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e Bulletin of the Rotary Club of Patong Beach Phuket Thailand – district 3330

Longtail boats in Patong Bay looking north Meetings Tuesday 7.00pm for 7.30pm Aloha Villa Hotel 145/2 Rat–U–Thit Road PATONG BEACH

http//www.rotarypatong.org

Volume 7 - Issue No 23 – 4th December 2012 Future Events

Tuesday 4th December Dinner Out - @ John Underwood Factory Arranged by P. Larry Tuesday 11th December

Club Elections PE George McCall Saturday 15th December Christmas Party @ The Holiday Inn

Volume 7 Issue 22

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CLUB PROGRAMME 2012-2013 DECEMBER – FAMILY of ROTARY MONTH Dec

Sat

2013 Jan

4 8 9 11 11 12 15 18 25

DINNER OUT - @ JOHN UNDERWOOD FACTORY 8-9 DISTRICT CONFERENCE – KANCHANABURI

1 8 8 15 22 22 29

NEW YEARS DAY – HAPPY NEW YEAR - NO MEETING BOARD MEETING BODHI GARRETT - MOKENS THEIR WAY OF LIFE MARTIN SMETZER - ORGANIC FARMING BOARD MEETING NORMAL MEETING NORMAL MEETING

P. Larry Amsden

BOARD MEETING GEORGE McCALL & CLUB ELECTIONS SECOND POLIO PLUS VACCINATION DAY @ KOH SIRAE CHRISTMAS PARTY @ HOLIDAY INN MEETING CANCELLED – SEE ABOVE CHRISTMAS DAY – NO MEETING COMPLIMENTS OF THE SEASON

George McCall

JANUARY – ROTARY AWARENESS MONTH

RCoPB Future Event 1st March 2013 Fun GOLF fund raiser at Laguna Phuket Golf Club BIRTHDAYS

No one this week

Next meeting Tuesday 4th December The last Dinner Out for 2012 will be another great night @ John Underwood’s FACTORY - a superb menu has been arranged for your enjoyment Due to the late sending of the Bulletin resulting from on the road and limited internet PLEASE ENSURE YOU EMAIL YOUR RSVP – WITH A YES OR NO Note from Larry -- Attached are a few photos of a recent event at Underwood's Factory to (hopefully), wet your appetite. If you haven't seen John's factory, you are in for a real treat.

PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY IF YOU WANT A TOUR OF THE FACTORY

RSVP -- Larry OR Pat at beaujeu1@yahoo.com Volume 7 Issue 22

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Night Report

– 22nd November 2012

SAA Richard welcomed all to the meeting and asked PP- AG Best to open the meeting. (P.Larry is in the north with Khun Tim)

GONG ! SAA Richard invited the visitors to introduce themselves

Visiting Rotarians: Neville Clare – immediate Past President RC West Perth – Western Australia

Paddy Rowe RC Putney London England

Richard Levy RC Chevreuse Et Sa Vallee France

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Immediate PDG Orachorn Saisrithong RC Phuket South

Visitors Jan - Michael Todd-White Barry Rowe – guest of Paddy Rowe Ryanne & Steve - The Good Shepherd

A WARM WELCOME TO ALL RCoPB member Adriano Trapani has been working with The Good Shepherd and recently completed a photo shoot to assist their fund raising Ed note – Adriano’s photos were included in last week’s Bulletin

A night @ Indigo Pearl on Saturday 1st December was announced – everyone welcome. Adriano introduced the guest speaker – Ryanne Rothenberg Ryanne gave a presentation about The Good Shepherd

Volume 7 Issue 22

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Volume 7 Issue 22

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PP Jeroen gave a vote of thanks to Ryanne for her informative presentation – as we all learned what a dedicated small team are doing in Phuket to help those in need.

Club Business: PN Brad Kenny advised that he & Boon travelled to Koh Sirea and visited the Mokens to access the needs. Brad thanked Mark Pendlebury for the 5,000 baht provided for a young girl who had an eye problem – he further advised the girl was seeing a doctor and further follow up will occur to determine if further treatment is required. Also delivered the liquid solution to treat skin problems provided by Michael Massey Today 150 people walk 500 metres to get water. Need for worm medication – improved sanitation PP Jeroen: advised the Golf Fund Raiser on 1st March at Laguna Golf Club – looking for sponsors – more details to follow Happy Hundreds : Many were happy – and reminding all of The Good Shepherd night on 1st

ATTENDANCE 27-11-12 Total members: 30

Night reporter & Photographer – Denis Carpenter Thank you Ed

Leave of Absence Attended: Make-Ups:

lol

2 28 10 4

Attendance –Week 50.0 % Month 55.4% Visiting Rotarians: 4 Visitors: 4----------------------------------------Honorary Members 4

Volume 7 Issue 22

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ABC’s of Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarships The Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarships program is the world's largest privately funded international scholarships program. In 1947, 18 "Rotary Fellows" from 11 countries were selected to serve as ambassadors of goodwill while studying in another country for one academic year. Since that time, approximately US$335 million has been expended on some 30,000 scholarships for people from more than 125 countries, studying in 105 countries around the world. The purpose of the scholarships program is to further international understanding and friendly relations among people of different countries. Scholars are expected to be outstanding ambassadors of goodwill to the people of the host country through both informal and formal appearances before Rotary and non-Rotary groups. Each scholar is assigned a host Rotarian counsellor to facilitate involvement in Rotary and integration into the host culture. Since 1994-95 The Rotary Foundation has offered two new types of scholarships in addition to the AcademicYear Ambassadorial Scholarships. The Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship is awarded for two or three years of specific degree-oriented study abroad. The Cultural Ambassadorial Scholarship provides funding for three or six months of intensive language study and cultural immersion in another country. In addition to being an investment in the education of tomorrow's leaders, Rotary Foundation scholarships create personal links between countries and are an important step toward greater understanding and goodwill in the world.

Group Study Exchange One of the most popular and rewarding programs of The Rotary Foundation is Group Study Exchange. Since the first exchange between districts in California and Japan in 1965, the program has provided educational experiences for about 35,000 business and professional men and women who have served on about 6,500 teams. The GSE program pairs Rotary districts to send and receive study teams. Since 1965, almost US$59 million has been allocated by The Rotary Foundation for Group Study Exchange grants. One of the attractive features of GSE is the opportunity for the visiting team members to meet, talk and live with Rotarians and their families in a warm spirit of friendship and hospitality. Although the original Group Study Exchanges were male only, in recent years teams have included both men and women. In addition to learning about another country through visits to farms, schools, industrial plants, professional offices and governmental establishments, the GSE teams serve as ambassadors of goodwill. They interpret their home nation to host Rotarians and others in the communities they visit. In recent years, teams of a single vocation or cultural group have been exchanged. Some GSE teams help create humanitarian projects between their countries. Many of the personal contacts blossom into lasting friendships. Truly, the Group Study Exchange program has provided Rotarians with one of its most enjoyable, practical and meaningful ways to promote world understanding.

Volume 7 Issue 22

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Rotary International News Mercy’s Village provides an education to orphans of war, AIDS in Uganda Top: Jeami Duncan with Mercy, the child who inspired her to start the school. -: Students at Mercy's Village International primary school in Gulu, Uganda, play outside during physical

Jeami Duncan first heard about the atrocities in Uganda from a friend who had served on a mission there. education.

“The stories were unbelievable,” says Duncan, who was working in human resources at an information technology firm at the time, in the mid-2000s. Her friend recounted the plight of tens of thousands of children conscripted and brainwashed by a maniacal rebel leader who forced them to carry out heinous acts, including orders to murder their siblings and drink blood from their victims’ crushed skulls. “She told me about the night commuters, who would walk miles into town to find a safe place to sleep to avoid being abducted or murdered by the rebels” – that is, by the cultish Lord’s Resistance Army, led by Joseph Kony, whose actions displaced millions of people in Uganda and neighboring countries. “I thought it was crazy. It was a huge human migration that happened on a nightly basis.” Duncan decided to go to Uganda herself. “She is one of those people who, when a commercial comes on about Africa or sponsoring children, won’t look away,” says her husband, Paul. When Duncan made her first trip, in 2006, Kony’s forces were omnipresent in Gulu, the northern city where she stayed. (Kony remains at large and is wanted by the International Criminal Court on charges of crimes against humanity.)

“I signed up with Life Connections International for the trip.

Nobody else signed up,” Duncan says. “I never thought about how dangerous it was. When I got there, I stayed with a missionary couple. They had to check on the conditions of the only road into Gulu. The rebels ambushed cars, blew them up, and burned the occupants alive.” On her first day, she went to a camp for 20,000 displaced persons. “I was the naive American,” says Duncan, who brought a suitcase full of candy, clothes, and other goods donated by her church. “Within five minutes, I was completely overwhelmed. As I was handing out clothes, mothers were handing me naked babies. “The children were so malnourished,” she recalls. “They are lucky to get one meal in three days. Every night I heard personal stories about the war, and every story was a brutal murder story. There was no hope in people’s eyes,” she says. “I came home devastated. Those images kept running through my head. I asked a lot of questions. What can one person do?” Duncan, now 31 and a member of the Rotary Club of El Segundo, California, USA, spent five years planning and fundraising. Today, 136 children – most of them orphaned by war or AIDS – are receiving an education through Mercy’s Village International primary school. The school, which opened in 2011, has students ages five to nine in the first, second, and third grades and aims to add a grade each year, through grade seven. An individual recently donated $10,000 to construct a kitchen, and the school is raising money for a building to use as a dining hall and as a space for after-school and adult literacy programs. Eventually, Duncan says, “we would love to have a computer lab and electricity.” The idea for a school came from the villagers themselves. In 2007, Duncan returned to Uganda and consulted with elders in Gulu about the best way to help. “They humbled me,” she says. “They told me that a lot of aid organizations or Westerners come in and do what they want to do.” The villagers advised her to focus on education. Though primary education is officially free in Uganda, fees for uniforms and supplies are overwhelming for many families. Joe Harding, a member of the El Segundo club, plans to visit the school with several other Rotarians. When he first met Duncan, he was impressed. “Having been to Uganda in 1998, I knew firsthand all the things she was talking about,” Harding says. “I was inspired by her. I felt she had to become a Rotarian. She doesn’t just talk about it. You can see the long-range plan and the energy she puts into it. Mercy’s Village is a part of her, and she has a way of making it a part of you.”

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Photos of the week - by Denis @ Loy Kratong – 28th November Patong Beach – a special beauty contest for 6-8 year olds

On the way out of Patong this driver had a few problems - near the shooting gallery I guess he did not run away from the accident ! Pleased we were going out as traffic building up quickly

Volume 7 Issue 22

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Vol 7 issue 23  
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