus) so much: tenacity, humour, good planning, trust in the Holy Spirit. Above all else, he taught us never to underestimate the commitment of lay people nor treat lightly the skills they had to bring. I suppose he also taught me (as a priest) the importance of working with a team, of trusting in them and valuing them. We did amazing things over the next three years. There were five seasons to the programme. The plan was to train potential leaders of small groups of say eight to 12 people. Supported by terrific literature the group would share on a weekly basis the Scriptures, the teaching of

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the Church, and their own experience. Of course, there would also be time for prayer. To all this Cardinal Cormac was deeply committed. He made countless visits around the diocese, and he established a diocesan group made up of laity and clergy with whom he met regularly. After three years, the programme came to an end. We had been all over the diocese and involved in most of our parishes. I think we established more than 2000 small Christian communities. I know we encouraged solid teaching in the Catholic faith. Certainly, we established new leaders: men and women of a new generation who would be confident in taking on leadership as the previous generation grew tired. I can’t forget the great final event in Westminster Cathedral where well over a thousand renewed and committed Catholics came to give thanks for all that had been achieved. It was a wonderful event. So ended my time working closely with the Cardinal. He allowed me a break and I went to Australia, visiting many parishes talking and preaching about what had happened in Westminster. I never lost touch with the Cardinal; he treasured those whom he had worked with. What did I learn about him through my work with him? I think above all the importance of faith, prayer and trust in the Lord. He also taught me to have courage especially when the going was tough. He was keen not to judge those who did not quite understand where he was leading but rather set out to encourage them to walk with him, and to come and see. He was a great inspiration to me. He laid new foundations for our diocese; even today I think there are over 600 small communities that still meet regularly. He became well respected by so many lay people who treasured him as a friend. He gave new inspiration to the spirit of evangelisation, which is alive in our diocese today. Thank you, Cardinal Cormac.

A visible and constant presence by Paul Moynihan

Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor greeting a couple after the Mass for Matrimony

It is not easy to write about Cardinal Cormac: just where do you start with this giant of the Church in all senses of the word? While he may have only been Archbishop of Westminster from 2000 to 2009, he has been a visible presence long before and after. I suppose that I first heard the name when reading the press coverage of Archbishop Basil Hume’s creation as Cardinal. Mgr Cormac, then the Rector of the Venerable English College, met the Cardinal-elect at the airport and hosted him during his stay in Rome. It was some years later that I met him in person on several occasions when,as Bishop of Arundel and Brighton, he confirmed nephews and a niece in ceremonies at Worth Abbey. I remember well his installation as Archbishop of Westminster. He arrived in the sacristy that morning with a look of a rabbit caught in the headlights of a car. Who can blame him as he faced head on the immensity of the great office he had been called to? And then there was that near-fall from the throne steps (I was by the credence table at the time and saw it closer than most) nearly landing on Canon Scholes, which guaranteed its place on that week’s edition of BBC’s ‘Have I got news for you’. Amongst his liturgical legacies are several of the nowlargest attended and popular annual Masses in the cathedral diary. The Mass for Migrants on the May Day Bank holiday draws hundreds in national dress for a real celebration of cultures and customs. Then, on the eve of Pentecost, Cardinal Cormac introduced the annual

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Mass for the celebration of Matrimony, at which married couples particularly marking significant anniversaries renew their commitment to each other. Many other dioceses have copied this idea, so successful it has been. He really loved this cathedral, presiding frequently. He also loved his Titular Church in Rome, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, assigned to him the day he was created a Cardinal in 2001. In 2014 I was privileged, along with a few other cathedral servers, to look after him at a Mass he celebrated there the night before Cardinal Vincent was created a Cardinal. He managed while vesting before Mass to lose his red skull cap, much to his dismay, but laughed afterwards when we found it had been caught underneath his alb all along. His last public visit to the cathedral was on 4th July when we welcomed our new Papal Nuncio, but Cardinal Cormac’s last public words were spoken here on 27th May when he assisted Bishop John Wilson in a Deanery Confirmation Mass, during which he confirmed his great niece. At the end of this Mass, having asked Bishop John’s permission, he spoke for a few minutes of his great love for Holy Mother Church, encouraging those newlyconfirmed to be also strong in their faith. I sensed then that this might be the last time that he would speak here. There was none of his trademark humour on this occasion. These were serious but wise final words, spoken in love. Paul Moynihan is the Cardinal’s Master of Ceremonies at Westminster Cathedral

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Westminster Record | October 2017

A Road with no Exit: Cardinal Cormac and the Ecumenical Journey

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Church into the mainstream of English life. He was never patronising. He accepted and welcomed his fellowChristians in the common task of witnessing to the Gospel in the public space. Without any disloyalty to the faith he had received and which he was committed to uphold, he knew that the road to unity would require change in the Catholic Church as well as in others. I finish with three memories. The first is of the day when he and I together welcomed Pope John Paul II to share prayers in the church and a meal in the refectory of Palazzola with the members of ARCIC-II. A marble plaque with our names on it commemorates the day. Secondly there was the day when he and I, together with the two Co-Secretaries of ARCIC, went to meet the Cardinal Prefect of the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith (Cardinal Jozef Ratzinger) to discuss what we saw as the CDF’s unhelpful response to our Agreed Statement on Salvation and the Church. I found myself having a constructive conversation with Cardinal Ratzinger on the nature of dogmatic statements; I felt myself in the presence of a German professor of theology with whom I shared a common world of theological discourse. His underlings were less happy. As we left the meeting, one of them said to Cormac and the Catholic CoSecretary, ‘Next time you come, send us the questions seven days in advance’. My third memory is of the visit that he and I paid together in May 2016 to a meeting of ARCIC-III, assembled again in Palazzola. They made us enormously welcome. But what I remember above all is lunch one day with Cormac on the terrace of a restaurant in Castel Gandolfo, looking out over Lake Albano: a little foretaste of the heavenly banquet in which we all hope to share together. To quote the apostle: Cormac, I thank my God upon every remembrance of you.

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by Mgr Mark Langham

difficulties in the way to There are two incidents in the greater unity, notably the ordination of women as priests earlier life of Cardinal and (perceptively) the wider Cormac that awakened his issue of authority. interest in ecumenism: the If sober about the prospects first was meeting his local for any early ecumenical Anglican clergy in his parish breakthrough, he was in Portsmouth Diocese and untiringly optimistic about the finding out that they were ecumenical journey, which he rather pleasant, and the called ‘a road with no exit’. He second was reading the maintained personally warm document on ecumenism relations with members of from Vatican II, Unitatis other Christian communities, Redintegratio. These events and as Cardinal arranged stirred in him a sense of plenary meetings between a greater Christian identity, Catholic and Church of a common calling, that he would later characterise with England Bishops. As rector of the technical term koinonia – the English College in Rome he had hosted the Archbishop of communion. Indeed, for Cardinal Cormac, ecumenism Canterbury, Donald Coggan, and established an exchange was a natural part of being a Catholic, a recognition indeed programme whereby Anglican ordinands spent a semester at that so long as Christians the College, an initiative still were divided, the Catholic alive, and one which has had Church itself lacked untold benefits in increasing something. Two further events were to knowledge and collaboration between Catholic and Anglican confirm him in his opinion. clergy. But above all, Cardinal As Bishop of Arundel and Cormac felt that ecumenism Brighton, he welcomed Pope John Paul II to England in 1982 was something that ordinary Christians had to do, and and witnessed him praying indeed, faced with a with the Archbishop of secularising world, had to do. Canterbury, Robert Runcie, at ‘In every town, in every Canterbury Cathedral. The village, everywhere, there sight moved him to tears, and ought to be some things that convinced him of the need to Christians are doing together’, work tirelessly for unity. The second was his appointment as he said in 2012. For him, the enemies of ecumenism were co-Chairman of the Anglicansuspicion, inertia and Roman Catholic International impatience, and his conviction Commission (ARCIC), where of the role of the Holy Spirit, he gained first-hand combined with his generous experience of the theological issues at stake. In this capacity, and affable character, did as much as any theological he underlined the real discussion to further the path achievements of the dialogue: he called ARCIC’s agreements of Christian unity, and establish the real but imperfect on Eucharist and Ministry ‘money in the bank’. Yet he communion shared by was also realistic about the Christians.

Some ecumenical guests at Cardinal Cormac’s funeral. There were representatives from many Christian faith traditions at the Mass.

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with its sharp sense of separation within deeper communion. We began our work in 1983 at a time when for many people hopes were high for growth in reconciliation between the churches. During the following years enthusiasm for our kind of work waned on all sides. But Cormac always kept his eye on the long-term hope, seeing the work that we were doing as something to be banked for use in future years. And if anyone is responsible at the human level for the quality of friendship and trust that now exists between the bishops of by Bishop Mark Santer our two churches in England, it is he. I remember Cormac MurphyCormac was a churchman O’Connor as above all a rather than a theologian. He wonderful friend. On the respected the crucial role of evening of the day of his theologians. But he death one of my daughters understood that what in the rang and said how sorry she end is at stake is the had been when she heard the reconciliation not of theologies news of the death of my but of divided Christian ‘friend’. She remembered him people. His primary skills lay as the nicest of the people in his acute understanding of who used to come and stay at our house (when we used one human and institutional another’s houses for meetings relationships. In many ways he reminded me of my own of ARCIC drafting committees). Her memory was mentor Archbishop Robert of a man who enjoyed family Runcie, who used to say that life and who was at ease with nobody without a sense of humour should be put in teenagers and children. charge of anything. Cormac I remember him too as a certainly passed that test. He friend who came all the way was shrewd in his judgements, from Sussex to Birmingham to be present at the funeral of but always generous. He observed and enjoyed the my wife Henriette in 1994. quirks of human behaviour, I start with Cormac’s but never unkindly. He did not friendship because, through put people down. Rather, he the seventeen years during encouraged them. Totally loyal which he and I worked to the Church, he was together as Co-Chairmen of anything but an anxious ARCIC-II, I came to see friendship and mutual trust as traditionalist. A natural conservatism, if such it was, an indispensible foundation was tempered by a sense of for fruitful ecumenical work. proportion, generosity and Cormac’s good humour, pastoral realism. He was one generosity of spirit and for whom institutions and emotional intelligence helped laws exist for the good of the members of the human beings, and not the Commission to trust one other way round. another, to speak frankly and Cormac was born and honestly with each other, so as nurtured in the old world of to be able to work together pre-conciliar Roman constructively towards the Catholicism. As a young priest articulation of a shared he lived through and Christian and Catholic faith. welcomed the work of the Friendship in Christ, Second Vatican Council, to expressed in the daily sharing of prayer and food was the whose legacy he was wholly context of our work. At the committed. As a bishop and centre of it all was the daily archbishop he played a crucial celebration of the eucharist, role in bringing the Catholic

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Westminster Record | October 2017

Homily given by Archbishop Bernard Longley at Solemn Vespers of the Dead on the Vigil of the Funeral of Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor at Westminster Cathedral on 12th September 2017 We have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ ... and we rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God. Earlier today Cardinal Cormac’s body was received here at Westminster with solemnity and with affection by the Provost and Metropolitan Chapter of the Cathedral. It brought back to mind the morning, seventeen years ago, when he was received and led into the Cathedral for the first time as Archbishop of Westminster at the beginning of his Mass of Installation. On that occasion there was due solemnity but there was also affection. And there was plenty of hope and joy, the theological virtue and its fruit which characterised Cardinal Cormac’s life. These two went before him in his motto Gaudium et Spes, they accompanied him to the very moment of his death and they brought him the great peace that was so evident in his final days among us. We rejoice in our hope of sharing God’s glory. St Paul’s Letter to the Romans sets before us the link between hope and joy which also spanned the Christian life and the priestly ministry of Cormac Murphy-O’Connor. We have gathered to remember him, to pray for the repose of his soul, to console one another, but above all to praise and worship to God for the remarkable blessings that have come through the Cardinal’s life and ministry, just as he would have urged us to do and to do without delay. It was in Cardinal Cormac’s nature and temperament to be impatient for results. This was not the impatience of frustration or irascibility, critical of others’ slowness or hesitation. It was the impatience that is borne out of hope: longing to see God’s will achieved in the lives of others and for the good of others. It was the impatience that arose from a perceptive nature, whose insights and

Homily given by Bishop Mark O’Toole at the Vigil Mass in Chiswick

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understanding realised the many possibilities for achieving and doing good long before they were grasped by colleagues and friends. In the personality of Cardinal Cormac the virtue of hope also awakened a life-long awareness of the God-given potential that lay within people or situations and ultimately within himself. Regarding his own life he lived by the motto which he would often quote: nemo sibi judex (nobody can be his own judge). Even until the very end of his life he would humbly ask the opinions of others about a policy, a decision or a statement that he was considering. But it was hope that made him joyful as well as peaceful in the decisions that he made. He maintained that when we are faced with making a great decision for ourselves we must come to recognise some joy in the matter before us, for the experience of joy is a measure of our hope. This insight has helped many of those who sought his advice to discover the right way forward. It made him a great friend and it made a great priest and bishop.

For Cardinal Cormac the source of this hope was the prayer which daily united him with Christ. For this reason he would acknowledge, as we must today, that no good thing came from his life except by the grace of Jesus Christ. It is the same Lord, the crucified One, to whom he would turn at the outset of each day and at the end of his life for forgiveness and mercy. It is to the crucified and risen Lord that we turn today to ask pardon and peace for him, knowing that we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. It was hope that led Cardinal Cormac to follow his calling to the priesthood in company with his brothers when other attractive and worthwhile careers lay easily within his grasp as a young man. It was hope that gave him the confidence to accept demanding appointments with grace and enthusiasm as a pastor and formator of pastors. It was hope, deeply embodied within his character and personality, that enabled him to see the potential within situations that eluded others. This gracious perceptiveness was the root of his yearning for Christian unity, in tune with the insights of the Second Vatican Council. He believed in and strove for the renewal called for by the Council, not only in individual Christian lives, but in the life of the Church, so that the prayer of Jesus Christ that they may all be one might become a reality. And, despite all the struggles of ecumenical dialogue, it was not a misplaced hope that made him accept his appointment as the Catholic Co-chairman of the second phase of ARCIC, the Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission, alongside Bishop Mark Santer (who is happily with us here today). The presence of so many ecumenical friends and representatives of other faith communities is a striking tribute to the difference Cardinal Cormac made in realising the will of Christ for the Church and in achieving the vision of Nostra Aetate which sees the goodness and truth of God beyond the household of Christian believers.

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Cardinal Cormac’s genuine interest in people bore fruit in the hopes that he entertained for their progress and happiness. His ability to read the character and temperament of those he guided has continued to bear fruit for the Church and for her mission. He could often see the potential for good that others failed to recognise in themselves. He has encouraged and enabled men and women of faith, whether ordained, religious or lay faithful, to take up tasks which they had never imagined or believed themselves capable of fulfilling. The joy and hope that were dominant themes in Cardinal Cormac’s life drew young people to him and he rejoiced in their enthusiasm for the Gospel and their impatience for justice and peace in the world. When Newman University in Birmingham was granted university status in 2014 Cardinal Cormac readily agreed to become its inaugural Chancellor. Filled with hope he had a natural rapport with young people setting out on life’s pilgrimage, even while his own was drawing towards its fulfilment. The virtue of hope deepens trust and, alongside his astuteness and prudence as a bishop, Cardinal Cormac instinctively trusted human nature. And if there were times when this trust was misplaced then he learned to follow the way of St Paul: we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts by the Holy Spirit who has been given to us. In these great moments of prayer, today and tomorrow, we give glory to God through recognising the abundant outpouring of the Holy Spirit in and through Cardinal Cormac’s life, and we remember with gratitude the grace that touched our own lives through the hope-filled words and the joyful deeds that we can never forget. With our dear friend, pilgrim Cormac, we too rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God. Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Twitter at: twitter.com/dowym

You will not be surprised to know that Cardinal Cormac made careful arrangements for this Mass and for the funeral rites which will follow in these days. Among others, I had the great privilege of accompanying him through some of those discussions and he was keen that a Mass be said here in Chiswick. He lived very happily here in the parish for nine years, and was grateful to be able to be a pastor in this setting in his retirement years. It was part of the great humanity of those conversations, that we were able to joke with one another, that he would even write this homily for me if he could. I had the great privilege of working closely with Cardinal Cormac for six years. They are some of the most happy ones I had in the priesthood. He was not only my bishop but became a good friend and an inspiring mentor. He had the capacity to see the potential in another and to draw that out. I know that a number here, friends and family, experienced him in his last weeks. Even in those last conversations he was keen to be generous and impart to each of us, some wisdom, some concrete piece of advice of how to live life well, how to make the most of our vocations. As for himself, he was thoroughly focused on making the last act of his dying, a culmination of how he'd lived his life, with great openness of heart, with humility, and with a very deep, rock-like faith. In one of the last conversations I had with him, in the hospital before he died, he repeated again what he had said so often to me before. He did not want me to eulogise about him but to concentrate on preaching on the faith of the Church, her belief in her Risen Lord and upon God's mercy. Cardinal Cormac wanted this Mass, and his funeral rites at Westminster Cathedral, not to be a celebration of his life or a record of his personal history, but an expression of his faith, a faith which did not fear the reality of death but saw in it the opportunity to be finally united with his Lord. As we heard on the day of death itself, he said, ‘I am at peace and have no fear of what is to come’. Follow us on Instagram at: @dowym

Parishioners paying their respects at the Vigil Mass in Chiswick.

He believed he was embarking upon another journey. He wanted to die in the way he had lived, and with God's great goodness he was given what he desired. Death is for him the culmination of the whole of his life, because it means an eternal face to face with Christ, an encounter which would go on forever. In that reading from the Book of Deuteronomy, Moses gazes with undimmed eye as he stands on the verge of the Promised Land. He gazes across a new horizon, on a new land, and with new possibilities. We believe this is what is now taking place for Cardinal Cormac as he gazes, with undimmed eye, upon a new landscape, and sets out on that final pilgrimage which will lead him home. An undimmed eye and looking for new possibilities; these were characteristic of Cormac's whole life. It was this which sent him forth from Reading, to study for the priesthood in Rome, which brought him into priestly ministry in the Diocese of Portsmouth, back to the English College again as Rector, where his skills as mentor and wise counsellor assisted many in discovering and deepening their vocation. It was this capacity for new possibilities which gave him the confidence to set out to Arundel as a young bishop, and then to Westminster as Archbishop 22 years later. It was what made him such an outstanding ecumenist and interlocutor in inter-religious dialogue. An undimmed eye, but with a certain twinkle in it, it has to be said. I remember when we would go to a parish function or celebration. Before leaving the car he would comb his hair in Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/doywm

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Cardinal Cormac: ‘Gazing with an undimmed eye’

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

Cardinal Cormac: Joy-filled hope

the mirror, and brush down his cassock. He'd give me a nudge on the arm, and with that twinkle in his eye, he'd say, ‘Now remember your task is to get me out of here as quickly as possible!’ That humanity and lightness of touch was acknowledged by Pope Francis in their last telephone conversation together. From his hospital bed, Cardinal Cormac expressed his gratitude and encouragement to his friend, now Pope, and Pope Francis, assured Cormac of his prayer and blessing, thanked him for his accompaniment and his friendship, and then added, ‘especially, I thank you for your good humour’. It is no surprise to us that his episcopal motto was, ‘Joy and Hope’ for this was the manner of his being, and the very bedrock of his life and of his faith. It was firstly within his own family that Cormac learned to live these realities. Pat, Julie, Chris, Leigh, James and Kieran, through you we give thanks to the MurphyO'Connor and Cuddigan families for giving such a generous, gentle and humble pastor to the Church. We know he remained close to you, his family always, and desired that you and all his family come to know more deeply something of the beauty of friendship with Jesus which he experienced in the family of the Church. It is this sense of the Church as a family which was so central to Cardinal Cormac's life. Rather than being an institution, the Church was, for him, that community of believers where each person could find a real home and a path to follow her Lord. In her, Jesus fulfilled that promise made to his disciples, ‘I do not leave you orphans’. Cardinal Cormac believed that

none of us are spiritual orphans. We all have a Father in heaven, Jesus as our brother, and Mary as our mother. The loving heart of our mother Mary, we discover in our mother the Church. These were truths, Cardinal Cormac learned in the midst of his own loving family, and they were deepened by his experiences within the family of the Church. How often in these past months he would quote words from the final audience of the Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI. They had clearly become his own, and I quote: ‘I can say that the Lord has truly led me, he has been close to me, I have been able to perceive his presence daily ... a ... journey which has had its moments of joy and light, but also moments which were not easy; I have felt like Saint Peter with the Apostles in the boat on the Sea of Galilee: the Lord has given us so many days of sun and of light winds, days when the catch was abundant; there were also moments when the waters were rough and the winds against us, as throughout the Church’s history, and the Lord seemed to be sleeping. But I have always known that the Lord is in that boat, and I have always known that the barque of the Church is not mine but his. Nor does the Lord let it sink; it is he who guides it, surely also through those whom he has chosen, because he so wished. This has been, and is, a certainty which nothing can shake. For this reason my heart ... overflows with gratitude to God, for he has never let his Church, or me personally, lack his consolation, his light, his love.’ Cardinal Cormac's belief in the presence of his Lord in the Church, does not mean, in a rather glib fashion that things are simply made right at the end. That is why he wanted to be buried at the tenth station in Westminster Cathedral, so that people would pray for him as they passed by on the way to the Lady Chapel, to the sacristy, or to the confessional. Cardinal Cormac knew he was dependent on God's mercy, in death as in life. This awareness wasn't primarily because of his faults or failings as a bishop, of which he was well aware. We know he was honest in facing his limits, particularly in the

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area of child protection. He recognised his mistake and sought to put in place, ways of working and responding which would make it easier for victim survivors, and hopefully, bring healing to those most vulnerable who had been hurt. His humble awareness of his own vulnerabilities was deeper than anything he experienced in the spotlight of the media. It was because he knew that death would bring him before God. Before the face of the living God I recognise my own unworthiness and the need to shed illusion and untruth. This shedding of the old self is of course the work of every human life; what St Edith Stein calls the ‘breaking of the chains of personality’. The breaking of the chains for most of us is a work that is not complete by the time of our own death. Cardinal Cormac knew this, but he also knew that in the loving mercy of God, this process of change is continued in the journey we make to God following death. In these last weeks he was deeply consoled by this awareness, and regularly described it in pilgrimage terms, as 'being on the way'. For him, this was the Church's deeply consoling belief in purgatory. For the believer time does not run out. If there is any unfinished business to prepare the soul for an eternal face to face with God, then God in his providence allows for this. At the same time, the person on their way through purgatory knows that what is longed for, what is desired, eternal beatitude, will eventually be granted. So tinged with any sense of regret is the joy that such a soul will ultimately see God. It is this which gave Cardinal Cormac's death such peace and such a gift to those who witnessed him. For us, too, there is consolation in the knowledge that we are still united with the one we have lost. We can help them with our prayers and their suffering which is but the pain of deep longing and deep desire to be with God forever, this longing and this desire can be offered to God out of love for all those who are still on the way. It is such longing and desire which acts as a flame to purge away any lack of love or truth and which expands the soul

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fully so that we can be prepared to receive God in his fullness. It is our fundamental belief and our hope that this process of transformation begins in our earthly life, as it clearly did for Cardinal Cormac. This is not only through those things which he endured in his life, but also in these last weeks when we accompanied him through his final suffering, as he day by day came to terms with embracing a whole new possibility. It is an immense consolation to us, to know that all has been taken up in and through his participation in Christ’s embrace of suffering and death. There is one last word. We are between two jubilees in Cardinal Cormac's life. Last October he celebrated sixty years as a priest, and in December he would have been forty years a bishop. He was looking forward to another party! Yet in these final weeks he knew that celebration would have to take place in another way. He was, to his very bones, a priest. The final goodbyes are a blessing which we shall forever treasure. In one of our last meetings, he suddenly stopped talking and after a few moments of quiet, he said to me, ‘Mark, for all the words that you and I might say to one another at this point, it is the words of the Mass and the Liturgy which above all give me comfort....let us say Mass together’. And so we did, with a fellow bishop and the hospital chaplain. Life had become very simple: the praying of his daily Office, the Rosary, and Mass. These were the things which had sustained him all his life and these sustained him as he embarked on the final journey. I suspect that as he is now accompanied by his guardian angel through purgatory, he's got that twinkle in his eye, and is giving them a nudge, and saying, 'Remember, your job is to get me out of here as quickly as possible’. Dear Cardinal Cormac, dear Father, my very dear brother, go in peace and may you soon gaze forever on the One for whom you worked so faithfully, with such humility, and for whom you long so ardently. Eternal rest grant unto him O Lord and let perpetual light shine upon him. May he rest in peace. Amen

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Westminster Record | October 2017

Homily given by Archbishop Bernard Longley at Solemn Vespers of the Dead on the Vigil of the Funeral of Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor at Westminster Cathedral on 12th September 2017 We have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ ... and we rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God. Earlier today Cardinal Cormac’s body was received here at Westminster with solemnity and with affection by the Provost and Metropolitan Chapter of the Cathedral. It brought back to mind the morning, seventeen years ago, when he was received and led into the Cathedral for the first time as Archbishop of Westminster at the beginning of his Mass of Installation. On that occasion there was due solemnity but there was also affection. And there was plenty of hope and joy, the theological virtue and its fruit which characterised Cardinal Cormac’s life. These two went before him in his motto Gaudium et Spes, they accompanied him to the very moment of his death and they brought him the great peace that was so evident in his final days among us. We rejoice in our hope of sharing God’s glory. St Paul’s Letter to the Romans sets before us the link between hope and joy which also spanned the Christian life and the priestly ministry of Cormac Murphy-O’Connor. We have gathered to remember him, to pray for the repose of his soul, to console one another, but above all to praise and worship to God for the remarkable blessings that have come through the Cardinal’s life and ministry, just as he would have urged us to do and to do without delay. It was in Cardinal Cormac’s nature and temperament to be impatient for results. This was not the impatience of frustration or irascibility, critical of others’ slowness or hesitation. It was the impatience that is borne out of hope: longing to see God’s will achieved in the lives of others and for the good of others. It was the impatience that arose from a perceptive nature, whose insights and

Homily given by Bishop Mark O’Toole at the Vigil Mass in Chiswick

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understanding realised the many possibilities for achieving and doing good long before they were grasped by colleagues and friends. In the personality of Cardinal Cormac the virtue of hope also awakened a life-long awareness of the God-given potential that lay within people or situations and ultimately within himself. Regarding his own life he lived by the motto which he would often quote: nemo sibi judex (nobody can be his own judge). Even until the very end of his life he would humbly ask the opinions of others about a policy, a decision or a statement that he was considering. But it was hope that made him joyful as well as peaceful in the decisions that he made. He maintained that when we are faced with making a great decision for ourselves we must come to recognise some joy in the matter before us, for the experience of joy is a measure of our hope. This insight has helped many of those who sought his advice to discover the right way forward. It made him a great friend and it made a great priest and bishop.

For Cardinal Cormac the source of this hope was the prayer which daily united him with Christ. For this reason he would acknowledge, as we must today, that no good thing came from his life except by the grace of Jesus Christ. It is the same Lord, the crucified One, to whom he would turn at the outset of each day and at the end of his life for forgiveness and mercy. It is to the crucified and risen Lord that we turn today to ask pardon and peace for him, knowing that we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. It was hope that led Cardinal Cormac to follow his calling to the priesthood in company with his brothers when other attractive and worthwhile careers lay easily within his grasp as a young man. It was hope that gave him the confidence to accept demanding appointments with grace and enthusiasm as a pastor and formator of pastors. It was hope, deeply embodied within his character and personality, that enabled him to see the potential within situations that eluded others. This gracious perceptiveness was the root of his yearning for Christian unity, in tune with the insights of the Second Vatican Council. He believed in and strove for the renewal called for by the Council, not only in individual Christian lives, but in the life of the Church, so that the prayer of Jesus Christ that they may all be one might become a reality. And, despite all the struggles of ecumenical dialogue, it was not a misplaced hope that made him accept his appointment as the Catholic Co-chairman of the second phase of ARCIC, the Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission, alongside Bishop Mark Santer (who is happily with us here today). The presence of so many ecumenical friends and representatives of other faith communities is a striking tribute to the difference Cardinal Cormac made in realising the will of Christ for the Church and in achieving the vision of Nostra Aetate which sees the goodness and truth of God beyond the household of Christian believers.

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Cardinal Cormac’s genuine interest in people bore fruit in the hopes that he entertained for their progress and happiness. His ability to read the character and temperament of those he guided has continued to bear fruit for the Church and for her mission. He could often see the potential for good that others failed to recognise in themselves. He has encouraged and enabled men and women of faith, whether ordained, religious or lay faithful, to take up tasks which they had never imagined or believed themselves capable of fulfilling. The joy and hope that were dominant themes in Cardinal Cormac’s life drew young people to him and he rejoiced in their enthusiasm for the Gospel and their impatience for justice and peace in the world. When Newman University in Birmingham was granted university status in 2014 Cardinal Cormac readily agreed to become its inaugural Chancellor. Filled with hope he had a natural rapport with young people setting out on life’s pilgrimage, even while his own was drawing towards its fulfilment. The virtue of hope deepens trust and, alongside his astuteness and prudence as a bishop, Cardinal Cormac instinctively trusted human nature. And if there were times when this trust was misplaced then he learned to follow the way of St Paul: we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts by the Holy Spirit who has been given to us. In these great moments of prayer, today and tomorrow, we give glory to God through recognising the abundant outpouring of the Holy Spirit in and through Cardinal Cormac’s life, and we remember with gratitude the grace that touched our own lives through the hope-filled words and the joyful deeds that we can never forget. With our dear friend, pilgrim Cormac, we too rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God. Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Twitter at: twitter.com/dowym

You will not be surprised to know that Cardinal Cormac made careful arrangements for this Mass and for the funeral rites which will follow in these days. Among others, I had the great privilege of accompanying him through some of those discussions and he was keen that a Mass be said here in Chiswick. He lived very happily here in the parish for nine years, and was grateful to be able to be a pastor in this setting in his retirement years. It was part of the great humanity of those conversations, that we were able to joke with one another, that he would even write this homily for me if he could. I had the great privilege of working closely with Cardinal Cormac for six years. They are some of the most happy ones I had in the priesthood. He was not only my bishop but became a good friend and an inspiring mentor. He had the capacity to see the potential in another and to draw that out. I know that a number here, friends and family, experienced him in his last weeks. Even in those last conversations he was keen to be generous and impart to each of us, some wisdom, some concrete piece of advice of how to live life well, how to make the most of our vocations. As for himself, he was thoroughly focused on making the last act of his dying, a culmination of how he'd lived his life, with great openness of heart, with humility, and with a very deep, rock-like faith. In one of the last conversations I had with him, in the hospital before he died, he repeated again what he had said so often to me before. He did not want me to eulogise about him but to concentrate on preaching on the faith of the Church, her belief in her Risen Lord and upon God's mercy. Cardinal Cormac wanted this Mass, and his funeral rites at Westminster Cathedral, not to be a celebration of his life or a record of his personal history, but an expression of his faith, a faith which did not fear the reality of death but saw in it the opportunity to be finally united with his Lord. As we heard on the day of death itself, he said, ‘I am at peace and have no fear of what is to come’. Follow us on Instagram at: @dowym

Parishioners paying their respects at the Vigil Mass in Chiswick.

He believed he was embarking upon another journey. He wanted to die in the way he had lived, and with God's great goodness he was given what he desired. Death is for him the culmination of the whole of his life, because it means an eternal face to face with Christ, an encounter which would go on forever. In that reading from the Book of Deuteronomy, Moses gazes with undimmed eye as he stands on the verge of the Promised Land. He gazes across a new horizon, on a new land, and with new possibilities. We believe this is what is now taking place for Cardinal Cormac as he gazes, with undimmed eye, upon a new landscape, and sets out on that final pilgrimage which will lead him home. An undimmed eye and looking for new possibilities; these were characteristic of Cormac's whole life. It was this which sent him forth from Reading, to study for the priesthood in Rome, which brought him into priestly ministry in the Diocese of Portsmouth, back to the English College again as Rector, where his skills as mentor and wise counsellor assisted many in discovering and deepening their vocation. It was this capacity for new possibilities which gave him the confidence to set out to Arundel as a young bishop, and then to Westminster as Archbishop 22 years later. It was what made him such an outstanding ecumenist and interlocutor in inter-religious dialogue. An undimmed eye, but with a certain twinkle in it, it has to be said. I remember when we would go to a parish function or celebration. Before leaving the car he would comb his hair in Follow Westminster Youth Ministry on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/doywm

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Cardinal Cormac: ‘Gazing with an undimmed eye’

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Cardinal Cormac: Joy-filled hope

the mirror, and brush down his cassock. He'd give me a nudge on the arm, and with that twinkle in his eye, he'd say, ‘Now remember your task is to get me out of here as quickly as possible!’ That humanity and lightness of touch was acknowledged by Pope Francis in their last telephone conversation together. From his hospital bed, Cardinal Cormac expressed his gratitude and encouragement to his friend, now Pope, and Pope Francis, assured Cormac of his prayer and blessing, thanked him for his accompaniment and his friendship, and then added, ‘especially, I thank you for your good humour’. It is no surprise to us that his episcopal motto was, ‘Joy and Hope’ for this was the manner of his being, and the very bedrock of his life and of his faith. It was firstly within his own family that Cormac learned to live these realities. Pat, Julie, Chris, Leigh, James and Kieran, through you we give thanks to the MurphyO'Connor and Cuddigan families for giving such a generous, gentle and humble pastor to the Church. We know he remained close to you, his family always, and desired that you and all his family come to know more deeply something of the beauty of friendship with Jesus which he experienced in the family of the Church. It is this sense of the Church as a family which was so central to Cardinal Cormac's life. Rather than being an institution, the Church was, for him, that community of believers where each person could find a real home and a path to follow her Lord. In her, Jesus fulfilled that promise made to his disciples, ‘I do not leave you orphans’. Cardinal Cormac believed that

none of us are spiritual orphans. We all have a Father in heaven, Jesus as our brother, and Mary as our mother. The loving heart of our mother Mary, we discover in our mother the Church. These were truths, Cardinal Cormac learned in the midst of his own loving family, and they were deepened by his experiences within the family of the Church. How often in these past months he would quote words from the final audience of the Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI. They had clearly become his own, and I quote: ‘I can say that the Lord has truly led me, he has been close to me, I have been able to perceive his presence daily ... a ... journey which has had its moments of joy and light, but also moments which were not easy; I have felt like Saint Peter with the Apostles in the boat on the Sea of Galilee: the Lord has given us so many days of sun and of light winds, days when the catch was abundant; there were also moments when the waters were rough and the winds against us, as throughout the Church’s history, and the Lord seemed to be sleeping. But I have always known that the Lord is in that boat, and I have always known that the barque of the Church is not mine but his. Nor does the Lord let it sink; it is he who guides it, surely also through those whom he has chosen, because he so wished. This has been, and is, a certainty which nothing can shake. For this reason my heart ... overflows with gratitude to God, for he has never let his Church, or me personally, lack his consolation, his light, his love.’ Cardinal Cormac's belief in the presence of his Lord in the Church, does not mean, in a rather glib fashion that things are simply made right at the end. That is why he wanted to be buried at the tenth station in Westminster Cathedral, so that people would pray for him as they passed by on the way to the Lady Chapel, to the sacristy, or to the confessional. Cardinal Cormac knew he was dependent on God's mercy, in death as in life. This awareness wasn't primarily because of his faults or failings as a bishop, of which he was well aware. We know he was honest in facing his limits, particularly in the

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area of child protection. He recognised his mistake and sought to put in place, ways of working and responding which would make it easier for victim survivors, and hopefully, bring healing to those most vulnerable who had been hurt. His humble awareness of his own vulnerabilities was deeper than anything he experienced in the spotlight of the media. It was because he knew that death would bring him before God. Before the face of the living God I recognise my own unworthiness and the need to shed illusion and untruth. This shedding of the old self is of course the work of every human life; what St Edith Stein calls the ‘breaking of the chains of personality’. The breaking of the chains for most of us is a work that is not complete by the time of our own death. Cardinal Cormac knew this, but he also knew that in the loving mercy of God, this process of change is continued in the journey we make to God following death. In these last weeks he was deeply consoled by this awareness, and regularly described it in pilgrimage terms, as 'being on the way'. For him, this was the Church's deeply consoling belief in purgatory. For the believer time does not run out. If there is any unfinished business to prepare the soul for an eternal face to face with God, then God in his providence allows for this. At the same time, the person on their way through purgatory knows that what is longed for, what is desired, eternal beatitude, will eventually be granted. So tinged with any sense of regret is the joy that such a soul will ultimately see God. It is this which gave Cardinal Cormac's death such peace and such a gift to those who witnessed him. For us, too, there is consolation in the knowledge that we are still united with the one we have lost. We can help them with our prayers and their suffering which is but the pain of deep longing and deep desire to be with God forever, this longing and this desire can be offered to God out of love for all those who are still on the way. It is such longing and desire which acts as a flame to purge away any lack of love or truth and which expands the soul

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fully so that we can be prepared to receive God in his fullness. It is our fundamental belief and our hope that this process of transformation begins in our earthly life, as it clearly did for Cardinal Cormac. This is not only through those things which he endured in his life, but also in these last weeks when we accompanied him through his final suffering, as he day by day came to terms with embracing a whole new possibility. It is an immense consolation to us, to know that all has been taken up in and through his participation in Christ’s embrace of suffering and death. There is one last word. We are between two jubilees in Cardinal Cormac's life. Last October he celebrated sixty years as a priest, and in December he would have been forty years a bishop. He was looking forward to another party! Yet in these final weeks he knew that celebration would have to take place in another way. He was, to his very bones, a priest. The final goodbyes are a blessing which we shall forever treasure. In one of our last meetings, he suddenly stopped talking and after a few moments of quiet, he said to me, ‘Mark, for all the words that you and I might say to one another at this point, it is the words of the Mass and the Liturgy which above all give me comfort....let us say Mass together’. And so we did, with a fellow bishop and the hospital chaplain. Life had become very simple: the praying of his daily Office, the Rosary, and Mass. These were the things which had sustained him all his life and these sustained him as he embarked on the final journey. I suspect that as he is now accompanied by his guardian angel through purgatory, he's got that twinkle in his eye, and is giving them a nudge, and saying, 'Remember, your job is to get me out of here as quickly as possible’. Dear Cardinal Cormac, dear Father, my very dear brother, go in peace and may you soon gaze forever on the One for whom you worked so faithfully, with such humility, and for whom you long so ardently. Eternal rest grant unto him O Lord and let perpetual light shine upon him. May he rest in peace. Amen

Page 11


Westminster Record | October 2017

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Cardinal Cormac: ‘A priest to his fingertips

Homily given by Archbishop George Stack at the Funeral Mass of Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor at Westminster Cathedral on Wednesday, 13th September 2017 On 10th November 2016, Cardinal Murphy O’Connor gave a poignant reflection during a Pause for Thought on BBC Radio 2. It was an unusual reflection, not just because it was Radio 2, but that the topic was ‘a good death’. As he spoke, he knew he was suffering from a serious illness. He was speaking, as always, from the heart. ‘I want to say two things to you,’ he said. ‘Firstly, I believe in the value and dignity of every human person – that means you. And secondly, I believe that everyone is loveable in the eyes of God. In spite of all our weaknesses and failures, God loves us. So death must be of one piece with life. With the help of God, I hope I will be able to face it, not with fear but with hope and confidence as being in the hands of God.’ Those family and friends who were with him at the moment of his death, and the many visitors who saw him in hospital during these last weeks, know how well he lived up to those words. Full of faith, full of Gaudium et Spes, full of a quiet resignation as he prayed often the words of the psalm ‘Into your hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit’. The same smile of Page 12

welcome. The twinkle in the eye spoke of all these things. But he was also full of gratitude: gratitude to the medical staff, those who cared for him so professionally and sensitively. He could not let go of one of his great characteristics, however. He, who would rush for trains and taxis, moving quickly from one engagement to another, was impatient to be gone. As one bishop said ‘...he was probably texting the angels to get a move on’. His life’s work was done. ‘I have fought the good fight. I have finished the race. The time has come for me to be gone...’ as we read at the 60th anniversary of his priesthood. What a life and what a work. Cormac was a priest to his fingertips. He was comfortable in his own skin. He was aware of his failings, yet supremely confident in his calling. He was a gifted man who would have made a success of whatever career he chose. Medicine or music, maybe even golf or perhaps rugby like his brother! Yet from an early age he was convinced he should be a priest, like his two other brothers. The Cardinal chose today’s reading from St John’s Gospel because of his belief that we do not choose God, but God chooses us, earthenware vessels that we are, to be signs, and servants and instruments of his presence in the midst of his people. ‘You did not choose me, but I chose you

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that you should go and bear much fruit.’ His gift for friendship and his capacity for putting people at their ease, together with his insightful mind and depth of faith, were a wonderful combination of gifts. He generously put them at the service of God and the Church and society at large. They enabled him to reach out in meaningful and constructive ways to other churches. His membership and scholarly contribution to the conclusions of the Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission: Much to his delight the fruits of his work were captured this year in the publication of all five ARCIC documents in one volume. His conviction that unity of mind and heart amongst the followers of Christ were not optional extras but sorely needed in a fragmented world. His gift of hospitality: He took the words of Jesus seriously, ‘Love one another as I have loved you’. These gifts, and the generous way he used them, were expressive of the fact that he liked people and liked being with them. He drew the best from others and gave them nothing but the best of himself in return. But his was not superficial friendliness. He was convinced that people could and should share their faith and learn from the life experiences of others. He

was not afraid to explore those paths either personally or in the diocese at large. 'At Your Word Lord' was a risky venture not just for Peter the fisherman but for priests and people in each of the dioceses he served. No matter what the challenges, Cormac was clear on the need for formation of the laity. This is why he chose the words of St Paul in our first reading, ‘For this reason I bow my knees before the Father from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named’. He loved his family and drew strength and joy from their accomplishments. But he wanted the wider family of the parish and the Church to contribute to the building up of society, to the development of the civilisation of love ‘...that you be strengthened with might through his Spirit in the inner man... that you, being rooted and grounded in love... may be filled with all the fullness of God’. Faith and religion were not for him privatised activities but necessary contributions to a complex world. The cathedral lectures and his book 'At the heart of the World' were just two expressions of this conviction. The Cardinal is to be buried beneath the tenth station of the Cross. Like every sign and symbol in the Cathedral, this station has a special lesson to teach us. Jesus is stripped of his garments. Our faith and devotion teach us that the seamless robe of his revelation of divine love, the integrity and compassion of Jesus, is torn away. The Jesus who stands before us naked and unashamed calls us to pay more attention to who we are rather than what we have so cunningly conspired to be. Cormac knew well what it was like to have judgments questioned, decisions criticised, mistakes analysed. That 'stripping away' could easily have made him angry and cynical, causing him to retreat from the public arena. Yet he acknowledged his mistakes. He made no excuses. He said the most difficult words of all: ‘I’m sorry’. He learned a huge lesson and proceeded to establish the most robust safeguarding mechanism possible, a model

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for other institutions. Humility and action were part of the robe that he wore. Perhaps more than anything else, our final illness strips away all pretence and brings us face to face with the reality of who we are. To know and love ourselves as we are known and loved by God must surely be the greatest mystery of all. The measure of God’s love for us is the measure of our need for forgiveness, and our willingness to receive it and be healed by it. That innocent nakedness in the presence of God was personified in the life of the one whom we bury today. Shortly before he died, the Nobel Prize winning poet Seamus Heaney sent a final text message to his wife. It contained just two words. 'Noli Timere'. Do not be afraid. The same words were on the lips and in the heart of Cardinal Cormac when he wrote his final letter to the clergy and laity of the diocese, ‘Please tell them that I am at peace, and have no fear of what is to come’. May his soul, and the souls of all the faithful departed, rest in peace. Amen.

On Wednesday 13th September, a group of us from Our Ladt attended the funeral of the late Cardinal Cormac. The service was beautiful, Cardinal Cormac’s nephew paid tribute to him, telling us all about the great family man he was (around 95 members of his family attended the service.) We were told of how the power of his faith enriched their lives greatly- as well as those who met him. In the homily, given by Archbishop Stack, it was said of Cardinal Cormac: ‘Humility and action were part of the robe that he wore.’ This shows that an integral part of the late Cardinal’s mission was to always treat others with compassion, and to do so with ‘action’. Thus, it becomes a part of his legacy, a legacy that perhaps we should all try to live out in our everyday lives.

Jenna Colaco

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Westminster Record | October 2017

A True Servant of the Church by Fr Kevin Dring I was Cardinal Cormac's last priest secretary in Arundel & Brighton, being with him in those heady days when he was appointed as the new Archbishop of Westminster. The time living and working with Cormac were some of the happiest years I can remember as a priest. This was in large measure due to his great warmth and kindness, as a human being, and the inspiration of his spiritual care of others. Hours each day could be spent together in the confines of the car, going from one engagement to the next ... and the next... and the next. There was plenty of laughter, often around Cormac's observations of people we had been with. What struck me, though, was that he never spoke in an unkind way about anybody and ‘humorous observations’ were always said with kindness. He also had a habit, if he wanted to draw you in on his confidence, of holding your elbow as he shared whatever it

was he wanted to share. Unnervingly he would even do this while I was driving. I remember just a few days before the announcement of his appointment to Westminster, the newspapers were speculating that day on the odds of him being the chosen man. I asked him straight ‘what are the chances?’. His reply, ‘it's possible but highly unlikely’ while gripping my elbow and me trying to keep firm control of the steering wheel. When he spoke about himself I always felt he did so in a genuinely humble and selfeffacing way, but he also had a strong sense of the duty of ‘stepping up to the mark’ and taking on whatever tasks and responsibilities were given. This he did in Arundel & Brighton and then in Westminster. He was a true servant of the Church and cared deeply for people in his charge. I will remember him as one of the warmest and kindest people I have had privilege to know. May he rest in peace. Fr Kevin Dring was Private Secretary to Cardinal Cormac from 1998 to 2000. He is Parish Priest of Sacred Heart Church, Hove.

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‘I don’t want to make A sharp mind and any excuses’ Celtic charm by Fr Jeremy Trood

by Mgr Phelim Rowland I have known four Cardinal Archbishops of Westminster, all gifted men in different ways. Cardinal Cormac combined a sharp mind with Celtic charm. I suppose it was the latter that I appreciated most, having the same background. The storyteller is part of Irish folklore and it was a gift he rejoiced in. When I was Principal Chaplain to the Army, I invited him to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst to rededicate the refurbished Chapel of Christ the King. He asked for a brief on the history of the chapel which I duly produced. In his sermon, the carefully crafted brief was forgotten and the storyteller in him took over. I was not best pleased but the cadets and directing staff were! He always promised me a good parish when I retired from the Army and returned to the diocese. He was true to his word and eleven years on, I am still grateful to him for being in Hampstead. He always reminded me, whenever we met, that he had taken care of me. I trust that the Lord is now taking care of him in an equally satisfying place, most certainly richly deserved! May he rest in peace.

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It was entirely predictable that many of the obituaries of Cormac, Cardinal MurphyO’Connor should concentrate on child abuse and his role in the scandal which engulfed the Church at the turn of the millennium. When he became Archbishop of Westminster in 2000 he had already been a diocesan bishop for twenty years: mistakes had been made, bad advice had been taken, allegations had not been reported, abusing priests had been reassigned. In front of a camera, in front of a microphone, he could appear hesitant, unsure as to what to say or what to do. Of course he was not alone; he had acted no differently from other bishops, archbishops and indeed cardinals, both in this country and in many others; but he was now prominent, the media had him in their sight. He could so easily have been engulfed, and for a while it looked as if his time in Westminster would end before it had really begun. That it was not so marks him out as different from so many others. There were no excuses, no hollow promises and no prevarication. He appreciated the seriousness and the scale of the scandal. In his memoirs, ‘An English Spring’, published in 2015 he said ‘I don’t want to make any excuses. I had to bear the shame, for me and for the Church, and try and do something about it’, and he did do something about it. He learnt from his past mistakes and he learnt quickly. He apologised for Follow us on Instagram at: @rcwestminster

the errors he had made and was sincere in his contrition. He also acted. He invited a senior judge, Lord Nolan, to chair an independent committee to carry out a review on child protection in the Catholic Church in England and Wales. The report which followed produced a framework for best practise for child protection and the prevention of abuse within the Catholic Church. The Nolan Review recommendations were accepted and implemented in full. These policies and procedures, together with the recommendations of the Cumberlege Report, have led to our current ‘One Church Approach’ which provides a safeguarding environment which is robust and provides a model which other hierarchies would do well to follow. In the words of the Cumberlege Report: ‘We have done our utmost to help those in Christ’s Ministry to safeguard the vulnerable and weak, to be fair and just to those who have been abused and to be united in our belief that the love and care entrusted to us should never be betrayed’. Today, nearly twenty years after the depth of the abuse scandal became apparent, the culture of safeguarding is ingrained in the fabric of the Church in England and Wales. That it is so is, in no small measure, the legacy of Cormac, Cardinal Murphy-O’Connor. Fr Jeremy Trood is Episcopal Vicar for Safeguarding for the Diocese of Westminster.

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Cardinal Cormac: A man devoted to prayer

Condolences on Cardinal Cormac’s Death

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Cardinal Cormac was held in high esteem and loved by many people from all walks of life. Following the news of his death, condolences poured in from bishops, religious communities, parishes, faith and secular leaders, and individuals from near and far.

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Dinner would be cooking as we prayed and we would then have our evening meal together, joined by any house guests. Those of us who shared his home, his Private Secretaries and our sisters, were inspired by his prayerful example, not only at the times he spent before the Lord, but also over the rest of the day when an inner peace flowed from his life of prayer. In his memoirs, ‘An English Spring’, he wrote: ‘The Church has always been my heart and my home. It has brought order to my life, a sense of beauty, a sense of belonging to a living tradition that has been handed down through the centuries. The Church has always been and remains the centre of my faith and my prayer.’ My abiding memory of Cardinal Cormac will be of a priest at prayer, a pastor whose programme for renewal began and ended with the words of the Psalm we recited together each morning in his chapel and which he quoted in a Pastoral Letter in 2003 as an invitation to evangelise in the diocese: ‘Come in, let us bow and bend low. Let us kneel before the God who made us. For he is our God and we the people who belong to his pasture, the flock that is led by his hand. O that today you would listen to his voice, harden not your hearts.’ I had the privilege of being with the Cardinal in the final days and hours of his life. He died as he had lived: at prayer and at peace. His final words were, ‘start the Rosary’.

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Pope Francis has written to Cardinal Vincent to offer his 'heartfelt condolences after the death of Cardinal Cormac. In praising Cardinal Cormac's service to the Church in England and Wales, the Pope lauds the late cardinal's 'unwavering devotion to the preaching of the Gospel and the care of the poor, and his far-sighted commitment to the advancement of ecumenical and interreligious understanding'. Pope Francis concludes by commending Cardinal Cormac's soul to the mercy of God and imparting his Apostolic Blessing. The two men were elevated to the College of Cardinals at the same Consistory in February 2001.

God Bless Mary McAleese

In his message, Pope Francis writes: To Cardinal Vincent Nichols Archbishop of Westminster Deeply saddened to learn of the death of Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, Archbishop emeritus of Westminster, I hasten to offer my heartfelt condolences to you and to the clergy and faithful of the Archdiocese. Recalling with immense gratitude the late Cardinal’s distinguished service to the Church in England and Wales, his unwavering devotion to the preaching of the Gospel and the care of the poor, and his far-sighted commitment to the advancement of ecumenical and interreligious understanding, I willingly join you in commending his noble soul to the infinite mercies of God our heavenly Father. To all who mourn his passing in the sure hope of the Resurrection I cordially impart my Apostolic Blessing as a pledge of consolation and strength in the Lord. FRANCISCUS PP

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When he was appointed Archbishop of Westminster in 2000 Cardinal Cormac (then Bishop of Arundel & Brighton, in which our Augustinian mother house is situated) asked our Mother General Sr Thomas if three sisters could join him at Archbishop’s House, Westminster. So, together with Sr Barbara (since deceased) and Sr Pius, I came to Westminster in the summer of 2000. He called this a new outreach for us, as the first Augustinian nursing sisters to work in the Diocese of Westminster. He wanted to have our community’s support in daily prayer and in sustaining what he called ‘a rhythm of prayer’ in Archbishop’s House. Behind the warmth of his charming personality dwelt a man completely devoted to prayer, for whom prayer was the central focus of his life. His own prayer was contemplative and came from the heart: I believe that as he sat in silence before the Blessed Sacrament, he opened his heart to Our Lord. A spirit of prayer pervaded the new Archbishop’s home. In keeping with his priorities, our lives revolved around the times for prayer throughout the day. Cardinal Cormac began his day in private prayer at 6.30am, with his Private Secretary, our sisters and any guest(s) who happened to be staying. At 6pm each evening, regardless of other commitments or demands, we had Eucharistic Adoration in the Archbishop’s chapel; whoever arrived in the chapel first would expose the Blessed Sacrament.

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by Sr Clement Doran

Dear Cardinal Vincent, I send to you, his confreres and family my deepest condolences on the death of Cardinal Cormac. Cormac’s death evokes such a depth of sorrow at the absence of that hearty laugh, that face that exuded such a depth of humanity, that lilting voice with its hint of Cork, the story-teller, the grief-sharer, the utterly decent pastor, the all-round good, faithful friend to all of us and to Christ above all. It was good to have him for as long as we did and to have befriended him was a great blessing. He slipped away with characteristic humility, dignity and certainty that his true life’s destiny was only just beginning. His sense of wonder stayed to the end. It is a great and final lesson. God grant him eternal rest and to the rest of us, some of his humour and humanity.

Mary McAleese offering condolences to Cardinal Vincent

Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis inscribes the book of condolences in Archbishop’s House: ‘With a great sense of humility I bring the condolences of the Jewish community on the sad passing of Cardinal Cormac – a man imbued with spirituality, warmth and fun – a wonderful friend and comfort to people of all faiths. May the rod and staff of Almighty God be with him, and may his cup run over with peace and joy in Heaven.’

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Westminster Record | October 2017

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Fr Gian Matteo Serra OP, Rector of the Basilica of Santa Maria sopra Minerva writes to Cardinal Vincent: It is with sincere emotion that I write to Your Eminence upon hearing that our beloved Cardinal Cormac MurphyO’Connor, whose Titular Basilica has been Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome, has returned home to the Father. Each occasion that I had the joy to encounter His Eminence was an experience of his profound humanity, which especially impressed me as a young priest and Rector of the Basilica, when I felt truly

From Athanasius Toma Dawod, Syriac Orthodox Archbishop in the United Kingdom: I have received with sadness the news about the passing away of the late Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor to the loving mercy of God. I have known the late Cardinal for many years and

welcomed, encouraged and accompanied by him. Personally, and on behalf of the community of Dominican friars at the priory of Santa Maria sopra Minerva, we offer the assurance of our prayers for the repose of his soul, with great fraternal affection. We entrust him to the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen of the Rosary, and to the mercy of God who infinitely more than us has been able to see the goodness and sincerety of the heart of his devoted son, whom he called to serve his Church and whose response was joyful and generous. met him on various occasions. He was an unwavering devotee to the preaching of the Gospel. He was loved by all in his church, the UK and beyond for his commitment to the advancement of ecumenical and interreligious understanding. I share with Your Eminence and our sisterly Roman Catholic Church the grief about his passing away but also rejoice in the knowledge that he has departed from this earthly world to the better world promised by our Lord Jesus Christ. Also, I would like to express on behalf of the Syriac Orthodox Church in the UK our sincere condolences to Your Eminence and to the Roman Catholic Church. May God receive him into his heavenly kingdom and may his memory be eternal.

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Hope in Action

Published by SPCK, 82pp

In his new book published in September, Cardinal Vincent explores the contribution of faith to society. The book is based on a series of talks and lectures he had given, mainly during the Year of Mercy. As he explains in the preface, Some years ago the then the Cardinal looks at ‘what we Director of the National Gallery, mean by Christian hope, and Neil MacGregor mounted an what it means to be a disciple Exhibition called Seeing with a mission’. As Archbishop Salvation. It brought together Justin Welby amplifies in the Forward, this is a ‘book about some of the most arresting and practical hope, hope for every moving paintings of the face of Christ by great artists over many day, everywhere and every years. The Exhibition drew huge person. It is about recognising and nurturing signs of hope crowds. ‘People’, Neil said to around us. It is about the hope me, ‘came to catch a glimpse of that faithfulness in the small the transcendent’. For many things of life can make a gazing on the face of Jesus Christ difference that reaches far was an opportunity to gaze on beyond what we can imagine; the human face of God, a face of hope that rests on God’s incommensurable love for suffering and a face of love. human beings and the power of There may be someone in your family, a relative or a friend his Spirit at work within us and without us.’ who endured great suffering, but The chapters that follow your love and suffering with him focus on ‘the importance of or her has exposed the deepest mercy and some particular truths of our lives, namely that situations in which God asks us we do have to suffer but to put our Christian hope into action’. These situations include suffering can lead to great love. some of the more pressing I hope you won’t mind if I problems that face society, such end this thought with a prayer as sexual violence and abuse, which you may have heard human trafficking and slavery, before. It is by St Francis of the treatment of prisoners, and Assisi and perhaps not religious extremism. inappropriate on this particular This slim volume concludes day: with an epilogue on what makes Lord, make me an instrument of us human. Tears shed at the problems and injustices of the your peace Where there is hatred let me sow world, as a mark of our humanity, ‘must move us in love ways that will help to heal these Where there is injury, pardon wounds,’ he explains. ‘We must Where there is doubt, faith strive to bring God’s hope and Where there is despair, hope mercy to the world. For this is Where there is darkness, light our calling, our God-given And where there is sadness, joy. mission.’ © Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

Celebrating Mass at Santa Maria sopra Minerva

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From Downing Street, Prime Minister Theresa May writes: Like so many people, I was sorry to hear the news of the death of Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor. The Cardinal’s contribution to the nation as the tenth Archbishop of Westminster has, rightly, been widely recognised. My thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends at this difficult time.

Pause For Thought: 8th June 2017 Cardinal Cormac gave this Pause for Thought on BBC Radio 2 on the day of the General Election. I am now 40 years a bishop and the first 23 years were spent in the South of England where I lived in a house with a large garden. I used the house and garden for all kinds of events. One of the social highlights of the summer was a special celebration of an open air Mass with disabled people in the diocese, normally about 500 including their parents and carers. Our liturgy would be followed by tea and impromptu music and dancing. I always remember one man whose wife had been very ill for many years. They had a disabled daughter and this man came with her to the event each year. One year I caught sight of him and his daughter dancing together after the celebration. I had never before seen such intense love and suffering, radiating simultaneously, on the face of a human person. It was as if the suffering he so clearly experienced only increased his love for his daughter, and his love for his daughter in turn deepened his inner suffering.

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Inside the Hospice: ‘Process’

Autumn Talk

by Fr Peter-Michael Scott

by Deacon Adrian Cullen, Evangelisation Coordinator The autumn rolls on with the shortening days and changing colours. It is a time when everybody seems to be in their stride, working hard without the seasonal distractions of summer, now long gone, or winter with its celebrations not yet in full view. What does continue is that sense of mission. It may be that your parish used last month’s Home Mission Day to focus on what our mission is as Catholics, and perhaps are using the resources that were distributed. The idea of home mission may seem a little strange; surely missions are about taking the Gospel overseas to lands where it has not yet been heard and to peoples who do not know who Jesus Christ is? Well, there is still a need for overseas missions, perhaps even more than ever as populations grow and new generations have no knowledge of Jesus. Even in our own country we have many welcome visitors who are strangers to Christianity, and perhaps long to hear about the Spirit of God who can transform their own, often very difficult lives. But there is also a mission to home. It is to those who have heard the message of love of the Gospel, but have forgotten it. The mission is to the many people in our increasingly secular society who have turned away from their faith, perhaps because they can’t see how it can provide fulfilment in their lives. Instead they look for fulfilment in short-term excitement, and in the achievement of goals that cannot last. Then there are some people who have been hurt by those who were there to guide and help. They will have needs still unmet, and hurt that needs to be healed. As much as we need to take the message of Christianity to those far away, we need to do as much to those who are close by. Page 16

To take on these tasks of spreading the Catholic faith, we can no longer rely on past methods of evangelisation in spreading the Good News. In the past parishes trusted in the work of the missionary religious and lay people. They are still there and carry on good work and need our continuing support to meet the needs of people across the world. But for those who are nearby, in our parish, in our street, in our home, the mission, the new spreading of the Good News, the New Evangelisation, relies on all of us to do what we can to reach out to where the message of Jesus Christ has not been heard, has been ignored, or has been rejected. But where do we start? What are the methods and tools that we are to use? How we are going to undertake a task that we were not trained to do? It may seem difficult, may be even impossible. But we are not much different to those fishermen by the Sea of Galilee, or the many other disciples of Jesus Christ who heard what he taught, and then told others. And that is where we can start: to talk. To talk about our Faith wherever the opportunity arises, to make opportunities to introduce Jesus, and to talk about how we live our life as a Catholic. Talk to your children over mealtimes; ask them who provides nature for humanity to harness. Talk to your neighbour over the fence or your colleague over coffee; tell them about what you have been doing on Sunday, what you learnt at Mass, or what activities you are doing in your parish to reach out to others. Talk on the phone, talk through social media. And talk to God. In those quiet moments talk to him, and listen. For more information on Home Mission and resources see: www.catholicnews.org.uk/ Home/Featured/HomeMission-Sunday-2017

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‘Process’ has been adopted as a new, modern word. Over the past month my niece has been staying a couple of days each week while she searches for a flat in London. It is always a delight to see her. She cooks a meal and the two of us sit down and have a good old natter. Inevitably our conversation leads to what she is studying. She is a law student and we discuss the conundrum of court cases and verdicts. By the time we have finished my head is spinning and when she has left, I value the silence, because it gives me time to ‘process’ what we have talked about. In the hospice I find patients need time to process conversations as well. They often present themselves as having an inbuilt timer, that is to say, that when I visit I know when it is time to leave. Patients are rarely rude, but I can tell when they need time to be by themselves and think through what has been prayed, received or discussed. Prayer is like that. The Lord arrives at our invitation, talks within our souls, feeds us with encouragement, selfdiscernment, guidance and wisdom, and then he leaves. However, the departure of the beloved is often felt as a bereavement, rather than a time to pray through and process what the Lord has taught us. I often listen to patients who express delight at the imminence of the Lord and then confusion or loss when they can no longer feel his peaceful presence. I tell them that the Lord is giving them time to think and accept his enlightenment, invitation or forgiveness. Another word for process is route or course, and when the Lord comes near to us in the Sacraments or prayer or through Scripture, he is there as a fellow pilgrim leading us forward towards his heavenly kingdom, and that journey needs periods of silence to help us notice the pathway, the scenery and the lessons we learn on the way. Please pray for the patients, staff and volunteers of St Joseph’s hospice.

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Across the Channel by Barbara Kentish Justice and Peace Commission

On a wet, cold day in August, four members of Westminster J&P left London for the Catholic Worker house in Calais, France. Brother Johannes, tired and preoccupied with health and practical issues in the house, took us to a point near the former ‘Jungle’ camp, where several charities were serving hot meals to 40 or 50 young people who looked damp and chilled. We had arrived at the tail end of the proceedings. Help Refugees, Calais Kitchen, Auberge des Migrants and others have banded together to provide nearly 2000 meals a day to those who have come back to Calais still hoping to cross the Channel by one means or another.

The very energetic Franciscan brother was then told about the generous donations from parishes (including St Albans, Hanwell, West Green and Edmonton) and individuals who responded quickly to his appeal, publicised by the J&P team at the end of July. An astonishing £3,500 plus was collected which Brother Johannes will put towards the drop-in work of Maria Skobstova Catholic Worker House. The team had also carried a good amount of household cleaning materials and toiletries. To donate to this appeal, please visit https://goo.gl/sEVHek For an update on the current situation in Calais, please visit Seeking Sanctuary’s website www.Seekingsanctuary.weebly. com.

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Westminster Record | October 2017

Director’s Spotlight

Phil Ross, Youth Ministry Director I guess all good things must come to an end and after five years working for the diocese I have opted to retire at the end of the year. During this time, I have been truly blessed to have worked alongside lots and lots of good people and been involved in several wonderful projects. There are lots of highlights one that springs to is starting the job in September 2012 and going straight into the planning for World Youth Day, Rio scheduled for July 2013. The Pilgrimage itself was amazing, and as this was one of Pope Francis’ first major engagements since his election, everyone was particularly excited. Rio was just

the best and, being there with my wife Ann too, made it extra special. The Opening of the Centre for Youth Ministry and the development of the youth team was a real joy and I have been lucky to be surrounded by an amazing group of people over the last few years and I especially thank Fr Michael O’Boy, Fr David Reilly and Rebekah Curran for their support. Of course, the SPEC Retreat Centre building project was a significant highlight and one that caused me much heartache. However, I’m chuffed that we’ve got it done and the campus is magnificent. It combines stateof-the-art technology, found in the new residential complex, with the majesty of Waxwell House and the glorious gardens. The students spending time on retreat are truly in for a treat! There have been many people within the curia and round and about the diocese who have been there for me throughout my time and I thank them. Countless priests have supported my work and I’m eternally grateful for their generosity. My thanks extend outside the diocese too with friends as

diverse as the Friars over in Canning Town through to my friends Elroy Fernandes, Anel Zuniga-Daly and Jo Warren. Finally, I remain hugely in the debt of Cardinal Vincent whose vision, drive and commitment to the youth of the diocese provided me with the platform to make things happen. All in all, it’s been fun and I take with me a bagful of wonderful memories.

Chaplain’s Corner

Fr Mark Walker, Youth Chaplain I’m now one week into my new appointment as diocesan youth chaplain and have more or less settled in to my new home at Somers Town. The warm

welcome of the parishioners and the parish priest, Fr Jeremy, more than makes up for having to get used to the rumbling of tube trains during the night! In the youth service, we recently commissioned our thirteen new volunteer missionaries for service at the SPEC retreat centre in Pinner. They will have plenty to do given that our brand new residential retreat accommodation is now up and running and open for bookings! We are looking forward to once again receiving young people from schools, parishes and elsewhere for overnight retreats, during which we can explore and open up the faith to a greater depth than is possible with a single day of recollection. It’s inspiring to be able to work with the volunteer missionaries who give up a year to serve our young people and to be able to journey with them and help develop and deepen their own love for God and understanding of how he is calling them to live their lives. Speaking of which, Pope Francis has decided that the next meeting of the Synod of

Bishops will reflect on the theme of ‘Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment’. The next year or so therefore gives us an opportunity to reflect on how we can better communicate to our young people that God calls each of them and what it means to respond to that call. We also hope that a number of our young people will feel that God is calling them to join us in Panama in January 2019 for the next World Youth Day! Being a bit further away from the diocese than Poland, there will inevitably be higher cost so if you were thinking of going, it’s never too late to start saving! I’d like to conclude by paying my own small tribute to Cardinal Murphy-O’Connor, who accepted me for seminary when, at the age of 21, I was discerning my own call to the priesthood. I remember his gentle encouragement during my interview with him. Having decided to accept me he said, ‘I think you’ll do alright’. I will try to live up to this hope as my priesthood continues! May he rest in peace.

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Westminster Record | October 2017

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Blessed John Henry Newman Feast Day: 9th October

In Newman we celebrate a local saint, born in the City of London, spending his childhood and adolescence just off Holborn and schooled in Ealing. It was at school, as a 15 year-old, that he experienced a form of conversion to Evangelical Christianity, which he took with him the following year when he became an undergraduate at Trinity College, Oxford. His career there exhibited remarkable ups and downs. He took a poor degree, yet was elected to a

Fellowship at Oriel College, notable at the time for the intellectual standing of its Senior Common Room. Ordained in the Church of England, he moved from being an assistant in the parish of St Clement’s to become the Vicar of the University Church of St Mary. There his preaching so entranced the undergraduates that heads of colleges were alarmed and began to warn against going to hear him; which, of course, simply encouraged the young men. To his solid knowledge of the Scriptures Newman increasingly added reading of the Fathers of the Church, and this led him inexorably to the conclusion that the Church of England could not sustain its claim to be part of the Catholic Church. With his preaching and writings increasingly under attack in Oxford and beyond, he retired with a few friends to Littlemore, just outside the city, where he was received into the Church a little later by Blessed Dominic Barberi. His conversion had sensational repercussions, and

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many were to follow him in the succeeding years. Dr Pusey, a friend who remained Anglican, noted that as Newman had done great things for the Church of England, so he might do great things for the Roman Church. As a Catholic, Newman was attracted to the pattern of life of the Oratorians, founded by St Philip Neri, the ‘Apostle of Rome’, and in 1848 was able to found the first English Oratory in Birmingham. Despite three early changes of location (including a disused gin distillery), the community survived and continues. Although Oratorians seek to live a more hidden life, Newman was too well-known to be allowed the peace which was his desire. In 1851 the Irish Bishops called on him to found a university, which entailed endless negotiations and 56 crossings to and from Ireland in seven years. University College, Dublin flourishes, but other projects, such as the foundation of an Oratory in Oxford and a new translation of the Scriptures, foundered, frustrated in part by

suspicions of Newman’s orthodoxy. The careful and restrained precision of his thought was not always appreciated, and relationships with his fellow convert, Cardinal Manning, were often prickly. Pope Leo XIII is said to have claimed that his pontificate could be judged by whom he would create a Cardinal; and he chose Newman, who responded with the words: ‘the cloud is lifted for ever’. In Rome, when the formal news of his appointment was brought to Newman, he made a famous speech, noting that his life had been devoted to opposing ‘the spirit of liberalism in religion … the doctrine that there is no positive truth in religion, but that one creed is as good as another … It is inconsistent with any recognition of any religion as true’. It is appropriate that Newman was beatified at Cofton Park in 2010 by Pope Benedict XVI, who has been much influenced by his writings and has fought the same battle in our own age for the truth of our Catholic Faith.

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Notices Talks on St Elizabeth of the Trinity marking the first anniversary of her canonisation on Thursday 19th October, 6.30-8.00pm: A Saint for all seasons of our life; Tuesday 7th November, 6.30-8.00pm: A Carmelite mystic who speaks to us today, organised by Secular Carmelites at Carmelite Church hall, 41 Kensington Church Street, London W8 4BB are free and open to everyone. Donations welcome on the day.

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A one-day national conference on the contribution of spiritual communities to public life to be held in London on Sunday 15th October 2017 from 10.00 to 18.30 hrs at Cloisters Hall, St Benedict’s school, Marchwood crescent, Ealing W5 2DZ. For enquiries/bookings contact: Clare Cogswell 020 8862 2156. Email info@benedictine-institute.org.

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Pope Francis, Laudato Si’: A talk by Mgr Kevin Irwin at Farm Street Parish Hall, 114 Mount Street, at 6.45pm on 11th December. The lecture will examine the contributions made by Pope Francis in this encyclical and implications for theological reflection, ecumenical initiatives and pastoral action. There is no charge, but there will be an opportunity to make an offering at the end of the evening.

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In Memoriam: October

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Canon Des Sheehan (2004) Fr John Fleming (1974) Fr Walter Meyjes (1987) Fr Denis Murphy (1999) Fr Thomas Daniel (1984) Canon Peter Phillips (2014) Fr Thomas Allan (1982) Fr Norman Fergusson (1986) Fr Arthur Moraes (2008) Fr Joseph Davey (1970) Fr James Finn (1977) Canon John P Murphy (1989) Fr Henry Bryant (1972) Fr John Woods (2002) Fr Barry Carpenter (2012) Mgr Canon Terence Keenan (1984) Fr John Eveleigh Woodruff (1976) Fr John Murphy (2005) Fr John Farrell (1983) Fr Richard Berry (1989) Fr David Cullen (1974) Fr Herbert Keldany (1988) Fr Ben Morgan (2005) Fr Joseph O’Hear (1970) Fr Joe Gibbons (2002) Fr Dermot McGrath (2012) Fr John Halvey (1990) Fr Ken Dain (2010) Fr Andrew Moore (1994) Fr John Kearney (2007) Fr John Clayton (1992) Fr George Talbot (2004) Fr Colin Kilby (1985) Canon Leo Ward (1970) Fr Joseph Eldridge (1993) Canon William Gordon (1976) Fr William Dempsey (2008)

Free Catholic Tours in the City of London Qualified Catholic tour guide leads 'Saints and Scholars' walk first Sunday of the month including Mass. Contact Peter FFI on 07913904997 or circlingthesquaretours@hotmail.co.uk

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Events & Calendar

REGULAR EVENTS Westminster Record | October 2017

Liturgical Calendar - October

If you have an event, please email: communications@rcdow.org.uk

Prayer Groups SUNDAYS

Taizé at St James, Piccadilly W1J 9LL every third Sunday 5pm. Call 020 7503 5128 for details. Tyburn Benedictines Monastic afternoon Every first Sunday 2-5pm Martyrs’ Crypt, Tyburn Convent, 8 Hyde Park Place W2 2LJ. Westminster Cathedral Young Adults meet socially after the 7pm Mass on Sundays and then at the nearby Windsor Castle pub. For further details please contact: westminsteryoungadults@gmail.com

MONDAYS

Mothers’ Prayers at St Dominic’s Priory, Haverstock Hill NW5 4LB Mondays 2.30-3.30pm in the Lourdes Chapel. All are welcome.

TUESDAYS

Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament Tuesdays 6-9pm concluding with Benediction at Newman House, 111 Gower Street WC1E 6AR. Details 020 7387 6370.

Prayers for London at the Shrine of Our Lady of Willesden Tuesdays 7.30pm. Organised by the Guild of Our Lady of Willesden, Nicoll Road NW10 9AX. Our Lady of Walsingham Prayer Group First Tuesday of the month 2.30pm to 4.15pm in the Chapel of St George and the English Martyrs in Westminster Cathedral. Details: antonia@walsingham.org.uk

Vocations Prayer Group Second Tuesday of the month 8pm at 47C Gaisford Street NW5 2EB. Taizé at St James’, Spanish Place, W1U 3UY every first Tuesday of the month at 7pm. Email: penny28hb@aol.com or just come along.

WEDNESDAYS

Wednesdays on the Wall (WOTW) Every first Wednesday of the month. 6pm at All Hallows on the Wall, 83 London Wall EC2M 5ND. A short service of prayer and reflection at 6pm, coffee at 6.45pm followed by discussion. Corpus Christi Contemplative Prayer Group for Young Adults Wednesdays from 7pm at Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB. For further details please contact corpuschristipg@yahoogroups. co.uk.

Our Lady, Untier of Knots, Prayer Group of Intercession meets every third Wednesday at St Anselm & St

Cecilia, Lincoln’s Inn Fields. Parish Mass at 6pm followed by Prayer Group until 8.45pm. Rosary, Adoration, Silent prayer and Divine Mercy Chaplet. Email: Antonia antonia4161@gmail.com.

THURSDAYS JCFL

Jesus Christ the Fullness of Life (JCFL) provides a space for Christians of different traditions to join together in prayer and friendship. For further details please visit www.jcfl.org.uk.

NFG Prayer Group meet weekly at 8pm for praise and worship followed by a social. Monthly a DVD is watched followed by a time of sharing. Held in St Mark’s Room, Christ the King Church N14 4HE. Contact Fr Christophe: christophe.brunet@chemin-neuf.org. Soul Food A Catholic charismatic prayer group for young adults meets Thursdays 7-9pm at St Charles Borromeo, Ogle Street W1W 6HS. Details at www.soulfoodgroup.org.

St John Paul II Prayer Group Every second Thursday of the month 7-8pm, Mass, Adoration and Prayer at Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB.

FRIDAYS

Divine Mercy Prayers and Mass Every first Friday 2.30-4.30pm at Our Lady, Mother of the Church, 2 Windsor Road W5 5PD.

Westminster Cathedral Charismatic Prayer Group meet every Friday 7.30pm Prayer, Praise and Teaching. First Friday is a healing Mass. For details, please call 020 8748 2632.

1 Sun 2 Mon 3 Tue 4 Wed 5 Thu 6 Fri 7 Sat 8 Sun

9 Mon

10 Tue 11 Wed 12 Thu 13 Fri 14 Sat 15 Sun 16 Mon

17 Tue 18 Wed 19 Thu

20 Fri 21 Sat 22 Sun

23 Mon 24 Tue 25 Wed 26 Thu 27 Fri 28 Sat 29 Sun 30 Mon 31 Tue

+26th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME The Holy Guardian Angels Feria, Twenty-Sixth Week of Year 1 St Francis of Assisi Feria Feria or St Bruno, Priest; Friday abstinence Our Lady of the Rosary +27th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME Day of Pray for Prisoners and thier Dependants Collect Harvest Fast Day Offerings for CAFOD Feria, Twenty- Seventh Week of Year 1or St Denis, Bishop and Companions or St John Leonardi, Priest or Blessed John Henry Newman, Priest Feria, or St Paulinus of York, Bishop Feria or St John XXIII, Pope Feria or St Wilfrid, Bishop ST EDWARD THE CONFESSOR No Friday abstinence Feria or St Callistus I, Pope & Martyr or Blessed Virgin Mary on Saturday +28th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME Annouce mandatory special collection Feria, Twenty-Eighth Week of Year 1 or St Hedwig, Religious, or St Margaret Mary Alacoque, Virgin St Ignatius of Antioch, Bishop & Martyr ST LUKE, Evangelist Feria, Twenty-Ninth Week of Year 2 or Ss John de Brebeuf and Isaac Jogues, Priests, and Companions, Martyrs or St Paul of the Cross, Priest Feria; Friday abstinence Feria or Blessed Virgin Mary on Saturday +29th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME World Mission Day Collection for Missio Feria, Twenty-Ninth Week of Year 1 or St John of Capestrano Feria, Thirtieth Week of Year 2 or St Anthony Mary Claret, Bishop Feria Feria or Ss Chad and Cedd, Bishops Feria ; Friday abstinence SS SIMON and JUDE, Apostles +30th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME Announce Holy Day of Obligation Feria, Thirtieth Week of Year 1 Feria

Young Adults Mass with an Ignatian twist

Every Sunday at 7pm. Church of the Immaculate Conception, 114 Mount Street W1K 3AH. Contact: yam@mountstreet.info or visit www.pathwaystogood.org Mass at Canary Wharf Held on Tuesdays at 12.30pm at 2 Churchill Place E14 5RB. Organised by Mgr Vladimir Felzmann, Chaplain to Canary Wharf Communities. Details www.cwcc.org.uk.

St Albans Abbey Fridays at 12 noon. Mass in the Lady Chapel of St Albans Abbey AL1 1BY. Members of the Westminster LGBT Catholic Community are specially welcomed at the following Sunday Mass at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, and invited to our parish hall afterwards for tea/coffee, when there is also an opportunity to learn of pastoral help available: 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month, 5.30pm. EXTRAORDINARY FORM MASSES

Sundays: Low Mass 9.30am, St James Spanish Place W1U 3QY. Low Mass 9am, The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP. Low Mass 5pm, St Bartholomew, St Albans AL1 2PE. Low Mass 5.30pm, Shrine of Our Lady of Willesden, NW10 9AX.

Mondays: Low Mass 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP Mass 6.30pm Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB.

Fridays:

Low Mass 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP.

SATURDAYS

Low Mass 6pm St Etheldreda, Ely Place EC1N 6RY. First Friday only.

Taizé at Notre Dame de France 5 Leicester Place WC2H 7BX at 7.15pm. Call 020 7437 9363.

Low Mass 6pm St John the Baptist Church, King Edward's Road E9 7SF. First Friday only.

Pope’s Intentions for October

Low Mass 6.30pm Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane WC2E 7NB. Second Friday only.

Workers and the Unemployed

Saturdays: Low Mass 12.15pm, St Wilfrid’s Chapel, The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP.

That all workers may receive respect and protection of their rights, and that the unemployed may receive the opportunity to contribute to the common good. Follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/RCWestminster

Deaf Community Mass First Sunday of the month 4.30pm at Westminster Cathedral Hall, Ambrosden Avenue SW1P 1QW.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays: Low Mass, 8am The Oratory, Brompton Road SW7 2RP.

Queen of Peace Prayer Group at Our Lady of Lourdes Church, Acton. Every Friday evening after 7pm Mass. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, a homily, recitation of the Holy Rosary and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy. All welcome

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Other regular Masses

Low Mass 4pm, Side Chapel, Westminster Cathedral SW1P 1QW. Second Saturday only.

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Page 19


Westminster Record | October 2017

© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

Pope’s Prayer Intention

by Fr David Stewart In this month of October, Pope Francis has asked us to pray with him: That all workers may receive respect and protection of their rights, and that the unemployed may receive the opportunity to contribute to the common good. You might recognise how this Intention echoes key concerns of our Catholic social teaching, first promoted over a century ago but, of course, present in the Gospels in the teaching and practice of Jesus himself. The rights of workers concerned Pope Pius in 1891, in a groundbreaking document called Rerum Novarum (Of new things), while the idea of the

common good, a key principle of Catholic thinking, has once again become known recently. As we look at our world, as the Holy Father does, we can see plainly just how much the concept of the common good, which embraces the promotion of human dignity, is needed at this time. Pope Francis explained, in a 2014 address to workers and managers at an Italian steel-mill, that the ‘primary value of work is the good of the human person since it fulfils him as such, with his inner talents and his intellectual, creative and physical abilities. Hence the scope of work is not only profit

and economics; its purpose above all regards man and his dignity. Man’s dignity is tied to work.’ The serious problem of unemployment, particularly among Europe’s young, arises when the system is geared too much to profit and not enough to human dignity; profit can’t be the only value. When any human person is denied the fulfilling dignity of work, they are excluded and the common good is not achieved. Solidarity, another key principle of our social teaching, is threatened. Pope Francis has said that the word solidarity risks vanishing from the dictionary! Some people, including prominent politicians, from time to time, suggest that the Church, its pastors and its leaders have no business getting involved in politics and economics, or that our involvement should be selective, i.e., in some issues but not others. There are others again who suggest that certain key issues should be the only ones that should concern Catholics, thus ignoring not only our social teaching tradition of solidarity and compassion when it suits them but also the very words and practice of Jesus himself. Such a temptation, for that is what it is, will have its appeal in many

ways to many of us. One way of opposing that temptation is to make ourselves aware, each month, of the Pope’s Intention concerning the challenges that face humanity and by making a daily offering of ourselves, united to his intention and to the Heart of Christ, that the wold might become more just, more good and more sacred. Prayer moment: Ask God’s Spirit to lead you to a place of interior calm and silence within yourself, and of external quiet too, if possible, away from some of the noise of everyday life. Let God’s gaze upon you and on the world become a reality for you, now. Place yourself, in your imagination, among the unemployed people of our world, particularly the younger generations. Ask the Spirit to unveil for you just how their human, God-given dignity is destroyed by unemployment, which throws them on the scrapheap in the name of profit. Ask for the grace of compassion and even of righteous anger for this sin, to guard against ignoring it. Reflection moment: Ponder if I’ve ever been in a situation where workers’ rights, and the right to work, have been damaged or destroyed. Was I the one to suffer or was it someone I

know, perhaps a family member? What action could I have taken or might I take in the future? I could reflect on whether I feel powerless and unable to act, or whether there might be ways in which I could stand up against this sin, for example, by refusing to deal with companies who remove people’s dignity by scrapping their jobs in the name of sheer profit. Ways of Praying with the Pope: From the beginning of October our Living Prayer 2018 booklets and our 2018 wallcalendars will be available. Each has lovely pictures of churches around the world dedicated to the Heart of Christ, the Sacred Heart, and details of liturgical feasts and the Pope’s Intentions. Online we have lots of good material on our website www.popesglobalprayer.net and there’s our new daily prayer App on www.clicktopray.org. You can use this App to pray, each day, on your smart-phone or tablet! Several different prayer-cards, including our popular Daily Prayer Pathway, are available free of charge (but with a small donation, if possible, towards P&P) by leaving a message on 020 8442 5232 or 074 3259 1117.

Film Review: Finding Fatima by Andrew Nicoll

On 13th May 1981, Pope John Paul II was shot and seriously injured. From that moment, the future saint developed a profound emotional relationship with the appearances of Our Lady to three children in a field close to the village of Fatima in Portugal, the first of these having taken place on 13th May 1917. On 13th May 2000, two of the seers, Jacinta and Francisco Marto, were beatified by Pope John Paul II at Fatima, when it was also announced that the so-called third secret of Fatima was to be revealed. The third visionary and ‘interviewer’ of Our Lady, Sr Lucia passes away in 2005 and the day of Page 20

Published by The Diocese of Westminster, Archbishop’s House, Ambrosden Avenue, London SW1P 1QJ. Printed by Trinity Mirror, Hollinwood Avenue, Chadderton, Oldham OL9 8EP. All rights reserved.

her funeral is declared a national day of mourning in Portugal. So convinced was he of the efficacy of the Fatima message, Pope John Paul has the bullet which was used in the assassination attempt on his life embedded in the crown on the Virgin’s statue at Fatima, and as a potent symbol of the importance of Fatima to him personally. This moving and dramatic documentary film tells the Fatima story, speculates on its significance and describes the third secret, using reconstructions, interviews with the descendants of those involved, and incredible graphic imagery. The historical context, including the hesitancy of both Church and secular authorities to accept the

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Fatima story, is also recounted even though the ‘miracle of the sun’ at the time was witnessed by possibly 40,000 people over an area of 600 square miles. Timothy Tindall-Robertson points out that Fatima, including its prediction of the Second World War, is a message for the whole world: the children are exposed to the fear of hell so ‘we can know that hell is an unfortunate possibility’ he says. Fr Guerra (Shrine Rector 1973-2000)speaks movingly about the accounts of Fatima her learnt from his boyhood parish priest and Sr Angela Coelho ASM gives a thoughtful commentary on the character of the children and the significance of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, as well as the centrality of Jesus in

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the Eucharist as described by the Angel who visits the three children in the months prior to the appearance of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The film includes the brutal, post-apocalyptic account of the Third Secret, relating it to the events at Hiroshima at the end of World War II. This is one of the most moving and inspirational films you could ever see and, as Sr Angela says, we should all pray the Rosary every day, and Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart will surely triumph. Dr Andrew Nicoll, St Joseph’s parish, Oakham (Nottingham Diocese) Finding Fatima: seek and you will find. Written by Ian and Dominic Higgins, produced by Joel Fletcher, Major Oak Entertainments, DVD 90 mins. Follow us on Twitter at: twitter.com/RCWestminster

Westminster Record October 2017