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R I C H A R D

K E L L Y

J R


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Richard Kelly Jr 204 Godwin Ave Wyckoff, NJ. 07481

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Bachelor of Architecture Penn State University 2006 - 2011

T [201] 956.0382 richard.kelly.jr@gmail.com E

architecture portfolio

architectural discovery

the art of activating the kinetic potential of unoccupied space through permeable design


Discussion of findings from literature review

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4.0

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Program type and description

Program

3.0

Site and context information

2.0

Thesis statement

Abstract

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6.0

Design Precedents

Area of focus

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Bibliography

Theoretical issues

Conceptual / preliminary design studies

Research and Documentation for Area of Focus

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Architectural issues

Graphic representation of program Programmatic elements

Aerial photos and maps of site

Site documentation Site analysis

Site parameters


EDUCATION Penn State University, class of 2011 | University Park, PA. 16802 Bachelor or Architecture

WORK EXPERIENCE May 2006 - August 2010 Davis Brody Bond Aedas | 315 Hudson Street, 9th floor | New York, NY. 10013 Architectural Intern [summer] Cooperated with partner Chris Grabe in addition to communicating with other architects, graphic designers and project managers. Assisted on schematic design drawings, final construction documents, high rise development, historical preservation, award nominations and government issued operation, using Auto Cad, Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. October 2007 - October 2009 Penn State Solar Decathlon| Penn State University| University Park, PA. 16802 Design-Build PM As a lead architect of a primarily student run operation, it was my focus to integrate function and purpose within each element of engineering and sustainable design. The design focus was on natural fusion, a way of rethinking energy and fusing the natural and built environments. As a leader of the architecture team, it was my responsibility to balance aesthetics, integration of technology, materials, and schedule. I saw myself develop into this leading role, as I gained knowledge in integrative design, green technology, materials; a lesson learned only first had through mentors and first hand construction, leadership and design. September 2005 - May 2006 BlueLine Architects | 397 Franklin Avenue 2nd floor| Wyckoff, NJ. 07481 Architectural Intern Collaborated with both partners in residential design details, full construction drawing sets, and 3-D models representing additions and renovations to existing structures, historical monuments or residential houses.

RELATED COURSEWORK Design: Graphic Design, Photography, Advanced Drawing/Sketching, AutoCad, Visual Communications, Art/Design Theory I-II , Art/Design Studio I-V, Sustainability/Construction: Architectural Materials, Architectural Structures, Environmental Protection, Environmental Control, Professional Practice, Technical Systems and Integration, Building Envelopes and Performative Design, Study Abroad [Rome]: Architectural Design, Urban Studies[Cartography], Architectural Analysis [Classical Architecture] Architectural History: Ancient to Modern Architecture, Modern Japanese History, History of Landscape Architecture, Architectural Planning [theories], Architectural History of Human Settlements and Urban Planning, Baroque Art and Architecture [focus on Gian Lorenzo Bernini]

ACHIEVEMENTS 2011 2011 2010 2009 2005

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Faculty Letter of Commendation The John Stewardson Memorial Scholarship in Architecture [finalist] L’Art Urbain - International Competition [finalist] Hajjar Scholarship [winner] Award of Excellence: University of Austin Texas: Summer Architectural Program

RELATED SKILLS Hand Drafting, Model Making, AutoDesk[2004-2011], Adobe Suites[CS3-CS5], FormZ, Sketch-Up, Revit, Vasarri, EcoTect, 3-D Max

REFERENCE CONTACTS Chris Grabe Architecture Partner, Davis Brody Bond Aedas [212] 633.4700 | chris.grabe@davisbrodyaedas.com Katsuhiko Muramoto Associate Professor of Architecture, Penn State University [814] 863.0793 | kxm15@psu.edu Jodi LaCoe Assistant Professor of Architecture, Penn State Univeristy [814] 863.2452 | jll154@psu.edu

architecture resume architectural discovery


Abstract

1 .0

Today, the most glaring signs of the Great Recession are the stalled construction sites, abandoned buildings and unused areas littering the urban fabric--boarded up, dusty, and desolate eyesores. This recession has impacted every urbanite; from the successful developers that line the streets with growing potential to the unemployed that plead for the opportunity for a fresh start. These once unavailable properties remained untouched, providing viable space to become activated by the general public. Yes, un¡owned and illegal, but the potential of activating the limitless space that lines the streets of urban cities provides a power for the everyday person to ‘park and build’ a foundation to recovering from the Great Recession. This thesis draws upon the potential occupancy of underdeveloped space, by providing an architectural framework to access, analyze, evaluate and create habitable space in a variety of forms. Maximizing function and interest, by removing the static qualities of architecture, where the systems and the building must interact with the occupant, resulting in an active machine of life, energy and production. These interactions must be adaptable, transportable and affordable, reflecting in the material choice and focus on minimizing artificial lighting, water, and electricity and maximizing the natural flux of these utilities. As architecture is defined by events and activities, proposing a space that facilitates the inclusion of individuals in communal dialogue and shared experience. The foundation for my theoretical design is based off of the Gowanus neighborhood in Brooklyn, known as a polluted and isolated area of New York City. Within this Industrial setting is a thriving art community where the integration of art, life and industry coexist. It is based off this desire for coexistence and inclusion that the Gowanus Neighborhood enables the development and growth of a space where people can manipulate and interact with the transitional zones of unoccupied space.


Thesis statement

2.0

The urban context has become littered with abandoned, open and viable surfaces where the art of activating the kinetic potential of unoccupied space can result in a public salvage of wasted space. The ability to claim unoccupied space on an individual scale can re路invent architecture for the everyday person, creating an interactive, understandable and social experience to space. My thesis functions as a framework to activate habitable space defined by events and activities. Proposing a space facilitates the inclusion of individuals in communal dialogue and shared experience.


Research an Documentation for Area of Focu

3.0 Learning from the urban street¡scape of Europe and the multiple-shared-use facility of ‘loose space’, the urban dweller must become educated on the boundaries and limitless qualities of the public domain. Our society must look towards redefining how the public interacts and is empowered by architecture and space. The Great Recession has changed the rules of how society becomes successful, challenging the general public to stand on their own and become a powerful patron, separate from the corporate domain that once controlled the urban dwelling.


“What could be learned from the experience of the Modern Movement is that urban engineering has failed. The city is too complex and too dynamic to be planned or ruled merely by functional, financial or bureaucratic brutality.” - Patterning daily life Central to the idea of the social condenser is the premise that architecture has the ability to influence social behavior. The intention of the social condenser was to influence the design of public spaces, with a goal of breaking down perceived social hierarchies in an effort to create socially equitable spaces. Approaches in creating the built form of a “social condenser” include the intentional overlapping and intersection of programs within a space through circulation. In this example, shared circulation nodes create collision zones of varied constituencies. The premise is that these areas of collision create the environment where there is potential to allow for otherwise disperse social communities to interact. - Social condenser

Question of freedom and interrelations – dependable on the spatial changeability and social congruence of a community


Discussion o findings fro literature revie

The idea of the Post-it City shares the same characteristics as an inappropriate occupation of space, above all, due to its ungovernable appearances and disappearances. In any case, the most significant thing, in the desire to define the projectual profile of the idea of the Post-it City, is that Foucault identified the paradigm of heterotopia as a boat laden with promises of adventure for its pirate crew. Subversive Architecture / / 
Robert Kronenburg Un-adopted space in dense urban environments is precious Unless you specifically seek them out, urban interventions like this can be easily ignored. This is part of their builders’ survival strategy – if they are too audacious, the authorities might remove them. But it can also be argued that this subversive architecture has strong underlying design concepts, because even if it is not immediately obvious, it can actually enriches the urban environment. It is building that is disregarded at first, but when established can have great influence on how people subsequently perceive and understand the city. Sometimes it is illegal, or at least on the boundaries of what can be done without permission. Sometimes, surprisingly, it is completely official – but still breaks all the rules about where and what you can build. Perhaps the most provocative form of subversive architecture is camouflage – buildings or objects that pretend to be something other than what they are. Santiago Cirugeda- Urban Refuge project uses temporary licences to create more permanent installations, for instance obtaining a permit to erect scaffolding to do repairs or maintenance and then occupying the new structure as an addition to the building. Urban Reserves. This uses the permission granted to locate a building refuse container in order to create a new public facility, for example a playground, a reading room, an information booth, exhibition space, or performance venue. The structure superficially appears to be the container, but is transformed into its new use on demand. The objective is not to take the land but to use it temporarily whilst it would otherwise be unused. unofficial inhabitation of space draws attention to the value of that space and leads to more formalised investment and improvements. When the “official” developers move in – it moves out to find the next opportunity. Subversive architecture is an essential tool for many people who are simply searching for a solution to their own problems, which might be extreme – unofficial building, can be the division between a comfortable life and poverty, or even life and death. The city in the making: informal economies / temporary spaces / / Jorge Mario Jáuregui Informal is a phenomenon of multiple dimensions and this is why, in order to address it, we have to consider, simultaneously, economic, political, cultural and town-planning aspects as interrelated fields that are intercepted by questions of the contemporary subject. TIME ZONES: ALTERNATIVE SPACES OR TERRITORIES OF CONTROL SOCIETY? 
Alessandro Petti Temporary zones seem to fluctuate continuously between control and freedom, between dominance and resistance. This is an age-old struggle, which is countered, on the one hand, by the attempt to conquer spaces of freedom, and, on the other, by the power that always seeks to invade every space. It is hard to say which came first: the free zones that power seeks to occupy, or the power structures that men try to counteract with forms of resistance. What is certain is that, today, both forms use temporality more as an instrument of control than resistance. How can we finally construct a post-it city that can escape control and institutionalization, a city that, in the final analysis, knows how to reinvent itself continuously? Or, on the contrary, if power has

already definitively occupied temporary practices, mightn’t it be time, for whoever is interested in new spatial and lifestyle forms, to face up to overt power and start working on the concept of permanence, monument and stability? Post-it City. Ciutats ocasionals / / 
Filippo Poli Glossary of words The dynamics of public space diversify practices through processes that are impossible to categorise. Grouped rather than categorized For instance, a stadium in Warsaw occupied by a market that has become an institution is on the side of the itinerant street vendors in Los Angeles, and the homeless in Milan, who hide in abandoned cars, look across to their counterparts in Tokyo, who can be recognised by the characteristic blue tarpaulin provided by the city council. It is clear that the setting for each case is different, but the forms of appropriation of space are very similar, although in different locations. Put together the puzzle of the informal city. Close-knit relationship between the observation, production and dissemination of the work The intention is to maintain, at all times, a close relationship with the territory that will be staging the exhibition and to promote parallel activities, workshops and lecture series related to the specificity of each place. The CCCB is the nerve centre of this living, retransmissive space which reflects the desire that, after touching down in Barcelona, the project can be disseminated, with its incongruences and incoherences, which perhaps find their fundamental aporia in the exhibition: showing these phenomena – which often survive due to their scant visibility, officiousness, and the difficulties planning encounters when defining them and, consequently, suppressing them – means, in a certain sense, undermining them at their foundations, or, as we hope, making it possible for the awareness that an another city exists to become a useful element to be taken into account in the next urban planning scheme that is able to leave space open to the unforeseen and to accommodate an «inappropriate» use of space which often proves to be more stimulating.


Theoretica issue

How has corporate America altered the general public’s view one shared public space?

Uncertain States of Europe by Stefano Boeri Succession of colonization and external reinterpretations of monuments and cultures of inhabitation within a tolerant and “open” system of rules. Fundamentally, European space is transformed by accumulation, addition, and superimposition, but rarely by outright replacement or elimination. The invention of new urban entities, new typologies of habitat, does not depend on tabula rasa, as it may in other cultures of inhabitation; rather it demands the reuse and reconversion of the existing urban materials. Territorial mutation and self-organization Phenomena are created and shaped by the actors taking part in a particular system, rather than by external and imposing institutions. Thus they rely on individual or specialized, as opposed to centralized knowledge; they do not correspond to hierarchical or centralized regulation systems but are the result of a temporal thickening of local structures. Marginal hidden areas beyond the perimeter of our gaze

LOOSE SPACE: Pursue a very rich variety of activities not originally intended for those locations In all such cases, through peoples activates, spaces become “loose” Emergence of loose space For a site to become loose, people themselves must recognize the possibilities inherent in it and make use of those possibilities for their own ends, facing the potential risk of doing so. Varies with place for building type, types being the main term types order activities and the manner of carrying them out some types allow for more freedom of choice of activities and more means of carrying them out hard architecture versus soft architecture [movable and not] type = interconnected set of features of form, use and meaning, often particular to a specific culture People’s actions make the space loose “Cities are composed of a great variety of place types. In between the more constraining ones, the private and enclosed places of the city, lie public spaces, often outdoors, where definitions and expectations are less exclusive and more fluid where there is greater accessibility and freedom of choice for people to pursue a variety of activities” Breathing spaces of city life – opportunities for exploration and discovery, for the unexpected, the unregulated and spontaneous and the risky Leisure, entertainment, self-expression or political expression, reflection and social interactions

May occur only once, or may occur on a regular schedule Unfamiliar, strange, disruptive, unruly, temporary [minutes, months or years] Occur without assurance of continuity and permanence from those in authority Possibly camouflaged except to those in the known Loose spaces give cities life and validity Loose spaces allow for the chance encounter, the spontaneous event, the enjoyment of diversity and the discovery of the unexpected Placing people in a role of Active creator or participant rather than the passive consumerism of privatization Free access Anonymity among strangers Diversity of persons Fluidity of meaning “The ‘Right to the City’ encompasses the ‘right to freedom, to individualization, to habitat and inhabit’ as well as rights to participation and appropriation” Strangers require a reason to engage with each other Negative or void to the city of named and fixed types of open space *abandoned railroad maintenance building in Denver becomes an unofficial “museum of graffiti:

What brings the public to utilize and interact with space [with or without architectural interventions]? TIME ZONES: ALTERNATIVE SPACES OR TERRITORIES OF CONTROL SOCIETY? 
 Alessandro Petti Temporary zones seem to fluctuate continuously between control and freedom, between dominance and resistance. This is an age-old struggle, which is countered, on the one hand, by the attempt to conquer spaces of freedom, and, on the other, by the power that always seeks to invade every space. It is hard to say which came first: the free zones that power seeks to occupy, or the power structures that men try to counteract with forms of resistance. What is certain is that, today, both forms use temporality more as an instrument of control than resistance. How can we finally construct a post-it city that can escape control and institutionalization, a city that, in the final analysis, knows how to reinvent itself continuously? Or, on the contrary, if power has already definitively occupied temporary practices, mightn’t it be time, for whoever is interested in new spatial and lifestyle forms, to face up to overt power and start working on the concept of permanence, monument and stability?


How can architecture be interactive?

architectura issue

Informal is a phenomenon of multiple dimensions and this is why, in order to address it, we have to consider, simultaneously, economic, political, cultural and town-planning aspects as interrelated fields that are intercepted by questions of the contemporary subject. TIME ZONES: ALTERNATIVE SPACES OR TERRITORIES OF CONTROL SOCIETY? 
Alessandro Petti Temporary zones seem to fluctuate continuously between control and freedom, between dominance and resistance. This is an age-old struggle, which is countered, on the one hand, by the attempt to conquer spaces of freedom, and, on the other, by the power that always seeks to invade every space. It is hard to say which came first: the free zones that power seeks to occupy, or the power structures that men try to counteract with forms of resistance. What is certain is that, today, both forms use temporality more as an instrument of control than resistance. How can we finally construct a post-it city that can escape control and institutionalization, a city that, in the final analysis, knows how to reinvent itself continuously? Or, on the contrary, if power has already definitively occupied temporary practices, mightn’t it be time, for whoever is interested in new spatial and lifestyle forms, to face up to overt power and start working on the concept of permanence, monument and stability?

How can architecture embrace the transformative need of the public?

Adaptation to a new framework Innovative form of sociality that takes place in specific places and develops partial, temporary, fleeting emotions Slightest of links between its places of aggregation and their appearances A vacant lot, a strip along the edges of transportation infrastructures, a void that opens up temporarily in a zone of dense construction: chance will define it, by the sum total of stratifications (or subtractions) which, in the course of time, have produced an uncertain, undefinable result, at least in the technical terminology that habitually characterizes the city. This is the case of the shopping center-parking lots evoked above, which at night or on holidays become gathering points. The proximity of the major road infrastructures makes them a possible interval, a stopover on a car trip. You suddenly leave the flow, but remain in direct visual communication with it. The automobile becomes a complementary element of this temporary occupation: it marks off a space and signals a momentary presence. Constellation of spaces, “Light up” and “go dark,” the public life of the European city seems to find the energy of regeneration. Stefano Boeri has called a “territorial intimacy,” which continually brings their residual nature, their marginality into a state of tension. Occupying a space which belongs to no one, doing so temporarily but repeatedly, giving it another meaning inside a small group without modifying its spatial and material nature, is not an attitude which prefigures any particular demand: for example the demand for “inhabitable space,” or any other environmental condition, or nay new services. Post-It City rediscovers the dimension of “do it yourself,” as Colin Ward says, a dimension which is above all creative and abounds in its own proposals and reflection. This “do it yourself” denounces the hidden, spasmodic will to impose a practice of collective space, it is foreign to the preordained and preconstituted models of habitat.

What elements of architecture bring public activity?

Can architecture create?

empower

individuals

to

Communities in the midst of urban change / / 
Pelin Tan The cities are in transition. The terms “city” and “metropolis” have represented the utopia of cosmopolitanism: diversified communities and the right to participate in public space. In recent decades, however, we have witnessed the failure of urban utopias and the notion of the elite modern citizen. Research that had as its objective the narration of a phenomenon, of a tactic of conquering space, of its temporary or sporadic occupation. The informal, improvisation and marginality seemed to be, from the very outset, the most suitable themes, worthy of an attempt to build an archive in progress about the post-it phenomenon

What makes architecture flexible and temporary?

Post-it City: http://www.ciutatsocasionals.net/ “La Varra calls these spaces and their uses Post-it City: ‘a fragile and fragmentary network which filters into the tightly woven structures of urban public space” It is a case of empty places, residual spaces, and places forgotten by the town planning process and which are located on the edges of the main lines of communication of the city. The Post-it space is secondly a temporary space. In it activities unfold at certain times of the day or night. During the rest of the time, no indication of them remains within it. Thirdly, the Post-it space is an intensified space, a no-man’s land that is available for all kinds of collective practices. The Post-it city is a criticism of the design of contemporary public spaces in Europe, spaces that are more and more formalized, financed, and sophisticated, spaces that are less and less spontaneous and real. La Varra proposes resisting the standardization of public behavior that the “official” European public space induces. Poetizations created in the urban space Post-it City. Occasional Cities / / 
Marti Peran Designed for, the temporary occupations of public space planned from ingenuity, recycling and parasitic action, reveal a singularized subjectivity, put in place and ready to institute, in an autonomous way, an imaginary different to the hegemonic one. Is to abolish the communal illusion as an objective, and to focus attention on the mechanisms through which subjectivity aspires to a full life beyond the private perimeter of romantic intimacy, but also far removed from community consensus. This converts these practices, almost inevitably, into acts of sabotage, but this is precisely the discreet seed of revolution according to which, thanks to this powerful return to subjectivity, it could found and articulate its own sociability mechanisms. There is a long-standing tradition in the social sciences, which are fascinated by disorder – led by the Chicago School and Michel de Certau

How does architecture adapt and engage with society?

Vanessa Keith: we have long been interested in the combination of architecture, landscape, and technology, and believe in the potential of the built environment to be both ecologically and socially performative. rather than continuing to put up structures which are merely containers for the occupants within, architects are beginning to explore smart envelopes which react to the building’s local conditions and surroundings. this is good, but it still needs to go a few steps further. we are also very interested in the building’s place at the urban scale, and in the ability of cities to be retrofitted in such a way as to begin to solve our problems in place rather than by starting from scratch. this could be with devices, such as our remediators, which can have a dual civic/ environmental function, or with clip-on architecture, an idea we developed last summer in a research project, which begins to work at the urban scale.


Site and contex informatio

4.0


Aerial Photo & Maps of Sit

Purposed site

Gowanus New York


Marsh filled in; canal is created by deepening, widening and walling a natural creek to make it navigable; it is “a passage to nowhere” ending 1.5 miles from the bay; first industry related to the building boom in Brooklyn, lots of bars, rooming houses, and sailors

Marshy inlet with game, fish, oysters; Gowanus oysters exported to Europe

1766 1836

1848 A newspaper calls the canal “a blot on America’s civilization”; barges used to boat through it to kill barnacles; For half a century was a “maritime superhighway for barges bearing coal, sand, oil, and brick”

1874

Pollution and smell are so bad (hydrogen sulfide), that city at one point dumped in truckloads of chlorine to neutralize the smell; hydrogen sulfide is from sewage overflow, sediment sinks to bottom and decomposes and creates bubbles of the smell.

1893 1903 GCCDC presents comprehensive community plan addressing restoration, development of residential and mixed-use zones, and canal access rights

2005


Site Analysis

industrial

Gowanus Canal dredged in the late 1800’s as an industrial corridor for Brooklyn. This rapid development lead to quick decay and evacuation due to chemical contamination and industrial poison. Leaving a scar through the center of the Gowanus Neighborhood.

dead space

With abandoned lots scattered throughout the industrial corridor of the Gowanus Canal, many of the vacant and restricted sites result in dead zones, or non-permeable land. These unapproachable lots separate and dissolve the community atmosphere.


zoning

APART OF THE COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN PLAN FOR THE NEIGHBORHOOD IS A RE-ZONING, SEPARATING PRIMARILY INDUSTRIAL TO THE SOUTH AND MIX-USE NORTH OF 3RD AVENUE.

historical

contamination

REMNANTS OF AND INDUSTRIAL BOOM OF THE EARLY 1900’S LEFT MANY FACTORY BUILDINGS AS HISTORIC LANDMARKS, PUTTING FOCUS AND ATTENTION ON THE IMPORTANCE OF ADAPTIVE REUSE AND UTILIZING THE STRUCTURES THAT BREATHE CHARACTER INTO THE GOWANUS CORRIDOR.

Rapid industrialization lead to increased dumping and contaminating of the active Gowanus Canal. The last few decades have been devoted to dredging, cleaning and bringing life back into the organic estuary that roamed these fertile lands.

open space

WITH A HEAVY INDUSTRIAL AREA LITTLE SPACE HAS BEEN DEVOTED TO PUBLIC, SHARED USE. MOSTLY DIVIDED BY PRIVATE CORPORATE LOTS, MARKED WITH TRESPASSING SIGNS

vacant

In result of the recent recession as well as the approval of the Gowanus Canal Superfund site, many sizable lots are left vacant and boarded up. Many illegal occupants have claimed these structures and created individual communities and neighborhoods within the walls of abandoned factories, warehouses and residences.


Proteus Gowanus [Nevins street between Union and Sakkett street]

Brooklyn Creative League [President street btw 3rd and 4th Ave]

Bell house [7th street btw 2nd and 3rd Ave]

Brooklyn Artists Gym [7th street btw 2nd and 3rd Ave] King Killer Studio [2nd Ave and 9th street]

The Doghouse NYC Studios [10th street btw 2nd and 3rd Ave]


Life cycles of buildings = sustainable Green community fuses landscape and buildings Valuing place Providing community facility and services Design green spaces Build with environmentally sustainable materials New job opportunities that are community based Redevelopment of under utilized or vacant land Increase building social and community cohesion Appearance Environmental qualities Networking Development of green industries Redevelopment Second avenue corridor - market MTA Power Plant Site Special Mixed Use Zoning District Zoning generally divides the community into districts Special mixed zones Sustainability: encourages adaptive reuse of existing structures Development densities, building heights, set backs and landscape standards Canal Improvement District Public/private sector partnership

Gowanus CANA purpose

VISION STATEMENT Environmental renewal Achieving economic health Binds the community together Gain a new spatial and cultural significance to Gowanus’ residential and business environments

Purpose of the plan Restore health to the canal and utilize it as a public amenity Launch and embrace a community-wide “green� initiative Retain and enhance the unique mix of residential, retail, commercial and industrial uses in Gowanus Retain the low intensity development character of Gowanus Retain and improve the industrial/commercial district to the south Reinforce the mixed-use (residential commercial and industrial) district to the north Improve and increase public open spaces throughout the community Encourage adaptive reuse of existing buildings


Site Documentatio


Founded in 1896, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Corporation was an attempt by the city to consolidate all the steam railroads and elevated and streetcar lines in Brooklyn. This Romanesque Revival, brick Central Power Station was built in 1902 to fashionably support this newly consolidated system. The power system pioneered a new kind of powering technology called alternating current to replace the generated direct current used in power stations built in the previous century. Alternating current was a technological advancement since this kind of system was better able to transmit power over long distances, with the advantage that power stations could be spaced at greater distances apart. The plant was located adjacent to the Gowanus Canal, giving it easy access to barges carrying the coal needed to fuel its boilers. At one time a coal elevator stood along side the canal and fed coal from the barges to a conveyor that carried it through a tunnel directly into one of two boiler buildings in the power plant. The generating equipment was in a separate dynamo building. By 1938, the boiler buildings were gone and the dynamo building was empty. It was later used as a warehouse by another owner while the MTA placed electrical equipment in the nearby yard and a new building. By 1977, the dynamo building was the lone remnant of the site’s power-generating past.


Program

5.0


Program Type an Descriptio based off of the success of public squares the organization patterns for each floor, is based off of the constant movement and development of the general public. How people interact with spaces and each other was key to zoning each floor. With permeable edges along the walls that connect to the outside, a scattering of hanging hubs, are centralized as hubs of activities, bringing activity and life into the space, rather than limiting the social activities amongst the exterior walls.

Developing a program is based of the functions of altering the materiality of the skins in which encompass the space. Each space is prescribed by the manipulation of materiality. where in this case plastic bags are used to depict the use and occupation of each skin. Whether rain protection, insulation, water catchment, waste removal, acoustical buffer, or natural ventilation is needed, the plastic can be personally manipulated to conform to the utilitarian program that is required, rather than just a typical organizational program, this is a manipulative and developmental program.


design stuDY

6.0


plastic bag [flat]

folded heat press

insulating properties pinched

plastic bag [open]

insulative pouch

structural support

waterproof facade

h20 collector


Bibliography

7.0


“Architecture is inextricably linked to our urban condition and that each of the projects featured here is first and foremost a constituent element of our global system or cities” “There is no architecture without action or without program, and that architecture’s importance resides in its ability to accelerate society’s transformation through a careful agencing of spaces and events” “There is no architecture without the city, no city without architecture” “Urban generators or architectural systems that are actual catalysts for every kind of activity or function” Tschumi, Bernard. Event Cities. Cambridge, Massachusetts [etc.: MIT, 2000. Print.

This book examines physical spaces and how people use them. Contributors discuss a wide range of Åsome are conventional, others are more experimental. Some of the activities occur alongside the intended uses of planned public spaces, such as sidewalks and plazas’ other activities replace former uses, as in abandoned warehouses and industrial sites. Franck, Karen A., and Quentin Stevens, eds. Loose Space: Possibility and Diversity in Urban Life. London: Routledge, 2007. Print.

From parking spaces being transformed into temporary parks, to metal pigs being deposited on sidewalks, to “sleep-in” protests, public spaces around the world are often utilized in unconventional and unusual ways. Frequently going against their traditional uses, citizens and activists are reclaiming and retaining places for temporary, informal gathering in urban sites across the globe. Hou, Jeffrey. Insurgent Public Space: Guerrilla Urbanism and the Remaking of Contemporary Cities. New York: Routledge, 2010. Print. Bobic, Miloš. Between the Edges: Street-building Transition as Urbanity Interface. Bussum [Netherlands: Thoth, 2004. Print. Private and public - Lead to conclusions that raise the question: Is the urbanity of traditional cities a result of activities of responsible and decent citizens that constructively coped with their living environment, or is it a result of their conflict? Going beyond an analysis of urban limits, this book focuses on the “space in-between” where the superimposition between public and private domains occurs. In part, the effort has resulted in a book with a wide overview of spatial forms of the transitional zone between the building and the street-interface, which can be viewed as a small scale core of urbanity.


A

Richard Kelly Jr 204 Godwin Ave Wyckoff, NJ. 07481

T [201] 956.0382 richard.kelly.jr@gmail.com E


thank you

Thesis Portfolio  

my theoretical portfolio

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