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e Bulletin of the Rotary Club of Patong Beach Phuket Thailand – district 3330

Meetings Tuesday 7.00pm for 7.30pm Aloha Villa Hotel 145/2 Rat–U–Thit Road PATONG BEACH

http//www.rotarypatong.org

Meetings Tuesday 7.00pm for 7.30pm Aloha Villa Hotel 145/2 Rat–U–Thit Road PATONG BEACH

http//www.rotarypatong.org

Volume 7 - Issue No 12 – 18th September 2012 Future Events

Tuesday 18th September

Kerry Leach

GO ECO PHUKET

Tuesday 25th September Bengt Soderberg – President International Society Prosthetics and Orthotics

Tuesday 2nd October Dinner Out - The Slug & Lettuce Cherngtalay George Mccall

Volume 7 Issue 12

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CLUB PROGRAMME 2012-2013 SEPTEMBER - NEW GENERATIONS MONTH Sept 18 25 25

Kerry Leach

LARRY

GO ECO PHUKET

BOARD MEETING BENGT SODERBERG -

GEORGE McCALL

PRESIDENT INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY PROSTHETICS AND ORTHOTICS

Oct

2 9

OCTOBER - VOCATIONAL SERVICE MONTH The Slug and Lettuce – Cherngtalay

DINNER OUT -

BOARD MEETING

9 NORMAL MEETING 16 NORMAL MEETING 16RYLA – Rotary 22 20 23 23 30

GEORGE McCALL

Youth Leadership Awards

VISIT SISTER CLUB - CENTRAL DAMANSARA – KUALA LUMPUR BOARD MEETING CLUB ASSEMBLY NORMAL MEETING

LARRY

Next meeting 18th September Go Eco Phuket: Dive Against Debris Saturday 29th September

BIRTHDAYS

24th September ARNAUD VERSTRAETE

A couple of thoughts for the week “It is never too late to be what you might have been.” - George Eliot “Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

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Night Report

– 18th September 2012

Gong – meeting opened Brad acting SAA

No visiting Rotarians No visitors Rtn Johan & PP Sam distributed a food survey and asked each table to fill out, survey to be given to kitchen PN Brad - updated club on water project at Kho Lao being funded by RCo San Moritz Larry - Announced that Antoine had been re-instated a member as of 28 Aug. PP Sam - Sam presented a training program on the Rotary Foundation Imp. Points: where does money come from, what is it used for, how should a club member contribute, five focus areas objective to simply the grant program. Brad, Larry Stewart, Jack. Mark, Gerry agreed to contribute to EREY. (Every Rotarian Every Year) PP Sam reminded us that contributions should go through district (not on-line) to get credit for the club Please direct contributions for EREY - to the RCoPB Treasurer

Rotary Club of Patong Beach Rotary Foundation

District Rotary Foundation Seminar

SHARE System • Divides Annual Fund contributions between – District Designated Fund (DDF) – World Fund

• Transforms contributions into grants, etc. • Allows clubs to determine how district contributions are spent

Annual Fund Contributions At the end of Rotary year, Annual Fund contributions split: • 50% to the World Fund • 50% credited to district’s DDF

District Rotary Foundation Seminar

District Rotary Foundation Seminar

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Permanent Fund Earnings The Trustees determine the spendable earnings. Contributions designated to Permanent Fund-SHARE, the spendable earnings are split: • 50% to the World Fund • 50% credited to district’s DDF

Two Funds • District Designated Fund

• World Fund

– District directed – Used by Rotarians in the district – Spent on TRF grants and programs

– Trustee directed – Used by Rotarians worldwide – Spent on TRF grants and programs

District Rotary Foundation Seminar

District Rotary Foundation Seminar

Who is involved in planning? • District governor • District governor-elect • District Rotary Foundation committee chair • District Rotary Foundation subcommittee chairs

District Rotary Foundation Seminar

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Who is involved in planning? • District governor • District governor-elect • District Rotary Foundation committee chair • District Rotary Foundation subcommittee chairs

District Rotary Foundation Seminar

PP Sam announced the contribution from PP Arnaud of over US$14,000 to the Foundation, making him the largest donor in the district

(A PDF of the Finances of Rotary International & Rotary Foundation is attached for members) After the presentation, we welcomed Piyawat Ruengphongdarnchan- Bangkok Bank All thanked PP Sam Happy Hundred Toast to all the men and women risking their lives for our freedom after 9/11. Gong – meeting closed.

ATTENDANCE Total members: 29 Leave of Absence Attended: Make-Ups :

Night Reporter: P Larry Amsden

1

28 12 2

Attendance –Week 50.0 %

Photographer: Gerry Cummings -

Visiting Rotarians: 0 Visitors: 1 -----------------------------------------Honorary Members 4

Thank you fellows ed Volume 7 Issue 12

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Good Memories The Stranger Years after I was born, my Dad met a stranger who was new to our small town. From the beginning, Dad was fascinated with this enchanting newcomer and soon invited him to live with our family. The stranger was quickly accepted and was around from then on. As I grew up, I never questioned his place in my family. In my young mind, he had a special niche. My parents were complementary instructors: Mum taught me good from evil, and Dad taught me to obey. But The stranger... He was our storyteller. He would keep us spellbound for hours on end with adventures, mysteries and comedies. If I wanted to know anything about politics, history or science, he always knew the answers about the past, understood the present and even seemed able to predict the future! He took my family to the first major league ball game. He made me laugh, and he made me cry. The stranger never stopped talking, but Dad didn't seem to mind. Sometimes, Mum would get up quietly while the rest of us were shushing each other to listen to what he had to say, and she would go to the kitchen for peace and quiet. (I wonder now if she ever prayed for the stranger to leave.) Dad ruled our household with certain moral convictions, but the stranger never felt obligated to honour them. Profanity, for example, was not allowed in our home - not from us, our friends or any visitors. Our long time visitor, however, got away with four-letter words that burned my ears and made my dad squirm and my mother blush. My Dad didn't permit the liberal use of alcohol but the stranger encouraged us to try it on a regular basis. He made cigarettes look cool, cigars manly, and pipes distinguished. He talked freely (much too freely!) about sex. His comments were sometimes blatant, sometimes suggestive, and generally embarrassing.. I now know that my early concepts about relationships were Influenced strongly by the stranger. Time after time, he opposed the values of my parents, yet he was seldom rebuked... And NEVER asked to leave. More than fifty years have passed since the stranger moved in with our family. He has blended right in and is not nearly as fascinating as he was at first. Still, if you could walk into my parents' den today, you would still find him sitting over in his corner, waiting for someone to listen to him talk and watch him draw his pictures. His name??? We just call him "TV." I really fear what his grandkids will be like. He has a wife now...we call her "Computer." Their first child is "Cell Phone." Second child "I Pod." Third child “ I Pad�

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ABC’s of Rotary Women's Groups Associated with Rotary Clubs Some very significant programs of Rotary service are not conducted by Rotarians. This is true because of the many projects sponsored by organizations of Rotarians' wives and other women relatives associated with Rotary clubs around the world. Women's groups - often called Women of Rotary, Rotary Ann Clubs, Las Damas de Rotary, Rotary Wives or, the more formalized organization, The Inner Wheel- annually conduct hundreds of notable projects of humanitarian service in their communities. The women's groups establish schools, baby clinics, food and clothing distribution centres, hospital facilities, orphanages, homes for the elderly and other service activities, and they frequently provide volunteer service on a day-to-day basis to operate childcare centres for working mothers and provide necessary resources for Youth Exchange students. Usually the women's groups complement and supplement the programs of service performed by the local Rotary clubs. Many of the women's groups actively conduct international service projects as well as local projects. The Rl Board of Directors in 1984 recognized the excellent service and fellowship of the clubs and organization of women relatives of Rotarians, and encouraged all Rotary clubs to sponsor such informal organizations. Functional Literacy Program It has been estimated that a billion people - one-sixth of the world's population - are unable to read. Illiteracy among adults and children is a global concern in highly industrialized nations and in developing countries. The number of adult illiterates in the world is increasing by 25 million each year! In the United States, one quarter of the entire population is considered functionally illiterate. The tragedy of illiteracy is that those who cannot read are denied personal independence and become victims of unscrupulous manipulation, poverty and the loss of human dignity that give meaning to life. Illiteracy is demeaning. It is a major obstacle for economic, political, social and personal development. Illiteracy is a barrier to international understanding, cooperation and peace in the world. Literacy education was considered a program priority by Rotary's original Health, Hunger and Humanity (3-H) Committee in 1978. An early 3-H Grant led to the preparation of an excellent source book on the issues of literacy in the world. The Rotary-sponsored publication, The Right to Read, was edited by Rotarian Eve Malmquist, a past district governor from Linkoping, Sweden, and a recognized authority on reading and educational research. The book was the forerunner of a major Rotary program emphasis on literacy promotion. In 1985 the Rl board declared a ten-year emphasis on literacy education. In 1992 the board extended the emphasis until the year 2000. In 1997 the board again extended the emphasis until 2005. Many Rotary clubs are thoughtfully surveying the needs of their community for literacy training. Some clubs provide basic books for teaching reading. Others establish and support reading and language clinics, provide volunteer tutorial assistance and purchase reading materials. Rotarians can play a vitally important part in their community and in developing countries by promoting projects to open opportunities that come from the ability to read. Volume 7 Issue 12

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Rotary International News RYLA veteran gets with the program Steve Melton has been going to Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) events for almost two decades. A major in the U.S. Army Reserve, Melton has volunteered at the RYLA camp held by District 5810 (Texas) almost every summer since his own time as a RYLA participant. He’s served as everything from counselor to deputy director to construction team member. THE ROTARIAN: What led you to RYLA? MELTON: My high school counselor had me fill out an application. I had no idea what RYLA was. I was not going to go. I was a football player looking for a scholarship, worried about missing a week of working out. One of my friends had gone and she came up to me and said, “I heard you got picked for RYLA. You have to go – it’s the greatest thing ever.” It is one of the top three decisions I have ever made. TR: What did you learn? MELTON: That everyone has something to bring to the table, and you only have to figure out what that is. One of the secrets to my success is putting the right people in the right position. I’ve used that in the military. Last year was my final year of command in the Army Reserve, and when I took over the group, the brigade commander pulled me out and said, “You’re getting the worst we have.” I applied the lessons from RYLA, and when I was done with my three-year command, the brigade sergeant major told me, “This is the best company in the brigade.” TR: How does RYLA work? MELTON: RYLA, in our district, is a weeklong leadership seminar. It’s complete immersion training. Every day is full of activities and speakers, and every day we have a theme related to different facets of leadership, such as ethics and community service. We do team-building exercises, including a challenge course with a 6-foot wall that everyone has to help each other over. We want to make the participants better leaders so that when they go back and become team captains and student council presidents, they can be examples for the groups they’re leading. TR: What do you love about being a camp counselor? MELTON: It’s the most direct contact you have with the campers, and that’s what camp is all about. After dinner and after the night’s activities, when they’re back in the cabin and they’re just talking, that’s when they get their epiphanies and you can watch them come together as a group. It’s inspiring to see. TR: What sort of epiphanies? MELTON: Normally they come in thinking that leadership means being the boss, as opposed to being the person who does the small thing that goes unnoticed but allows the group to accomplish a goal. TR: Why is the RYLA experience unique? MELTON: It’s one of the few, maybe only, times in my life and most of the campers’ lives when there’s a completely safe environment. You are free to be yourself. Volume 7 Issue 12

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Photos – Montreal by Gerry Cummings

Habitat

GRAFITTI - Colourful Art Volume 7 Issue 12

Thanks Gerry th

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