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RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

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DEGREE SHOW 2016

Royal College of Art Degree Show 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

Dear Students – Show 2016, Ceramics & Glass – a ‘final show’ that we will never forget! Full of vitality, it shouts out: ‘We are here, and we are definitely now!’ It talks about the materials of our trade with an intelligence and perception, pushing the boundaries of our disciplines as you stray into new territories of thinking and making. It is about the ‘what if’, and the culmination of two years where you questioned, pondered ideas, experimented, took risks and made your work fast and furiously throughout.

But I cannot write this letter without a mention of the ‘move’ from Kensington to Battersea, for in many ways it has been the shaping of you as a group, and a significant factor in determining the work you have made. Arriving in October for the start of your final year, there was a nervous buzz as you all explored our new home in ‘Woo’. An awe-inspiring building with state-of-the-art facilities, but one that was to present many challenges… Surrounded by crates, pristine workbenches and new equipment, it must have been a daunting prospect to be the first to make that ‘mark’ that would transform these beautiful clean spaces into a creative working environment. This inspirational ‘final show’ is the proof that you have surpassed that challenge. There is bravado in scale, glass whose chemistry of colour explores our emotions. There is invention in design, in the use of material and process, exquisiteness in surface and detail. There is work that questions our preconceptions of the disciplines, work that tells a story, and work of quiet authority. It feels honest and professional. Time now to celebrate your achievements – you have created an amazing platform for your futures, go out there and be successful!

FELICITY AYLIEFF

Head of RCA Ceramics & Glass

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Inevitably along the way there have been highs and lows, moments of uncertainty and frustration followed by moments of pure exhilaration, and now I hope you will feel proud as you see your ideas resolved and the ambitions in your work realised.


THE WHY QUESTION

The Why Question BY A L I S O N B R IT TON

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ur students are often asked why they have made something. Not stuck in any ivory tower, they are aware of the outside world; some indeed have previous practices as architects or designers, and come to RCA to reconnect with hand making. They repeatedly present their work verbally, in crits and exams, and to competition juries. Many choose to write about their own work and its critical underpinnings in their dissertations. For some students, the writing element of the course becomes fundamental and confirms their own sense of self – and this year we have had more distinctions awarded for these texts than ever before. The ‘why’ question was of great interest to the audience in Japan for a lecture I once gave about Hans Coper. He was my tutor here at RCA in the 1970s, and one learnt to expect ‘why’ questions in his tutorials. The curator of the Shigaraki Museum

(where I spoke for Coper’s first retrospective in Japan in 2010) was curious, and very keen that this aspect of RCA teaching was brought out, as if it were a novelty. Why work in ceramics and glass, then? A focus on particular materials and skills could be seen as limiting, but these capacities can liberate wider territories of practise. We encourage ideas that lead students in all the directions of Art, Craft and Design. Very few courses can offer this scope, but through our connection to two bodies of material understanding, we can. Our students explore many different possible careers; as studio makers and designers, in one-off or batch production, a dish for a particular chef, or an international industry (which may still do small-scale manufacturing); making art as object, ornament, polemic or installation. They question

Alison Britton


their objects’ roles and purposes, as things that are linked to everyday life. Students unpick conventions, and are driven by a curiosity that can be shared through things, both real and virtual. Work could include the scientific exploration of material, finding new technologies, the crossing of techniques for new forms. Thinking through making is underpinned by a critical approach to artefacts and the discussion around them, stretching the language for the crafts, and investigating ideas of ‘use’ in a broad sense. The interdisciplinary flow of material culture through current contemporary art and design practice puts our work at an axis in this discourse, and students extend the debate. The American curator, historian and theorist of the crafts Glenn Adamson wrote an essay in 2010 called Tooling up and Tooling Down, in which he said that innovation might currently be situated

in a new way of working, rather than creating a new work. He continued: ‘in the “post-disciplinary” condition in which young artists find themselves they sense that they have the permission (maybe even the obligation) to move laterally across fields of practice. A student in a ceramics department may well find herself making a video one day and a sculptural installation the next. She might even make a pot now and then.’ This flexible ambition is realised in the work of students exhibiting now. For example; an animated film about grass, unbelievably made of porcelain, and explored as film where the sun seems to shine on it, in its raw fragile state. One puts ‘food and the vessel in harmony’ for extraordinary meals, another makes socio-political craft to coax the young and unwealthy. Many of them think about the human condition, playing with fear, the continuum between man and nature, or the particular events

Degree Show 2016

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RCA CERAMICS & GLASS


THE WHY QUESTION

that are testament to process, special to clay (or glass). Conveying the transcendental in planes of flat coloured glass, or the ornamental, in sculptures that recognise the spiral movement of history. Adamson again: ‘ . . . as welcome as this freedom may be, . . . you can’t have meaningful movement between fields if the fields themselves are vacant. The word ‘discipline’ itself remains deeply attractive to me. Yes, it may connote limitation, but it’s usually by being disciplined, focusing rigorously within a specific set of problems, that artists make headway. What this suggests, at least to me, is that the goal of inventing a ‘new way of working’ requires some basis in traditional means of production. It is only by having at their disposal established skills, infrastructure, and forms that new, multivalent approaches can be created. To make a collage, you need something to rip up first.’

A few years earlier Kevin Murray, an Australian writer and curatori, described the impact of current gadgetry on children’s upbringing thus: ‘With proliferating technologies such as Gameboys and iPods designed to fill every spare minute it seems unlikely that childhoods today have the kind of space necessary for developing a craft spirit… But craft will continue to be relevant, while we still have bodies. Multimedia really only engages two senses: hearing and seeing. There will always be room for arts that engage the mysterious realm of touch. The tactile sense has the capacity to break through the prefabricated work of image and sound.’ The visceral sense of material, and clay in particular, means that ‘the body’ features strongly for some current students – sensual thinking researched through practice as well as in their

Alison Britton


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

writing. One writes that ‘I am interested in how the sheer scale of my interventions challenges the physical engagement that my body has with the material.’ A bodily connection to material can include dance; Pina Bausch is a case study in one dissertation. Another is working on ‘the narrative of the primal hunter’, where the iconography is of rocks, meat, and fur. The sophistication and vitality of work made in C&G does not communicate the huge number of medium-specific BA courses that have closed in the past decade. We have been faced with depletion here and abroad in course provision – the managers of higher education seeming to think, ‘Why do they need to actually make things in a digital age?’ This misguided ideology now seems to be reaching into British children’s education also, and needs to be fought. The RCA embraces an increasingly international group of students – the nineteen

students graduating from Ceramics and Glass come from North America, Russia, East Asia, the Middle East, and across Europe. This exhibition is not just about these students, but for our disciplines, to convey more than the necessity of art and design in our culture, and the possibility of specialist craft study, to beyond that, reaching through boundaries and across categories. As one of them says, ‘I tend to get lost between the definitions of art, craft, and design. I find those semantics boring and unnecessary.’ The final show for these students is to celebrate the beginning of something beautiful, viable and exciting, and to reveal the fundamental importance of making as a way of developing thought.

Murray, K, Craft Unbound: Make the Common Precious, Thames and Hudson, Australia, Pty, Limited, 2005

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THIS EXHIBITION IS NOT JUST ABOUT THESE STUDENTS, BUT FOR OUR DISCIPLINES


AISLING CHEN

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FERNANDA CORTES

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JAMES DUCK

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MICHAL FARGO

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MICHE FOLLANO

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ELENA GILEVA

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MANOS KALAMENIOS

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AHRYUN LEE

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CHRISTINA LIU

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EVA MASTERMAN

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PATRICIA MATO-MORA

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LAUREN NAUMAN

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MARY O’MALLEY

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MICHÈLE OBERDIECK

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FENELLA OSBORNE

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ELINOR PORTNOY

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JULIA SCHUSTER

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KATIE SPRAGG

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ALISSA VOLCHKOVA

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RCA CERAMICS & GLASS


Image © Dominic Tschudin

ESCAPE (RED & BLACK)

Blown glass, wood • 37 x 51 x 17cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

AISL IN G CHEN e: chen.xiao@network.rca.ac.uk t: +44 (0)7588 875 787 w: aislingchen.com

Image © Dominic Tschudin

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My work was inspired by one of my dreams; in the dream, I was locked inside a dark room, where a lot of red lines suddenly escaped from a window along the floor. My dreams are often whimsical, and while I document them all, this one made the most impression on me. As a starting point, the dream is a link between my work and my own experience. I use ceramics and glass as tools to translate my imagination into real objects, using those simple forms to represent space, trying to create a whimsical conception.

ESCAPE (BLUE) Earthenware, porcelain, blown glass • 49 x 14 x 19cm • 2016

Degree Show 2016


Image © Dominic Tschudin

FORZA

Handbuilt Earthenware, variety of colour slip, semi-matt glaze and transparent glaze • 73 x 28 x 18cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

FE RN AN DA CO RTES e: fernanda.cortes@network.rca.ac.uk t: +44 (0)7849 272 819 w: fernandacortes.com

Image Š Dominic Tschudin

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Using my imagination to create anthropomorphic forms, I seek to create figures that emerge from an overwhelming emotional density and question whether my subjects are marked by a dehumanisation that I apprehend as a general condition. I can only say that they hover in the realm of the in-between of human and non-human. Qualities swirl about in this realm, like infusions of light and dark, but invariably they loom in a state of abject otherness. In this state there is a quality of a fold of force and emergence in which questions are emitted.

VERANO Handbuilt Earthenware, turquoise and lilac slip, semi-matt glaze, transparent glaze and lustre 36 x 25 x 45.5cm • 2016

Degree Show 2016


Image © Dominic Tschudin

MENDAX

Porcelain • 13 x 18cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

JAM E S DUCK e: james@jamesduck.com t: +44 (0)7545 189 372 w: jamesduck.com

Image © Dominic Tschudin

I’d like to think of myself as a humble potter; but I’m not. For a humble potter doesn’t acknowledge the importance of what they do. They make honest pots, and I don’t. I make artwork, and I make tableware. But both attempt to accomplish the same ideological goals. This tableware: considered, functional, Scandinavian-Oriental tableware is ‘faux-honest’ tableware. It embraces its making, its imperfect nature, but does so with hidden intentions. I make honest pots, dishonestly achieving honest goals.

MENDAX Porcelain • Dimensions Variable • 2016

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‘I make honest pots.’ Mendax


Image © Matan Ashkenazy

POST FOSSIL

Glass • h: 38cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

MICHAL FA R GO e: michal.fargo@network.rca.ac.uk t: +44 (0)7541 756 829 w: michalfargo.com In my work I am driven by textures, materials, shapes and surfaces; I deal with the thin line that lies between imitation and interpretation.

Image © Matan Ashkenazy

I tend to get lost between the definitions of art, craft, and design – I find those semantics boring and unnecessary.

POST FOSSIL Parian body • Dimensions Variable • 2016

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I try to capture an innate longing to authenticate nature and, at the same time, celebrate progress and its many benefits; maybe combine both emotions into one. My main ambition is to pursue authenticity and a personal aesthetic perception.


Image © Dominic Tschudin

DÉRIVE, Detail

Hand painted and printed, slab built Earthenware • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

M ICHE FO LLA NO

Image © Dominic Tschudin

Excited by formal abstracted elements, shape, line and colour are first and foremost the motivating force behind this body of work. The interplay between surface and form, the relationship between the turned edge and the primitive scar; the interplay between colours that exist side by side, transform this base material into rich, visceral and personally expressive individual statements. Intuitive mark making, incongruous imagery and clay manipulation, combined with careful deliberation and intention on a familiar form, allows for the spontaneous to sit beside the considered. This builds an exciting visual language, one that leaves the objects open to personal interpretation.

DÉRIVE Hand painted and printed, slab built Earthenware Dimensions Variable • 2016

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e: miche@michefollano.com t: +44 (0)7714 257 471 w: michefollano.com


Image © Sylvain Deleu

ORNAMENT N3 (MENHIR)

Stoneware • 156 x 34 x 40cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

E L E N A GI LEVA e: contact@elena-gileva.com ig: @elena_gilev_ceramics w: elena-gileva.com

Image © Manos Kalamenios

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The fascination I hold for history contained in objects is imbued throughout my work. By exploring formal aspects of material culture, I aim to create their contemporary counterparts. Decoration and surface are my main basis. I abandon current trends. ‘Ornamental’ is a subject and symbol for both the old and new. The narrative it creates through the agency of relics is the base of our collective consciousness, however in the contemporary world that axis has been shifted. Historical objects become displaced. Acting as a ‘collector’ of surfaces, ideas and shapes I seek to assemble an alternative universe.

ALL THAT GLISTERS IS NOT GOLD Slipcast Earthenware, bronze glaze, polyurethane foam 190 x 56 x 40cm • 2016

Degree Show 2016


Image © Dominic Tschudin

AMOEBA

Bone china • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

MAN OS K ALA MENI O S e: manos@madebymanos.com t: +44 (0)7544 418 180 w: madebymanos.com

Image © Manos Kalamenios

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The marks and cracks that punctuate the surface of all natural materials (even at micro level) are an intrinsic part of my practice. The tactility of a material, how it feels to touch and hold, is a key part of its overall character, informing just as much as its visual landscape; my work prioritises this aspect of materiality. I feel that it is very important to let the material do what is best for it in the most simple way possible, instead of forcing it to be something else. I aim to always be true to the material, listening to its voice and observing its personality.

AMOEBA, Detail Bone china • Dimensions Variable • 2016

Degree Show 2016


Image © Dominic Tschudin

“WE ARE NOT SCARY!”

Porcelain, stoneware glazes • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

AHRYUN LEE

Image © Dominic Tschudin

Materiality can manifest a sensual perception. This investigation of surface quality is the primary feature of my work. Driven by materials instinctively, I create metamorphic sculptures which incite discourse between the object and the viewer, whilst maintaining an interesting and unusual aesthetic. The body of work is abstract, which brings boundless imaginary ideas about the invisible world. The transformation of forms are reflected in the fusion of human, natural and subconscious emotions. I invite viewers into my fictional world when gazing upon my curious sculptural beings; a creation of a new species that rises out of my imagination and takes the viewer onto a fantasy voyage.

MATERIALITY: COLOUR RESEARCH Porcelain, stoneware glazes • Dimensions Variable • 2016

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e: ahryun.lee@network.rca.ac.uk ig: @ceramist_ar w: ahryunlee.com


Image © Sylvain Deleu

A SAVOURY SCENE

Porcelain, borosilicate glass • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

CHRISTINA LI U e: christina.liu@network.rca.ac.uk ig: @foodjetaime w: christinaliuceramics.com My interests lie in the interactions between the plated food, the vessel, and the diner, with the goal of enhancing the beauty and experience of cuisine through exquisite tableware.

Image © Sylvain Deleu

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Although my work is deeply rooted in functionality, it is not limited by it. The pieces I create are meant as vessels for the serving of food, but they are not merely utilitarian plates or bowls. They are intricate objects that invoke a sense of luxury, to be admired and brought onto the dining table only for extraordinary meals; the restaurant is my gallery and the spotlight is on the dining table.

A SWEET ENDING Porcelain, parian, borosilicate glass, brass Dimensions Variable • 2016

Degree Show 2016


Image © Dominic Tschudin

THERE’S A HOLE IN MY BUCKET

Clay, bicarbonate of soda, pallet wood • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

E VA M ASTER MA N

Image © Dominic Tschudin

Eva Masterman’s practice endeavours to create a collective visual language that investigates the encounter between process, maker and viewer. Connecting gestures of surface and form are reactivated through site-specific curation and installation, creating tension through displacement of the familiar. Deeply routed in subjective making, disrupted imagery of the studio/site/workshop, signal towards an underlying preoccupation with the value and relevance of labour and skill. The work becomes a testament to the colluding nature of process and environment, a means to an end, where the means becomes the end.

THERE’S A HOLE IN MY BUCKET, Detail Clay, bicarbonate of soda, pallet wood • Dimensions Variable • 2016

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e: eva.masterman@gmail.com t: +44 (0)7878 911 701 w: evamasterman.co.uk


Image © Dominic Tschudin

FAERIE CIRCLE, Detail

Terracotta • 70 x 70 x 12cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

PATRICIA M ATO - MO R A e: studio@pmatomora.net t: +44 (0)7914 011 482 t: pmatomora.net

Image © Dominic Tschudin

As a result, my sculptures are natural occurrences that appear to have escaped from the digestive system of industry and colonised our familiar environments. With regards to the creative process, I am interested in how the sheer scale of my interventions challenge the physical engagement that my body has with the material.

FAERIE CIRCLE Terracotta • 70 x 70 x 12cm • 2016

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I understand the division between man and nature to be illusory: nature is all there is. My current body of work interferes with ceramic industrial production, itself a colossal natural process that results in large quantities of material output. I appropriate a small percentage of said output and use it to constitute the material tissue of my own work.


Image © Dominic Tschudin

SAGE

Porcelain, stain, brass • 12 x 10 x 15cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

LAURE N NAUMA N e: lauren.nauman@network.rca.ac.uk ig: @lauren.nauman w: laurennauman.com

Image © Dominic Tschudin

My current work explores the boundaries within clay through experimental processes. With metal as an aesthetic reference and material contrast, additive and subtractive methods are used to create pieces with minimal amounts of clay. The results show opposing characteristics; clay can be both fluid and rigid. Some pieces are very controlled in their process of making, while others depend on chance.

BLACK AND WHITE, Detail Porcelain, stain, brass • 24 x 24 x 17cm • 2016

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As a project-based ceramicist, I make works ranging from decorative to functional objects. I start with the industrial method of plaster moulds and slip-casting; however, I don’t always use these processes in traditional ways.


Image © Sylvain Deleu

FALSE THREATS

Black stoneware, glass • 7 x 5cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

MARY O’ MA LLEY e: mary.omalley@network.rca.ac.uk t: +44 (0)7459 826 281 w: maryomalley.co.uk

Image © Sylvain Deleu

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Observations of fears within the Western psyche and the residual affects of colonialism in globalisation are some of the commentaries running through my work. The items I create are relics from a journey towards greater understanding.

FALSE THREATS Black stoneware, glass • 7 x 5cm • 2016

Degree Show 2016


Image © Sylvain Deleu

WATER REEDS

Graal, free blown glass • 38 x 24cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

M ICHÈ L E OB ER D I ECK

Image © Sylvain Deleu

Inspired by natural forms, and organic structures, I explore balance and the asymmetrical through shape, texture, and the gradual transition of colour. I mirror soft organic lines, created when a molten colour bleeds into another, with a biomorphic form. Colour, purely sensory, enriches the linear with meaning. My 3D forms are meant as gestures, and as such they express a narrative. As a medium of both clarity and ambiguity, glass’ capacity to distort and alter our view is intriguing. By cutting, and stripping away layers of colour, I examine the positive and negative ground by playing with transparency and opacity, exposing the reflection of light and shadow from the inner contained space onto the exterior form.

COLOURSCAPES Free blown glass • 30 x 11cm ; 26 x 8cm • 2016

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e: michele.oberdieck@network.rca.ac.uk t: +44 (0)7711 875 312 w: micheleoberdieck-glass.com


Image © Dominic Tschudin

VAPOUR

Deposition on glass • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

FE N E L L A O S BO R NE e: info@fenellaosborne.com t: +44 (0)7481 272 771 w: fenellaosborne.com

Image © Dominic Tschudin

Through the exploration of these transcendental qualities with the deposition of pure and intangible radiant colour, translucent veils of thin film optical interference, I seek to transcend the dimensional and perceptive space between thought and feeling within the affinity of the eye.

VAPOUR, Detail Deposition on glass • Dimensions Variable • 2016

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The glass surface, an architectural intervention, is an illuminated surface of fleeting phenomena. A fragile, tactile translator of light and space, glass dissolves the edge of reality, emphasising and enhancing an understanding of the immaterial though partial materiality. A surface of complex-clarity glass is a synthesis, to look on, through, and beyond, altering the visual perception of time.


Image © Matan Ashkenazy

GLASSHAKES

Blown glass, brushed brass • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

ELINOR PORTNOY e: info@elinorportnoy.com ig: @elinor.portnoy w: elinorportnoy.com Curious about processes, formation and fabrication, I let small observations lead the way, searching for a design that challenges materials and questions the way we normally perceive objects and matter. I make objects on different points of the spectrum from art to design, shifting between them in order to communicate different concepts, ideas and values.

Image © Dominic Tschudin

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I’m currently exploring the qualities of man made and naturally formed items. I wish to address the dwindling of natural resources and examine our appreciation of nature, by designing objects that mimic natural formations expressing a sense of futuristic artificial elements.

SHIFTING SANDS Fused glass powder and minerals • Dimensions Variable • 2016

Degree Show 2016


Image © Dominic Tschudin

RELEASE

Stoneware, terra sigillata • 70 x 31 x 7cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

J UL IA SCHUS T ER

Image Š Roddy Canas

Fascinated by the unique ability of clay to appeal to the senses, this body of work explores the very essence of the material; its physicality. Through repetitive and rhythmic movements, the aesthetic of natural motion is solidified in time in ceramic objects. Working performatively with the gestures of caressing and massaging, I enter an intimate and sensual relationship with matter. I caress the clay and it caresses me, making for a two-way contact. A relational encounter is developed that puts touch at the very core of being human. Using objects, spoken word and the medium of film I seek to create a space for contemplation.

Still from the film CARESS Digital film • 2016

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e: julia.schuster@network.rca.ac.uk t: +44 (0)7511 398 030 w: juliaschuster.net


Image © Sylvain Deleu

DAYDREAM, Detail

Porcelain, wood, paper and light • 58 x 180 x 60cm • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

K ATIE SPR A GG e: katie.spragg@network.rca.ac.uk ig: @katie_spragg_ceram w: katiespragg.com Through ceramic objects, installation and moving image I create momentary experiences that allude to the amazement and wonder of being outside in nature.

Image Š Katie Spragg

While the fired ceramic pieces capture a moment in time, the animations describe the dynamic, receptive qualities that clay and grass share. They record the durational element of making and the elastic sense of time that is felt when in nature.

Still from the animation BOTTOM OF THE GARDEN Digital film • 2016

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The pieces offer the viewer a space to daydream; evoking distant, possibly half-imagined memories. The contrasting situations presented play on the conflict between our sublime fantasy of nature and the often more mundane reality of our experience of it.


Image © Sylvain Deleu

FROZEN IN TIME

Glass • Dimensions Variable • 2016


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

AL ISSA VOLCHKOVA e: alissa.volchkova@gmail.com t: +44 (0)7889 674 856 w: alissavolchkova.com Frozen in time. My work combines the use of the ceramic and glass mediums. I am fascinated by their similar and contradictory characteristics of being solid and static, but at the same time liquid and malleable. The notion of movement is essential for me. I am crystallising and decomposing it by revisiting the traditional industrial processes of production, and revealing the unique aspects of these processes.

Image © Sylvain Deleu

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I have to find a dialogue with the material by letting it express itself and without forcing it – which means to accept a part of unpredictability. I have to adapt to it, but also to control it at the right moment.

FROZEN IN TIME Glass • Dimensions Variable • 2016

Degree Show 2016


22-23 JUNE

Industry days • 8am-10pm • invitation only

24 JUNE 

Private view • 6.30 -9pm • invitation only

25 JUNE-30 JUNE

Open to the public • midday-8pm

1 JULY 

Convocation • closed

2 JULY-3 JULY

Open to the public • midday-8pm Woo building, 22 Howie Street, LONDON SW11 4AY

FOLLOW US: twitter: @RCACANDG instagram: @rcaceramicsandglass facebook: facebook.com/rcaceramicsandglass rcaceramicsandglass.co.uk

DESIGN: P RI N T:

boults-studio.com ruddocks.co.uk

We are indebted to our sponsors:


RCA CERAMICS & GLASS

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our staff for their unwavering guidance and patience. We couldn’t have done this without your collective enthusiasm and support:

TECHNICAL STAFF: Kelly Allsopp, Sabrina Cant, Stan Chen, Olivia Fink, Joe Harrington, Anthony Harris, Katy Jennings, Liam Reeves, Stefan Stefanou, Rodrigo Solorzano, Sarah Wiberley OUR ADMINISTRATOR: Sandra Reynard OUR DISSERTATION TUTORS: Martina Margetts and Jonathan Miles

THANK YOU

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TEACHING STAFF: Felicity Aylieff, Heike Brachlow, Alison Britton, Steve Brown, Annie Cattrell, Anna Dickinson, Tavs Jorgensen, Simon Moore, James Rigler, Martin Smith and Philip Wood


We would also like to thank the following charities and individuals for their support of individual students through scholarships and awards: Fernanda CortÊs, recipient of: The Abraaj Innovation Scholarship James Duck, kindly supported by: The Behrens Foundation, The Royal College of Art, The Kiln Rooms Michal Fargo, kindly supported by: The Clore Foundation, The Bezalel Academy Miche Follano, recipient of: The Charlotte Fraser Award Special thanks to Digswell Arts Trust Christina Liu, recipient of: The Jameson Works Bursary Eva Masterman, recipient of: South Square Trust Grant, Sir Sidney Perry Trust Grant, The Eden Trust Grant Patricia Mato-Mora, recipient of: The Sir Alastair and Lady Pilkington Scholarship Lauren Nauman, recipient of: The Woo Scholarship Fenella Osborne, kindly supported by: Larry Bell, Plasmaquest, Schott Glass, Prinz Optics, delta optical thin film, 3M, GloFX Elinor Portnoy, recipient of: The Grocers Company Bursary, The Pilkington Award The ROSL Trophy Commission Julia Schuster, recipient of: Sir Eduardo Paolozzi Travel Grant The Royal College of Art Ceramics Prize awarded by The Worshipful Company of Tin Plate Workers alias Wire Workers of the City of London Katie Spragg, recipient of: The Charlotte Fraser Award, The Grocers Company Bursary


Published by RCA Ceramics & Glass students 2016 LIMITED EDITION OF 500

Profile for RCA Ceramics & Glass 2016

Royal College of Art - Ceramics & Glass 2016  

Degree Show Catalogue Graduating class of 2016

Royal College of Art - Ceramics & Glass 2016  

Degree Show Catalogue Graduating class of 2016

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