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hands up for our children

There are many different ways you can assist the Foundation in our fundraising endeavours – make a donation, attend or sponsor special events, hold your own event or join an auxiliary – we have something for everyone. The future health and wellbeing of our children rests with each of us.

Campus Partners

Our year in review 2009 – 2010

You can become part of the wonderful family of RCH Foundation supporters by getting involved.


Contents A history of giving – 140 years of generosity

01

A celebration of life and love

21

Contact us

Financial outline

02

Fab Five have a ball

22

For more information about The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation and its fundraising activities, please contact:

A message from the Foundation

03

A coming of age gift

23

Many minds one goal

04

Responding with love

24

A message from The Royal Children’s Hospital 05

A friend indeed

25

Twins’ success shines spotlight on hospital

06

A tradition of caring

25

New hospital signals a bright future

08

A ray of hope for neuroblastoma

26

Creativity is the key for Good Friday Appeal

10

A helping hand for burns nurses

27

Appeal is real winner in Run for the Kids

11

Henry’s big test may be a first

28

A passion for helping

12

Why going to emergency is no longer a pain

29

From little things big things grow

13

A heart set on better outcomes

30

The lady with the hair – and the heart

14

In pursuit of the big picture

30

Mother Goose – Rhymes for a reason

15

In search of knobbly knees

31

Pledge allegiance to better health for diabetics 16

A bow from the man with the bow tie

32

Making a difference for kids with cancer

17

A step forward in the quest for answers

33

Quest for a magic bullet

18

Becoming a youth friendly hospital

34

Comfort First eases stress

18

Tarli’s beads tell a story of their own

19

A big hand up for those working with young people

36

Sparkies dare to make a difference

20

Sisters’ legacy shows way for doctors

38

Common goals, uncommon generosity

39

A message from our new Executive Director, Sue Hunt

40

Major donors

41

Bequests

42

Trusts and Foundations

42

In honour

43

Board of Governors

44

Committees

44

Contact us

45

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation 50 Flemington Road, Parkville VIC 3052 Phone + 61 3 9345 5037 Fax + 61 3 9345 6900 E-mail rch.foundation@rch.org.au www.rchfoundation.org.au ABN 15 007 143 142 RCH1000 Phone + 61 3 9345 5143 The Royal Children’s Hospital Auxiliaries Phone + 61 3 9345 5188 www.rch.org.au/rchaux Good Friday Appeal Phone + 61 3 9292 1166 www.goodfridayappeal.com.au Volunteers Phone + 61 3 9345 5880 www.rch.org.au/volunteers The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne Phone + 61 3 9345 5522 www.rch.org.au Thanks to Design: Commotion Creative & Educational Resource Centre, RCH Photography: Jerry Galea Photography & Educational Resource Centre, RCH Writer: Jane Cafarella

(Cover) Little Rupert de Wolff can expect to live a normal, healthy life thanks to life-saving cardiac surgery performed by Royal Children’s Hospital surgeons. After spending four days in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, eight-month-old Rupert is all smiles. Photo courtesy of the Herald Sun.

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A history of giving 140 years of generosity In the 1860s, when the need for a free children’s hospital in Melbourne was first contemplated, whooping cough, diphtheria, scarlet fever, typhoid, tuberculosis and measles were rife.

Back in the 1860s, financing hospitals was seen as a function of charity, rather than government. From 1870 to 1900, government grants only accounted for 14,700 pounds of the hospital’s 144,000 pounds of total capital and current expenditure.

The children of the poor, living in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions, were especially susceptible.

The rest came from private donations, subscriptions, endowments and fundraising activities. Members of the hospital’s committee of management – all women – were the largest contributors.

Even if they could afford a doctor, there was little hope as there were no specific treatments available other than good food and skilled nursing. How times have changed. Today’s children are the beneficiaries of 140 years of medical advancement. Science and technology have contributed to huge improvements in diagnosis, research, education and treatment – solving many of yesterday’s diseases and now working hard to find the solutions to eradicate today’s. But none of this would have been possible without the generosity of Victorians – then and now. Right from the start, the public has been both the beneficiary of the treatment and care provided by The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) – and at the same time, its major supporter.

Collectors were appointed to raise money for the hospital’s day-to-day running expenses, but much of the fundraising was left to the committee. Then, as now, the success of this depended on hard work and ingenuity. The first of many spectacular bazaars in aid of the building fund was held in 1872 and raised more than 2,000 pounds. Thus the tradition of giving was begun and continues to this day, marking 140 years of generosity. The people who put their hands in their pockets then to build a better future for sick children would be proud to see how their dream has been realized today.

Right from the start, the public has been both the beneficiary of the treatment and care provided by The Royal Children’s Hospital – and at the same time, its major supporter.” They would be proud to see that their trust and investment in the future has paid off and continues to pay off, thanks to the enduring generosity of the seven generations that came after them. It’s a partnership of which the hospital is immensely grateful and proud. Today, the RCH is a world leader in caring for sick children and in working towards the cause and prevention of disease. It is our hope that thanks to your continued support, the diseases that are common in children today will also be eradicated. It’s an ideal, but not a fanciful one: the past 140 years are proof enough of that. They are also proof that we cannot do it alone. That’s why, through our Year in Review, we thank and salute you, our donors and supporters, and invite you to join us, hand-in-hand, to make our next 140 years of dreams of a better world for sick children come true. •

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(Above) Sporting Globe, Herald Sun staff counting the money – late 1940s. 3DB’s Curtis Crawford and Elisabeth Murdoch announcing the total for the 1955 Appeal. Collectors on bicycles – late 1950s.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

01


Financial outline

Foundation income Source

$

%

Good Friday Appeal

14,462,000

35.9%

Bequests, trusts and foundations

10,900,810

27.1%

Other public donations

8,231,434

20.5%

Investment income

6,642,532

16.5%

40,236,776

100.0%

$

%

Distributions to the hospital

15,216,368

37.8 %

Future distribution commitments

15,628,126

38.9%

Future Fund

5,678,663

14.1%

Fundraising costs

3,713,619

9.2%

40,236,776

100.0%

Total

How funds were used

Total

How hospital funds were spent

02

$

%

Research

4,795,891

31.5%

Talent

5,929,864

39.0%

Technology

1,283,089

8.4%

RCH International

2,835,066

18.6%

Other

372,458

2.5%

Total

15,216,368

100.0%

The Royal Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010


A message from the Foundation This year’s publication reflects on the 140th anniversary of The Royal Children’s Hospital, and in particular the generosity of the Victorian public who have supported our children’s hospital in so many ways over so many years. As you will read further on, the very beginnings of this hospital back in 1860 owes its existence to the public of Victoria who saw the need and were prepared to roll up their sleeves to make it happen. That generosity has continued unabated over 14 decades, each year reinforcing that helping our sick children is at the very heart of Victorians’ emotions. And of special significance, as our armed forces continue to fight in places far from home, is the extraordinary donation of $1.5 million which we received this year from the Victorian Branch of the Rats of Tobruk Association. This generosity will continue to be acknowledged on our neuroscience ward and each year a neuroscience fellowship will be presented and named in their honour – Lest We Forget.

Sue Hunt Executive Director Julian Clarke Chairman, Board of Governors

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation wishes to sincerely thank the many thousands of Victorians who, either through public campaigns such as the Good Friday Appeal, or Run for the Kids, or the literally hundreds of events and fundraising activities, make it possible to provide our sickest children with the chance to enjoy a healthy life. Throughout the following pages you will read of amazing stories of generosity, many of which occurred because families of sick children have wanted to express their thanks for the love and attention their children have received from the hospital’s wonderful staff and talented professionals. In the financial year to June 30, 2010, the Foundation has been able to direct $15 million to areas the hospital has nominated as its priorities, namely, research, technology and the development of staff. Also, set aside for future expenditure is a further $15 million, the major centre-piece is the purchase of the very latest intraoperative MRI at a cost of approximately $12 million, to be installed in the new hospital.

This equipment, the first of its kind in Australia and one of the first in the world, will be located in the operating theatres precinct and robotically capable of transferring itself to either the neurosurgery theatre or the cardiac theatre, or be used separately for other purposes. This will revolutionise the current practice of having to transfer patients, possibly mid-operation, to a fixed MRI position. None of this is possible without the amazing support of the hospital’s devoted supporters, for which we sincerely thank you. Those who founded the hospital so many years ago had the foresight and the will to create a hospital of international standing. Undoubtedly that light burns just as bright as ever, as next year we open our new hospital. We look forward to continuing our partnership with our many supporters. Thank you indeed. • Sue Hunt Executive Director Julian Clarke Chairman, Board of Governors

Major funding highlights $

$

Murdoch Childrens Research programs

4,270,153

Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery

203,639

RCH Children’s Cancer Centre – research

1,112,687

Social Work

202,094

Professorial chairs and medical fellowships

905,425

Gastroenterology

169,001

Career grants and scholarships

900,000

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

154,461

RCH Foundation scholarships

683,874

Endocrinology

154,227

RCH nursing services

466,088

Neuroscience Centre – research and equipment

149,432

Play Therapy / Music Therapy

442,915

Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

139,681

Anaesthesia, Pain Management and equipment

357,909

Developmental Medicine

139,456

RCH Education Resource Centre and equipment

329,320

General Medicine

134,501

Children’s Bioethics Centre

315,200

RCH Centre for Adolescent Health

129,795

Integrated Mental Health programs

309,531

Orthopaedics

114,059

Health Information Technology and services

227,319

RCH Laboratory Services

100,000

Respiratory Medicine and equipment

222,716

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

03


Many minds, one goal The saying that it takes a village to raise a child is never truer than when a sick child enters The Royal Children Hospital (RCH).

Hand in hand, they are working to ensure not only the best treatment for sick children today, but a better future for the children of tomorrow.

The world-class treatment that children receive at the hospital is the result of four vital partnerships combining research, education and clinical care and the commitment to ensure that funds are available to support this.

Professor Paul Monagle, who is Stevenson Chair of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne and Director of Haematology at the hospital, as well as an MCRI group leader, explains: “By bringing together the power of all those three individual entities, the RCH, the MCRI and the University of Melbourne, we actually have a campus that is more than just a sum of our individual parts.

The campus partners, as they are known, comprise The Royal Children’s Hospital itself, the University of Melbourne’s Department of Paediatrics, the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI) and The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation, which supports the hospital through fundraising. Most staff members have appointments to some or all of the campus partners.

The aim for the campus partners would be to work together in ways that improve child health both now and in the future. And that’s achieved through the clinical care, through education and training of the next generations and through research.”

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(Below) Rose Morgan, oncology patient

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The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

Hand in hand, they are working to ensure not only the best treatment for sick children today, but a better future for the children of tomorrow.” Clinical care that is enhanced by world-leading research means that you are keeping your clinical care at the front edge of what’s available, he says. “So I think it means access to the best available clinical care. I think having an environment that also places a heavy premium on teaching and learning means that there is a continuing questioning of what we’re doing. We are always looking forward to how we are going to make it better for the next group coming through.” •


A message from The Royal Children’s Hospital We have had a wonderful year here at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), leading into the celebrations for our 140th anniversary and just over a year until the move to our new hospital, right next door to the site we have occupied in Parkville for the past 47 years. During our 140 year history, one constant in our success has been the support of communities and individuals across Victoria, Australia and around the world. Our hospital was in fact built on philanthropic support and in 2010 we continue to be humbled by the generosity of those who give of time, money and resources in support of our great hospital. Indeed the RCH has always held a special place in the hearts of so many people, and it is these people who share our passion for the health and well being of children, that enable us to purchase the very latest equipment, conduct ground-breaking research and provide the very best in staff education and training.

This support profoundly changes the way we are able to deliver care, providing better outcomes for our young patients. Of course, the separation of twins Krishna and Trishna in late 2009 really captured the hearts of not only all Australians, but people globally who watched and waited through the 32 hour surgery to separate the young girls.

During our 140 year history, one constant in our success has been the support of communities and individuals across Victoria, Australia and around the world.”

It was a wonderful team effort that goes to the heart of our enduring values. And it was wonderful to see the team responsible recognised with prestigious 2010 RSL ANZAC of the Year Award. This year, the hospital was also awarded the Committee for Melbourne, 2010 Melbourne Achiever Award, awarded annually for outstanding contributions to the Melbourne community. Both awards are a wonderful recognition of the hard work, dedication and commitment of our staff and the values that drive what we do. Our role as one of the world’s great children’s hospitals would not be possible without our many supporters and I would like to thank those who are too numerous to name, but who are part of our history and our future. • Professor Christine Kilpatrick Chief Executive Officer, The Royal Children’s Hospital

Professor Christine Kilpatrick Chief Executive Officer, The Royal Children’s Hospital

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

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Twinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; success shines spotlight on hospital

The Royal Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital has always been a leader in clinical care, education and research, both locally and internationally. But this year it attracted international attention, thanks to the success of an operation to save the lives of conjoined twins Trishna and Krishna. The twins, originally from Bangladesh, were brought to Australia by the Children First Foundation two years ago in the hope that the hospital could save them. In that time, they underwent many procedures, many of them complex, difficult and dangerous, to lay the ground work for the final operation to separate them.

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The operation was a triumph and a fitting pinnacle for the hospital’s 140th anniversary this year.”

> (Right) Members of the surgical team

Finally, last November, Australia and the rest of the world watched and waited while a team of more than 16 medical staff, led by neurosurgeons Wirginia Maixner and Alison Wray, worked for 32 hours to separate the girls. Now, almost four years old, the twins are recovering remarkably well. Trishna is doing all the things a normal four year old does, and Krishna is fast catching up. The story of Trishna and Krishna captured the imagination of the public worldwide. But Wirginia Maixner says it did more than save the lives of two very sick little girls. She says that for the first time, an international spotlight was shone on the work of the hospital, giving it an opportunity to showcase its wealth of talent and expertise. “I think what it really highlighted was the team, to be honest,” she says. “It was an enormous logistical exercise, as so many contingencies had to be catered for.” One of the biggest achievements was combining the wealth of knowledge and expertise in the hospital and working together successfully to find solutions. “It was truly like planning a military exercise, getting that many people together. “There were so many people who in one way or another at some point contributed to the girls’ care. And that was anything from the high-end specialists to theatre techs to medical imaging to the people who cleaned the

room and the people who prepared their meals. Somebody somewhere had some affiliation to the girls.” It also made everyone “think outside the box”, Wirginia says. “Because we had to invent things and we had to multi plan things, we were constantly working out ways to adapt what we had to deal with this contingency.” One of the biggest challenges was the cross circulations between the girls, particularly the venous circulation. Co-incidentally, at the same time, the MRI department was trialling a new technique which allowed the team to use an MRI scan to show blood flow between one side and the other. “So that was something that did come out of it and we were able to use the sequences to treat the girls and we use those sequences for other things now,” Wirginia says. New information was also gleaned about how drugs affected the circulation. The operation was a triumph and a fitting pinnacle for the hospital’s 140th anniversary this year. For the staff, the national and international attention was recognition for the work they do every day. “The twins were a once in a lifetime – no question. But we do good work every day,” Wirginia says. “We do phenomenal work every day. And most of that is unsung. So here was just one occasion where people said, ‘Wow – you did a great job!’

“That’s I think what the twins did. It took that glimpse that families see and that the public sees and just put it up there. It shone a great big spotlight.” Just how bright that spotlight was, came as a shock for both Wirginia and fellow surgeon Alison Wray. “Alison and I were in theatre for such a long time and we knew there was a media interest but we had no idea what sort of media interest it was.” As a result, Wirginia received many invitations to speak about the operation publically – most of which were refused because it would mean one less child who was treated that day. “That’s not what I set my life out to do. What I set out to do was to become a neurosurgeon and that’s my job – not to be a spokesperson. So the notoriety was a double-edged sword. I think it’s fantastic because it showcases what the hospital does. But it was a bit difficult because I’m not used to being under the limelight like that.” The attention she most enjoyed came from her daughter, Harriott, 16. The week of the operation was bad timing as Harriott had exams. Wirginia had hoped to be home before midnight to support her and take her to school the next day. “Well, I wasn’t home at midnight. I wasn’t there for her exams. And then when I finished, she cooked me this celebratory dinner which I finally ate at something like midnight.” Harriott had been too tired to stay up and so had gone to bed. “There was this beautiful three-course dinner. I was just so touched.” •

The story of Trishna and Krishna captured the imagination of the public worldwide.”

< (Left) Wirginia Maixner, Director, Neurosurgery and Alison Wray, Neurosurgeon with twins Krishna and Trishna

> (Right) The surgical team at work

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A passion for excellence Whether they are working in clinical care, conducting vital research, teaching, or helping to raise money through The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation and the community – our staff, partners and donors have one thing in common – a passion for excellence in the treatment and care of sick children, today and in the future. It’s what drives us all. This year, this passion has meant that the children who came under our care have received the best treatment possible, whether through the world class talent that the hospital attracts, the state of the art equipment that we have been able to purchase, the ground-breaking research and first class teaching. Our donors have been our partners and our inspiration in this journey. Their initiative, generosity and dedication are always surprising and humbling. Our 2010 Year in Review tells their stories and ours – why and how the money was raised and just some of what we were able to achieve with it. We hope you enjoy reading it and that we are able to inspire a similar passion in you.

New hospital signals a bright future In the late 1870s, The Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, as it is known today, was established in response to a rising child mortality rate. The items purchased to set up the hospital included six cots, a bedstead for the nurse, blankets, flannels, pails, a hip bath, towels, chairs, brooms and a table. The government of the day provided an initial grant of 50 pounds, but like most hospitals at the time, the new children’s hospital relied on private donations, so in December 1870 the first of many thousands of raffles was held. One hundred half-crown tickets were sold – the prize being “statuary”, donated by a Mrs Lloyd Jones. One hundred and forty years later, the Victorian Government is building us a world-class $1 billion new Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). As the building takes shape, it is worth noting how much has changed – and how much has remained the same. Today, as then, we rely on philanthropy to provide funds for the outstanding research, teaching and equipment that underpins our clinical practice. The new hospital, to be opened at the end of 2011, is designed with the future in mind. The wonderful new building more truly reflects the needs of today’s children, families and staff.

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It will feature patient and familycentred facilities; it will be surrounded by parkland and it will support the continued advances in treatment and technology that are so profoundly changing and improving outcomes for patients.

Such advances herald an exciting new period in the history of the hospital. They save time, distress and lives.”

Many of these are the result of innovations and inventions that could not have been imagined when the hospital was first established.

That’s why we must continue to preserve funds to ensure that we can continue to strive to find the answers to today’s problems and take advantage of the technology of tomorrow.

Today, not only have the reasons that children get sick changed, but so has the way we diagnose and treat them. Medical imaging in particular allows more precise and safer diagnoses and guidance during surgery.

This will ensure that our new RCH maintains the tradition of the old and continues to be recognised internationally as a leading centre for clinical care, research and education. •

One such piece of equipment which the hospital has just ordered is a mobile intraoperative MRI. This will transform the ability of surgeons to receive vital medical images without having to interrupt surgery. Such advances herald an exciting new period in the history of the hospital. They save time, distress and lives. But this state of the art equipment does not come cheaply. For this piece of equipment alone we have set aside $12 million of the Foundation’s funds. As we prepare for the exciting and complex task of moving into the new hospital late next year, we cannot know what other advances await us. All we can do is make sure we are prepared for them.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

> (Right) Artist Impression of the new Royal Children’s Hospital


This will ensure that our new hospital maintains the tradition of the old and continues to be recognised internationally as a leading centre for clinical care, research and education.â&#x20AC;?

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Creativity is the key for

Good Friday Appeal If there’s one thing that our fundraisers have in common, apart from an unwavering commitment to The Royal Children’s Hospital, it’s creativity. While the Channel Seven Telethon may be the best known event of the Good Friday Appeal (GFA), throughout the year donors came up with some ingenious ideas to help the hospital – from competing for the world record game of underwater noughts and crosses in Melbourne’s Fed Square to a golf challenge on the Nullarbor. “It’s just fabulous,” says GFA Director Christine Unsworth. “What’s so good is that people embrace this. They are constantly creating new ways to help us.”

What’s so good is that people embrace this. They are constantly creating new ways to help us.”

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Along the way, they also invest in their communities – and have fun. This year, the appeal raised a record $14.462 million. This is Christine’s 13th year heading the appeal, and she admits that every year she hopes but dares not dream about the appeal tally. “I guesstimate about what it will be and I don’t think I’ve ever managed to get it right. It always exceeds our expectations,” she says. “We’re constantly amazed at the generosity of people, and the trust they place in the Good Friday Appeal and the hospital. People open up their lives to us in lots of ways. In many instances, they invite us into their homes – and their hospitality is overwhelming.” Many of our GFA donors are people whose children have been patients at the hospital, or who were patients themselves and now want to give back.

“These people have been through so much and yet they can still turn around and give something back,” Christine says. “It’s humbling.” Many say that they are doing it for other children. In country towns in particular, raising money for the GFA has become a tradition, so much so that area managers who find they can no longer continue, due to age or illness, almost always find someone else to take their place – passing the baton on. “This year, country towns collectively came in with a bigger contribution than ever before – $3.5 million, which is fantastic,” Christine says. Whether they are in the city or the country, all those who help the appeal have their hearts in the same place. Over the years, Christine has run out of ways to thank and acknowledge them. That’s why this year, there’s only one word: “Unbelievable.” •


Appeal is real winner in Run for the Kids There are some races where everyone’s a winner and the Herald Sun CityLink Run for the Kids is one of them. This year, more than 30,000 participants from all walks of life and levels of fitness took part in the race, which at just five years old is one of the Good Friday Appeal’s newest and most inclusive events. But the real winner was The Royal Children’s Hospital. This year, Run for the Kids, raised $1,001,631, with major sponsor CityLink generously rounding the overall donation to $1,050,000.

“Run for the Kids is a highlight of all of the activities that are on and around Good Friday,” Christine Unsworth, appeal Director says. “It’s a wonderful healthy pursuit, a family oriented activity, and a once-a-year opportunity to run across the Bolte Bridge and through the Domain tunnel.” For many participants, training and preparing for the 14.5km run is a metaphor for the challenges that are faced by many of the children at the hospital, particularly those needing long-term care. “Running for the kids is way of supporting them on that journey,” Christine says.

Run for the Kids is a highlight of all of the activities that are on and around Good Friday.” Thanks to the generosity of the Herald and Weekly Times and CityLink, the bulk of the entry fee paid by every participant goes directly to the appeal. “Our heartfelt thanks go to the Herald Sun and CityLink, for making this activity possible; to all the sponsors and donors who make it so memorable, and to all the participants who’ve made it such an event on Melbourne’s calendar in five short years.” •

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A passion for helping

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I love it. I don’t have a lot of money in life but I do what I can to help.”

(Above) Elie Freijah (seated) with friend Tim Palioudis

Most people dream of giving up work and putting their feet up. But not Elie Freijah. He dreams of giving up work and putting his hand out – collecting donations for The Royal Children’s Hospital.

“The next year, dad had the whole family involved in collecting money around Horsham, tin-shaking around the traffic lights there. That became an annual event involving all the family members in everything.

When his father had to bow out in 2006, Elie offered to help in the Geelong phone rooms. He spent a year working with co-ordinator Tracey Wagener, before being offered the job himself, “which I took over gladly”.

“I don’t know how to put it, but if I was rich enough to not work, it would give me more time to devote to it,” he says. “And as long as my kids are healthy, are well and no one needs my help or takes my time away, I’ll continue to do it.”

“Then when we moved to Geelong back in ‘86, we continued fundraising here: tin-shaking, doing our own door-to-door and all that.”

“I run the Geelong division. I run the phone room, the traffic lights, and the volunteers right across Geelong,” Elie says.

Elie had his kidney removed and underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy at the hospital before finally being given the all clear at age 16. “I’m still here, so that’s a good sign,” he says.

The annual market day where stall holders at Beckley Park donate their stall fees and sponsors donate items for the raffle is a highlight. “Ah it’s fun,” he says. “I love it. I don’t have a lot of money in life but I do what I can to help.” •

In 2008, as well as being a local real estate agent, Elie took on the job of voluntary co-ordinator for the Geelong division of the Good Friday Appeal – which raised a record $385,000. But his family first started shaking tins for the appeal after he was diagnosed with a tumour on his kidney at the age of four.

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So is his family – including his wife, Sally and children Max, three, and Olivia, five – still tin-shaking every Good Friday.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

> (Right) 2010 GFA Telethon country tally board


From little things big things grow You don’t have to be big to make a big difference. That’s the message from Telangatuk East, a farming community of around 120 people near the Grampians State Forest, west of Melbourne. The tiny community appeared on the Good Friday Appeal Channel Seven Telethon country tally board for the first time this year, having raised $6,242. Its contribution was inspired by five year old Joel Rees, who suffered a stroke at just three years of age. It was a week before Christmas in 2008, and Joel was playing outside with a friend on his family’s farm. “We had friends here at the time and his friend yelled out, ‘Mum – Joel’s crying’,” says his mother, Karen. By the time Karen went out, Joel was lying on the ground, completely paralysed down his left side. “Joel was rushed by ambulance to Horsham Hospital, then The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) flew a team

up to Horsham and flew Joel back to the RCH where they confirmed that he’d had a stroke,” Karen says.

started collecting on Good Friday, we had just over $3,000 and collected the other $3,000 on the day,” she says.

The family spent the next 10 weeks at the hospital for tests and rehabilitation.

“We had two cars. My mother and father-in-law, Gil and Glenda Reese went in one direction in a vehicle and then Luke and I and our three children, Joel, Alex and Mia, went in another direction and I think between us we did over 300 km for the day. “

Now five years old and in prep at Balmoral Community College, Joel wears a leg brace and still requires some treatment for his hand – but thanks to the work of the RCH, is otherwise doing well. “He’s doing most things that a five year old would do now,” Karen says. Karen and Luke were inspired to fundraise after witnessing the handover of a cheque for $1.5 million to the hospital’s neuroscience ward, where Joel was staying, from the Rats of Tobruk, generously donated from the sale of their Albert Park meeting hall in 2007. “I just found this to be a testament to what their money is being used for,” Karen says. Karen began emailing friends and family for support, who in turn emailed their family and friends. “Even before we

Last year, the town’s contribution of around $1,200 was pooled with funds collected from neighbouring Harrow, and Karen expected to collect a similar amount his year. “To turn around and get over $6,000, we were totally blown away. We couldn’t believe the support that we received. It was just wonderful.” •

Karen and Luke were inspired to fundraise after witnessing the handover of a cheque for $1.5 million to the hospital’s neuroscience ward.”

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Flannelette nightgowns and red flannel jackets were the most urgent items needed when 40 ladies met in 1922 to start the Malvern Auxiliary, raising money for what was then just known as the Children’s Hospital. Today, there are more than 85 auxiliaries raising funds for everything from high tech equipment to vital research. Each has their story. Here, we highlight the work of few as an example of the dedication and commitment of many.

The lady with the hair – and the heart One of the fixtures of the old hospital that will definitely be found in the new is the colourful stalls run by The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Auxiliaries. <

Since 1922, the auxiliaries “trading tables” have brightened the hospital foyer, with auxiliary members often lending a shoulder and an ear to parents who come down for a browse and a chat. The items for sale have changed over time, but the loyalty and dedication of the volunteers who have manned them over the years has not. One of these is Irene Hubbard, who together with her husband, Tony, has run the toy stall twice a month for the past four years. Like her stall, Irene admits to being a fixture at the hospital – fondly recognised by her beautifully coiffed hair. “It’s bouffant – always,” she says proudly. “We had a woman the other day, and she spotted me and said, ‘You’re the lady I want with the hair. I’ve been asking around for the lady with the hair.’ I said, well here I am.”

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And here she has been, helping the RCH auxiliaries for the past 30 years. Irene received the auxiliaries’ coveted Madge Tate Award for service in 2008, in recognition for her work, and has also been named a “living treasure”. “A living relic, my son says.” These days, Irene and Tony’s life operates on a fortnightly cycle of gathering, repairing and selling toys. On trading days, they leave their Plenty home at 3.30am with a loaded trailer – often not returning home until 9pm. Auxiliaries’ Co-ordinator Sue Manson says: “She’s not happy to go home until she’s got $2,000 on that stall.” This year alone, Irene and Tony have raised over $59,000 to support the hospital’s Neonatal Unit and over the past four years a staggering $250,000. Many of the toys are donated through the auxiliary office, where Irene also works two days a week doing administration work.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

(Above) Irene Hubbard, Prem Bubs Auxiliary

Irene and Tony ran their own business until they retired, and between visits to the hospital, Irene is actively involved with her two grandchildren. While she is happy to talk about her hair, she struggles to talk about her volunteer work. “It’s just that we don’t usually talk about this, we just do it,” she says quietly. Pressed further she says, “I suppose it’s giving back – it’s just that you’re doing something for someone else who gets a lot of pleasure. I like doing it. I like being occupied. I like the hospital – they’re a great lot of people.” •

I suppose it’s giving back – it’s just that you’re doing something for someone else who gets a lot of pleasure. I like doing it. I like being occupied. I like the hospital – they’re a great lot of people.”


Mother Goose Rhymes for a reason Twenty minutes in a doctor’s waiting room can be a long time when you have a restless toddler.

“It gives parents skills to interact with their child that they may not have had,” Michele says.

That’s when snakes come in handy.

Mothers report that they use the rhymes to calm a tired child while waiting in the doctor’s surgery or in the supermarket queue. “Then the child will anticipate the actions and is engaged and therefore won’t take sweets off the shelf, or she’ll have diverted a tantrum.”

“There’s one nursery rhyme that goes ‘Some snakes are long, some snakes are short, so you draw a line down the child’s back with your finger,” Michele Spreckley, Manager of Uncle Bob’s Development Centre, says. The rhyme ends with the best snake of all – the one that bites – and a playful nip on the child’s neck. The snake rhyme is just one of many learned by parents who take part in the Mother Goose program, managed by Uncle Bob’s. The program aims to provide coping and bonding tools for disadvantaged families, including mothers suffering from post-natal depression.

The program, which is aural and requires no reading skills, has been funded by the Waverley Auxiliary since its inception in 2004. “It was a pilot program when we first started, so they came in blind with us and have seen the whole thing mushroom and grow, which is very exciting,” Michele says. This year, the auxiliary raised $15,000 to pay for two staff members to run the program, which is offered for free through Maternal and Child Health Centres in Flemington, Brunswick and Ascot Vale.

It was a pilot program when we first started, so they came in blind with us and have seen the whole thing mushroom and grow, which is very exciting.” Waverley Auxiliary has raised a total of $90,000 in support of this Mother Goose program over the past six years, and since 1967 a grand total of $492,105. A formal evaluation of the program from 2006-08 found a significant improvement in children’s expressive communication compared to those in community play groups. The program is particularly helpful for migrant families. “Because a lot are quite separated from their bigger family circle, they don’t all have grandparents to pass things down the line. Sometimes they are isolated and this can help.” •

It gives parents skills to interact with their child that they may not have had.”

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Pledge allegiance to better health for diabetics

It’s a wonderful thing when you can stand up at these nights and tell everyone that they are making a difference.”

< (Left) Kerry Beauglehall. Image courtesy of Coast Magazine.

Fourteen years ago, while sitting in The Royal Children’s Hospital’s diabetic clinic, Kerrie Beauglehall and her daughter Carla made a pledge. Carla, aged 11, had been newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and the family had spent three days learning all about it. “Carla and I had a discussion and we decided then and there that we needed to raise some money to help somebody find an answer to diabetes,” Kerrie says. Today, Kerrie and the community of Inverloch can proudly say that while there is still no cure, they have made a major difference to the lives of children with diabetes. Thanks to Kerrie and her supporters, the hospital has been able to run a complications’ screening program that has seen the incidence of heart,

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kidney, vascular and eye complications in children with Type 1 diabetes drop from 30 per cent to 2 per cent. The program is supported through the annual ball which Kerrie organises between running her own hairdressing business and caring for her family. This year the ball raised a record $40,000. Over the past 14 years, Kerrie’s Inverloch Auxiliary has raised a total of $332,717 to support the hospital’s diabetes research programs. Funding a specific program has been important for the people of Inverloch, Kerrie says. “We wanted to know what this hard work we were doing was achieving. It’s a wonderful thing when you can stand up at these nights and tell everyone that they are making a difference.”

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

In the past few years, extra money raised has meant that the program has also been able to screen for mental health problems, in recognition of the fact that more than 30 per cent of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes suffer anxiety and depression. “If we could get that from 30 per cent to two per cent that would be wonderful,” Kerrie says. “I didn’t actually realise children got diabetes until Carla got diagnosed,” Kerrie says. Now, 24, Carla has been running her own hairdressing business for the past five years, and is coping well with her illness. But that doesn’t mean that Kerrie plans to give up fundraising – especially now. “When you go to the auxiliary meetings and they say we’re not far away from our 100 years, you think, I’ve got to be there for the 100 years.” •


Making a difference for kids with cancer “I’m a great believer that when they chuck you in the ground if you’ve made a difference, then your life has been worthwhile,” says Sandra Lehrer.

Since then, its main commitment has been to fund research in the hope of curing the disease. “Even the squidgiest smallest outcome can be a positive thing if it makes the lives of kids better or the delivery of treatment or outcomes,” Sandra says. “You can’t throw enough money at research.”

Most would say that Sandra would not have to wait until then. Together, with a small team of fundraisers known as the CIKA team, she has made a difference to the lives of children with recurring solid tumour cancers by funding research into a vaccine. The research conducted by senior researcher Denise Caruso has now gone to clinical trial. CIKA, which stands for Cancer in Kids Auxiliary @RCH, was formed in 1980 by parents of children diagnosed with cancerous tumours.

This year, the group’s annual Blue and Orange Ball was attended by the Minister for Health in honour of its 30th anniversary. The ball, which raised a record $204,000 this year, is the group’s main fundraiser, but not the only one. The CIKA calendar is peppered with events from dog shows and raffles to an annual Wood Day in Milltown in the Western District.

> (Right) Previous patients Sam Casilli, Dean Dyvestyn and Fiona Gilchrist celebrating CIKA’s 30 anniversary

You can’t throw enough money at research.” Sandra and her husband became involved when their son, Shawn, then aged 13, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in the right leg. Shawn relapsed at age 15 but has since recovered. However, he still struggles with the consequences of the treatment. “Not everyone has the strength to stick around if their child dies from cancer, or even if they recover,” says Sandra. “I have the utmost respect for those that have chosen to stay and continue funding research, recognising that that’s the best way of changing outcomes for children.” •

Since 1980 CIKA has raised an amazing $1,899,120 to fund solid tumour research programs at The Royal Children’s Hospital.

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The Children’s Cancer Centre is the largest paediatric cancer in Australia, managing more than 70 per cent of all children Flannelette nightgowns and red flannel jackets were the mostunit urgent items needed in Victoria with cancer. But these days, treating children cancer is no when 40 ladies met in 1922 to start the Malvern Auxiliary,with raising money forlonger what just wasabout chemotherapy. We now recognise that cancer treatment requiresHospital. improving the long-term quality of life for children and their families. then just known as Thealso Children’s That’s why invest in pain management for childrenfrom and in supporting families, particularly through Today, therewe are moremajor than resources 85 auxiliaries raising funds for everything high tech our psychosocial research and treatment programs. These aspects of care are critical in helping children with cancer. equipment to vital research. Each has their story. Here, we highlight the work of few However, they are not viewed as routine care, and so depend heavily on the generosity of our philanthropic supporters. as an example of the dedication and commitment of many. In the past 12 months The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation, has supported these programs with more than $1 million. As the following stories show, this support has made a huge difference to our children and their families. <

(Above) Paul Monagle with patient Ben Pritchard

Quest for a magic bullet If Denise Caruso’s research is successful there will be no such thing as chemotherapy. Instead, there would be vaccines to specifically target cancer. That’s the ideal, anyway. For the past three years, Denise, a senior research officer with the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, has been working to develop a vaccine to immunise children with stage 4 neuroblastoma against recurring solid tumours. “Neuroblastoma stage 4 almost always comes back, so we’re trying to prevent that,” she says.

This study involves newly diagnosed children with stage 4 of the disease, as well as a concurrent study for patients with other solid tumours who have been through all the standard therapies, but who have not been cured. Samples are taken from their own tumour to create tailormade vaccines to trigger a specific immune response against their tumour. “And the reason we do that is that we know the immune response is so powerful and very specific. Those are the two things that are really lacking in cancer therapy at the moment – that specificity. Chemotherapy can obviously be very powerful, but it’s not specific enough,” Denise says.

“It’s a hand grenade. A vaccine would be a magic bullet.” So far about six children have received the vaccine, with promising results. “We were lucky that in a couple of those kids, we did see their metastatic lesions go away and even their primary tumours shrink. But the problem is that we need to give it every month for we don’t know how long. We see them go away and then we see them come back.” However, there have been profound responses from a minority of patients. “Our challenge is that, obviously, we want to make it more enduring, and to make it in the majority of patients.” •

Comfort First eases stress Whether it’s sitting on mum’s lap, holding her hand or even stroking her eyebrow, comfort is a very personal thing for children at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) Children’s Cancer Centre. That’s why every child who is diagnosed is offered a comfort plan, a personal plan based on what works for them when it comes to minimising the stress of having repeated medical procedures. “We had a little boy who was quite distressed for a long period of time and with time we figured out it was really helpful for him to stroke his mother’s eyebrow,” explains Kari Peters, Comfort First clinician at the RCH Children’s Cancer Centre.

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“That’s how he fell asleep each night, stroking his mother’s eyebrow. So for us, it was how to best position him so he could be stroking his mum’s eyebrow, whenever possible.” Since 2007, the Koala Foundation has funded this program, generously donating $250,000 last year and overall a total of $1,216,281 in support of the Children’s Cancer Centre at the RCH. Maria McCarthy, the Director of psychooncology at the centre, says, “The program really started in recognition that distress and anxiety was really a marked issue for children undergoing cancer treatment and for their families.” When a child is first diagnosed with cancer, families feel a sense of loss of control, especially in their ability to protect their child.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

“If we can give them a sense of control of this environment, a sense of agency in what is happening to them, then I believe we are more likely to have children and families that will be able to get through their treatment and adjust back to their lives.” While safety always comes first, children and parents are encouraged to both comfort and advocate for themselves. “Often you hear stories of a child coming in and saying, oh I like to sit this way, or I need to take a break right now,” Kari says. “Every single child has a way of comforting themselves so it’s our role to figure out what works best for that child and that family.” “It’s strength-based, harnessing the resilience of the child and the family,” Maria adds. •


Tarli’s beads tell a story of their own They’re so proud of their beads. It’s a positive reason to come into the hospital.”

> (Right) Patient Tarli Tonks

Five year old Tarli Tonks’ Beaded Journey string is far too long to wear comfortably. If she draped it around her neck, it would trail to her waist. That’s why she prefers to hang it on her IV pole. The string, made up of colourful beads, is more than just a decoration – it’s a story that describes her journey as a patient at the Children’s Cancer Centre of The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). Every bead represents a doctor’s visit, a procedure, a visit from a family member or a special occasion during her 10-month journey from first diagnosis to her most recent treatment for rhabdomyomsarcoma, an aggressive muscle cancer. Tarli’s mother, Tricia Kelly, says, “I love it. It brightens her day up. Lydia, one of the Comfort First clinicians, she’ll come in with the beads, and Tarli’s straight up with a smile on her face. She remembers more than I do, what she needs beads for.” The Beaded Journey was introduced a year ago by Comfort First therapist Kari Peters, and has been embraced by children and parents. More than 260 families now take part.

“They’re so proud of their beads. It’s a positive reason to come into the hospital,” Kari says.

represent their gift to the next family and the passing of the torch to other families,” Kari says.

The program was initially funded by the hospital’s Viva Auxiliary, which gave $4,544 to kick-start the program. Since then, the KOALA Foundation has come on board, providing $24,000 for the next three years.

What comes next depends on the child’s individual journey. “If they were going to a doctor’s office, it would be a light blue one, if they were getting a scan or x-ray, it would be a yellow one,” she explains.

KOALA, which stands for Kids Oncology and Leukaemia Action group, was formed in 1992 and is run by parents and carers of children who are being, or have been, treated for cancer.

“We want to acknowledge all the positives that are happening as well, so – Cup Day,” she says, holding up a flat round bead with a picture of a brown horse on it.

The program is offered to families soon after diagnosis to provide a visual representation of the child’s journey and a way of explaining their experience to friends and family.

These special occasion beads are Tarli’s favourite. “She likes the big special beads, birthday ones, Valentine’s Day and Australia Day – so they stand out on her line,” says Tarli’s mum.

The first beads are letters spelling out the child’s name. Families are also given a journal to record their journey and any procedures that were carried out elsewhere – to ensure that beads can be updated when they come to the RCH Children’s Cancer Centre.

The beads are a boost for staff, too, Kari says. “For me, it’s such a natural easy way to engage with children. It’s something physical that you can do together while discussing potentially distressing things. It just gives a little bit of an outlet.” •

After the letter beads, comes the koala bead, to represent KOALA’s contribution. “They wanted that to The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

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Sparkies dare

to make a difference

We build hospital after hospital. This is one that I will walk away from and be really proud of... well we know that we’re building something that’s first class.” <

(Above) Electricians, Peter Giampa, Chris Smith and Wayne Phair

When Peter Giampa and Wayne Phair started working on the new Royal Children’s Hospital site they had no idea how it would change them. For a start, both ended up losing their hair. It was a small price to pay for the $11,000 they raised for the hospital in the process. Sponsored by their fellow tradespeople from PSG Elecraft, electricians for the new hospital, they raised the money in just a few days. “It started off with bit of a dare,” Peter says. “One of the boys asked me to shave me moustache. And I said, if you pay, yes, I’ll shave.” The idea was raised at the company’s weekly “toolbox” meeting where safety and general issues are discussed. Fellow tradesperson Matt Joynson said “If we raise some money, Peter will shave off his moustache.” Wayne Phair, whose chest-length beard and hair had been a trademark for 10 years, was quick to respond. “Well, if Pete does it, I’ll do it,” he said.

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“The crowd just erupted,” says Chris Smith, the foreman, who chairs the weekly meetings. They didn’t have to look far for a good cause. “It was obvious – the kids next door,” Chris says. So the day before the PSG Elecraft Christmas breakup, both Pete and Wayne shaved off every hair on their faces and heads. It was the first time Pete had been clean shaven in 35 years, which is why his family came to witness the occasion. “All except one daughter, who was at work. They took a picture and she started crying at work. She’s 23. She’s never seen me without a moustache.” Wayne’s daughters, aged six and two, also cried. “It was a bit of a shock,” he says. But it was the changes on the inside that they say made the most difference. “I’ve known a couple of kids that have been at the children’s hospital while I’ve been here, and you think about it in a different way,” Peter says. “You’re basically working here to help them, it hits you differently,” Peter says.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

Wayne agrees: “We did a mains upgrade in the actual hospital and I remember coming in quite a few days and there would be parents in tears with the chaplain and it sort of really hit home for me – just how life can change so quickly and you just never think about it.” Chris says the cranes on site, all of which are named after a seriously ill child at the hospital, are a constant reminder. “Every time we looked at a crane, we knew what the story was. We knew they were long-term kids that would be over here when the hospital was finished. “We’ve all got kids, and you’ll probably find that a lot of us, although our appearance is a bit rugged, we’re all softies at heart. We’re all family people. As he walks around the site, he proudly points out its features. “We build hospital after hospital. This is one that I will walk away from and be really proud of,” he says. “Well we know that we’re building something that’s first class”. The boys are now cooking up an idea for the next fundraiser – something offbeat and whacky, because Chris says, “We’re a little bit different!” “Maybe a back and chest shave?” quips Peter. •


A celebration of life and love It took the specialist skills of doctors at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) to put their finger on the problem when 16 year old Beau Afri came to them with a rare and nasty growth on his finger earlier this year. For his mother, Catherine Cervasio, it was yet more proof of why she is committed to raising funds for the hospital through the annual Celebration of Life (COL) dinner. “I sent him everywhere to try to check it out and eventually was recommended to a senior surgeon at The Royal Children’s – like go figure. It just reiterated everything I love about the hospital.” As the Managing Director of Aromababy, manufacturers of natural organic skin products for infants, Catherine had been involved with the hospital at a charitable level for some years, frequently donating products for fundraising events. Her first association with the hospital began when Beau was admitted at the age of five months old for bronchiolitis and was on oxygen for a week.

“Being able to stay in there with him, I had a bit of a wander around. Something that struck me was the noticeboard with all the beautiful cards and letters from parents,” she says. “And it wasn’t only the parents of babies that had been treated and had become well; it was the ones that didn’t make it and the gratitude from the parents and I felt very touched and very inspired by some of the things they wrote. It was very emotional. I’ve always had a great love of babies. It was a no-brainer for me to do something with Melbourne’s iconic babies’ and children’s hospital.” Last year was the fourth year she has been involved in raising money for the Neonatal Unit through the Celebration of Life dinner and her first on the committee, at the invitation of RCH Foundation Donor Development Manager, Donna Aranyi. “I got involved and basically she and the team really make you feel valued and loved and appreciated for your contribution. Why wouldn’t you want to be amongst people like that and be involved in things like that? It’s wonderful.”

There’s an amazing feeling of love and energy in the room... It’s a great thing to be involved in.” Last year, the ball held each year at Crown Palladium, raised $106,000 “There’s an amazing feeling of love and energy in the room,” Catherine says. “It’s a great thing to be involved in.” Since 2006 a total of $1,459,306 has been raised. For the first time, companies were invited to sponsor the cots in the Neonatal Unit through an “auction” where they were “sold” for $5,000 each. “This year we’ve actually pre-sold 10. I think a lot of companies enjoy the feeling of knowing they’ve sponsored a life-saving cot in that hospital for 12 months,” Catherine says. Catherine is now chairwoman of the COL Gala Ball Event committee. •

“The contribution, work and support of Celebration of Life have been transformational for the Neonatal Unit. The Celebration of Life has provided funds to purchase important equipment that we otherwise could not have purchased; it has funded the family retreat and post-natal mother’s unit, which are state of the art in Australia, and importantly it has provided an incredible morale boost for our staff working in the unit. I cannot tell you how uplifting it is to know that we have such great support from families of the babies who we have looked after. We know that they are grateful for the work we do and this makes us strive harder to achieve more to improve the lives of sick newborn babies and families.” Dr Peter McDougall Executive Director, Medical Services

> (Right) Catherine Cervasio

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They don’t call them the Fab Five for nothing. Even an ordinary evening, set up to discuss how they managed to organise a sell-out masquerade ball to raise more than $79,000 for the hospital, is an event. There are Sanja’s home-made vanilla slices and pastries, cured meats, cheese and dips, chocolates, wine and Croatian beer, and plenty of laughter – the best ingredient of all. Sanja Franjic and her daughter Ann-Marie, 25, and friends Jasna Pavlovic, Sandra Topcic and Slovica Zovak, all members of Melbourne’s Croatian community, already had a reputation for fundraising success when they contacted The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation in January 2009 offering to raise money for the hospital. They had previously organised a ball in aid of breast cancer, raising more than $70,000. This time, they wanted to celebrate the fact that Jasna’s daughter, Bianca, now 22, had been successfully treated at the hospital for leukaemia when she was two years old.

Four years later, she was given the all clear and has been thriving ever since, recently qualifying as a nurse. Jasna had always wanted to raise some money for the hospital to say thank you. “It just took me a while,” she laughs. The funds raised from the ball, which was held at Australian Croatian House in Footscray in March will support research into leukaemia. Although survival rates have increased dramatically over the years, 20 per cent of children with leukaemia still succumb to the disease. The research will help develop new tests at the hospital to identify those children with leukaemia who are at highest risk for disease recurrence and who will be the most likely to benefit from intensified treatment when they are first diagnosed. The original fundraising goal was around $30,000 but thanks to the teamwork of the Fab Five, tickets were sold out. “We had a waiting list,” Slovica says.

<

Fab Five have a ball

(Above) The Fab Five

You know what I think the biggest achievement is? ...Organising two balls and still being best friends.” And no wonder. Many people made their own masks and matched them to their costumes, but for those who didn’t, the Fab Five made masks – 500 purple masks in total. “We wanted it to be memorable,” Slovica says. “We didn’t want it to be just another corporate event.” The ball was so memorable that it was widely covered by the Croatian media. “We got the name ‘The Fabulous Five’ in all the Croatian newspapers,” Sanja says. The five are now recovering before deciding their next fundraising event. “You know what I think the biggest achievement is?” Sanja says. “Organising two balls and still being best friends.” •

Jasna vividly recalls the day Bianca was diagnosed. “They put us in a little room with a box of tissues to give us some time. I was already hyperventilating. I was on the floor. I couldn’t breathe. I just couldn’t breathe,” Jasna says.

<

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(Above) Lauren Stewart and Brian Mallon of the RCH Foundation with the Fab Five


A coming of age gift Thirteen year old Andrew Joel holds his finger to his lips and frowns slightly at his mother sitting opposite. “Mum, how about you shush?” he pleads. This is his story, and he is determined to tell it. “Some people at the synagogue also gave money,” he continues, describing how he used his Bar Mitzvah on February 6 to raise $5,477 for The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). “Grandparents, friends and cousins and people I didn’t even know. It was very generous.” “I just thought it’s amazing how nice people can be – and how like this is their hard-earned money and it’s going to a very good cause, helping these people.”

“He’s just had some tests done a few weeks ago and has been given the all clear at this stage. It’s amazing,” Toni says. The boys’ generosity was followed by their aunt, Shareen, who raised $2,849 for the hospital in lieu of gifts for her 40th birthday this year. Her son, Nicholas, also raised $170 when he celebrated his 9th birthday. “But I must say it’s not like it took this to make us do it,” Toni says. “We’ve always given to Royal Children’s and for Brandon it wasn’t even a question.” Having the Bar Mitzvah was just a good excuse. “I think the fact of having the Bar Mitzvah brings forward that idea of donating,” Brandon says.

He had no idea he would raise so much. “I didn’t have a goal because I had no clue what the benchmark would be. I was amazed by it. When were sitting there counting out who gave what, there were some people who gave $200 to the two charities. Very generous. There was one person who gave $500 to each charity.” “One person gave $500 to me, “pipes up Andrew. “I was astounded.” The money helped the hospital to purchase two vital signs monitors for the Neuroscience ward. For Andrew, that was the best present: “To think that I’m helping these people. It gives you such a great feeling inside. It’s just great.” •

Andrew was following a family tradition. His brother Brandon also asked for donations to the hospital in lieu of presents at his Bar Mitzvah in 2007, raising $5,464 – although their mother, Toni, is quick to add that neither boy missed out. “We had some friends who said to us, we still want to give a present.” “Some of my best friends gave me presents and pretty much most of the people there gave me donations for the RCH and Jewish Care,” Andrew adds. This year, the family’s desire to give to the hospital was spurred by Andrew’s cousin, nine year old Lucas, who was diagnosed with a cancerous tumour last September. Lucas, who lives in Byron Bay, spent six months in Melbourne being treated at the hospital.

I just thought it’s amazing how nice people can be – and how like this is their hard-earned money and it’s going to a very good cause, helping these people.”

> (Right) Andrew and Brandon Joel

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RESPONDing with love Brother and sister Lindsay and Cathy Cook have a lot more in common than most siblings. Cathy, a MICA paramedic and Lindsay, a Sergeant with Victoria Police, are two of the four committee members that make up RESPOND For Kids, which has raised $95,954 for the hospital in the past four years. This means they spend a lot of time together. “I think it might help rather than hinder,” laughs Cathy. RESPOND was formed in 2007 to provide an avenue for people from the emergency services industries to raise money for the hospital. “The idea was we, the committee, would drive it,” Lindsay says.

So far, the four committee members are doing most of the work – but that hasn’t stopped them from making a huge difference in the lives of sick children in Victoria. Last year, RESPOND, together with Toys“R”Us, raised $50,000 for a special gantry to be manufactured for the Paediatric Emergency Transport Service (PETS) helicopter so that the stretcher and equipment can be moved as one unit – making it safer and faster. At the moment, staff carry and manage about 70 pieces of equipment, while they are transferring the patient on and off the aircraft.

The committee’s next project will be to ask the Emergency Department for its “wish list”. Getting going means cooking up another calendar full of trivia nights, Bunnings barbecues, dinner dances and such, but they don’t mind. “Over the years, we often went up to the wards to see the kids and to see who we are helping – that’s probably the biggest part for me,” Lindsay says. “Seeing these kids who have been born with issues and it’s not their fault. They haven’t really had a chance.”

RESPOND was formed in 2007 to provide an avenue for people from the emergency services industries to raise money for the hospital. The idea was we, the committee, would drive it.” <

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(Above) Emergency services representatives


> (Right) Franz Madlener with Mina

A friend indeed What do you do when your friend and his family are suffering? That’s the question that plagued Franz Madlener when he saw his friend James Marshall and his wife Megan take an emotional roller coaster ride with the birth of their daughter Mina.

As a parent of two young children himself, Franz empathised – but it was more than that. “The key thing for a lot of us as friends was the realisation that 10 years ago, maybe even five years ago, she wouldn’t have lived, without the technology and expertise that’s there today,” he says.

“As a friend, you want to help but there’s not a lot you can do other than open a good bottle of wine and have a conversation,” Franz says.

Franz decided that the best way to galvanise the support that friends and family had offered was to ask them to sponsor him to run the Great Ocean Road Marathon. As the founder and Managing Director of Villa and Hut, he knew he could tap into a wide network of business colleagues and supporters.

Mina was born with holes in her heart and suffered a cardiovascular collapse when she was three days old, shutting down her vital organs. At eight days old she underwent surgery at The Royal Children’s Hospital and spent the next six weeks fighting for her life. Now eight months old, Mina is thriving. “Thank God she came out the other end,” James says. “We were completely blown away by the nurses and care from everybody. It makes you feel quite humble in your own life.”

“I was absolutely determined to do something on behalf of a whole lot of people that wanted to help.” Franz raised $7,000 for the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit after completing the run in his targeted 4.5 hours. “We’d originally set a goal for $4,500, because it was 45km.

That was about how many days that Mina was in hospital, too,” he says. “If there’s a message to get across, it’s that if you’re in a situation where you need to use the facilities of the hospital, those facilities are only there because somebody somewhere has done something to try to help raise some money. And if you have the opportunity yourself to be part of raising funds, do it – because you never know when somebody close to you will need it.”•

A tradition of caring In 1929, with the onset of the Great Depression, the Children’s Hospital, as it was then known, faced a financial crisis. Costs were rising but contributions from the government and the public were static. An “economy sub-committee” was faced with the decision to close three wards and cut staff. It was Sidney Myer, the founder of the Myer Emporium, who came to the

rescue, relieving the immediate financial crisis with what the hospital history records as “a substantial donation”. Today, the Myer Stores Community Fund is committed to building on the tradition of community support started by Sidney Myer. This year, the Fund generously donated $100,000 to the hospital to purchase a state of the art heart/lung machine that acts as the patient’s heart and lungs during heart surgery.

The Maquet HL30 heart lung machine plays a critical role in the hundreds of heart bypass procedures performed each year at the hospital. Every March, each Myer store nominates a local charity relating to children, youth or women, for which store members raise funds. John Hawker, Chairman and Director of the Fund, says, “It’s all borne out of Sidney Myer’s desire to be philanthropic and that has just evolved over time and is part of Myer’s DNA.” Most staff had some association with the hospital, making it a “natural and obvious” choice for support, he says. This year, a highlight for John was seeing the new heart-lung machine in operation. “To see the end of the result of that is extremely heart-warming. It’s quite an emotional experience.”• < (Left) The new Maquet

HL30 heart lung machine

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A ray of hope for neuroblastoma Kahlilla Blyss Donahoo’s favourite song was You Are My Sunshine. “That was her song,” her Nanna, Jude Donahoo says. “And, in fact, she was on the Good Friday Appeal for two years in a row singing it – this little bald kid singing You Are My Sunshine.” So it was fitting that when Kahlilla died on 25 August 2008, the foundation that was set up in her memory to find a cure for neuroblastoma was named You Are My Sunshine Foundation – YAMS for short. Kahlilla was just two years old when she was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a rare and very aggressive childhood cancer.

“It was 15 November 2005. I remember it so vividly,” Jude says. Kahlilla, Lilly for short, had had a persistent tummy wog. Concerned, her mum Nell and Jude took her to see a family friend who is a GP. “He took one look at her and said ‘I can tell by looking at her she’s anaemic’. He took blood tests and the next day we’re at the children’s hospital being told she has neuroblastoma.” Diagnosed early, neuroblastoma is quite curable. However, by the time most children are diagnosed, it has reached stage 4 and has spread to the bone marrow. “The sad part about this disease is that it would appear the average age of diagnosis seems to be two to three years old, so these children may well have symptoms that they are unable to articulate,” Jude says.

Jude Donahoo YAMS Foundation

Kahlilla struggled for nearly three years. “About a month before she died, she was on quite heavy doses of morphine. She died at home. She looked up and said ‘I feel like crap and it’s not fair.’ And we said, ‘No it’s not fair, Lilly’. And we decided to try to raise funds. We promised her then that we would try to find a cure.” Kahlilla was the second child in her family. She has an older sister, Indigo, and a little brother, Eli, two, and now a baby sister, born in June, called Luna Claire. “Kahlilla had almost an obsession with the moon,” Jude says. “She adored the moon. It was very special to her. Luna is really named in honour of Lilly. Six months after Lilly died, the family contacted The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation and in conjunction with the Children’s Cancer Centre at The Royal Children’s Hospital, made a decision to raise funds in support of research into finding a cure for neuroblastoma. From that YAMS Foundation was born, and is now aiming to raise $150,000 to fund research by Dr Paul Wood. So far, much of the support has come from Phillip Island and the surrounding communities where Kahlilla’s family live. “When Kahlilla was alive, the community got behind us and raised probably $30 – $40,000 to help her parents survive,” Jude says. When the family formed the YAMS Foundation after Lilly’s death, the local community once again put their hands in their pockets, raising about $52,000. The biggest supporter so far is the Inverloch and surrounding Lions Clubs, which have raised $14,000 and are committed to keep going. “That won’t be the end. We are here for the long haul,” Jude says.

The work of YAMS is vital for research into neuroblastoma.” Paul Wood Paediatric Oncologist

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< (Left) Kahlilla Blyss Donahoo


A helping hand for burns nurses Every time Norm Winn visits the burns unit at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) he gets the same feeling. “I never cease to be amazed about the homely atmosphere the staff try and generate in the unit – while still being technically effective and efficient – to look after the overall well-being of the child,” he says. As a long-time member of the Victorian State Committee of the Fire Protection Authority (FPA) Australia, Norm has a special interest in seeing that kids who suffer burns get the best treatment. The association is the umbrella organisation for fire protection, prevention and safety throughout Australia and plays a big part in public education.

> (Right) Jane Wilcock

Nurse Unit Manager, burns unit

This year marks its 50th anniversary, and the eighth year that its Victorian State Committee has supported the burns unit at the hospital through its annual dinner, raising $5,000. Over the past eight years the FPA has donated a total of $40,000 to support our burns unit. For the first time, too, the association has created an innovative scholarship trust for selected staff to attend a course in emergency management of burns conducted by the Australian and NZ Burns Association. “We’ve tried to have something that is quite clearly related to the association, so we’re really chuffed about that,” Norm says.

It never ceases to amaze me – the immense pain that they go through yet they’ve always got a smile whenever I go in there.” Still an active committee member, Norm has recently resigned as State Committee Chair after 22 years, but that doesn’t mean that he won’t still be a regular visitor to the burns unit – just for the smiles that greet him. “It never ceases to amaze me – the immense pain that they go through yet they’ve always got a smile whenever I go in there.” •

Jane Wilcock, nurse unit manager of the burns unit at the hospital agrees. “It’s going to make a huge difference in that those nurses will then come back and be able to share their knowledge with other people who are caring for the patients.”

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A helping hand for research Astronaut Neil Armstrong once explained, “Research is creating new knowledge’’. It’s a truism that especially applies to the research conducted here at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute. Together with our campus partners, The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) and the University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, we are working to create new knowledge and solutions about the problems facing children today and tomorrow. But all this would not be possible without the support of the RCH Foundation, which this year gave the institute $4.5 million. This has allowed us to leverage support from competitive granting bodies to continue vital research. For every dollar that our donors so generously give we are able to raise $5. Without the leverage funds we wouldn’t have enough money to do world-class research and without the donors’ dollars there would be no leverage funds. Here, we highlight just a few of the research programs that have received funds this year. Unlike Neil Armstrong we have yet to walk on the moon. But together, we can try to reach for it.

Professor Terry Dwyer AO Director, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

Henry’s big test may be a first

Associate Professor Mimi Tang can barely contain her excitement. “It’s actually really exciting today – can I tell you?” she confides. “Because our first subject to enrol is having his first food challenge.”

In the treatment room, eight year old Harry is playing Memory, while being monitored for his sensitivity test to peanut protein. “How’s your breathing?” asks Mimi. “Good,” he says, looking down shyly. Under the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute trial, participants are given a 2g oral dose of peanut protein, as well as an immune modulator in the form of pro-biotic bacteria, once daily over 18 months to induce tolerance. Today Henry faces his first big test, a placebo-controlled peanut challenge. Seven doses of either peanut protein or placebo are administered over 15 minute intervals to determine if Henry is still allergic to peanut. “If he passes today, he’s definitely de-sensitised,” Mimi says. “If he passes the second challenge in two weeks time, he’s cured. It’s a very exciting day.”

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The oral immunotherapy treatment study is a result of research led by Mimi which found hospital admissions in Australia for food-related anaphylaxis had more than trebled from 1994 – 2005, with most occurring in children under four. The study found that peanut allergy was responsible for one in four hospital admissions for food-related anaphylaxis. The increase in allergy problems coincides with a rise in auto-immune disease as well, suggesting that a fundamental change in immune tolerance. “We currently do not have any cures for any of the allergic problems, and the problem is that this rapid rise is going to be continuous into adolescence, possibly into adulthood,” Mimi explains. The priorities now are to identify risk factors for the development of allergic disease, prevention strategies and new

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

treatments that will result in a cure, she says. “Because not only do we need to stop the onset of allergic disease, we need to help switch off the allergic diseases that have already developed.” One third of children have some form of allergic disease, and up to eight per cent of children have a food allergy. Henry’s mother, Caroline Andrew, says Henry’s multiple food allergies were identified when he was just six months old. Like Mimi, she is optimistic. “It’s a time commitment to get in here every two weeks, but the benefits far outweigh the inconvenience,” she says. Mimi’s interest in allergy and autoimmune disease began when she was diagnosed with arthritis at age 15 and spent one memorable Christmas at The Royal Children’s Hospital in traction after a hip operation. “I was on 3 East back then, looking out onto the balcony.


Professor Terry Dwyer AO Director, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

Why going to emergency is no longer a pain Don’t be surprised if occasionally you hear some giggling in the Emergency Department. It’s not the Clown Doctors, but simply the nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, which is most often used these days in procedural sedation. Research published in 2008 by Associate Professor Franz Babl in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics; found that nitrous oxide was one of the safest ways of sedating children. “Nitrous oxide is probably the most important agent that we use for sedation in the emergency department,” Franz says. “The beauty of nitrous oxide is that it has very quick onset and very quick offset.”

< (Left) A/Professor Mimi Tang

Director, Allergy & Immunology, RCH Allergy & Immune Disorders, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with patient Henry Andrew

I really remember it was actually quite a good Christmas because Father Christmas visited and there were fireworks and the fire engines came. I loved it.” Now, thanks to Mimi, children like Henry may not have to spend one day in hospital, let alone Christmas. •

News flash: A peanut butter sandwich or a Snickers bar is no longer taboo for Henry. He passed his second peanut challenge and is now cured of his food allergy.

It may be going a bit far to say that the children are laughing, “But we do have children who really start giggling once they have had it,” he says. The safety and comfort of these patients is of paramount importance, which is why, under Franz’s leadership, the hospital has instituted a standardised staff education program to improve the sedation safety and quality for young patients in the emergency ward.

More than 500 doctors and nurses have completed the program in the past eight years and it has now been selected for state-wide rollout in all emergency departments as a joint innovation and safety project of the Department of Human Services Emergency Care Improvement and Innovation Clinical Network (EIICN) and the Victorian Managed Insurance Authority (VMIA). “For this program to have taken off to such a degree, it’s really great,” Franz says. A key part of the program is creating an environment that’s better for the families and the children. “That includes input from pain specialists and from play therapists.” Parents are also vital allies. “We essentially teach them how they can help us in this process.” •

For this program to have taken off to such a degree, it’s really great.”

The program was initiated eight years ago after several incidents which although did not result in any negative outcomes, highlighted a lack of education. It has been revised several times since and recent evaluations have shown that standards have been maintained.

A/Professor Franz Babl Paediatric Emergency Physician, RCH Emergency Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

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A heart set on better outcomes The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) leads the way in paediatric heart surgery. Every year, up to 30 children who are suffering the most complex heart disease undergo the Fontan procedure, an operation where the blood to the lungs is redirected to bypass the heart. It’s a life-saving operation that Associate Professor Yves d’Udekem performs regularly. But it’s what happens to these patients afterwards that concerns him. It is possible that Fontan patients will only live 20 to 25 years before they would need a heart transplant. However, with only a limited amount of heart transplants available each year for patients with congenital abnormalities, he predicts there may be an epidemic of need that cannot be resolved. While there may be medications that can help to slow the progression of the disease, so far there have been no large-scale studies.

“We need to test these drugs to see if these patients can live longer, but nobody can line up enough patients,” Yves says. “There is no centralisation of care and there’s no agreement on one specific treatment for these patients.” That’s why he believes it is vital to create a national registry of patients on whom new medications and treatments can be tested. “I feel absolutely passionate about this Fontan research. For me it’s very important to have these answers because it’s how I can personally contribute a little bit to easing the misery in this world.” He believes national guidelines employing simple inexpensive measures are likely to give Fontan patients an extra five to 10 years. “We will have a management policy so we can attend to the problems before they arise. We are not waiting until the last minute for the patients to be desperately sick and need the heart transplantation.”

Yves’ research received seed funding thanks to donations made directly to the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute. This seed funding enabled the research to be developed to the stage where competitive grants could then be secured from both ANZ Trustees and the National Health and Medical Research Council. He likens the potential improvements to those that have occurred in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). “When I graduated 20 years ago, most CF patients were not expected to live beyond the age of 25. Now most of them live to 40 to 45, and it’s still improving. “There has been no major breakthrough in medication for these patients. The only thing that happened was centralized health care and better management. That’s exactly what I want to do for Fontan patients.”

In pursuit of the big picture Theo Wong admits that his research is not very sexy. After all, who wants to talk about bowels? But for children with short bowel syndrome, a functioning bowel that absorbs nutrients can be a matter of life and death. That’s why Theo and a team of researchers at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute want to know which factors determine outcomes in newborn babies who suffer from short bowel syndrome. Originally from Brisbane, Theo is a Murdoch Childrens PhD student who was a recipient of a postgraduate scholarship in 2009 and has since gone on to receive an NHMRC scholarship in 2010.

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“There is no other research centre in Australia that looks at short bowel syndrome. Without the funding I wouldn’t have been able to come at all,” he says. Short bowel syndrome occurs when a person is unable to absorb nutrients properly due to severe disease or because a significant part of the small intestine has been removed. In premature newborn babies, one common cause is necrotising enterocolitis, or NEC, where death of the intestinal lining as well as its walls occurs. Every year about 70 newborns at the hospital undergo bowel surgery for NEC or other malformations. The operation,

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

known as a resection, means part of the bowel has to be cut out and the rest rejoined. After a resection, the bowel goes through a natural process of adaption. Sometimes this means it is able to function normally – and sometimes not. For those children who don’t recover, the only option is to be fed through the veins, or parenteral nutrition or PN, as it is known. The question for Theo Wong is which babies are likely to do well after a resection and which are not? It’s a question that parents are keen to answer too. “It’s such a roller coaster ride for the parents, from having hope and then not,” he says.


A/Professor Yves d’Udekem Cardiac Surgeon, RCH Heart Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

I feel absolutely passionate about this Fontan research. For me it’s very important to have these answers because it’s how I can personally contribute a little bit to easing the misery in this world.”

In search of knobbly knees When I was a kid, growing up in the ‘60s and ‘70s, kids had knobbly knees,” says Professor Melissa Wake. “Boys wore shorts and they had knobbly knees. You don’t see knobbly knees anymore.” Her observation is borne out by the statistics. “In 1969, just over one per cent of kids were obese. Today 20 per cent of kids are overweight or obese.” Melissa is one of a team of researchers at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute who are trying to find solutions to the childhood obesity epidemic. While the rates of increase are now slowing, of great concern is that the biggest increase over the past five to 10 years has been the pre-school age group, she says. “People used to worry a lot that their kids were too thin. The irony now is that probably that is the healthiest state for us to be in – on the thinner side of the normal weight range, and that goes for adults and kids.”

Dr. Theodore Wong Clinical Nutrition Fellow, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

In animal models, certain proteins have been shown to increase during the adaptation period, so the question for researchers is whether these are markers for adaptation. “It’s not a sexy area but the results of research in a particular area can then have ramifications for other people as well’’. “Like all research you try to build a story,” he says. With lots of stories, sooner or later you might be able to see the whole picture. “I think that’s what research is all about.” • Dr Theo Wong is a recipient of one of many PhD scholarships and grants totalling $900,000 a year, which are funded through The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation each year.

Part of the problem is that, even while the seeds of future problems are being sown, obese children are usually not suffering any overt ill effects now. “One of the great challenges of obesity is that the ill effects are not apparent for many years,” she says. Unlike the child with a disability or ADHD, the obese child does not always stand out as having a “problem.” But today’s big kids are tomorrow’s adults with big problems. “This is what is going to lead to devastating epidemics of diabetes, of stroke, of kidney failure, of orthopaedic problems and disability,” Melissa says.

were four to five in 2008. “Just over that four year period, pre-school obesity jumped another 15 to 20 per cent.” The solution is simple: “eat a little less and move a little more” – but there is a whole raft of complex barriers to achieving this. “The challenge for researchers is to find ways to change the behaviours that cause obesity.” However, current policies are not always based on good evidence. In 2009, Melissa’s research showing that national guidelines for GPs aimed at helping children lose weight were costly and ineffective, was published in the British Medical Journal. In response to these findings, Melissa and her colleagues have developed a shared-care model in which GPs and hospital specialists can work together to co-ordinate patient care. In recognition for her work, Melissa also received the 2009 Federal Health Minister’s Award for Excellence in Health and Medical Research. For now, however, knobbly knees may still be a thing of the past. She notes with irony a recent Wizard of Id cartoon, in which the king offered a famine as the solution to the obesity epidemic. “In times of plenty we are programmed to eat. Individual education and support is part of the solution. But it also needs to be tackled on a broader societal level.”•

One of the great challenges of obesity is that the ill effects are not apparent for many years.”

Melissa heads the Health Design Team for Growing Up in Australia, a longitudinal study of Australian children, which recently compared 5,000 children nationally who were four to five years of age in 2004, with 5,000 children who Professor Melissa Wake Associate Director, Research, Centre for Community Child Health, RCH

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

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A bow from the man with the bow tie John Hutson, Chair of Paediatric Surgery, sums up his career in one sentence. “It’s been a lot of fun,” he says, smiling. This year, John, known around the hospital for his colourful bow ties, received the Chairman’s Medal – the hospital’s highest award – in recognition of his exceptional contribution to the hospital. “This is real humbling stuff,” he says. “To get public recognition from one’s colleagues for doing what I just regarded as a fun career, is a bit overwhelming really.” But visitors to his office, which is stacked with family photos, books and children’s artwork, will not find the medal displayed there. Instead, he confesses, it’s in a deed box under his desk at home – with all his other important documents and awards. Important, but not as important as the medal made of gold metallic paper, stuck on a length of fading cream crepe paper that hangs on the side of his noticeboard. “This is a very precious medal. Just read what that says,” he says excitedly. Awarded to John Hutson for being the Best Dad in the World – BDITW. Happy Father’s Day from Iain and Rowena, 1996.

“Isn’t that priceless?” he grins. Father for 33 years, a Scout leader for 20 years and a familiar face at the hospital for 25 years, John has been recognised nationally and internationally for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of surgery, particularly in regard to intersex children and those born with chronic bowel disorders and congenital anomalies. He began life wanting to be a cardiologist, then changed tack and decided to become a paediatric surgeon, diverting into research along the way, for which he developed a passion. This led him to three years’ research in a lab at Harvard Medical School, where the only available project was a study of the sexual development of chickens. “That’s why I’m now the doctor in this part of Australia who looks after all the children with ambiguous genitalia, because I learned about sexual development in the chicken – of all things,” he laughs. John’s professional position at the hospital is funded by The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation. But he is better known for his bow ties than this title. “It’s not very subtle, is it” he says. The tie was made by Amy’s mother, an artist, and was a thank you gift after Amy spent a summer with the family while on a summer scholarship at Melbourne University. “My children said, Dad you’re such a dag you’ll never wear that.” So he did – with profound results. “The very first day I’m wearing it, I’m in the lift and people who have worked in the hospital for 20 years and who’d never spoken to me, spoke to me for the first time.”

To get public recognition from one’s colleagues for doing what I just regarded as a fun career, is a bit overwhelming really.”

< (Left) Professor John Hutson

<

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Amy’s mother is still supplying the ties, supplemented by even more outrageous ones given by patients. “It’s my name badge. You’ve got to get on the same wave length with the children,” he explains. •

with patient William Folder

(Above) Professor John Hutson Chair Paediatric Surgery


A step forward in the quest for answers Every parent wonders what their children will be like when they grow up, but none more so than a parent of a child with cerebral palsy. “When parents come in with very young children and little babies, and young toddlers, really what they want to know is what will my child be like when they are five or ten years old,” says Associate Professor Dinah Reddihough, Director of Developmental Medicine. Through research into the brain injuries of children with cerebral palsy, or CP, as it is known, she hopes to give them some answers. The generosity of the Barr Family Foundation means that research will soon be underway to study the clinical outcomes of children with CP where the MRI brain scan has shown peri-ventricular white matter damage – the most frequent MRI abnormality seen in children with CP. Originally, it was thought that this pattern of damage occurred between 23 and 34 weeks’ gestation, but it is

> (Above) A/Professor Dinah Reddihough AO with patient Bradley Thompson

now recognised that it also occurs in children born at full-term. The researchers will study the clinical outcomes of scans of over 200 children born between 1999 and 2006 who are part of the Victorian Cerebral Palsy Register, one of the largest such registers in the world. Cerebral palsy is a condition caused by damage to the part of the brain that controls movement. It affects 17 million people worldwide, 33,000 of them in Australia, and is the most common form of physical disability in children. Children with CP may have problems with movement, speech, hearing and or vision, as well as epilepsy, learning and nutritional problems. It was first described in detail in 1861, and while treatments have improved there is no cure.

More information about causes would mean better strategies for prevention.” “Cerebral palsy is a field where there are many unknowns, where there is a lack of information about causes and a lack of information about outcomes and the best treatments for children and their families,” Dinah says. “If we knew more about outcomes, we would know how to target our interventions more appropriately.” Thanks to the gift of $59,729 from the Barr Family Foundation, which aims to enhance the lives of physically, intellectually or health disadvantaged young people in Victoria, this may one day be possible. It’s a quest that Dinah has been on for almost 30 years. “It’s such an unmet need. I could see that even when I was younger.” Until more is known, the focus is on managing the health and quality of life of children with CP. “You don’t cure children, but you make a lot of difference.”•

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Making a difference on the ground The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) recognises that the journey from childhood to adolescence and adulthood can be exciting, complex and challenging, both physically and psychologically. That’s why it is concerned with children at all stages of their development, from birth through to the transition to adult healthcare. Through its Centre for Adolescent Health at William Buckland House, the hospital has led the way in adolescent health research and practice that is increasingly recognised nationally and internationally. The RCH Centre for Adolescent Health recognises that as children grow up, their needs and problems change. It equally recognises that the needs and problems experienced by contemporary young people are very different from those of previous generations. Together with its campus partner, The University of Melbourne, and its links with the community, the centre aims to take its practical and clinical skills and its research understandings out to those in the community who are working with young people aged 10 to 24. As centre Director, Professor Susan Sawyer says – “it’s about making a difference on the ground, where it matters”.

Becoming a

youth friendly hospital While The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) is affectionately known as “the kids”, some may be surprised to find that the “kids” treated at the hospital are increasingly teenagers or even young adults.

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< (Left) Professor Susan Sawyer,

Director, Centre for Adolescent Health


<

Some of this change reflects advances in technology and practice. Children with complex chronic conditions are now expected to survive through adolescence into adult life. Beyond this are growing numbers of young people with highly complex problems, such as eating disorders, ADHD, depression and anxiety. Through its Centre for Adolescent Health care, the hospital aims to ensure that they receive excellent health care during all stages on the road to adulthood. Back in 1983, when centre Director Susan Sawyer was a medical student at the hospital, the cut-off age for admissions to the RCH was 14 years, a common cut-point for organisations such as the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This failed to recognise that many youth health concerns are quite distinct from those of older adults. These days, while the cut-off for hospital inpatients is 19 years, the centre responds to the health needs of young people from 10 to 24 years, recognising that young people continue to mature until their mid 20s.

This year, through the generous donation of $250,000 over three years from the William Buckland Foundation and a matching donation of $250,000 over three years from The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation, the centre is helping to improve the quality of care provided to all adolescents within the hospital, as well as continuing to influence practice and policy more widely in the community.

(Above) Members of the Youth Advisory Council

“These new investments from the William Buckland Foundation and the RCH Foundation will extend our capacity to respond to the health needs of adolescents. Future generations of children and young people will hopefully reap the benefits for many years to come.” •

“Our goal is to become a more adolescent friendly hospital,” Susan says. The funds will be used to survey adolescent patients and their parents, with the aim of improving their quality of care. One of the first steps has been to establish a Youth Advisory Council – the first in any children’s hospital in Australia.

This is incredibly exciting. It is the first time this type of work has been undertaken anywhere in the world.”

“This is incredibly exciting. It is the first time this type of work has been undertaken anywhere in the world,” Susan says.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

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A big hand up for those working with young people When Angela Wood began working on the adolescent ward at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) she realised that if she was going to truly help her patients, she needed to understand them better. That’s why she enrolled in the Centre for Adolescent Health’s Graduate Diploma in Adolescent Health and Welfare. Angela and her nursing colleagues, Jacqueline Sazdanoff and Willow Stubbs, have all been awarded RCH nursing scholarships to complete the course, delivered through The University of Melbourne via distance education. Angela, now a clinical nurse specialist on the cardiology ward, and in her first year of the diploma, says she had no idea how useful it would be. “I didn’t think it would help me so quickly. I find myself talking to adolescents differently,” she says. “There’s more depth to my conversations with patients. I’m asking better quality questions and getting a better history.” Willow Stubbs agrees: “I think my practice has been completely enhanced by the course.” The Graduate Diploma in Adolescent Health and Welfare was developed in 1995 by the hospital’s Centre for Adolescent Health (CAH). CAH Director Professor Susan Sawyer says those who have been supported to complete the course include youth workers, nurses, teachers, police, doctors, lawyers, chaplains and sometimes parents.

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“They are largely people who are actively working with the young and who are really feeling that they need a stronger conceptual understanding from which to develop their skills.” Shortly after its inception, a scholarship program was initiated by Brighton North Rotary Club in its bid to help prevent youth suicide. Since then, more than 35 Rotary Clubs across Victoria have been involved in providing scholarships to cover half the fees for at least 120 students of the graduate diploma across Victoria. This year, the Brighton North Rotary Club has also supported the Robbie Mitchell scholarship for professionals working with very high-risk young people in the community. One of the most passionate advocates of the course and the CAH has been Phil Wheatley, a member of the centre’s development board and the Executive Director of Operation Newstart, which aims to help young people who have become disengaged from education.

“Over 30 members of the Victoria Police have been supported in their efforts to gain a specialist qualification in adolescent health,” Susan says. The graduation ceremony is the highlight of her academic year. “One of the most humbling experiences is to go and hear the presentations at the graduation ceremony from two or three of our graduating students, who consistently describe how powerfully it has changed their practice.” •

The Rotary contribution over the past 15 years has been quite remarkable, very much led by Phil’s energy.”

Phil regularly speaks to Rotary Clubs around Victoria about the course and the centre’s work. “The Rotary contribution over the past 15 years has been quite remarkable, very much led by Phil’s energy,” Susan says. Since 1998, Victoria Police has also come on board. Its Youth Affairs Department now administers the Silk-Miller Scholarship, initiated by the Rotary Club of Melbourne Central Sunrise after the deaths of two Victorian police officers, Gary Silk and Rodney Miller in 1998.

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

> (Right) Willow Stubbs and Jacqueline Sazdanoff with patient Shea Brettwingard


They are largely people who are actively working with the young and who are really feeling that they need a stronger conceptual understanding from which to develop their skills.â&#x20AC;?

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Sisters’ legacy shows way for doctors With her dark hair swept on top of her head and her hands clasped demurely in front of her long full skirt, Annette Collier doesn’t look like someone who could see into the future. But 63 years after her death, Annette’s legacy and that of her sisters has meant better and safer anaesthetic procedures for children at The Royal Children’s Hospital through the purchase of an ultrasound machine. The daughters of Welsh immigrant Jenkin Collier, who arrived in Melbourne in 1852 and made his fortune building railways, Annette, Alice and Edith grew up in an era where anaesthesia was a relatively new procedure and ultrasound had yet to be invented. The sisters grew up at Werndew, a 40-room mansion on four acres in Toorak, and attended the newly established Presbyterian Ladies College. When their father died in 1921 at age 91, he left them an annual income of 50,000 pounds.

Alice Collier

This year, the Collier Charitable Fund’s contribution of $50,000 for an ultrasound machine has made a “phenomenal difference” to the ability of anaesthetists at the hospital to insert needles and catheters into deep veins and to apply nerve blocks during surgery more easily and accurately, says Dr. Ian McKenzie, Director of Anaesthesia and Pain Management. “It’s like having the blindfold taken off,” Ian says. “With ultrasound, if it looks like there’s any issue at all you can look, you can see it – you see the needle approach the vessel and you just put it in.”

The result is safer, more precise and enduring; reducing the need for further invasive procedures, minimising distress and aiding recovery.” The result is safer, more precise and enduring; reducing the need for further invasive procedures, minimising distress and aiding recovery. Annette, Alice and Edith probably had some idea that the legacy they left would live on to help future Victorians. But they could not predict the leaps in technology that would change diagnosis and treatment so profoundly. Clinical guidelines in the UK now say that such procedures should not be done without the help of ultrasound. Ian McKenzie is happy to make further predictions. “I would predict that in the future they may not build an anaesthetic machine without having this sort of equipment as part of the thing,” he says. “I suspect it will go beyond that. We’d hope that the children on the ward will be the next ones to benefit from it as other people learn the skills and get the equipment.” •

Annette Collier

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

Edith Collier

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38

Devoted to each other, the three sisters never married. Instead, they lived prudently, going to church, travelling extensively and giving generously and anonymously to charities and those in need. They also invested wisely and after their deaths left a 1.25 million pound trust, the income from which has been donated annually to charity ever since. To date, the fund has distributed more than $57 million.

(Above) The Collier Sisters, Alice, Annette and Edith


Common goals, uncommon generosity The Eynon family, the Mitchelmore family and the Brown family have never met, yet they have one thing in common. All have made an enduring contribution to the work of The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) through a bequest. They are among 120 families who have bequeathed money to the hospital in the past year. Bequests continue to be a major source of income for the hospital, yet they are the most unexpected and surprising. This year, the hospital received approximately $7 million in bequests, providing much needed funds for a wide-range of vital projects. There are a myriad of reasons why people choose to leave money to the hospital. Sometimes it is because of a direct connection. They may have been a patient themselves, or had children or grandchildren who were patients, or seen a friend’s child benefit from the work of the hospital.

In some instances, the reason for the bequest is unknown. We can only assume that the person wanted to make a contribution to society that would live on to benefit future generations. Such altruism not only contributes to the work of the hospital, it contributes to a better society in general. It’s what makes us not just human but humanitarian.

We at the RCH Foundation are especially touched by these gifts from people that we do not know and cannot thank directly.”

We at the RCH Foundation are especially touched by these gifts from people that we do not know and cannot thank directly. We can only thank the families that represent them and through the stories highlighted in this report, show them the difference that their bequest has made. For a full list of those who chose to help the children of the future through a bequest, turn to page 42. •

39


A message from our new Executive Director, Sue Hunt When I was three years old, playing an angel in a church play, I had an epiphany. I knew then what I wanted to do. It wasn’t a religious epiphany. I didn’t want to be an angel. I didn’t want to be an actor, either. I wanted to make this transformational thing happen, where people’s lives were changed through art. And this is what I did for over 20 years of my working life, most recently as Chief Executive Officer of CarriageWorks in Sydney; I was a facilitator of change through a life in the arts. My aim then was to make a difference. And that’s also why I have come to this new role as Executive Director of The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation. Lives are not only saved here, they are changed.

Perhaps that’s why our Chairman, Julian Clarke, refers to the “Foundation Family”. I am grateful to have been welcomed so warmly into that family and to receive the baton from outgoing Executive Director Brian Mallon.

In appointing me to this new role, the board has given me a gift...”

In appointing me to this new role, the board has given me a gift – a gift that Brian has delivered in an incredibly enthusiastic and passionate way. It is a gift that I intend to treasure and nurture; respecting and building on the love that Victorian’s have for their hospital and working to making new connections to ensure that our Foundation Family continues to thrive.

As Victorians, we all grow up connected to the hospital and the Good Friday Appeal. But for those whose children have been cared for here, and who have seen the commitment and dedication of staff, it is transformational. The connection that families feel as a result is profound and enduring.

> (Right) (L-R) Marie Difalco, Melisa Williams, and Lucy Cavallaro

<

Back Row (L-R): Laurel-Leigh Lawson, Lauren Stewart, Janelle Holden, Bob Skilton, Ellie Pateras, Brian Mallon, Stefan Hnativ, Laura Campbell, Donna Aranyi, Stacey Brown, Sue Manson, Michelle Olinder, Suna Panicker Front Row (L-R): Sue Hunt, Rachael Hurley, Fiona Ballantyne, Veronica Fahmy

40

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010


The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation is grateful to all this year’s donors, big and small. To those who have given gifts under $2,000 we thank you. Special thanks to our major donors who have contributed more than $2,000 – they are listed below.

Major donors

2009 –10

$13 million+

$20,000+

$5,000+

$2,000+

Good Friday Appeal

Australian Leisure & Hospitality Group Baystreet Pty Ltd Bupa Australia Group CSL Limited Glas, Robert Grantali Pty Ltd Kearney, John & Alison New RCH Workers and Contractors Fund Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd Palmer, Ray Scott Hunter Head Shave Strassman, David Morton Toys“R”Us (Australia) Pty Limited Wallace, Aileen T

Access Mercantile Agency Alberti AO, Susan Australand Holdings Custodian Pty Ltd Australian Chinese Events Committee Inc Bain & Company Besen, Marc Bobs Shave BSX2010 CAF Community Fund Checkpoint Building Surveyors City of Melbourne Costco Shopping Night CSR Building Products Limited Dyer, George & Maureen Eltringham, Lilian Firefighters & Affiliates Credit Co-Operative Ltd Fire Protection Association Australia Gatto, Mick Icon Construction Australia Pty Ltd International Chin Christian Network Concerts Israel Family Koadlow, David & Leonie Kolieb, David & Mira Leah Sarris Tribute Wig Party Leslie, Norma Lion Nathan Limited McKeand McCraith Family MILU Pty Ltd Multicom Consulting Pty Ltd Murray, Lachlan & Darcy North, Colin Novy & Selwyn, Barry & Susan Radok, Anita Rene Hartnett Stall for Oncology Research Rocca, Jasmine Ryan Delahey Headshave Schneider, Paul Seek Limited Smith, Maureen Stonnington Financial Group Sunrise Plastics Swart, Ricci The Lions Club of Inverloch UCB Umbria Social Club of Victoria Universal Steel VAG Group P/L Welvic Australia Pty Ltd Western Emergency Services Team

Aquamax Pty Ltd Asia Pacific Arbitrage Partnership Australian Food Group Australian Leisure & Hospitality Group Limited BMDI Tuta Healthcare Pty Ltd Brainwave Australia Cambourne Clinic Carji Club Inc Chebter Pty Ltd Clarke, Wendy Comunita Montana Dei 7 Comuni Inc Crime Watch Security Daggy Dinner Dance Danigelis, Peter Data3 Davies, John Dulux Australia Elise Sneddon Grand Final Family Fun Day Elton, Zelman Fawkner Crematorium & Memorial Park First Tax & Duty Free Francesca Morrison – Team FIMM Tandem Tour Geelong & District Drivers Association Geelong BMX Club Inc Grand Hotel Healthkare Intelligence Pty Ltd Hoffman, Martin Integr8it ITT Water & Wastewater Australia Ltd John Lim Bike Ride Khan, Sabah King, Bill Kliger Wood Real Estate Pty Ltd Koda Project Kwon, Jonghak Lam, Princeton Larsen Family Lloyd, Craig Loy Yang Power Management Pty Ltd Lubansky, Pearl Marcellin College McCoullough, Ian McKeon, James Mediterranean Shipping Co (Aust) P/L Melton Country Club Mentone Grammar School Metro Diamonds Australia Mulwala Golden Inn Restaurant Pty Ltd Norwood Industries Pty Ltd Our Kinda Country Club Inc. Ozeparts Parker Pham Family Ramvek Reece Pty Ltd Rotary Club of Rosebud Inc Shadinuofu, Bolat Shell Australia Employees – Project Better World Silk Trading Singleton, Bradley Slumbercare Bedding (Aust) Pty Ltd Sofcorp Financial Services Pty Ltd Sonenberg, Elizabeth Spicer, Roberta Technika Australia The Dog Rocks Hotel Pty Ltd Topstar Computer International Pty Ltd Werry, Marc Zeke’s Fund

$1 million+ Department of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations Rats of Tobruk Association (Vic. Branch)

$500,000+ KOALA Foundation Special Events Committee

$100,000+ A Celebration of Life Beck Corporation Pty Ltd Coles Supermarkets Australia Pty Ltd / Hardie Grant Magazines Handbury, Geoff Leukaemia Research Fund My Room Myer Stores Community Fund RCH1000

$50,000+ Convic Car Rally Children’s Hospital Foundations Australia Epilepsy Society of Australia Ipsen Pty Ltd Mazda Foundation – Operation Newstart Victoria Mystical Masquerade Ball Nestec SA Opera in the Roses Orica Australia Pty Ltd Seafood Retailers Association of Victoria Victorian Medical Insurance Agency Limited

$10,000+ ADP Allen & Unwin Pty Ltd Australian Red Cross Blood Service Bluescope Steel Limited Coca-Cola Sales & Customer Service Charity Committee (VIC) Domain Charter Group Pty Ltd Fast Track Australia – Fleet Services Pty Ltd Gorman & Kelly Commercial Property Management Pty Ltd HealthWise Vic/Tas Jacobson Family Kontis, Chris G Matthews, Mavis Michael’s IGA Supermarket Nelson Alexander Pty Ltd Nicks Wish Niklaus, Kevin & Louise PSG Elecraft Beardshave Rasimi, Ilat Respond for the Kids SG Manning & Associates Shand, Jocelyn M The IN Group Wintrust Pty Ltd

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

41


Bequests

2009 –10

$1 million+

$50,000+

$10,000+

$2,000+

Moss Trust Fund, Harry Lyon

Aitken, M J Carlyle, Marjorie Delaney, Peggy Patricia Florence Moore, Mary Anne Gower, Nancie McRae Estate, Ian Donald Thomson, Jean McDonald

Brown, Ernest L Brown, Joseph Burrows, Lachlan Catford, Jean Mary E C Blackwood Charitable Trust Halliday, Stuart James Macrow, William Pratt, Douglas Dale The Frank & Sybil Richardson Charitable Trust Tootal & Broadhurst, Harry & Eva Wright, John Frederick

Bateman, Frank Hincks Blannin, Arthur L Cowell, Kevin Stewart Francis Thomas & Jeanette Warren Trust Godfree, George Lawrence Grimwade, Alice Marion Lanassa, Irene Mary Levi Charitable Trust, Joseph & Kate Marshall, Charlotte Marshall, William McTaggart Estate, Edith Murdoch, John S Pile, George Leonard Ramondt Charitable Trust, Kitty & Harry The William & Mary Ievers & Sons Maintenance Fund Thompson Estate, Flora Louisa Weldon, Mary Veronica

$500,000+ Eynon, Neville Lindsay Jofeh, Daniel John

$100,000+ Adams, Grace Cain, Dennis Neil Dalton, Audree V R Davey, Peter Dooley, Zadel Sylvia Dorothy Isabel Stirling Charitable Trust Dunn Family Perpetual Trust Heymanson, Joyce Holden, Robert Keith Kearton, Richard Keown, Elena Mitchelmore, Gwynneth Nancy Norman, Mavis & Graham Waters Charitable Trust Philpot, Mavis

$20,000+ Clarke Charitable Trust, Dennis Osborne Clement, Alexander Stewart Gilchrist, Muriel Nellie Grazebrook, Phyllis Henry B Smith Charitable Trust Lillian Little Trust Robinson Charitable Trust, Edith & Don Shepherd, Frederick B Spencer Lionel R V Trust Fund Smith, Heather Sybil Walker, J H Winder, Emily Vera

$5,000+ Aitken, K B Fleming, John William Grant Bequest Healey, Joyce Adelaide John William & Anna Maria Ford Memorial Fund Keith Goods Memorial Trust McWilliams, Horatio R C Morgan, David Mathais Nanson, Katharine St. Clair Price, Leigh & May Provelson Trust Fund, Peter James Robyn, Jaap Snell, Reginald Archibald Wells, Arthur Donald William & Eileen Walsh Trust

Trusts &Foundations

2009 –10

$2 million+

$20,000+

$10,000+

$2,000+

The Atlantic Philanthropies (USA) Incorporated

Baby Emma Foundation Besen Family Foundation Geelong Community Foundation Starlight Childrens Foundation Australia Syd and Ann Wellard Perpetual Trust administered by Equity Trustees The Bachrach Charitable Trust The Creswick Foundation The George and Freda Castan Families Charitable Foundation The Kimberley Foundation Nominees Pty Ltd The Marian & E H Flack Trust The Orloff Family Charitable Trust The Pratt Foundation Victorian Women’s Trust Limited William & Vera Houston Memorial Trust

AMP Foundation Bagot Gjergja Foundation Kilwinning Trust Muriel & Les Batten Foundation The Harcourts Foundation (Australia) Pty Ltd The Michael & Andrew Buxton Foundation The William Angliss (Victoria) Charitable Fund

Izaak Wolf & Genia Auschwitz Szykman Charitable Foundation Jeffrey & Helen Mahemoff Endowment Spotlight Foundation State Trustees Australia Foundation – Herbert William Hampton State Trustees Australia Foundation – Marjorie Hayes & Olivia Cock Memorial The Ray & Joyce Uebergang Foundation

$200,000+ Sidney Myer Fund The Baker Foundation The William Buckland Foundation

$100,000+ Bone Marrow Donor Institute & Fight Cancer Foundation

$50,000+ Barr Family Foundation Foundation for Young Australians Sporting Chance Cancer Foundation Ltd The Bell Charitable Fund The Collier Charitable Fund The Dyson Bequest The R E Ross Trust

42

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

$5,000+ Debbie Stach Memorial Trust Gringlas Family Charitable Fund John & Pauline Gandel Charitable Trust Leslie Eric Paddle Trust Fund administered by Equity Trustees State Trustees Australia Foundation – Denis Aloysius King State Trustees Australia Foundation – Isabella Agnes Pritchard State Trustees Australia Foundation – Neville & Di Bertalli & Family Clinical Neurosurgical Fellowship The Andrews Foundation The Goldschlager Family Charitable Foundation The Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation Wang Jia Qi Trust Fund


The Foundation receives many donations in loving memory of children, friends and relatives, and in celebration of important life events such as weddings, special birthdays, anniversaries, Bar Mitzvahs and Bat Mitzvahs. Those honoured in this way are listed below.

In honour Agricola, Angela Aitken, Leslie Alfreda Allen, Thelma Andrew, Stuart Andrew & Amanda Aparo, Michele Ashurst, Ruth Ayling, Dora Bacolas, Katina Bain, Riley Robert Ballingall, Eva Balster, Joshua Barabash, Katie Barbakos, Dean Barber, Edith & Bernard Batrouney, Oscar Boulton Battiloro, David Baxter, Robert Norton Beever, William Ben-Zur, Yaacov Ovadia Bisinella, Maria Blackford, Hunter Charles Blake, Emily Blau, George Blyss, Kahlilla Bongiovanni, Franco Bradley, Helen Brennan, David Brincat, Emanuel Bristow, Gabe Britton & Greaves, Alice Jean & Mary Brooker, Ruby Brown, Valery Beryl-May Burke, Noela Bywaters, Robert Caesar, William Malcolm Pryde Calder, Agnes Cannataro, Carmine Carnevale, Mario Carter, John Arthur Casper, Hilda Ceniti-Porter, Felix Chambers, Edwina Margaret Chilianis, Xander Chin, Andrew Chortis, Stratos Christo, Oliver Clark, Mary Elizabeth Clark, Ned Clarke, Maddie Cohen, Bryan Ernest Collins, Chanel Mia Collins, Gay Colliver, Nathan John Cooling, Georgina Corser, Ronald Haden Courtney, Hayden Cowie, Matthew Coyle, James Crowley, Melissa Dabscheck, Adrian Dalgleish (Schulz), Hugo Leon William D’Amico, Agatino Dani & Jono Davey, Marion Davies, Brodie Davies, Frank Davies, Gregory John Davies, Havrena Fon Davis, Ian Coulthard De Bortoli, Hudson De Sensi, Francesco Demichele, Sabine Ho Dempster, Frederick Alexander Dethomas, Patrice Laurent Di Camillo, Luciano Di Marzio, Filomena Di Michele, Alberto Orlando

Di Rago, Ernesto Dickins, Charlie Diffey, Jean Do, Duc Dobson-Ratnam, Sian Marie Donald, Luke Driscoll, Shirley Driver, Thelma Grace Dujakova, Yana Duncan, Charlotte Paige Dunn, Thomas Lawrence Emry, Georgia Louise Esposito, Angela Felmy-Glas, Noah Fisben, Margaret Fischer, Edna May Forte, William Fox, Jack Foord Fraid, Ruby Franjic, Baby Luka Freedman, Adrian Gagliardi, Giuseppe Gardner, Simon Peter Gelber Gell, Luke Mitchell Gibbons, Catherine Gissing, John Francis Gligoris, Angelo Gogerty, Siabh Goldberg, Merle Goldbloom & Bloch, Anthony & Mirav Goldman, Asher Goldman, Tahli Greta Golshevsky, Layla Goodall, Dylan Greco, Francesco Carlo Greening, Betty Greenwood, Alex Gregs & Lauren Grieve, Sam Guaran, Bruce Hamilton Gucciardo, Francesco Guiney, Joel Guthrie, Stan Haddad, Wahija Hall, Dorothy & Jack Hall, William Halvy, Kevin John Hamill, Zoe Hampton, Patricia Mary Harris, Barbara Harris, Edwin Harris-Ryan, James Robert Charles Hartley, Charli Georgina Haynes, Barbara Herrech Family Hickox, Mary Hinchcliff, Myrtle Hogan, Helen Holdsworth, Travis Robert Holmes, Pauline Hopcraft, Brendan Horley, Mary Joyce Hornung, Peter Howell, Ezra Florence (Polly) Hull, Eric Hupert, James Hurst, Patrick Hyun Jeong & Paul Inge, Helen Jackofsky, Shoshana Jacobson, Pippa Jamieson, Fay Janetzki, Bob Joel, Andrew Joel, Nicholas Joel, Shareen Johnson, Mitchell

2009 –10 Kalogiras, Helen Kaminaras, Socrates Karabatsos, Nikolaos Kassis, Jade Hope Keast, Joyce Kennedy, Ross Cameron Kennedy & Poole, Ross & Lisa Kirkham, Florence ( Mavis ) Kluckow, Benjamin Walter Knott, Doris Krause, Esther Kurc, Ruth Kwon, Seong Eun Lachlan Donald, McCann Lambert, John Lasnitzki, Milton Lehrer, Barry Levin, Benjamin Levin, Gary Li Rosi, Nicoletta (Tina) Littlefield, Murray Lloyd, Marion Lorenz-Berry, Ethan Lowen, Riyani Lowinger, Jeff & Jocelyn Luff, Winifred Joan Maddocks, Molly Magee, Kathy Majerski, Ivanka Mannering, Ron Manos, Jordan Mao, Alexander Marks, Paul Marshall, Mykala Chloe Martin, Audrey Myrtle Masur, Margaret Mau, Ronald Mawal, Jacques May, William (Billy) Mazza, Jade McCaig, Frank McCann, Lachlan Donald McCormick, Kathleen McCoullough, Charli Lauren McNamara, Cooper McNeill, Jean ‘Margret’ McSweeny, Isobel Rose Medaisky, Philip & Thelma Meltzer, Hilda Milenkovic, Nicholas Jac Millar, Lynne Mitchell, Hana Monaco, Nicolina Morel, Crystal Judith Morrell-Porter, Lorna Joyce Morrison, Grace Mulcair, Teagan Muto, Assunta Namur, Gabrielle Irene Nancarrow, Hayley Jane Nathan, Cyril Natoli, Franca Naylor, Jacob John Neil, Hope Brook Newall, Paul Neylan, Lesley Nguyen, Dylan O’Driscoll, Mary Olston, Robert Edgar Osborn, Jordan Owen, Mia Palma, Francesco Paties, Vanda Paul, Albert Hugh Peck, Christian Jay Sherwood Peck, Patricia Pham, Khoa Phillips, John Harber Phillips, Ruby Matilda Pho, Jessica

Picini, Francesco Piva, Baby Angel Domenique Pizmony, Nir & Lai Platt, Maureen Pledger, Rob Polito, Antonio Pomeroy, Sylvia Pomroy, Sylvia Popple, Jasper Porter, Dawn Potts, Hayden Michael Potts, Kristen Lee Pouliassis, Stamati Pozydajew, Lulu Price, Alma Elizabeth Prior, Walter Prunty, Jake Prziovska, Suzie Raffaele, Rosaria Ransom, Virginia Richards, Jason Allan Rigby, Joshua Rogers, Allan Rogers, Tynan Ronan Boys Rosato, Giovanna Ross, Lorna Roszkowski, Jozefa Rotstein, Tia Rushton, Garth Russo, Daniel Rutherford, Chloe Ryan, Shirley Ryan ( Gallagher), Penny Saddington, Florence E Santos, Helenos Dos Savron, Santo Scarfo, Joe Sfinas, Marina Sheehan, Georgia Rose Shirreff, Mark Simon, Judd Smith, Arnold Smorgon, Ann Smorgon, Victor Sofianos, Electra Stanford-Mallia, Cleo Stephens, Stuart Stirling, Ann Storrar, Jean Swindells, Eva Symons, Freda Tatangelo, Clorinda Taylor, Rose Teese, Christian Thomaidis, Kristiana Thomson, Esther Rose Thomson, Ruby Angel Thye, Kow Tierney, Kaja Timms, Colin Timms, Nicholas Toniolo, Egisto and Eugienia Torey, William Traeger, Sonny Trang, David Thoai Tsalkos, Soula Tumino, Giorgia (Gina) Tweedley, John Verity, Jane Virdi, Meher Yuvraj Singh Virgona, Francesco Virtue, Neil Raymond Voice, Betty Voskoboynik, Eden Vrdoljak, Nicholas Wall, Elsie Florence Ward, Chloe Weiss, Betty Weller, Ken

Wengier, Zara Whiting, Dashiel Wilkinson, Tom Henry Williams, Dianne Kaye Willis, Christina Emily Wilson, Sam Wilson, Samuel William Winther-Jensen, Baby of Wishart, Clint Xanthopoulos, Christos Xanthos, Lawrence Cody Yeap, Ashley Yin E, Hao Young, Patricia Margaret Zuydwyk, Bill Zygier, Geoffrey

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

43


Board of Governors

Committees

Chairman Mr Julian Clarke Chairman, Herald and Weekly Times and Director, The Royal Children’s Hospital

Executive & Finance Mr Julian Clarke (Chair) Professor Christine Kilpatrick Mr Richard Leder Professor Paul Monagle

Deputy Chairman Mr Richard Leder Partner, Corrs Chambers Westgarth

Mr Tony Beddison AO Chairman, Beddison Group and The Royal Children’s Hospital

Dr Hugo Gold Clinical Associate Professor, University of Melbourne and Clinical Director of the Children’s Bioethics Centre, The Royal Children’s Hospital

Mr Geoffrey J Henke AO Former Vice-President Australian Olympic Committee

Mr David Huggins Assistant Director of Student Services Catholic Education Office Melbourne

Mr Ian Johnson Chairman, Channel Seven Melbourne

Mr Leon Kempler OAM Chairman, Acacia Australia Ltd and Tescom Australia

Professor Christine Kilpatrick Chief Executive Officer, The Royal Children’s Hospital

Mrs Carole Lowen President, The Royal Children’s Hospital Auxiliaries

Professor Paul Monagle Stevenson Professor and Head of the Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne

Professor Frank Oberklaid OAM Director, Centre for Community Child Health The University of Melbourne and The Royal Children’s Hospital Mr Peter Yates Chairman, Peony Capital General Partnership, The Royal Institution of Australia, The Australian Science Media Centre and Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Melbourne

44

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation Melbourne Our Year in Review 2010

Audit and Corporate Risk Management Mr Leon Kempler OAM (Chair) Mr David Huggins Mr Richard Leder Mr Dale McKee (external member) Investment Mr Peter Yates (Chair) Mr Stefan Hnativ Mr Richard Leder Ms Sue Hunt Mr Andrew Shelton (external member) Mr Ray King (Sovereign Investments – independent advisor to Committee) Remuneration Mr Julian Clarke (Chair) Mr Richard Leder Fund Distribution Audit Mr David Huggins (Chair) Mr Geoffrey Henke AO Mr Leon Kempler OAM Executive Director Mr Brian Mallon (until 8 August 2010) Ms Sue Hunt (from 9 August 2010)


Contents A history of giving – 140 years of generosity

01

A celebration of life and love

21

Contact us

Financial outline

02

Fab Five have a ball

22

For more information about The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation and its fundraising activities, please contact:

A message from the Foundation

03

A coming of age gift

23

Many minds one goal

04

Responding with love

24

A message from The Royal Children’s Hospital 05

A friend indeed

25

Twins’ success shines spotlight on hospital

06

A tradition of caring

25

New hospital signals a bright future

08

A ray of hope for neuroblastoma

26

Creativity is the key for Good Friday Appeal

10

A helping hand for burns nurses

27

Appeal is real winner in Run for the Kids

11

Henry’s big test may be a first

28

A passion for helping

12

Why going to emergency is no longer a pain

29

From little things big things grow

13

A heart set on better outcomes

30

The lady with the hair – and the heart

14

In pursuit of the big picture

30

Mother Goose – Rhymes for a reason

15

In search of knobbly knees

31

Pledge allegiance to better health for diabetics 16

A bow from the man with the bow tie

32

Making a difference for kids with cancer

17

A step forward in the quest for answers

33

Quest for a magic bullet

18

Becoming a youth friendly hospital

34

Comfort First eases stress

18

Tarli’s beads tell a story of their own

19

A big hand up for those working with young people

36

Sparkies dare to make a difference

20

Sisters’ legacy shows way for doctors

38

Common goals, uncommon generosity

39

A message from our new Executive Director, Sue Hunt

40

Major donors

41

Bequests

42

Trusts and Foundations

42

In honour

43

Board of Governors

44

Committees

44

Contact us

45

The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation 50 Flemington Road, Parkville VIC 3052 Phone + 61 3 9345 5037 Fax + 61 3 9345 6900 E-mail rch.foundation@rch.org.au www.rchfoundation.org.au ABN 15 007 143 142 RCH1000 Phone + 61 3 9345 5143 The Royal Children’s Hospital Auxiliaries Phone + 61 3 9345 5188 www.rch.org.au/rchaux Good Friday Appeal Phone + 61 3 9292 1166 www.goodfridayappeal.com.au Volunteers Phone + 61 3 9345 5880 www.rch.org.au/volunteers The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne Phone + 61 3 9345 5522 www.rch.org.au Thanks to Design: Commotion Creative & Educational Resource Centre, RCH Photography: Jerry Galea Photography & Educational Resource Centre, RCH Writer: Jane Cafarella

(Cover) Little Rupert de Wolff can expect to live a normal, healthy life thanks to life-saving cardiac surgery performed by Royal Children’s Hospital surgeons. After spending four days in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, eight-month-old Rupert is all smiles. Photo courtesy of the Herald Sun.

45


hands up for our children

There are many different ways you can assist the Foundation in our fundraising endeavours – make a donation, attend or sponsor special events, hold your own event or join an auxiliary – we have something for everyone. The future health and wellbeing of our children rests with each of us.

Campus Partners

Our year in review 2009 – 2010

You can become part of the wonderful family of RCH Foundation supporters by getting involved.

RCHF 2010 Year in Review  

The Royal Children's Hospital Foundation Melbourne explores the huge impact of giving for the hospital, our staff and programs, and most imp...