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September 24, 2009 An Associated Collegiate Press two-time national Pacemaker award-winning newspaper, serving students since 1922. Vol. xxxVIII, No. 2

Riverside, CA | www.viewpointsonline.org

First Copy Free | Additional copies 25 cents

Tigers looking to kick the competition

Khai Le / ONLINE Editor

BATTLE FOR THE BALL: RCC’s William Hoffman, #24, battles with Chaffey College’s Billie Cook, #13, for control of the ball during their match Sept. 21.


2 | September 24, 2009

Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

Welcome back for fall semester The Inaugural Convocation of Riverside City College by President Jan Muto will be held on Sept. 29 at 11:30 a.m. in the Landis Performing Arts Center. There will be a reception held after the ceremony from 12:50-1:50 p.m. in the A.G. Paul Quadrangle.

Giving back to the community ASRCC is asking for donations of personal hygiene products to assist students in need of basic necessities. Donations can be dropped off in the student government office located behind the cafeteria, or the student activities office in the Bradshaw building.

HUHO takes the stage On Oct. 2, HUHO will be hosting a talent show in the cafeteria. Doors open at 5 p.m. and refreshments will be provided. The cover charge is $3 for everyone.

Educational outreach promotes awareness Health services will be holding a series of educational outreach sessions. They will all be held in front of the admissions building from 12-2 p.m. “Love Your Skin” will be held on Sept. 29, “Breast Cancer Awareness” will be held on Oct. 26 and “Adult Immunization Awareness” will be held on Nov. 16. For more information, call 951-222-8151.

RCC fights the flu Flu shots will be given to RCC staff members on Oct. 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Landis Auditorium Lobby. The cost of the flu shots are $10 and will be given on a first come first served basis.

Win a nursing scholarship NANDA International is offering nursing students the chance to win a $2,000 scholarship through their article writing contest. For contest rules and entry information, log onto the NANDA International website

Parenting workshops offer free help On Oct. 21 from 6-8:30 p.m. there will be a free parenting workshop at Buchanan Elementary School. Free on-site childcare will be provided as well as a free buffet dinner. You must pre-register for this event. You can register online at alternativestodv.org or call 951-320-1370.

IE students show off their art The California Museum of Photography is presenting YO! Youth Media Showcase 2009. They will be showcasing the stories, images and graphic design work of Inland Empire teenagers. The event will take place Sept. 25 from 12 -5 p.m. Admission is $3 to the general public and free for students and seniors.

Donate to prevent domestic violence The Women’s Resource Center at UCR will be accepting donated cell phones. The proceeds will be used to support Wireless Foundations Call to Protect program which aids in the campaign to end domestic violence. For more information, contact Romanie Arterberry at romanie@ucr.edu.

News

bethania alvarez /staff Photographer

lunch Hour: Students line up before the afternoon rush to purchase their food in the newly renovated City Grill cafeteria.

Cafeteria leaves students hungry for more erene abdelmeseeh managing editor From the food to the completely remodeled facility, the cafeteria has undergone many changes recently. They have a new menu and have completely redesigned the facility. But are these changes getting the positive response from students that food services expected? Mary Black, food services manager, says that the students are responding positively to the new cafeteria. “Financially, the students are responding greatly,” said Black. “We are now accepting debit and credit, except American Express, which makes it easier for students to purchase their meals.” Students can now charge their meals, but many, like Brittany Williams, say that the price of food in the cafeteria is a bit expensive. “They give small portions for a high price,” Williams said. “I wish they gave us a discount with our student ID cards like they do in the bookstore.” Many other students agree saying that it is more convenient to buy their food in the bookstore so they don’t spend as much. “I’ll go to the bookstore and buy my food then just come sit in the cafeteria,” Williams said. Not only are students complaining about the price of the food in the cafeteria, but the quality of the food, poor organization and the facility itself. Black says that the food has changed tremendously with new items to accomodate everyone, including vegetarians. “There’s something for everyone,” said Black. “There are plenty of healthy choices too, like the salad bar, grab and go sandwiches and now you can even order your choice of veggie sandwiches.” Many students beg to differ, insisting their only option for a non-fried meal is the salad bar, which is not enough. Ruthanne Meagher, a Riverside City College student who often eats at the cafeteria, says that most of the food does not appeal to her. “I always get a salad because the food sits there under the heat lamp and it’s nasty,” said Meagher. “They should make fresher food, or at least rotate everything

out instead of leaving it to sit there. The pizza is cardboard grease and I’ll surely pay for it later.” Other students, like Chrystal Garcia, went on to agree with Meagher saying they wanted fresher food and a healthier menu with less grease soaked options. Edith Sanchez, another RCC student, said that she also wants more diverse choices when it comes to the options and variety of food in the cafeteria. “I wish they had less fried food,” Sanchez said. “The only healthy options in there are the sandwiches and salad bar. They should offer a variety of fruits too. Something like the salad bar, not just the fruit cups they have now.” Students like James Sly and Pierre Wattz agree with Sanchez about the lack of options and would like to see a change in what’s offered in the cafeteria. Another issue that arises is the organization of the cafeteria. Many students, like Megan Werts, say it gets crazy in the cafeteria during the “rush hour.” “The lines get pretty hectic sometimes,” said Werts.“You get confused and can’t really figure out if you’re in line to order your food or in the checkout line.” Other students, like Osker Trujollo, say that the cafeteria needs more tables and places to sit because during the times when more students are present it becomes a mission to find a place to sit. “It gets kind of crowded,” Trujollo said. “Sometimes I’m in a rush to get to class and don’t have time to wait for a place to sit.” Although the students are not completely satisfied with the cafeteria, many, like Ruben Garcia, are saying it’s decent. When it comes down to it, the cafeteria is not the ideal place for students to eat, but it is what’s available and they’ll take what they can get. Meagher said that the cafeteria left something to be desired. However, it is more convenient for students who need to stay on campus, especially for those who don’t have any means of transportation. Although the cafeteria has undergone a dramatic change, many students want their opinions taken into consideration and hope to see action taken toward making the cafeteria appealing to students.


Viewpoints

September 24, 2009 | 3

Serving students since 1922

News

Cuts cause students concern

lauren garcia asst. news editor

California colleges have taken a huge hit when it comes to funding. Students are also finding it more difficult to get the essential classes necessary for their success. According to Gregory Gray, Riverside Community College District chancellor, as of the second week of school, 189 sections of classes have been cut from the Riverside campus, 89 from Moreno Valley and 53 from the Norco campus for the fall session. Over the course of the fall, winter and spring sessions, 1000 total sections will be eliminated from all of the campuses combined. “Each campus has done a marvelous job coping with the budget cuts,” Gray said. “Although, if additional cuts come we won’t be able to absorb them as well as we did these cuts.” Accompanied by these reductions was a set of goals. “These cuts should create the least amount of disruption possible for the students. We need to try our best to continue as normal and avoid layoffs of the staff,” Gray said. “We are doing the best we possibly can,” Gray said. “Patience is definitely a virtue.” When it comes to student

Photo illustration by: Khai Le / Online Editor

college. “Students must meet the general education requirements and low division requirements just to have a chance at transferring to a UC or Cal State,” Andrews said. A Transfer Career Center Job Fair will be held on Terracina Street at RCC from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Over 200 employees and career representatives will be there to support students. Csumentor.edu has a helpful “transfer checklist” available for students looking to transfer from a community college. Bush, Gray and Andrews offered similar advice to students, especially those planning to transfer. Make sure you register as early as possible and pay all fines on time. See counselors and make sure you are not taking unnecessary classes. Also, identify the school you want to transfer to, and claim a specific major. The councelors also recommend that students talk with transfer representatives of the college they wish to attend, which will help in the creation of a personal timeline. “We need to keep our chin up, stay positive and continue moving forward,” Gray said. Although many cuts have affected RCC, the administration is doing all they can to aid students

services, every part is being evaluated. “We are trying to do everything to meet the student’s essential needs,” said Edward Bush, vice president of student services. “The students need to be supported while any barriers keeping them from being successful be eliminated.” During the 2010 and 2011 school year, 32 to 64 percent of the categorical funding can expect to be cut, said Bush. This will affect the most vulnerable students, such as those involved in the Extended

Opportunity Programs and Services and Community or Academic Progress programs. As for transfer students, it is going to be a difficult journey as well. CSU colleges will only accept applications starting on Oct. 1 and will stop accepting them any time after Nov. 30. Students may only apply for the 2010 fall term. Both UC’s and Cal States have cut back on freshman admissions by approximately 50 to 75 percent along with an approximate

chance of getting accepted into the program. According to http://www. Ed.gov, the official US Department of Education Web site, financial need is determined by the Department, using a standard formula established by Congress to evaluate the financial information reported on the FAFSA and to determine the expected family contribution. The fundamental elements in the formula are the student’s income and assets, if the student is independent, the parents’ income and assets if the student i s d e p e n d e n t , t h e f a m i l y ’s household size and the number of family members, excluding parents, attending postsecondary institutions. With the current California budget crisis, more students are becoming eligible for the program. Various issues contributing to higher eligibility are family members losing jobs or being demoted to part time. Many students who were financially stable independents are now struggling to even keep their part time jobs, not to mention all the cuts that have been made to the most basic of on campus jobs. Eugenia E. Vincent, the dean of student financial services, comments on the situation. “We have never had this strong of a demand,” Vincent said. “Nor have we had this number of students that were eligible for federal work study.” If there hadn’t been any budget

HELP WANTED: The student employment office in has a wall filled with job listings.

reduction of 25 percent in transfer student admissions, said Clarissa Andrews, educational advisor in the transfer center. “It’s killing us,” Andrews said “It’s really tough right now.” . RCC has lost representatives from UC Berkeley, UC Davis, Cal State Fullerton, Cal State Poly Pomona, Cal State San Bernardino and UCLA has cut back its visits by 50 percent. Andrews also said that if students do not declare a major when sending in an application they will not be admitted into the

Student jobs can’t meet the supply of high demand Jessica denilofs Staff Writer The Federal Work-Study Program, formerly known as the College Work-Study Program, provides jobs for undergraduate and graduate students with financial needs. Who is applicable for the program? Individuals and Institutions of Higher Education may apply for a distribution of funds to be awarded to undergraduate, vocational and graduate students enrolled or accepted for enrollment at an approximate 3,400 participating colleges. The program distributed $640,000 this year, even after the recent budget cuts. The district has to match the federal government award money proportionally. Once the fund is divided, all the students in the district who are a part of the program will be earning approximately $800,000 total this year. In previous years, all money was given to the Riverside City Campus. However, the Moreno Valley Campus and Norco Campus have each grown into substantially larger colleges. With the exponential growth, the money is now required to be spread out even thinner. Additionally, the percentage of eligible students for the program has increased significantly. With this rise, students have a far fetched

Khai Le / ONLINE Editor

cuts, it is possible the department may have received more funding, which would have resulted in placement for a greater amount of qualified students. “If each campus were to become its own separate entity, then all may be able to receive their own adequate funding. Until then it will be a challenge to gain employment through the program since the same amount of money is being spread across a much larger group of people,” Vincent said. All jobs were filled extremely fast due to the increased amount of eligible students, and there won’t be any more jobs available until next year. The only way to get a job through the program is if a qualified student has a status

shift, such as no longer being enrolled, quitting, or termination from the job. Once a student has been removed from the program, an opening is available and can be checked on the status of their Web site. The option is always open to check online regularly in the event that any openings arise. Students can go to www.rcc.edu/services/ workforce/studentEmploy.cfm and click on the “job postings” link to check for any available positions. The students who received jobs were the individuals who had their financial aid documents completed and returned in advance. When filling out financial aid documents for next year, check the Federal Work Study Program box and turn

in all forms before the deadline. One must be eligible for financial aid to be able to be a part of the Federal Work Study Program, and eligibility referrals are available for pick up from the financial aid office. Though there may not be any work study jobs available at the moment, there is also a student employment office on campus that serves as an alternative. There are always plenty of local job listings available for student consideration. Many different employers advertise in a range of career tracks such as childcare, sales and marketing. The employment office is located on the Lovkin Field, room F2 for any students who wish to see what alternative options are available.


Viewpoints

Construction causes chaos Serving students since 1922

4 | September 24, 2009

danee cuevas asst. news editor

The construction of a new nursing science building at Riverside City College proves to be a double edged sword. New buildings will mean more classes offered to students, which has become a serious issue on the RCC campus as of late. On the other hand, it means construction during semesters, and a decrease in parking spaces, which is already a major issue for faculty, staff and students. When the massive construction project commences later this month, the school will close all of student parking lot A and approximately half of student parking lot B. Additionally, parts of Magnolia Avenue and Fairfax Avenue will be shut down for the project. Not only will parking spaces be even more limited than they already are, there will also be a change in the flow of traffic around the college area. Building and construction will take place for approximately 18 months to two years. However, the administration is currently considering options that are going to make the congestion easier for students. According to Sergeant Jack Kohlmeier of the Riverside Community College District Police Department, the administration is currently considering two potential parking and travel related projects in negotiation. If the parking situation continues to be an issue during the construction period, the RCC

administration could potentially lease approximately 400 spare parking spaces. However, those four hundred new parking spaces will be located on the corner of Third Street and Market Street, which is an extensive walk from campus. If students were to park in that area, they would have to plan on leaving for school substantially earlier for a spot that may already be taken. If the parking spaces are leased, administration plans on creating incentives, such as cheaper parking permits for students who park at the farther location. Another option being negotiated by the administration is the implementation of a rideshare program. Carpoolers and vanpoolers will be awarded perks such as useful discounts at grocery stores and other businesses. The Riverside Transit Agency bus system is also another option for students to consider if they want to avoid the hassle of traffic and parking. RCC students are eligible to utilize all RTA bus services for free, as long as they swipe or show their RCC identification card when attempting to ride any RTA bus. So far, this is the most recommended mode of transportation by both the administration and RCCD Police Department. If students truly need to drive their own personal vehicles to school, then the most important tip students can get in order to avoid parking citations is to follow the rules. Park in designated student spaces and never in staff spaces.

News

ashley robinson / asst. photo editor

No parking: Parking lot A, in front of the Digital Library, will be permanently closed down starting Sept. 28 to make room for the new nursing building. Park within the lines, park straight with consideration to other drivers and only park in disabled stalls if the registered car has a valid permit to do so. Students must also make sure to purchase and obtain valid student parking permit every semester. The majority of parking citations given out in the RCC parking lots every year are due to the lack of a permit or an invalid parking permit. “In comparison to parking at a UC, it’s phenomenal how reasonable we are,� Kohlmeier said.

ashley robinson / asst. Photo Editor

closed for business: Parking lots A and B will be closed during the construction of the new nursing building, alternative lots will need to be used.


Viewpoints

opinions Serving students since 1922

Viewpoints Staff

EDITORIAL

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Holland (951) 222-8495 viewpoints@rcc.edu eic@viewpointsonline.org MANAGING EDITOR Erene Abdelmeseeh (951) 222-8488 managingeditor@viewpointsonline.org ADVERTISING MANAGER Vanessa Soto (951) 222-8488 viewpoints.ads@gmail.com

Registration woes turns adding classes into an episode of ‘Survivor’with students trying to outlast one another

FACULTY ADVISERS Allan Lovelace Dan Evans ONLINE EDITOR Khai Le admin@viewpointsonline.org

SPORTS EDITOR Javier Cabrera sports@viewpointsonline.org

NEWS EDITOR Amy Warshauer news@viewpointsonline.org

INSCAPE EDITOR Robert Johnston inscape@viewpointsonline.org

It is very crowded at Riverside City College this semester. Unlike previous semesters where the overwhelming crowded feeling was at a maximum for about two weeks, this semester is already showing that a lot of these new faces are here to stay. This semester, students came back to canceled and dropped classes, increased student fees and on top of all that–no parking, unless you showed up at 4 a.m. Frustratingly, the first couple of days were spent trying to figure out just what to do. Instructors divided up a good deal of their time between navigating their syllabuses to adding and dropping students. Now, a group of students trying to add on the first day is not relatively new. What is new, however, is that many of these students that were trying to add classes, had already been enrolled for said class. The recent fee increase from $20 per unit to $26 per unit came as a complete shock as many returning students showed up the first day of school with virtually no classes. At the mercy of instructors, who basically had no other course of action than to use the lengthy waitlist, some of these students did not even get their classes back. In the first week, classes were full beyond capacity. Popular required courses like English, math and history had students spilling out of the classroom, desperately trying to get any spot they could. Students in the library checked Web Advisor daily for any up-to-the minute drops in these courses in order to quickly nab the vacancy. Everyone could not be added, there was simply no room. And while in previous semesters there were good chances that a student on the first day could land a potential course, that chance was all but decimated. Unless that course was not a popular course like the required courses, they were in short supply, as a trip to the tech building where theater classes are held, doors had signs posted with messages “Class Canceled—Budget Cuts.” The emotion could be read on students’ faces when the instructor had to relay the news that this would not be the semester that they would be taking History 7. Disparaging? Indeed. Trying to acquire a class became survival of the fittest. Students who have to maintain a certain number of units for financial aid or a parent’s insurance deal clamored for remaining courses. A domino effect, more students who previously may not have been interested in newspaper production (hint, hint) were now figuratively speaking No. 16 on a wait list. Puzzled, some instructors applied various methods to adding students from the wait list. Some asked that if you could provide proof that you

OPINIONS EDITOR INSIDER EDITOR Corinne Love Sandra Diaz opinions@viewpointsonline.org insider@viewpointsonline.org PHOTO EDITOR Martin Iniguez, Jr photo@viewpointsonline.org

STAFF Jackie Adams Bethania Alvarez Joshua Arana Tracy Barker Rucheda Barnette Breanna Boozer Madina Brammer Ashley Canovas Diana Carrillo Andrew Conrad Danee Cuevas Jessica Denilofs Harmandeep Dhindsa Leonard Earnest Megan Evans Christina Espinoza Alan Fascinetto Lauren Garcia Jessica Gilfillan Feliciano Gonzalez Maria Gonzalez Arishne Green Wesley Hackenberg Benjamin Hernandez Ricky Holmes

Sade Hurst Kaniya Johnson Andrew Kendall John Kilgore Stacy Lee Phillip Levin Anjanique McKinney John Mendoza Karisa Miller Brandon Morgan Karina Nava Mario Navarro Melissa O’Beck Adrian Pascua Stephanie-Ann Pierre Louis Aubrianna Plavajka Ashley Robinson Fatima Rodriguez Sandra Rodriguez Dorothea Samuel Joshua Serrano Chaz Sherron Alexandra Tanner Daniel Torres Chanelle Williams

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EDITOR Letters to the editor should be kept to 250 words or less. Deliver letters to the Viewpoints office in the room behind the Assessment Building. Viewpoints reserves the right to edit letters for space and to reject libelous or obscene letters. Letters to the editor and columns represent the opinions of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the entire Viewpoints staff, Viewpoints faculty advisers, student government, faculty, administration nor the Board of Trustees.

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were dropped as a result of the fee increase, then you were granted some kind of priority. A fair method but also bittersweet as it left many students who were on the waitlist without a class. Students were screwed either way. It also left many students with a “take-no-prisoners attitude” as they were coming up with strategic ideas to land that extra class. Some students even resorted to pleading with instructors, however, because of the budget cuts there was no leeway given and those students were left with no options. Amongst tighter classes, the language and theater classes took a hard hit for the fall semester, as these are usually low enrollment classes and don’t fill up quickly, they were the first to be up on the chopping block. Also, it seemed like some (and not all) of the students who were adding what appeared to be random classes, don’t really care about the class they’re taking. Students who may have wanted to be in that class, but couldn’t get the class were replaced with students who were ambivalent. Another nonsensical element to the hell week of the fall semester was the cancelation of some popular courses, like English. Twenty four percent of English classes were cut this fall, more so than any other program this semester. This is completely ridiculous because in order to graduate from RCC, English 1A must be passed. But how can one pass it if one can not take it? The current climate of the California education system needs serious reworking. Just as community colleges are feeling the squeeze of the lack of funds, so are the higher institutions. The budget cut eliminated a staggering 1.3 billion dollars from colleges across California, as reported on the CSU Web site. Along with that budget cut, students in the Cal State system have started their fall semester with a 32 percent fee increase. We’re all crowded and basically reaching for the same goal, but why should the students and instructors have to bear the results of faulty budgeting? The California education system has long been regarded as one of the better education systems in the country. Yet, in comparison to the rest of the nation when it came down to budgeting for educational goals–we missed the mark tremendously. Students shouldn’t have to face an overwhelming amount of difficulty trying to get into a class. Now that the first hellish week of classes are behind us, hopefully the oncoming weeks will begin to clear up and some kind of normalcy can be established. Yet, in this current enviroment of filled classes and budget woes, it’s highly unlikely.

Viewpoints’ editorials represent the majority opinion of and are written by the Viewpoints student editorial board.

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September 24, 2009

Reach us: PHONE: (951) 222-8488 E-mail: viewpoints@rcc.edu Editor in Chief PHONE: (951) 222-8495

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Viewpoints is a public forum, First Amendment newspaper. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. © 2009 by the Viewpoints staff, Riverside City College, 4800 Magnolia Avenue, Riverside, CA. 92506-0528. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission of the Viewpoints Editor-in-Chief.


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

6 | September 24, 2009

Opinions

Ashes to ashes: RCC smoke free Wesley hackenberg Staff Writer We all find simple pleasures in life; some may be more unconventional than others, while some of them are daily habits. One of these is smoking cigarettes, and though the dangers of smoking are evident, the habit has continued. With the beginning of this fall semester, Riverside City College has recently become a smoke free campus. Smoking was limited to the always hazy, but social area that many students passed by on their way to class. That smoking section is now a thing of the past. Feelings are mixed when it comes to the smoking ban on campus. “It does not affect me because I don’t go to RCC to smoke, but I don’t think it is fair for the students and faculty that want to smoke but can’t go and enjoy a simple pleasure somewhere at their convenience,” RCC student Jordan Moretti said.

It is understandable to recognize why they would want to remove the smoking in the midst of the campus grounds. There are the health risks, not just for the smokers, but second hand smoke as well. On the other hand, why did they have to abolish it completely and not give the smokers another option? They could have provided another area, perhaps out of the main walkway, where smokers could go and enjoy themselves. To enforce these new rules of the ban, the campus police have been writing tickets to the unfortunate students that have been caught smoking. Simply asking the smoker to put out the cigarette is out of the question. Though many students and staff may not be smokers at RCC, and some may even support the ban on smoking, the question remains, why did they eliminate smoking from the campus? “I’m not a smoker and I don’t enjoy being around smoke, but I feel if people wanted to smoke on campus in the assigned areas, that was perfectly ok. I feel the smoking ban was RCC’s way of getting ‘greener’,” said Michaela O’Malley, RCC student. For those that do not smoke, imagine if one of the simple enjoyments like coffee in the morning or listening to an iPod in

martin iniguez jr. / Photo Editor

smokers not welcome: This plaque appears in what was once the smoking section at Riverside City College, the college is now smoke free. between classes was taken away were held where students could without a reason or alternative. voice their opinions and it seemed It’s a scary thought to know like there was some ground being that some of the little joys in life made. However the decision was can simply be taken away with no ultimately made during summer, way to contest it. therefore, no one could say One factor that sort of creeps anything about it. under the skin is that they took It is very difficult to refute a away the privilege during the rule when no one is aware that such summer session. a rule is about to be passed. Classes were not as full during While forums were held, there this session as the previous spring still should have been more input semester. from students. In the Spring, semester forums One can only wonder if this

was an intentional act of secrecy. If smokers want to have a place to partake with a cigarette, they should have the right to speak up and say how they feel about it. “If it is important to people, then they definitely should stand up for what they want,” said O’Malley. Only time will tell if the smoking ban will stay in effect or if like the famous alcohol prohibition, the students and staff will speak up and make a change.

Cafeteria woes: another look at the student dine-in

megan evans Staff Writer As a result of the economy’s downfall, California has suffered vast budget cuts at every educational level. Riverside City College is one of the many colleges that is directly affected by these budget cuts. Aside from classes being packed with students as if they were sardines, the entire cost of college has increased as well, forcing students to put their educational goals on hold. The increase of fees and decrease of funds, has led administration to cut from wherever possible. One place that may have been overlooked is the cafeteria. The college cafeteria serves as a modern day watering hole where students socialize, eat and relax in between classes. It is also an excellent place for students to go to when trying to escape from the blazing heat or from the freezing cold. For some, the cafeteria serves as a place to concentrate and complete homework that could not be completed at home. But, with the recent flush of

new students to the school, the cafeteria has become even more crowded than before. Students may argue that the college’s cafeteria is highly overpriced and the quality of the food in not up to par. The price of the food in the cafeteria may be costly, but for many students eating at the cafeteria in between classes beats learning on an empty stomach. Recently many students have voiced their opinions about the food and more often than not the opinion has not been a high one. Another complaint is that there is not enough variety of food choices in the cafeteria. The cafeteria offers mostly fried food and pizza, which is hardly a selection. Yet, the cafeteria is trying to keep up to student demands by adding newer items like vegetarian dishes such as salads and veggie sandwiches. For some students this may not be enough and some may even feel like the cafeteria isn’t necesarily needed. In the spring semester of 2008, the cafeteria was temporarily shut down for renovation. Some didn’t even notice the change, and it has often been joked that the cafeteria should be shut down. Would this really work? Are there any other options? If the cafeteria were to be shut down it would force students to leave campus in search of food.

phillip levin/ asst. inscape editor

let’s do lunch: The new cafeteria provides students with an array of choices that range from the classic pizza and french fries to “greener” dishes. This could be problematic, for end up paying more for several many students don’t have a large small snacks rather than one large enough gap in between classes to meal from the cafeteria. leave the campus. One thing that must be taken Another possibility to consider into consideration is how much is students driven by their money would be saved if the hunger. school decided to get rid of the When comparing an angry, cafeteria. Wo u l d t h i s a m o u n t b e hungry stomach to education, some students may side with their significant enough to lower the hunger and miss a class just to cost of classes, or large enough to decrease the amount of students satisfy their growling stomach. For the students who choose in one class. Before anyone can answer education over hunger they would be forced to eat from the snack bars this question, bear in mind that provided by the school and may this year California community

colleges were cut $840 million in funding. Now when comparing this large, unprecedented funding cut to the funding of the cafeteria, would getting rid of the college’s cafeteria make a large enough difference. The entire country is facing the same problems as California schools and so getting rid of the cafeteria would actually do more harm than good. In the mean time, students should just enjoy their burritos and concentrate on their studies.


Viewpoints

September 24, 2009| 7

The new hipsters: rude people Serving students since 1922

Opinions

corinne love opinions editor America needs Charm School. With recent pop culture and political events, it seems that our nation has lost its manners. It goes beyond the simple person cutting someone off in the parking structure here at Riverside City College. Indecent and ridiculous behavior continually crops up in the news and it’s annoying. From Kanye West’s infamous drunken hijacking of Taylor Swift’s video music award, to reports of Serena Williams getting ill-mannered towards an opponent, people have taken the term meltdown to new heights. No one embodies this recent “meltdown” quite like South Carolina House of Representatives Joe Wilson. Wilson, basically exhibited the worse of face-to-palm antics. In an act that resembled more of a scene from South Park than actual decency, Wilson interrupted President Obama during the President’s address for health care reform. Health care reform in this country, of course, is a big-panic button topic.

Wilson’s interruption, even if it had merit, was downright rude. It’s supposed to be common knowledge that when someone else is speaking one should let them finish. This seems like knowledge that would be pivotal in an arena like the house of representatives where communication is vital. Not only did Wilson throw in his two cents when it was not asked of him, he called the President a liar. Two offenses that garnered a media hailstorm of attention, which is probably what Wilson wanted anyway. He later “apologized” for his adolescent outburst, but the apology seemed insincere. Once the media got hold of Wilson’s outburst, it seemed the entire world was watching America to see what would happen next. And what did happen next? A string of public meltdowns from just every corner possible. It seems like the country had lost it’s manners along with it’s sense of appropiateness. To get a better idea of this, all one has to do is watch a Fox or CNN newsmedia program and see the sparks fly. “Newsmedia,” it’s not news, but instead entertainment with perhaps an ounce of actual journalism. Political pundits like Lou Dobbs, Rush Limbaugh and a host of others generally get to raising their voices and interrupting their guests mid sentence. If guests want to get their words in, it becomes a competition

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a moment in the spotlight: After being interrupted by Kanye West at the 2009 MTV

Video Music Awards country singer Taylor Swift delivers her acceptance speech. of how high they are willing to talk speaker so one can forcibly get CNN recently questioned, it’s their point across, obviously misses that Americans have become so over the commentator. What the viewers see instead the mark of communication. self-absorbed that it’s to the point It indicates that the listener is of oblivion. of thoughtful conversation, is a muddled mess of varying not listening. The common phrases of grace, Of course, the person on the like “thank you,” “excuse me,” opinions. These shows have a common speaker hears the messages being and “you’re welcome” are all trend among television shows, spoken but it fails to penetrate and becoming increasingly rare in it doesn’t matter what has to be make a lasting impression. everyday conversation. Simply, there is no excuse for said, it matters how to get the Not everyone though, is on the this behavior. point across. high road to rudeness. Conversely, rude behavior This lack of common The diva herself, Beyonce seems to be rewarded. etiquette pervades many aspects showed immense class at the 2009 While on the other hand, Video Music Awards. of American culture and every simple thoughtful behavior is an socioeconomic level. Although West may have afterthought. Not one group can be primarily ruined the awards, Beyonce The problem here is, and it brought back courtesy, which only blamed for it either, because it’s is a problem, is not that America reinforces the idea that it pays to becoming a national issue. has simply lost it’s manners as be polite. Constantly interrupting a

Calling the customer service hotline is so last year

alexandra Tanner staff writer With less than 20 followers on twitter, I’m pretty sure my opinion in the corporate world doesn’t matter. But, because of the almost instant satisfaction I’ve found that society gets from sharing its thoughts with the World Wide Web, I’ve come to find that this whole social networking thing can be pretty significant. The majority of college bound individuals living in the 21 st century, young or old, own access to a personal social networking page or personal profile. On these sites they are given the tools to express their opinions, actions, and even concerns as bold as they want, whenever and wherever they want. There are thousands of social networking or blog sites that have influenced a lot of today’s culture. From everything like the witty lines in current comedies to picking up a date or catching up with old friends, Web sites like twitter,

YouTube, MySpace or Facebook almost literally, have the user with the world at their fingertips. So it makes sense that users would take these tools to voicing their opinions on just about everything. How high would one personally rate the effectiveness of personal opinions on a site like twitter? Do tact and assertiveness apply when using forms of self expression through the internet? When dealing with consumer complaints online, why do users divulge blunt and uncensored comments of dissatisfaction about products and say things they would never say to an actual consultant? Believe it or not, corporate America, especially today, pays attention to questions like these when deciding if certain costumer complaints get enough attention to be confronted, possibly appeased. Most brands have prepared a representative on most social networking sites in case of emergency. Think of it as instant damage control. It is a new responsibility for corporations now that the internet is shaping to be the leading source of information, trends and references. On many occasions those with over 1,000 followers on

Source: Wikimedia Commons twitter, who stated complaints on a particular product or service, and received a substantial number of “retweets”, have proven to get a respectable response about the topic of complaint. The majority of the time would only be a statement or two about where they could get more information about their concern. The problem with social networking and instant updates is that, for the overt complainers out there, they think that they have the right to say whatever they’d like about a company or product. Even if they state something completely playful about their general discontentment, consequences still may ensue. Actions such as suing people for their tweets or groups on Facebook and MySpace have been drawn out before. An example of such disciplinary measures was displayed in July

2009. Amanda Bonnen, a twitter user, mentioned the mold in her apartment, and the realty company who provided it. On her twitter posting she stated “You should just come anyway. Who said sleeping in a moldy apartment was bad for you? Horizon realty thinks it’s okay.” This story was reported by Matthew Shaer, a writer for the Christian Science Monitor. Even though Bonnen was talking to the company sarcastically, Horizon Realty didn’t seem to think putting their name to shame was at all amusing or belonged on the internet. Bonnen was sued for defamation, for amounts that most likely ended up in the thousands, and it’s not even mentioned how many followers she had. With that, I’m not condemning your online opinions, I’m merely stating the facts. What you do

or say on these sites may offend that company or gather the wrong attention, namely legal attention. Not to mention your opinion will not be considered valid, but possibly received as a childish whine. When considering a product or service you would like to see improved, by all means; don’t hesitate to grace the keyboard with your presence. Just go into your rant knowing what you’re going to type before you type it. Persuasive and objective posts will probably gather more followers in the long run then statements that bore or come across repetitive. Online expression is highly encouraged and recognized as one of the best ways you can instantly give others warning while never having to be put on hold with customer service to “assist” you.


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

8 | September 24, 2009

New games promise ‘brutality’ phillip levin asst. inscape editor Summer ’s over, and fall gaming season is nearly upon us, during which the year’s biggest games are released. Below, you’ll find five games we’ve decided to spotlight. “Assassin’s Creed 2” (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3) Anyone who played the original “Assassin’s Creed” no doubt walked away impressed by the game’s stunning visuals and gameplay. It’s no wonder the title was a huge commercial success for Ubisoft, nor is it that the publisher is readying a sequel just in time for this holiday season. “Assassin’s Creed 2” stars a new time traveling assassin, Ezio. The game doesn’t stray too far from its predecessor’s template, but rest assured; Ubisoft is looking to take its franchise to new heights with this sequel. The adventure is set in Italy during the Renaissance, where you’ll visit cities like Florence, Venice, Tuscany and others. The focus of the game is still tracking down and assassinating specific targets, but “Assassin’s Creed 2” will be more story-driven than the original.

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BRUTAL PREVIEW: Jack Black as Eddie Riggs, brings his usual blend of rock and roll comedy to the new game “Brutal Legend” for the Playstation 3. And while there will be plenty of city architecture to explore and climb, as well as enemies to do combat with, the game will also feature underground platformingcentric scenarios ala “Prince of Persia.” What’s more, the game’s protagonist will come across new abilities, like the capability to

swim and glide with the use of Da Vinci’s own gliding device. Look for the game this November. “Borderlands” (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3) “Borderlands” is an original effort from Gearbox. It’s a futuristic sci-fi first person shooter with role playing mechanics. Remember

“Fallout 3?” “Borderlands” combines both the first person shooter and RPG genres in a similar fashion, except this game is more focused on its first person shooting aspects than “Fallout 3.” In the game, you’ll tackle missions, level your character

and collect new weapons and items. “Borderlands” features a groundbreaking content generation system, which allows for a nearly infinite number of missions, items and environments. What’s more, the game supports online co-op, allowing up to four to play through the game’s campaign mode together. Even more exciting, co-op is drop-in/drop-out, which means you can easily have a friend join your adventure at any time. “Borderlands” hits store shelves October 20. “Brutal Legend” (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3) There aren’t too many games like “Brutal Legend.” The game comes from Tim Schafer, who is responsible for the well-received 2005 Xbox title “Psychonauts,” and throws players into the shoes of Eddie Rigs, voiced by Jack Black. Eddie finds himself in an unbelievable world of rock ‘n’ roll, where he fights enemies using his battle-axe or guitar. With the latter, he can call forth pyrotechnics, which shoot out of the ground to damage enemies. Not crazy enough for you? He also has an ability called See

GAMES on Page 9

Vi ew p o i n t s E n t e r t a i n m e n t C a l e n d a r Sept. 25

Sept. 26

Sept. 27

MOVIES EVENTS EVENTS “Fame” Power 106 Comedy Fiesta Italian Feast of “Surrogates” Soapbox Derby in San Gennaro at “Pandorum” Downtown LA Hollywood and Highland EVENTS “Sound of Music” Disco Fever 3 at “All Shook Up” at Landis sing-a-long at Hollywood Hollywood Bowl PAC Bowl Riverside Tennis Alejandra Guzman at Pacific Symphony Championships Pechanga Orchestra at Komen Orange County Norm McDonald atMOVIES Irvine MOVIES Race for the Cure at Orange County PAC Improv “Fame” “Fame” Fashion Island “Surrogates” “Surrogates” “Pandorum” “Pandorum” “All Shook Up” at “All Shook Up” at EVENTS EVENTS MOVIES Landis PAC Landis PAC Wars” at Alice in Chains at Avalon “The Invention of Lying” Alejandra “Star Guzman at in concert Alejandra Guzman at Honda Center LA Opera: “The Elixir of “Whip It” Pechanga Pechanga Rick Springfield at CA Love” at Dorothy Chandler “Zombieland” Norm McDonald at Norm McDonald at Theatre Pavillion EVENTS Irvine Improv Performing Arts Irvine Improv Circus Vargas at Anaheim Farmer Boys Car Show at “The Laramie Project” Marketplace film screening at Wilshire Farmer Boys in Riverside Alex Reymundo at Brea Auditorium Long Beach Comic-Con Improv Spicy Latino Night at at Long Beach Convention Ontario Improv Center

Sept. 30

Oct. 1

Oct. 2

Sept. 28

Sept. 29

EVENTS Riverside restaurant week in Downtown Riverside through Oct. 10 Demolition Derby at LA County Fairgrounds Gretchen Bleiler autograph signing in Huntington Beach

EVENTS Sheryl Crow at Club Nokia Paramore at Fox Theater BET “106 and Park” Tour at HOB Sunset “Putting it Together” at South Coast Repertory

Oct. 3

Oct. 4

EVENTS Chinese Moon Festival at Heritage House Go Fest with Brad Paisley at Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre JUiCE Hip Hop Dance Festival at Ford Amphitheatre

Got something you want to get the word out about? Send it to

insider@viewpointsonline.org

EVENTS Live Life Festival at Fairmount Park Kevin Nealon at Irvine Improv Tap Dogs at CA Performing Arts Theatre Canadian Brass at Cal State Fullerton


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

9 | September 24, 2009

GAMES

Inscape

Continued From Page 8

face melt, which literally causes enemy faces to melt off. Yes, melt off. Eddie’s eccentric moves will come in handy as you do battle with this rock world’s enemies and bosses on a quest to dethrone this world’s tyrant, Lord Dolivicus. You’ll also hear other familiar voices, as the game’s cast is voiced by the likes of Lemmy Kilmister (Motorhead), Rob Halford (Judas Priest) and Ozzy Osbourne. “Modern Warfare 2” (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3) If there’s a single game this fall to be most excited about, “Infinity Ward’s Modern Warfare 2” is it. This is the sequel to the acclaimed “Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare,” although by the lack of the words “Call of Duty” in its title, you might not have guessed that. The shooter continues where its predecessor ended. You’ll control a member of Task Force 141, completing missions in Afghanistan, Rio de Janeiro and Russia. During this year’s E3, the developer demoed a level from the game -- an icy mountain in Russia, complete with rock climbing. Graphically, the game looks fantastic, featuring improved textures and lighting effects. In addition to the campaign storyline, there’s a new separate special ops co-op mode, which can be played either online or locally via split-screen. But the reason you should be excited for “Modern Warfare 2” is because of its online multiplayer. Expect new modes, maps, weapons, a re-designed killstreak system and other new content. “Modern

surprise!: Ezio, the time traveling assassin of “Assassin’s Creed,” does what he does best, stabby stabby. Warfare 2” is out Nov. 10. “New Super Mario Bros.” (Wii) Although there are many other games releasing this holiday season that are worth noting, “New Super Mario Bros.” gets a place in the spotlight because, well, it’s a brand new “Super Mario Bros.” game.

It’s not often we get a new “Mario Bros.” game, you know. However, this isn’t the singleplayer-focused “Mario Bros.” so many grew up with. Nintendo has turned its series into a multiplayer one, not unlike “LittleBigPlanet” on PlayStation 3. The gameplay you know and

still maintaining all it’s original functions, such as Wi-Fi and the ability to play DVDs and Bluray. The new model comes with 120 gigabytes of memory to help save your scores, putting the 80 GB model to shame while proving that bigger is not always better. Not only does the slimmer PlayStation 3 have a bigger drive, but it can also help you save on your electric bill since it runs on 20 percent less energy than the older model. If you feel that the picture on your old Playstation 3 isn’t good enough the new PlayStation 3 runs a 1080p HDMI support when it’s predecessor only ran up to 720p. What this means is that the newest version of PlayStation 3 can get you an even sexier image not only for your games, but for your Blu-rays and DVDs as well. Along with all these marvelous upgrades, the slimmer PlayStation 3’s more compact and lighter shape can fit in the smaller spaces that need filling in your entertainment center. With all the improvements in the PlayStation 3 slim, the drawbacks are not exactly the hardest thing to cope with. The best part of Playstation has always been the Playstation Network. Unlike X-box Live where you

are required to pay up to $50 for the whole year, the Playstation Network is totally and completely free. Got a bunch of PlayStation 2 games, how about 30? Unfortunately for you, unlike the original PlayStation 3, it can not play any games that were meant for the Playstation 2. With all those amazing games that the Playstation 3 has, it’s not exactly the worst thing to take into consideration. All in all, the Playstation 3 slim isn’t really a bad investment. So if you do have a bunch of Playstation 2 games, it wouldn’t hurt trading all of them in at a Gamestop or any place willing to buy your games so that you can buy the newer, slimmer and, in a lot of ways, better, Playstation 3. This model of the Playstation 3 is what gaming should be like in the future. If you’ve just read the fall gaming preview then you should expect to be playing “Modern Warfare 2” on your 120 GB hard drive with your 1080p HDMI with completely free online gaming. Even with the X-Box 360 and the Wii, this is what the beginning of high quality gaming should be like. Microsoft and Nintendo better watch out because Sony’s got their number on this one.

love hasn’t changed -- you’re still platforming your way through 2D levels. But the dynamic of having three other players on screen does change up the game. Yo u ’ l l h a v e t o p l a y cooperatively to complete each level, since there are obstacles

games press

you’ll encounter that require a group effort to overcome. Simultaneously, though, each level is a competition to see who will collect the most coins. Nintendo hasn’t announced a release date yet, but “New Super Mario Bros.” is expected sometime this fall.

The evolution of the Playstation

adrian pascua Staff Writer

Gaming isn’t easy, and now it isn’t even affordable due to the economy. For most gamers, the part that hurt most was the PlayStation 3 and X-box 360’s high costs. Original pricing for both were $500 for each gaming system, roughly the down payment of a small used car or a street bike. When the new systems in gaming came out, a small group of gamers were unable to enjoy the eye candy of the new systems due to their high prices. Even with the drop in prices, you’re bound to run up your electric bill with those all night gaming marathons; not to mention, the price of games isn’t cheap either. Just being a gamer in this day and age seems to be getting more and more expensive, especially if you own more than one gaming system (Wii, X-Box, PlayStation 3). Sony has decided to remedy this situation by making the newer, slimmer version of the PlayStation 3. Not only will it cost you less than an arm and a leg, it’s also the most economic out of all the gaming models, including it’s bigger and bulkier brother, while

PS2

PS3

PS3 slim

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Viewpoints

10 | September 24, 2009

Serving students since 1922

September 24, 2009 | 11

Image courtesy of: The Walt Disney Company

it’s miley!: “Hannah Montana” star Miley Cyrus performed her hit “The Climb” from “Hannah Montana: The Movie” for fans at the D23 expo Sept. 10-13 in Anaheim.

The walt disney company

D23 expo unites Disney’s small world stephanie holland editor in chief In the new world of corporate domination very few companies have the empire that Disney has. From theme parks to movies to television networks, The Walt Disney Company owns a subsidiary in every aspect of entertainment. Because of its worldwide domination, Disney has a very avid fanbase. Those fans got together at the Anaheim Convention Center Sept.10-13 for the first ever D23 expo, a celebration of all things Disney. The show was billed as a Disney Comic-Con, with an exhibit show floor and presentations previewing upcoming projects in televison, movies, theme parks and travel. The expo opened with a speech from Bob Iger, president and CEO of the Walt Disney Company. Iger discussed all the new plans the comapny has for the coming year and treated the audience to a preview of the first half hour of its new animated film “The Princess and the Frog.” “The Princess and the Frog” is a modern take on the story of the Frog Prince and is set in New Orleans during the jazz age. It features Tony award winner Anika Noni Rose as the voice of Princess Tiana, the company’s first black princess and additional performances by John Goodman, Terrence Howard and Oprah Winfrey herself. The film also marks the return to hand drawn animation and based on the footage screened it is a beautifully made film that will become the latest in a long line of classics. Following the screening, the crowd was treated to a performance of one of the movie’s songs by Rose. Even though she was suffering from bronchitis she was fantastic and brought the house down. From there it was time to hit the show floor, where if you weren’t a die-hard Disney fan, you would be by the time you were done walking around. Vendors were selling everything from a Snow White cottage themed playhouse to Mickey shaped chicken nuggets. That’s right. You can now enjoy your favorite afternoon snack and worship your favorite mouse all at the same time. After a stroll through what felt like a Disneyfied Home Depot, what with all the carpeting, furniture and other assorted home products, it was time for the ABC presentation. The panel was hosted by “Dancing with the Stars” host Tom Bergeron and Stephen McPherson, president of ABC entertainment group. The network chose to focus on its Wednesday night comedy lineup with

appearances by the shows’ veteran stars. Patricia Heaton stars in “The Middle,” which is about a midwestern mom who must balance her three wacky kids and husband with the rest of her average life. The well worn premise had a few laughs but it feels too much like “Malcolm in the Middle” to create a huge reaction. Kelsey Grammer is in “Hank,” which is the story of a CEO who suddenly loses everything and must downsize and move back to his hometown. There was nothing funny about this show, and it only received pity laughs and polite applause. Ed O’Neill returns in “Modern Family,” a show about the trials and tribulations modern families face today. It’s shot in the mockumentary style of “The Office” and has a really funny pilot. It will be interesting to see if it can sustain that level of humor throughout the first few episodes. Rounding out the night is “Cougar Town” starring Courteney Cox. She plays a newly divorced mom who decides to re-enter the dating game with a much younger man. All four stars appeared on stage together and discussed what brought them back to television and how the new roles differed from their more famous parts. The panel ended with a presentaion from “Dancing with the Stars” featuring performances by Cheryl Burke and Derek Hough and Kym Johnson and Donny Osmond. It was a really great opportunity to see the pros dance in person because the television really doesn’t do them justice. The next day began bright and early with a panel by the Disney Cruise Line, and boy were those fans excited about cruises. The big announcement of the morning was that the company would begin sailing to Alaska in 2011. Based on the reaction of the crowd, you would have thought Oprah showed up to give away cars. The pure enthusiasm fans showed for cruise ship news was astounding. Following that unexpected excursion to crazytown, it was time for Walt Disney Studios to preview its slate of upcoming films. Dick Cook, the now former chairman of Walt Disney Studios, hosted the presentation which featured appearances by Jerry Bruckheimer, Nicolas Cage, The Muppets and in a particularly poignant moment the first public appearance by John Travolta and Kelly Preston since the death of their son. The panel included previews of “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” “The Prince of Persia,” “Alice In Wonderland” and “A Christmas Carol.” In what had to be the highlight of the convention, the presentation ended

with an official announcement of the fourth entry in the popular “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise. Entering on a giant pirate ship, Captain Jack Sparrow himself showed up to greet the crowd. Johnny Depp appeared in full Captain Jack costume and stayed in character while asking the crowd about a talking frog. The crowd reaction can only be described as explosive. Day 3 of the expo was all about the theme parks. Jay Rasulo, chairman of theme parks and resorts, announced plans for an updated Star Tours at Disneyland. Star Tours II will feature footage from the newer “Star Wars” films including the pod races. Star Tours will close in Oct. 2010 and re-open 2011. For the announcement, Rasulo was joined onstage by the 501st legion of stormtroopers and via satellite by Darth Vader. Local fans also can look forward to the brand new Cars Land in Disney’s California Adventure. Based on the popular Pixar film, the land has three new rides, the Radiator Springs Racers, Luigi’s Flying Tires and Mater’s Junkyard Jam. Small scale models show the land to be an exact replica of Radiator Springs that will really bring the movie to life for visitors. On the last day of the expo John Lasseter, chief creative officer of Disney and Pixar Animation Studios, let the audience in on all the secrets of the studio’s upcoming projects. There were previews of “Cars 2,” “Rapunzel,” “Toy Story 1 & 2” in 3D and “Toy Story 3.” In a press conference following his panel, Lasseter discussed his excitement over Disney’s recent acquisition of Marvel Entertainment and debunked rumors of an Ant Man movie. After four days of nonstop “High School Musical” and Jonas Brothers and an overabundance of rodent shaped products, the Disney brainwashing machine seemed to work its magic on consumers. Plans are already underway for next year’s event and fans are no doubt making their travel arrangements as this story goes to print.

For photos and blogs on the D23 expo check out viewpointsonline.org


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

12 | September 24, 2009

ALL INVITED: Children jump on stage and participate at the Riverside Downtown Street Jam as the Cadillac Cats played its set.

john kilgore

The streets are alive with music john kilgore Staff Writer

The Riverside Downtown Street Jam went on without a hitch on Sept. 12. Friends and families arrived at the Street Jam with peaked interest. Attendees laid out blankets on the sidewalks to settle in and soak up the event around them. Breaking the silence at 2 p.m., The Cadillac Cats hit the stage. Upbeat rhythms reverberated throughout all the surrounding buildings towering overhead. Children experienced live music while hopping around to their own beat. “The Cadillac Cats enjoy playing for the kids,” Ed Dose said. “They’re very family oriented. Kids even get to come on-stage.”

Not only was there family friendly music for children to enjoy, but clowns were at the Street Jam too, painting faces and handing out balloons. Local business owners and restaurants along with the city of Riverside abundantly offered their services during recent construction. But despite all the construction in the Downtown Riverside area, the Street Jam managed to provide an inviting environment. “I think they should do more stuff like this and build more to make this town a bigger attraction,” said Christine Bias, a teacher from Riverside. Still, others seemed to believe there could be more to offer at the Street Jam. “The Downtown Street Jam could have had more vendors

here,” said Paula Rivers. Riverside Downtown Partnership provided a perfect environment for the community to join in and mingle as their children interact with each other providing a great opportunity for all to learn. Many dog lovers brought their companions to the Street Jam as well. Robert James Dick heard about the event through the PressEnterprise, and brought along his five Dalmatians. Besides a free concert, the Street Jam also offered free salsa lessons from the University of California Riverside dance team to all willing participants. Everyone on-stage listened intently to instructor Lou Luistro as they matched his steps to the choppy beat.

After going over the basics a few times attendees began to grasp the concept. Spinning and twisting all lesson, the participants panned out thanks to UCR’s dance team. As the final round of music played a circle of folks shuffled their feet in unison, in tune to the salsa beat. With laughter and smiles lighting up their faces, participants moved on to a courageous finish. For moments in time, people wearing looks of amusement whistled, cheered and jeered as children tugged at their parents pants yearning to run around. As the sun set, the children’s energy waned after a full day of running around with their balloons and painted faces. As the stage is greeted by Grammy winner Poncho Sanchez,

interest peaked with smiles galore. A psychedelic performance lead to an upbeat atmosphere. Fathers danced with daughters, mothers with their sons. As the crowd inched closer to the stage, praise increased in size and volume. “It’s nice to get out and hear the music,” said Gail Cameron. Closing this event, Sanchez is exactly what everybody expected. Finding this evening eventful, families retire for the night reveling a harmonious scene not to be forgotten. Richard Ortan, a Custom Knife Maker, came to the Riverside Downtown Street Jam for his second time. “It was worth the come back,” said Orton.

Local Riverside night club offers the ‘VIP’ treatment Mercedes deleon Staff Writer VIP is a place where anyone, gay or straight, is welcome to dance, have a few drinks, and enjoy each other’s company. “Even the most tragic looking drag queen is welcome,” said DJ Jonathon, a DJ and bartender for the club. VIP Nightclub first opened up for business in 1992. In July of last year Bob Warner and Cal Shreve got married on the dance floor of VIP Nightclub. Needless to say, VIP is a very special place for club goers, where they can come together as one, and are welcome to come be a part of the family. “We all have such amazing

relationships and view each other as more of a family rather than just co-workers,” Jonathon said. VIP’s DJ Jonathon always knows how to please a crowd by playing what’s popular and in demand. “I play a variety of music including house, hip-hop, and the Billboard’s top forty,” he said. He went on to say, “I just basically read the crowd before me and play music that the crowd as a whole will enjoy.” Some of the featured songs played at the club are “Throw it in the bag,” “Paparazzi,” “Ice Cream Paint Job,” “Every Girl,” and “Make her Say.” The club‘s calendar is full of events and special nights for people to attend.

Monday’s are free pool all night long with no cover charge. Draft drinks are $3 from 8 p.m. to close. Thursdays are the busiest days of the month. “Last week there were 560 people here,” Jonathon said. “People come from everywhere including Los Angeles and Long Beach,” he said. There’s an $8 beer bust that continues from 8-11 p.m. Cover begins at 7:45 p.m., 18 and over are $10 and 21 and over are $5. The same cover charges apply to Friday and Saturday nights. VIP is equipped with a dance floor, stage, dining area, pool area, and a 3,000 square foot patio. Five flat screen televisions

playing music and music videos are located behind the bar and in the dining area. The dark setup, dim lighting, and disco lights greatly contribute to the club and party scene of most nights. There are seats and a table that run along the perimeter of the stage so people can sit with their drinks. A foundation pole is located in the center of the stage. There are two full service stations inside and a fully stocked bar outside on the patio. The menu has several items such as the sampler, barbeque wings and the jumbo shrimp cocktail that is only $7.75. Generally everything on the menu is under $10 which is

extremely economical for the given portions. “My favorites are the chicken Caeser salad and the bacon cheeseburgers,” said student Maria Villela. VIP is and has always been a Grade-A nightclub. Cleanliness is evident upon entering the club. All the round tables, bar tables, and floors are continuously cleaned in order to avoid hazards or disgustingness. VIP is open seven days a week from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. VIP is located on 3673 Merrill Ave. in Riverside. Everyone 18 and over with a valid driver’s license is welcome at the club. All events and details can be found online at http://www. vipriv.com.


Viewpoints

September 24, 2009 | 13

Serving students since 1922

Insider

Parks provide cheap entertainment

Christina Espinoza Staff Writer

It seems we are all so busy these days with the hustle and bustle of life, we may forget to take the time to stop and smell the orange blossoms. California Citrus State Historic Park in Riverside may be the perfect place to provide an affordable escape from today’s inflating prices and hectic life-style. Whether you’re seeking inspiration, recreation or just a walk in the park, California Citrus State Historic Park has something for everyone. Opening in August 1993, the park spans 377 acres and includes 186 acres of golden orange groves, stone paved trails, romantic rose gardens, family picnic areas, tree shaded pathways and open grass landscape. Visitors can also enjoy the park’s historical museum which includes an interactive tour complete with life-size displays and life like murals. The park’s quaint Sunkist gift shop which is attached to the museum, is decorated with colorful citrus themed Sunkist merchandise, souvenirs and delectable candies. “It’s wonderful. It’s not your typical state park because it’s so quiet and because of the citrus heritage here,” said Gene Villarreal, park visitor and San Bernardino resident.

The citrus heritage of California Citrus State Historic Park began long before their gates opened to the public and continues still today. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, gorgeous orange groves spread throughout California and provided the state with a primary role in agriculture. “My family was involved in the citrus industry,” Villarreal said, whose ancestors contributed to the California citrus heritage by picking oranges in the mid 1900s. California Citrus State Historic Park officials explained that as a result of the decreased state budget the park had to increase it’s day usage fees. Still, California Citrus State Historic Park manages to maintain an affordable day usage fee of $8 per car. “I know they also talked about starting a shuttle service from downtown Riverside to the park,” said Vickey Tuey, California Citrus State Historic Park volunteer. “The shuttle services would increase visitation,” she said. Old programs have been cut and new programs have been implemented to help with the state reductions. “Due to the decreased state budget, our yoga classes were cut early this year,” Tuey said. Tuey also confirmed that in an effort to keep the park open and

christina espinoza

walk in the park: Entrance to the California Citrus State Historic Park in Riverside maintain staffing, California Citrus State Historic Park employees agreed to Furlough Fridays, a new program within the park which constitutes “a day without pay” for park employees every Friday. Schwarzenegger origianlly ordered the furloughs in early February to reduce the average state worker ’s salary by 9.2 percent.

“I think it’s a great program. It would be a bad idea to close the park,” said Bertrand Billups, Riverside local and supporter of the new California Citrus State Historic Park program. Of the 278 parks in the California State Park system, California Citrus State Historic Park is the only state park which uses it’s orange groves to generate

profit for future development of historic portions of the park. “It’s a good part of the state and city culture. The park isn’t just for us, it’s for the future, our children, and our children’s children,” Billups said. For more information about California Citrus State Historic Park, visit their web site at http:// www.citrusstatepark.org.


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

14 | September 24, 2009

Curtis brings music to world

chanelle williams asst. features editor

“I don’t know why Viewpoints would want to do another story on me,” said Peter Curtis, who teaches for the Music Performing Arts department at Riverside City College. He claims there is nothing that interesting about him. One would say otherwise after looking at his track record. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from Berklee School of Music in Boston, got a master’s in music from Yale and did not stop there. He then went on to get a doctorate in classical guitar from Indiana University. If that was not impressive enough, in 2007 he released a CD that featured compositions that he penned and renditions of songs by famous artists, Stevie Wonder and Thelonius Monk. His recent accomplishments include teaching for the Study Abroad program. He decided to be a part of the program because he enjoyed traveling. When he decided he wanted to be a part of the Study Abroad program, Curtis had to apply and be interviewed by a committee. Jan Schall, coordinator for the

Study Abroad program, said that what the committee looks for in applicants is “academic reputation, willingness to be mentors to students who were often away from home for the first time and ability to be responsible for students in a foreign country.” “Peter Curtis is well-reputed, in terms of getting along with students,” Schall said. “He is well liked by students and has been a fine addition to the study abroad program.” Curtis recommends students to plan a semester overseas. “It’s an incredible experience for students,” he said. RCC offers students a chance to live and travel in a foreign country at a price that is affordable compared to the UC and Cal State schools. Curtis said it was too expensive for him to study abroad when he was in school. He taught music appreciation in Florence, Italy in the fall of 2005 and in Oxford, England last spring semester. In his teaching, he likes to teach on subject matter which pertains to the environment the students are living in. For example, when he taught

in Oxford he focused on classical British compositions. Curtis was able to display his musical talent on both trips. “What is interesting about Peter Curtis is that he is an amazing classical guitarist,” Schall said. “It didn’t take long for the Florence community to discover this and he was in quite a demand to play.” The community liked him so much they wrote a feature about him in their local newspaper. Schall said she made a trip out to Italy half way during the program and was amazed to find an article about Curtis. His favorite memory from semesters spent abroad was going with the students to the Roman Forum and Coliseum during his trip to Florence. “I guess...that site was awe inspiring and being there with students on some of the most historically relevant sites in the western world is…priceless,” he said. Curtis strongly recommends students to experience what the Study Abroad program has to offer. “I encourage all students to try it. It is well well worth it,” he said.

brandon morgan / staff photographer

world traveler: Peter Curtis finds time in between being a talented classical guitarist and participating in the Study Abroad program to be a favorite instructor among RCC students.

Culinary arts offers students inexpensive training

jackie adams asst. features editor

Walk into the building marked RCC Culinary Academy on Spruce Street and you will enter a world of chefs in training, bustling around in white top hats. T h e y ’ r e b u s y  n o t o n l y preparing gourmet meals, but also serving them to patrons at a low cost. That’s because this culinary program, a branch of Riverside City College, doesn’t just teach students how to cook, it teaches them every aspect of the food industry by letting them operate and manage their own restaurant. From washing the dishes in the back to preparing and serving the food, these students take care of everything. Breakfast is served every day from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., and lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., with a daily changing menu. They offer a variety of foods and have very competitive prices. “This is a lab, it’s not for profit,” said chef Bobby Moghaddam, head of the culinary institute. “Our goal is not to be a money making venture, it’s to get students the most experience we can.”  Since Moghaddam, the almost cartoonish father figure with a stern hand but a soft heart, took over in 2003, the academy has

received numerous awards. Several are on display as you enter the restaurant, including the most recent; the prestigious National Achievement of Excellence Awards from the American Culinary Federation.            That explains why every semester there are up to 200 people who try to get into the mere 30 available student slots. In past years it was on a first come first serve basis, “But when people started camping out in the parking lot, it became a safety hazard,” Moghaddam said. Now students are selected randomly in a computer draw, and the lucky few that make it can look forward to an intense year of studying and training. “Most people are absolutely not prepared for the pressures of the program,” he said. “I always tell them, this is not a cooking school, but a culinary academy. It’s just as hard as any other course. There’s lots of reading, weekly projects and tests.” But the benefits for most students well outweigh the costs. For one, they get to be a part of an award winning school for only a fraction of the cost. The nearby San Bernardino Art Institute culinary program is over $40,000 a year to attend and the Cordon Bleu program in Pasadena is even more expensive than that,

feliciano gonzalez / Staff Photographer

cream of the crop: Students learn the ins and outs of a professional kitchen while working at the restaurant located at the RCC Culinary Academy. If you want to take a peek at while RCC’s is only $2,000 total. program are encouraged to go And the job opportunities are and try some of the food served whether or not the classes are for endless, past students have gone on Tuesday through Friday. you, check out their how-to videos to work for Club 33 in Disneyland, You could also do a taste test at on YouTube by searching Flavor on cruise lines and one is now the their annual fundraiser, California of Riverside. head chef at the Victoria Country Autumn Nights, on Oct. 23. Club. Tickets are $40 and include a For more photos “We love our students like six course meal served in a posh of the culinary family, we try our best to make setting. them successful,” Moghaddam They can be bought at the academy go to said. restaurant or by calling 951-EATviewpointsonline.org Students who are not in the FOOD prior to the event.


Viewpoints

September 24, 2009 | 15

Serving students since 1922

Features

S.T.E.M. center makes math cool

melissa o’beck asst. features editor

Welcome to the S.T.E.M. center, home of the science, technology, engineer and mathematics majors. Modeled after an old fashioned science lab complete with lava lamps, the S.T.E.M. center invites the students in to support, learn, tutor and enlighten one another in the S.T.E.M. fields. Although it is somewhat tight on space, the center is fully equipped with counselors, open access computers, Cal State representatives and supplemental group instruction. The S.T.E.M. center is a new program that opened at the end of April. It all started when the Department of Education awarded focus on success for students in S.T.E.M. with a 1.8 million dollar budget in October 2008. “There was a need to represent minorities such as women and veterans,” Bostra Moeung, the Educational Advisor, explained. “This is what allowed us to win the grant.” Although this program was set up to encourage minorities, it is not limited to anyone. This program is designed to facilitate anyone and everyone who is interested in the program, whether it is their major or simply a general education course they must complete. “It is vital that S.T.E.M. majors have the resources and guidance that they need. Our government has predicted that in the next fifteen years there is going to be a mass amount of retirements in the S.T.E.M. fields, and those vacancies are going to need to be

filled,” said the S.T.E.M. counselor, Garth Schultz. S.T.E.M.’s ambition is to help increase the transfer rate in these fields by enhancing the success and retention of the students. The center accomplishes this by providing all the students with the resources and aids that they need. The budget is dispersed among the two full time counselors, student tutors, one educational advisor, and open access computers/laptops that have the Mathematica program installed. Along with all of these valuable resources, there are faculty members that donate their time to come and interact with the S.T.E.M. students, sometime to be of assistance and engage, other times to socialize. “I did not have this type of engagement center with these resources when I was going to college,” said Moeung. “The students should embrace these sources and opportunity.” Although it is too soon to show the statistics of its success, the jam-packed classroom speaks for itself. Students seem to be benefitting from this program in various ways. While some students will stop by for information from a counselor or mentoring, others practically utilize the center as a campground where they can interact with other S.T.E.M. majors, study, get mentoring, and just stay on top of things. Schultz, who is one of the two S.T.E.M. counselors, explains, “If you surround yourself with students who share the same goals and aspirations, then you are more likely to succeed. You must

bethania alvarez /staff photographer

after school special: Students gather at the STEM Center to offer each other support and to receive extra help from counselors and tutors. congregate from the social and educational stand-point. That is what the center is all about.” The S.T.E.M. center goes above and beyond to reach out to students who may be skeptical about their major, or what career field their major will lead them into. This is why the program has created alternative learning approaches like field trips. The last field trip took students to the San Diego Wild Animal Park which was geared towards biology, zoology, environmental science, and landscape architecture majors. This helps spark interest in the students and allow them to see the program has much more job opportunity to offer than they are

even aware of. “It is an exhilarating area being in the cutting edge of all of the new, state of the art innovations. S.T.E.M. is the careers of the future,” said Virginia Mckee-Leone, dean of instruction and microbiologist. The S.T.E.M. center is located in the MLK building in room 222. It is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. They have an open door policy with no enrollment necessary. If you are baffled on your major, have questions about the S.T.E.M. career fields, or merely have a question about homework from a S.T.E.M. class then stop by.

scientific study: The center is located in MLK 222 and operates Mon.-Thurs. 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on Friday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.


16 | September 24, 2009

Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922


Viewpoints

September 24, 2009 | 17

Serving students since 1922

RCC defeats rivals, holds onto Victory Bell daniel torres asst. sports editor

The Riverside City College football team took to the field Saturday night against its Inland Empire rivals, San Bernardino Valley College. Coming off a loss against Victor Valley in week one, the Tigers were prepared to not let the fans, but especially themselves, down again. RCC battled hard and it showed when they leaped off the field in a 40-17 win. The win against their long time rivals not only brought RCC its first victory of the season, but it also kept the Victory Bell here on campus for at least another year. RCC’s fight against SBVC for the Victory Bell began in the 1940’s when it was donated by the Santa Fe railroad yards. Since then, the winner of these two adversaries would keep the bell as a symbol of their conquest over the other. Not only were the Tigers playing for the Victory Bell, they now had a new reason to play. The game did not start off as well as it ended. On RCC’s first possession, quarterback Nathan Lamonica threw an interception straight into the arms of an SBVC defender. The roaring crowd needed only two minutes to get back on its feet when defensive back Isaiah Holland recovered a fumbled ball. RCC scored almost a minute later when running back Cedric Foster threw a pass, yes, threw

KHAI LE / ONLINE Editor

A PACKED HOUSE: The RCC community came out in support of Tiger Football during their

game against San Bernardino Valley on Sept. 12. RCC won 40-17. a pass to wide receiver Tommy to head for a 3-yard touchdown touchdown run by receiver Kristin Curry. against two defensive backs; a James. SBVC later came back with play rarely seen by professional The lead was narrowed to 4 their own drive towards the end quarterbacks today. by the half by SBVC, bt RCC led zone, fortunately for RCC, it only RCC ended the first quarter 21-17. ended in a field goal. RCC completely shutdown with a 14-3 lead. Head Coach Bill Brown knew SBVC came out strong in the SBVC in the second half scoring what to expect from the fellow second quarter, though, scoring 19 unanswered points, but it Inland Empire team. on a 59-yard touchdown pass from was the defense that made itself “We watched their last game quarterback Robert Fuller to wide known. on film, so we knew they were receiver Marcus Williams. RCC safety James Calhoun going to come out and play hard,” The touchdowns went back started off the second half by Brown said. a n d f o u r t h w i t h L a m o n i c a picking off Fuller in a play that Lamonica then once again led throwing a nine yard touchdown drove the crowd, as well as the the team down the field, this time pass to receiver Jordan Stip and RCC bench, wild. rushing the ball in himself head SBVC striking back with a 7-yard After the play, Calhoun was

RCC mourns one of its own

daniel torres asst. sports editor Riverside City College lost one its own on Sept. 1 when Victor Partnoff, a 20-year-old resident of Yucaipa and a member of the RCC football team, died on his way home from practice. Partnoff was driving a 2008 Ford Fusion and crashed going eastbound on the I-10 freeway in Redlands, just east of Wabash Ave. Partnoff collided into a parked tractor trailer on the right shoulder of the I-10 and was said to have not been wearing a seatbelt. Partnoff was then transported to Loma Linda University Medical Center where he was declared dead at 7:04 p.m., according to the San Bernardino County Coroner’s Press Release. Head football coach Bill Brown described Partnoff as a hard worker who loved the game. “Vic (Partnoff) went to Cal Poly Pomona for academics then transferred over to RCC to play football,” Brown said. Fel low teammate James Calhoun said he didn’t know Partnoff very well. He did mention though that he always saw him working hard whether he was out on the field or in the weight room.

Most of football team also attended a memorial for Partnoff in order to pay their respects. The school held a moment of silence for Partnoff just before its game against San Bernardino Valley College on Saturday Sept. 12. RCC went on to win that game with many players saying the win was for Partnoff. The team decided to leave Partnoff’s locker untouched and to keep his jersey hanging as a reminder that he is still present and still a part of the team. The players are also wearing a sticker with Partnoff’s initials, VP, on their helmets. Partnoff Played three years varsity at Yucaipa High School before playing at RCC for Brown. He was seen as a star on the field at Yucaipa earning team defensive MVP during his senior year. Partnoff was laid to rest on September 10 at Montecito Memorial Park in Loma Linda. The California Highway Patrol is still investigating the cause of the collision. Myself, as well as the entire Viewpoints staff would like to send our condolences to Partnoff’s family and friends.

seen motivating his teammates, yelling, “C’mon lets go!” “We just had to finally start playing as a team, and that involves the defense, not just the offense,” Calhoun said. The interception by Calhoun led to a 30 yard field goal by kicker Noah Dobson, giving RCC a seven point lead. Defensive linemen Cody Browne also had an interception for a touchdown in the third quarter, his second in just two games. Brown credited the turn around on defense to the defensive coordinators for switching up different formations against the SBVC offense. “We noticed how they were playing, so we had to adjust our style,” Brown said. Then with just 20 seconds into the fourth quarter, RCC defensive back Georgio Bryant recovered a fumbled ball in the end zone for another touchdown. After the missed point after touchdown kick, RCC led 37-17. Adding insult to injury, the Tigers decided to kick one last field goal with final seconds couting down, the team ruushed the field celebrating its first win of the season 40-17. The win was well earned by the Tigers, especially after the loss of one of their own. They fought valiantly against an old rival and showed what it takes it to come out victorious. RCC will next host Pasadena City College on Saturday Sept. 26.


Viewpoints

18 | September 24, 2009

Sports

Serving students since 1922

RCC soccer starting off strong javier cabrera Sports editor

The Riverside City College men’s soccer team is showing great success as they began the season with four wins, one tie and one loss. The latest game was against Chaffey, a team coming into the game with two previous losses to Oxnard then Glendale and unsuccessful efforts against the Tigers in the past two years. For the full 90 minutes of the game, Chaffey played harder than the RCC Tigers showing they wanted the win more than the Tigers. History did not repeat itself as Chaffey settled for a 4-4 draw with the Tigers. Known for being rough, Chaffey had four yellow cards, two of which were handed to Joshua Salas which resulted in a red card and forced his team to play one man down for the rest of the game. The game began with the Tigers at a 1-0 lead against their opponent, but unfortunately, Chaffey was able to score two goals taking the lead from the Tigers. For the remainder of the game, the Tigers couldn’t recover their leading score. “Chaffey had a lot of skilled players and everybody on their team had the ability to get the ball and control it pretty well,” said coach Jose Angel Moreno. “That was why it was difficult for us to maintain the score, but luckily we adapted to their style of play and we managed to get the tie.” The Tigers’ lead scoring striker, Jimmy Martinez who has 11 of the Tigers 21 goals, had a ‘hat-trick’ meaning he scored three goals in one game. “I knew I had three goals but I was just trying to get my team a victory as always,” Martinez said. “I don’t care how many goals I make because I just go and play the full 90 minutes as hard as a I can and leave my effort on the field.” “Martinez is one of the most exciting forwards we’ve had in many years and he is very accurate when it comes to putting the ball away,” said Moreno. “He is barely going to be the league’s top scorer.” “I appreciate coach for saying

that about me and thinking highly of me like that,” Martinez said. “I plan on keeping that statement with me for the whole season.” “He is very fast with and without the ball,” Moreno said. “He knows how to move into open spaces and give his team the opportunity to see his movements very clearly so they can really find him when he is making the runs to the goal.” “I just play as hard as I can, score as many goals as I can and the opportunities I get I just try to finish each and everyone of them,” Martinez said. Their defense, lead by the team’s co-captains goalie Alexander Perez and sweeper Anthony Aguirre, has given up 18 goals this season. “Every single goal we have gotten scored on so far this season has been our mistake because those goals didn’t come out of plays that the opponents have worked on, they didn’t touch the ball, move the ball around or break through our lines and score the ball,” said Moreno. “Those goals come out of situations where we have ball control and when we are trying to give a pass to our midfielders or our forwards, we miss up the pass and it ends up on the defense and they give us a counter attack and they score because they have us on our mistake,” he said. “When we are moving our lines up and we lose the ball it’s very difficult for our team when we are attacking to switch back defensively right away so that is why we say it’s been our mistakes,” Moreno said. “Lack of concentration and skill when it comes to giving those accurate passes, that’s what’s been hurting us in our goals,” he said. “We are still trying to establish strong defense, but as the season moves on I think we will be very strong,” Aguirre said. “We just need to work on communication, but as for understanding each other’s playing styles, it’s all going good,” said Perez. RCC will host Irvine Valley on Sept. 29 to begin their first conference league game and take a chance to beat the state champions Santa Ana on Oct. 2.

KHAI LE / ONLINE Editor

ABOVE: RCC Forward Alvaro Mendoza battles for the ball against Chaffey.

BOTTOM: RCC Goalkeeper Alexander Perez unsuccessfully tries to block a shot from

Chaffey College during their match against each other Sept. 21. RCC and Chaffey tied the game 4-4.


September 24, 2009 | 19

Sports

Players give hope for a winning season Ricky holmes Staff Writer

Men’s Soccer

Football Season Record Overall: 1-2 Next Game: 9/26 vs. Pasadena

Season Record Overall: 4-1-1 Next Game: 9/29 vs. Imperial Valley

Football

Women’s Soccer

Men’s Waterpolo

Women’s Waterpolo

Volleyball

Season Record Overall: 4-1-1 Next Game: 9/29 at Fullerton

Season Record Overall: 2-2 Next Game: 9/30 vs Fullerton

Season Record Overall: 4-0 Next Game: 9/30 vs. Fullerton

Season Record Overall: 5-2 Next Game: 10/2 at Irvine Valley

Oct. 13

Vs Santiago Canyon 3 p.m.

Oct. 16

At Orange Coast 1 p.m.

Sept. 5

RCC 14 Victor Valley 27

Oct. 20

Vs. Santa Ana 3 p.m.

Sept. 12

RCC 40 San Bernardino 17

Oct. 27

At Irvine Valley 1 p.m

Sept. 19

RCC 7 Glendale 10

Oct. 30

Vs. Fullerton 3 p.m.

Sept. 26

Vs. Pasadena 6 p.m.

Nov. 3

At Cypress 3 p.m.

Oct. 3

At El Camino 6 p.m.

Nov. 6

At Golden West 6 p.m.

Oct. 10

Vs. Palm Desert 6 p.m.

Nov. 10

Vs. Saddleback 3 p.m.

Oct. 17

Vs. Mt. San Antonio 6 p.m.

Nov. 13

At Santiago Canyon 1 p.m.

Oct. 24

At Cerritoas 7 p.m.

Oct. 31

Vs. Chaffey 6 p.m.

Nov. 14

At Citrus 1 p.m.

Men’s Soccer

Volleyball Aug. 29

Pasadena Tournament

Sept. 4

Riverside Quad Tournament

Sept. 12

Victor Valley Tournament

Aug. 29

RCC 6 Desert 3

Sept. 18

San Diego Tournament

Sept. 1

RCC 3 Imperial Valley 2

Sept. 23

Vs. Desert 5 p.m.

Sept. 9

RCC 5 Palomar 4

Sept. 23

Vs. San Bernardino Valley 2 p.m.

Sept. 15

RCC 1 Rio Hondo 3

Oct. 2

At Irvine Valley 6 p.m.

Sept. 18

RCC 4 Citrus 2

Oct. 7

Vs. Santa Ana 6 p.m.

Sept. 21

RCC 4 Chaffey 4

Oct. 9

At Golden West 7 p.m.

Sept. 23

At San Diego Mesa 4 p.m.

Oct. 14

Vs. Orange Coast 6 p.m.

Sept. 29

Vs. Irvine Valley 3 p.m.

Oct. 16

Vs. Fullerton 6 p.m.

Oct. 2

At Santa Ana 3 p.m

Oct. 21

At Saddleback 6 p.m.

Oct. 6

Vs. Fullerton 3 p.m.

Oct. 23

Vs. Cypress 6 p.m.

Oct. 9

At Cypress 3 p.m.

Oct. 28

Vs. Irvine Valley 6 p.m.

Oct. 13

At Santiago Canyon 3 p.m.

Oct. 30

At Santa Ana 7 p.m.

Oct. 16

Vs. Golden West 3 p.m.

Nov. 4

Vs. Golden West 6 p.m.

Oct. 20

At Orange Coast 3 p.m.

Nov. 6

At Orange Coast 7 p.m.

Oct. 23

At Imperial Valley 3 p.m.

Nov. 11

At Fullerton 6 p.m.

Oct. 27

Vs. Santa Ana 3 p.m.

Nov. 13

Vs. Saddleback 6 p.m.

Oct. 30

At Fullerton 3 p.m.

Nov. 18

At Cypress 6 p.m.

Nov. 3

Vs. Cypress 3 p.m.

Nov. 6

Vs Santiago Canyon 3 p.m.

Nov. 10

At Golden West 6 p.m.

Sept. 11

RCC 17 American River 3

Nov. 13

Vs. Orange Coast 3 p.m.

Sept. 11

RCC 21 Fresno 2

Women’s Soccer

Sept. 12

RCC 13 Santa Rosa 6

Sept. 12

RCC 18 West Valley 6

Women’s Waterpolo

Sept. 1

RCC 2 Mt. San Antonio 1

Sept. 18

Chaffey Tournament

Sept. 4

RCC 3 Palomar 1

Sept. 23

At Golden West 3 p.m.

Sept. 8

RCC 1 Miramar 1

Sept. 30

Vs. Fullerton 3 p.m.

Sept. 11

RCC 2 Southwestern 0

Oct. 1

Cuesta Tournament

Sept. 15

RCC 0 Orange Coast 1

Oct. 7

Vs. Santa Ana 3 p.m.

Sept. 18

RCC 3 Santa Ana 1

Oct. 14

Vs. Orange Coast 3 p.m.

Sept. 25

Vs. Irvine Valley 3 p.m.

Oct. 16

Golden West Tournament

Sept. 29

At Fullerton 1 p.m.

Oct. 21

At Cypress 3 p.m.

Oct. 2

Vs. Cypress 3 p.m.

Oct. 23

Long Beach Tournament

Oct. 6

Vs. Golden West 1 p.m.

Oct. 28

At Saddleback 3 p.m.

Oct. 9

At Saddleback 3 p.m.

Oc

Vs. California Baptist 3 p.m.

Men’s Waterpolo Sept. 11 RCC 11 Mt. San Antonio 10 Sept. 11 RCC 8 Golden Coast 12 Sept. 12 RCC 8 Grossmont 13 Sept. 12 RCC 13 Los Angeles Valley 8 Sept. 18 Cuesta Tournament Sept. 23 At Golden West 4 p.m. Sept. 25 Cal Baptist Tournament Sept. 30 Vs. Fullerton 4 p.m. Oct. 9

Citrus Tournament

Oct. 23 Golden West Tournament Oct. 30 Vs. Cal Baptist 3 p.m. Nov. 5

Orange Empire Conference Championship

Nov. 7

Vs. Santa Ana 4 p.m.

Nov. 12 Southern California Championship Nov. 14 Vs. Orange Coast 4 p.m. Nov. 17 At Claremont 3 p.m. Nov. 19

Calfornia State Championship

Nov. 28 At Saddleback 4 p.m.

Cross Country Sept. 12 Fresno Invitation, Fresno, CA 10 a.m. Sept. 19 UC Riverside Invitation, UCR 9 a.m. Sept. 25 OEW Preview, Huntington Beach, CA 11 a.m. Oct. 10 Howard Brubaker Invitation, Irvine, CA 10 a.m. Oct. 16 Southern California Preview Walnut, CA 11 a.m. Oct. 24 Santa Barbara Invite Santa Barbara, CA 10 a.m. Oct. 30 Orange Empire Championship Huntington Beach, CA 11 a.m. Nov. 7

Southern California Championship Walnut, CA 10 a.m.

Nov. 21 California State Championship Fresno, CA 10 a.m.

The Riverside City College men’s water polo team is feeling optimistic about the upcoming season. With the acquisition of a few key players and a good showing at the Golden West Tournament, the Tigers have reason to be hopeful. During the off-season, the Tigers got an added boost to their roster. New acquisition Shawn Nolan is a transfer from Long Beach City College. Nolan and the Tigers faced his old Long Beach team and were short two points of knocking them off in the Cuesta tournament. The Tigers finished the tournament with an even 2-2 record, also losing to Ventura and picking up two wins against Cal Poly and host team Cuesta. Another choice addition came when freshman Bryce Baumstark joined the team this year. Baumstark plays the 2-meter position, which is the equivalent to the center position in basketball. Coach Nate Hass believes that he will add some real depth at the 2-meter position. “This is a huge position for us,” Hass said. “I think we’re a much better team but I also think that most of the teams in the state are a lot better, too,” Hass said when asked about this year’s team compared to last year’s team. The men’s water polo team currently has a 4-4 record. The team has faced some tough opponents and for the most part, they were on the road. The Tigers spent most of last year’s schedule on the road and was still able to acchieve 17 wins with 15 defeats. The Tigers started out their season at the Golden West Tournament in Huntington Beach. The Tigers had two wins and two losses at the tournament. The team beat two good competitors in Mt. San Antonio College and Los Angeles Valley College. One of their two losses was against Grossmont College. The team played well but ended up being eliminated by a team that they will have to face again in October, Orange Coast College. After Cuesta, the team will go to Huntington Beach and play a very formidable opponent- Golden West College. Then they will go across town and play at the Cal Baptist University Tournament. The whirlwind road trip comes to an end on Sept.30 when the team meets Fullerton at home at the Cesar Chavez Center. This home game marks only one of the three home games on the Tiger’s schedule this season. The Tigers will have to learn to excel on the road due to the fact that there will only be three home matches this year. Besides Fullerton, the Tigers will also play Santa Ana and Orange Coast at the Sippy Woodhead Pool. After Orange Coast on Oct.14, the team will play in three matches and four tournaments. With a slew of tough and ranked opponents ahead of them, the Tigers will have to find strength in their new players as well as the remaining players from last year’s team in order to be successful. Coach Hass is very optimistic about this season and has every intention of having a winning season. “I think we have an opportunity to do better than we did last year,” Hass said. “I think that we are a much better team.”


20 | February 12, 2009

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Viewpoints:September 24, 2009  

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