Page 1

• E Y E - C ATC H I N G DESIGN

THE REAL RUSSIA The renewed RBTH iPad App

• R I C H E R M U LT I M E D I A CONTENT • B R OA D E R COV E R AG E OF RUSSIAN REALITY

I PA D . R B T H . C O M

THE BEST OF MOSCOW FOR BUSINESS AND PLEASURE

rbth.com

Business travelers to Moscow can make the most of their time in the Russian capital with this guide, which includes a list of top restaurants, suggestions for unusual travel experiences and some tips on how to connect with Russian colleagues and clients. A Special Advertising Supplement to the International New York Times This special advertising supplement is produced and sponsored by Rossiyskaya Gazeta (Russia) and did not involve the reporting or editing staff of the International New York Times. F R I D AY, O C T O B E R 2 3 , 2 0 1 5

Don’t miss these useful travel tips for both first-time and frequent visitors to Moscow PII

Take advantage of the exchange rate with these stylish suggestions PIV

Experts offer advice on doing business with Russians PIII

Learn more about the city’s famous subway, the fastest st way to get around the Russian capital Perks for every traveler are available at Moscow’s top hotels, includ including free minibars, exclusive spa trea treatments and sumptuous breakfasts PII

Happily, there is no sho shortage of highend gastronomy in the R Russian capital. Check out our restaurant list. PII

PIII A Finnish entrepreneur gives his perspective on what is it like to spend three years working in Russia.

According to the most recent llegislation, every foreign citizen arriving in Russia must have his or her Russian visa registered with the Federal Migration Service within arrival. The inviting organization seven business days after arriva registration, but the traveler should is responsible for registration confirm that it has been done. Hotels will register guests presentation of a passport, visa automatically upon the prese and migration card at check-in. check Travelers are required to register in every city they visit, so make sure to save (always ask for a copy if not the registration forms (alw presented with one), in case you are asked to provide proof of registration.


ADVERTISEMENT

Moscow

RUSSIA BEYOND THE HEADLINES A global media project sponsored by Rossiyskaya Gazeta www.rbth.com

TOP

Your Russian Visa:Don’t Leave Home Without It

RESTAURANTS FOR MIXING BUSINESS AND PLEASURE

LORI/LEGION MEDIA

02

ADVERTISEMENT

Most visitors to Russia must obtain a visa beforehand, even if they are only coming for a short business trip or attending a conference

2

Know the exchange rate. Visitors should check the prevailing ruble to dollar or euro rate in several places before converting their money. Most places accept debit and credit cards in Russia, and although bank charges vary, their rates are likely to be good. Passengers will need cash when buying a ticket on the metro.

Tips for surviving a trip to Moscow

Book early for cultural events. Do you want to catch the ballet at the Bolshoi after work, or watch a Chekhov play? Although there is a plethora of cultural happenings during the season in Moscow, tickets are hard to get, unless one buys them in advance. Keep an eye on the Web sites of famous cultural institutions while planning a trip to Moscow. Tickets for concerts, plays, the opera and ballet sell out months in advance.

5

W

Business visas can be issued for a period of one month, three months, six months or a year. Travelers can only enter Russia on or after the first date the visa is valid. There have been cases of visitors turning up a day before their visa is valid and being forced to wait in the airport until midnight. A one-year business visa entitles a visitor to stay in Russia for 90 days within the first 180 days after entry, so if a traveler stays for 90 days on the first entry, he or she can only come back after a break of 90 days.

The most important document required to get a business visa is an official invitation issued by the Russian Foreign Ministry or the Russian Federal Migration Service. The invitation will have the legal seal, name and registered address of the host organization, and give the dates the visa will be valid. Certain countries also have a bilateral agreement under which a chamber of commerce can issue a business visa invitation. The visa invitation usually mentions the names of the cities that the visa-holder is allowed to visit.Visitors, however, have the legal right to travel anywhere in Russia that is not designated as a restricted area. Visitors will be issued a migration card at passport control that must be returned.

RUSSIA BEYOND THE HEADLINES IS AN INTERNATIONAL MEDIA PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE RUSSIAN DAILY NEWSPAPER ROSSIYSKAYA GAZETA. ITS PRODUCTION DOES NOT INVOLVE THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEW YORK TIMES. RBTH IS FUNDED THROUGH A COMBINATION OF ADVERTISING AND SPONSORSHIP TOGETHER WITH SUBSIDIES FROM RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES. RBTH’S EDITORIAL

Registration The Russian authorities have greatly relaxed the visa registration process for foreign nationals, although a visitor is technically supposed to register within seven working days of entering the country. A hotel will automatically register your visa with the authorities. Those staying in private apartments can register their visa by filling in a form and paying a small fee at a post office. Gone are the days when immigration authorities detain or fine exiting foreigners for not registering their visas, although those who overstay their visas are still liable to fines and prosecution.

Supporting documentation The immigration officer will print out a migration card at passport control. This small piece of paper is an important document that must be safeguarded as carefully as the passport. Hotels insist on it at check in, as they need to make a copy of the card along with your passport. The card must be returned at immigration when visitors leave the country.

Employment

LETTERS FROM READERS, GUEST COLUMNS AND CARTOONS LABELED “COMMENTS” OR “VIEWPOINT,” OR APPEARING ON THE “OPINION” PAGE OF THIS SUPPLEMENT, ARE SELECTED TO REPRESENT A BROAD RANGE OF VIEWS AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THOSE OF THE EDITORS OF RUSSIA BEYOND THE HEADLINES OR ROSSIYSKAYA GAZETA. PLEASE SEND LETTERS TO THE EDITOR TO INYT@RBTH.COM

tending a performance at the Bolshoi Theater: in order to appreciate the daring and artistry of the chefs, patrons should only go three to four times a year so that they can savor every bite and let the taste linger till their next visit in a few months.

15/1 ul. Mokhovaya Metro: Okhotny Ryad +7 499 922-0100

DOCTOR ZHIVAGO Restaurateur Alexander Rappoport always has design in mind when planning his restaurants. Doctor Zhivago is no exception, with its lush interiors highlighted by reds and whites and filled with copies of paintings of early So-

viet masters. The food here is classic Russian in the best sense of the genre: exotic Russian dumplings filled with fish, venison and duck; a caviar list fit for a tsar; an extensive selection of smoked fishes; and inventive preparations of Russian soups.

2 Teatralny Proezd Metro: Teatralnaya +7 499 270-1062

SAVVA Located in the Metropol Hotel, this is one of Moscow’s best places for fresh oysters and brunch, making it an ideal destination for a meal with a business partner to finalize any last-minute details. The restaurant, named for

the hotel’s founder, the merchant Savva Mamontov, features a gorgeous terrace overlooking the Bolshoi Theater and the Kremlin, and a ceiling dating from 1905. The Nordic-inspired fish, meat and vegetarian dishes provide options for every taste.

8 Novinsky Bulvar Metro: Smolenskaya +7 495 745-1000

LOTTE MOSCOW This recent winner of Conde Nast’s best Russian hotel prize is loaded with amenities guaranteed to impress even the most seasoned business traveler. An exquisite breakfast buffet with more than

100 items ensures that guests won’t go hungry. Later, after a long day of meetings, to unwind they can head to the Mandara Spa, a zenlike sanctuary with a silk batj, hammam, sauna and Balinese spa therapists.

1 ul. Balshug Metro: Kropotkinskaya +7 495 287-2000

HOTEL BALTSCHUG KEMPINSKI Those who wish to impress a client should book them here — the majority of rooms offer stunning views of the Kremlin. Russia’s first international 5-star prop-

erty when it opened in 1992, the Baltschug underwent extensive renovations beginning in 2013 and now features 12 conference facilities. The hotel’s Sunday Champagne brunch is legendary.

22 Tverskaya Ul. Metro: Mayakovskaya +7 495 787-8887

iNTERCONTINENTAL TVERSKAYA This hotel allows guests to easily combine business and leisure, as it is within walking distance of three subway stations, upscale shopping and the Kremlin. The InterContinental is known

for its concierges, who can arrange everything from a visit to a top-end designer’s loft to a tour of a cutting-edge artist’s studio to an exclusive excursion to Russia’s Star City space complex. Rooms feature a free mini-bar.

40 ul. Pokrovka, bldg. 2 Metro: Chistiye Prudy +7 495 229-5757

MAMAISON ALL-SUITES HOTEL POKROVKA Moscow’s only all-suites hotel, this 84-room property caters to travelers looking for a little extra space and attention. On the premises are an award-winning restaurant, a designer

spa, an indoor pool, a sauna and meeting facilities. With the largest suites measuring more than 200 square meters (2,153 square feet), this property is for those looking for much more than just a place to sleep when traveling.

12 Nikolskaya ul. Metro: Lubyanka +7 495 967-7776

ST. REGIS MOSCOW As far as our editors can determine, this is the only hotel in Russia that offers a butler service, especially helpful for CEOs who like to travel with the family. But individual travelers will also find much to smile

about, whether it is the central location, attentive staff, the omelet station at breakfast, or the traditional Russian banya (sauna). Style is important, too. Each conference room is named for and inspired by an avant-garde artist.

TOP HOTELS FOR BUSINESS TRAVELERS

Doing any work for payment while in Russia is strictly prohibited for travelers holding a business visa. There have been cases of foreigners getting deported, notably for conducting visiting lectures at universities while on a business visa. Any form of employment requires a foreign citizen to obtain a work permit. ■AJAY KAMALAKARAN RBTH

GAP IN INTERNATIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE. PLEASE E-MAIL INYT@RBTH. COM IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT OUR OWNERSHIP OR EDITORIAL STRUCTURE. RBTH PUBLISHES 37 SUPPLEMENTS IN 30 COUNTRIES WITH A COMBINED READERSHIP OF 28.4 MILLION AND MAINTAINS 22 WEBSITES IN 18 LANGUAGES.

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTS AND SECTIONS ABOUT RUSSIA ARE PRODUCED AND PUBLISHED BY RUSSIA BEYOND THE HEADLINES IN THE FOLLOWING NEWSPAPERS: THE DAILY TELEGRAPH, UNITED KINGDOM ● THE WASHINGTON POST, THE NEW YORK TIMES, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, THE INTERNATIONAL NEW YORK TIMES, UNITED STATES ● LA REPUBBLICA, ITALY ● LE SOIR, BELGIUM ● LE FIGARO, FRANCE ● HANDELSBLATT, GERMANY ● LE JEUDI, TAGEBLATT, LUXEMBOURG ● EL PAÍS, SPAIN, CHILE, PERU, MEXICO ● EL OBSERVADOR, URUGUAY ● LA NACION, ARGENTINA ● FOLHA DE S. PAULO, BRAZIL ● THE ECONOMIC TIMES, INDIA ● MAINICHI SHIMBUN, JAPAN ● THE GLOBAL TIMES, CHINA ● JOONGANG ILBO, SOUTH KOREA ● THE NATION, THAILAND ● DUMA, BULGARIA ● NEDELJNIC, SERBIA ● NOVA MAKEDONIJA , MACEDONIA. MORE DETAILS AT RBTH.COM/ABOUT

THIS SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE DID NOT INVOLVE THE REPORTING OR EDITING STAFF OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEW YORK TIMES. WEB ADDRESS HTTP://RBTH.COM E-MAIL INYT@RBTH.COM TEL. +7 (495) 775 3114 FAX +7 (495) 988 9213 ADDRESS 24 PRAVDY STR., BLDG. 4, STE 720, MOSCOW, RUSSIA, 125 993. EVGENY ABOV PUBLISHER VSEVOLOD PULYA CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR EDITORS FOR THIS SUPPLEMENT: MAX KORSHUNOV DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR GLEB FEDOROV EDITOR LARA MCCOY GUEST EDITOR JULIA SHANDURENKO TRAVEL EDITOR ANDREY SHIMARSKIY ART DIRECTOR ANDREY ZAITSEV HEAD OF PHOTO DEPT MILLA DOMOGATSKAYA HEAD OF PRE-PRINT DEPT IRINA PAVLOVA LAYOUT AN E-PAPER VERSION OF THIS SUPPLEMENT IS AVAILABLE AT

25 Malaya Nikitskaya ul. Metro: Barrikadnaya +7 495 775-3718

RAFF HOUSE Chef Anatoly Komm, the master behind the cuisine at Raff House, is known for innovative takes on Russian food and is the first Russian to have a restaurant listed in the Michelin Guide. Komm’s restaurants have been compared to at-

Migration card

While all Russian consulates require an official visa invitation, other requirements vary.

VOICE IS INDEPENDENT. ITS OBJECTIVE IS TO PRESENT, THROUGH QUALITY CONTENT, A RANGE OF PERSPECTIVES ABOUT RUSSIA AND RUSSIA’S PLACE IN THE WORLD. PUBLISHED SINCE 2007, RBTH IS COMMITTED TO MAINTAINING THE HIGHEST EDITORIAL STANDARDS AND TO SHOWCASING THE BEST OF RUSSIAN JOURNALISM AND THE BEST WRITING ABOUT RUSSIA. IN DOING SO, WE BELIEVE THAT WE ARE FILLING AN IMPORTANT

the grilled seafood and steaks (all sourced from Russia), hand-crafted cocktails and signature dishes, such as rabbit mini cabbage rolls in foie gras sauce with potato crisps and truffle juice. The restaurant was recently named one of the top 25 in the world.

Duration of the visa

Official Invitation

4

3 Smolenskaya Plosh. Metro: Smolenskaya +7 495 663-3999

WHITE RABBIT The brainchild of restaurateur Boris Zarkov and chef Vladimir Mukhin, White Rabbit is known for its extraordinarily creative takes on Russian cuisine and use of fresh products. There is often one seasonal set menu, but many opt for

Diplomatic missions no longer ask for HIVnegative certificates for business visas, but some consulates may ask for detailed financial statements and an itinerary. Those applying from the United Kingdom, Denmark, Namibia or Myanmar also have to submit biometric data.

ith the exception of citizens of the few Asian or South American countries that enjoy a short-term visa waiver arrangement with Russia, business travelers will need to obtain a visa in advance to visit the country for meetings, conferences and seminars. The bulk of the paperwork and documentation is usually taken care of by the Russian business partner or host, but it’s important to know the basics. Visitors coming on a short trip of less than a week will likely be issued a tourist visa, arranged through a hotel. Those traveling to Russia on business a few times a year, however, should get a multiple-entry business visa, as traveling for business on a tourist visa is technically illegal and could cause problems with immigration authorities.

GETTY IMAGES

Try a business lunch. Before the ruble devaluation, Moscow was widely regarded as one of the most expensive cities in the world. Dinner for two in a restaurant would be as expensive as in Western Europe or the United States, but when it came to lunch, there was always a cheaper option. Restaurants across the city center serve an economical business lunch that usually involves soup or starter, main course, beverage and, in some cases, a small dessert. Prices generally range from as low as 200 rubles (a little over $3) to 500 rubles.

3

minced reindeer and wild boar; venison kebabs; and young horsemeat steaks. If at the end of the meal, you still haven’t sealed the business deal, you could take your associate for a steam. The on-site banya complex features five sauna programs.

LORI/LEGION MEDIA

1

Learn some Russian. The biggest problem that travelers to Moscow face is the language barrier. It would be very useful to learn some basic Russian phrases. Even in Moscow, few people speak English, but they will go out of their way to help foreigners who attempt to speak a little Russian. There are several tourist apps in English and European languages that can help visitors navigate the city.

GETTY IMAGES

5

Take the train. The Moscow metro is safe, clean, efficient and the quickest way to get around town. During rush hour, there’s often a choice between a 15-minute ride on the metro or hours in a steady traffic jam. While there are no English announcements on the metro, some of the newer trains have signs in English. The best way to navigate the metro with ease is to download one of several free apps. All three international airports in Moscow have an airport express train to the city center. This is another way of avoiding the city’s dreaded traffic. Visitors can connect to the metro from the stations where the airport express trains terminate.

6 Pevchevsky pereulok Metro: Kitai Gorod +7 495 775-6075

EXPEDITSIYA This restaurant, whose name means Expedition, features a menu heavy on raw and smoked Arctic fish, such as omul (Arctic cisco), muksun (whitefish), nelma (white salmon) and other delicacies of the taiga, such as cutlets of

RBTH.COM/E-PAPER. TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SUPPLEMENT, CONTACT SALES@RBTH.COM. © COPYRI1GHT 2015, FSFI ROSSIYSKAYA GAZETA. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ALEXANDER GORBENKO CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. PAVEL NEGOITSA GENERAL DIRECTOR VLADISLAV FRONIN CHIEF EDITOR ANY COPYING, REDISTRIBUTION OR RETRANSMISSION OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS PUBLICATION, OTHER THAN FOR PERSONAL USE, WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF ROSSIYSKAYA GAZETA IS PROHIBITED. TO OBTAIN PERMISSION TO REPRINT OR COPY AN ARTICLE OR PHOTO, PLEASE CALL +7 (495) 775 3114 OR E-MAIL INYT@RBTH.COM WITH YOUR REQUEST. RUSSIA BEYOND THE HEADLINES IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS AND PHOTOS.


ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Viewpoint

RUSSIA BEYOND THE HEADLINES A global media project sponsored by Rossiyskaya Gazeta www.rbth.com

03

WORKING IN RUSSIA: THE FIRST 1,000 DAYS to see even serious, informed people lump Russia and China together in the same category when discussing online freedom. Despite all my doubts, the infrastructure of the cities I have visited more or less meets European and American standards. Yes, some of the roads are pretty bad, but airports, hotels, restaurants and other services are well developed. Starbucks is everywhere, and I use my credit card for almost everything. I pay my bills using the online services of Russian banks, and money transfers from my home bank can

PEKKA A. VILJAKAINEN BUSINESSMAN

f you’re working in international business, you have most likely participated in some kind of diversity or cultural training sessions. You know the kind. Those meetings where we learn that Germans are punctual, Italians are emotional and Finns don’t talk — without some alcohol. For me, the past 1,000 days of working in Russia have been a true deep dive into the Russian landscape, business culture and mentality. And I have gained an understanding that is impossible to get from these sterilized meetings, which tend to focus on stereotypes. During this amazing journey, I have visited 59 Russian cities, embraced numerous governors and seen all 11 time zones of this enormous country. And it is worth mentioning that all my preconceived notions about Russia were wrong. Before deciding to come to work in Russia, I had very little knowledge of it, even though my own country — Finland — shares a long border with it. I had been a tourist in Moscow and St. Petersburg, but as the Finnish and Russian languages share probably only three common words, my ability to communicate and get to know people was very limited. So what are my observations so far? I’m a nerd, so I was thrilled to see the level and quality of telecommunications across the country — in complete contrast to my wildest expectations. Russians truly love and use all the latest gadgets. The post-Soviet “PlayStation Generation” is particularly well connected. Social media is widely used, and news from all over the world is at everyone’s fingertips. There is no “Great Firewall,” on the Russian Internet, like in China, so it is very annoying

ALYONA REPKINA

I

I must mention the most beautiful part of life in Russia — the food.

be arranged overnight. For travel I use mostly airlines like Aeroflot, which has a very modern fleet of Airbus planes. I am not a specialist in air travel by any means, but as an anecdote I must say that in the past 1,000 days, I have only had my flights delayed twice, and for 15 minutes at the most. Of course the state of the Russian economy right now is not good, but this current turbulence is good for my business — promoting the culture of startups and innovation in Russia. If oil prices were high, it would be practically impossible to convince any local businesses to make difficult restructuring decisions. Naturally, I don’t wish hard times on anyone, but now, when I see the creation of new businesses and the modernization of big companies, I can’t help but think that there are some benefits to the current situation. Also from the standpoint of an investor, the devalued currency has created many opportunities — after all, our potential to make money occurs in the “buying” stage of the investment. But I must mention the most beautiful part of life in Russia — the food. When I arrived in the country, the only Russian food I knew of was borscht. But in the first few days, I realized that Russians will spend a lot of money on two things — high-quality food and highheeled shoes. In every city I visit, I just have to log on to TripAdvisor to see an amazing variety of restaurants and cuisine. There is something for every taste — from sushi to Caucasian cuisine. So, dear friends in the global business community, open your eyes to Russia. Take it from me — seeing is believing! Pekka A.Viljakainen is a Finnish businessman and investor. He is as an advisor to the president of the Skolkovo Foundation, and on the modernization of the Russian postal service.

INTERVIEW

‘Russians See Negotiations as a Battle’ Does culture matter in the negotiation process? It matters a lot. Negotiations are conducted between people, between human beings. And a human being is a combination of his or her own psychological profile, education system and culture. Culture defines many of the characteristic behaviors of a human being. For many years the classic negotiation literature coming from America argued that there is a preferred way to negotiate, which is the “win-win” strategy [ a negotiation strategy that aims to fulfill the interests of both sides] with the classic rational attitude toward negotiation being to maximize profit. When I studied at Harvard 20 years ago, cross-cultural elements were still underappreciated. There was one right way to negotiate: using the win-win strategy. And I, as an Israeli coming from the Middle East, said you have to incorporate cultural elements, because there is not just one right way to negotiate with Americans, Jordanians or Palestinians. After that, even Harvard did an abrupt turn and acknowledged the fact that culture matters today. Do Russians conduct business negotiations differently from other cultures? Russian people that grew up and were educated in the Soviet era negotiate differently than a young 23-year-old or even a 35-yearold Russian entrepreneur or high-tech visionary. Russian business culture has seen a dramatic shift over the past 20 years from a very “sila”-oriented [power-oriented] negotiation culture. One of the key elements for a win-win cooperation strategy is the capability to share information. But information sharing is not in the DNA of Russian people. Russians still have a long way to go to adapt or change their mentality from a power-based mindset to an interest-based or a win-win-based one.

DMITRY DIVIN (2)

Negotiation expert Moty Cristal spoke with Gleb Fedorov of RBTH about why you should first eat, drink and go fishing with Russians — and only then start talking business.

PROFILE

Moty Cristal A native of Israel, Moty Cristal is the founder of NEST Consulting group and the CEO of global consulting firm Negotiation Strategies Ltd. From 1994 to 2001, he

conducted negotiations on behalf of Israel with Jordan and Palestine. He teaches at Tel Aviv University as well as at the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo.

What would you say is the key difference of the Russian negotiation style? There are characteristics that are typical now for Russian negotiation culture. Putting aside this “sila” strategy — which translates to, “I will insist and, if not, I will threaten, and if it doesn’t work, I will threaten more” — I find two very dominant elements in Russian negotiation culture. One is what I call empire perspective. Russians do perceive of themselves as belonging to an empire. This is why some abilities that

are very common to the rest of the world, Russians are very bad at. They don’t know how to bargain, because they prefer to negotiate. They think,“I see the big picture; I see negotiations as a battle.” In going to the market, I leave it to Indians, Tajiks or Uzbeks. This is why I say to my Russian colleagues: If you go to India to negotiate a project, take an Uzbek or a Tajik as part of your negotiation team. Because they are very good at bargaining. The second element is the concept of “otnosheniye” [relations], which is a fundamental value in Russian culture. The idea is, if you don’t trust someone, you don’t share information. This is why in order to do business you need to have very, very good and deep otnosheniye with your partners. In order to have good otnosheniye, it has to be tested over a long period of time. And this contradicts the Western mindset that time is money. The West sees relationships in a very instrumental way. I can pick up the phone and call the supplier that I worked with five years ago and say, you know, I want to re-establish business. In Russia, it will not happen. Here you have to work to build otnosheniye. I ask Americans and other Westerners how much time you think you need to invest just in being social — drinking, eating, going fishing or going bowling just before you get to start talking about business. For Westerners, it’s simple:You have money, I have a good product. Let’s do business. It doesn’t work in Russia. You need to invest time. Is this the same way that negotiations are done in politics? It’s different, because there is no win-win outcome in politics today. There is what we call a strategic alliance, or alliances, which reflect some sort of the win-win idea in a sense, that sides have the same strategic goals at one particular point of time. There are alliances that are much deeper, like those between the U.K.U.S. and Russia-China. In politics,“sila”is the only game in town, although in business this is not always the case. In business I can be a very small player with no funds, but I have the technology, the knowledge. But politics is a pure power game.

READ THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW AT RBTH.COM/44349

ENGAGING THE WEST Read, Watch and Listen to RBTH’s weekly analytical program, featuring three of the most important recent developments in international affairs.

Never Push Russians Into a Corner Pierre Casse spoke with Gleb Fedorov of RBTH about the keys to becoming a successful businessperson in Russia, the importance of establishing emotional contact, and how Russia is just like France. How would you explain the communication deadlock between the West and Russia, both in politics and in business? When I try to explain to my colleagues in other countries why Russia is reacting the way it is in Ukraine, for example, I’m trying to explain that if you push Russian people into a corner, they will get together and fight back, even if they don’t like what is going on. Even if the big boss is not liked by everybody, everyone will still back up the leader. What should you do to get Russians to work with you? Russia is like France. Russians are unmanageable. That is why there was a close historical connection between the two, I guess. They need someone in a crisis situation, just like now, to take care and give directions.You need somebody to open the system slowly and carefully, to create the middle class. It takes time. Is the vertical distribution of political power in Russia reflected in business? It’s required right now. But what I say to my students here in Skolkovo is that you should start preparing for the next step. And the next step is not top-down leadership in the public and private sector, but more delegated management. And you don’t have a choice. These young people — you will empower them or they will leave. Russia has all the potential. I started to teach here at Skolkovo 10 years ago. Ten years ago, people wanted to be rich by stealing. Today Russian people want to be rich by working. How do Russians differ from others in the way they do business? My experience shows that Russians are very people-oriented and very emotional. If at a seminar here in Skolkovo you don’t manage

PROFILE

Pierre Casse In addition to teaching at the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo, Pierre Casse has taught leadership courses in France, Germany, Slovenia and the

U.S. The dean emeritus of the Berlin School of Creative Leadership, Casse has written more than 10 books on multicultural management strategies.

in the first 30 minutes to establish a good emotional connection with the audience, you will send them out for a break and you won’t see them come back. If you go to Russia to do business or to teach, business here is basically around people and the keyword is trust. You need to establish a trustworthy relationship first. And when you have that, then you have the foundation.

READ THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW AT RBTH.COM/40899

GLOBALLY SPEAKING GOING EASTWARD

rbth.com/world/troika


ADVERTISEMENT

04

ADVERTISEMENT

Experiences

RUSSIA BEYOND THE HEADLINES A global media project sponsored by Rossiyskaya Gazeta www.rbth.com

5

BUSINESS CALENDAR OPEN INNOVATIONS FORUM 2015 VDNKH PAVILION 75 OCT. 28-NOV. 1

Russia’s largest innovation event focuses on future technologies and global trends. Major tech companies and startups, along with scientists, engineers, developers, experts and venture capitalists will all take part. › forinnovations.ru/en/

Exclusive Ways to Fritter Away Time and Money in Moscow

POWER ELECTRONICS EXPO CROCUS EXPO OCT.. 27-OCT.. 29

This 12th international exhibition of components and systems for power electronics involves three days of cross-business activities. Exhibition speakers will reflect the latest market trends and highlight future technologies and innovations. › powerelectronics.ru

MOSCOW BUSINESS FORUM 2015 GKZ ROSSIYA, LUZHNIKI NOV. 29-30

MARINA LYSTSEVA

Over the course of three days, global business leaders will describe the practices that enabled them to lead their companies to unprecedented growth and multibillion dollar turnovers. › mbf2015.ru

thick walls. A former residence of the tsars, it now contains one of the world’s largest collection of jewels, the State Diamond Fund. Private tours range from $100 to about $1,270 — a price which is unlikely to include any diamond mementos.

oscow has a generally well-deserved reputation for being pricey. So, how best to spend your money when everyone seems to want it? Here is our guide to some of the best of what Moscow has to offer, where you can shop happily while the ruble conversion rate works in your favor.

M

REUTERS

Russia’s superrich come to this little alley — Moscow’s equivalent of Rodeo Drive — to spend some serious cash. Those shopping for a brand new luxury car will likely find what they are looking for at Bentley or Ferrari. Top fashion houses with showrooms here include Tom Ford, Ermenegildo Zegna, Armani, Prada, Brioni, Gucci and Dolce and Gabbana. The exchange rate should make for relatively good deals. Visitors can top off a day of shopping with a trip to the luxurious Tretyakov Spa for a massage and a pedicure before hitting the town in the evening.

Try landing a chopper inside the Kremlin and touring the State Diamond Fund.

1,500 to 5,000 meters (4,921 to 16,404 feet), passengers will see the city in all its grandeur. For those who like to be in control, one option allows a passenger to sit next to the pilot and take the second control during the flight.

2. Seeing Moscow from above

3. Taking a private tour of the Kremlin Perhaps no place is better suited for

Get a bird’s-eye view of Moscow in style riding in a Eurocopter AS350 or a Robinson R44 helicopter and look down on the little people. Flying at speeds reaching 240 kilometers (150 miles) per hour and altitudes ranging from

reminding individuals of their humble stature in the world than the Moscow Kremlin. This fortified complex overlooking the Moscow River contains five palaces and four cathedrals within its

Abrau Durso Victor Dravigny Extra Brut 2009. This sparkling wine is made according to the classic techniques: aged for three years, with hand-picked grapes and labeled with the the supplier’s name. It has a wonderful fruity bouquet with characteristic notes of brioche. The wine won a silver and bronze medal at the International Wine and Spirit Competition in 2012. Average price, $13

1

TOP WINES TO BUY IN MOSCOW

EPA/VOSTOCK-PHOTO

Museon

0 km

Krymsky Embankment

Usadba Divnomorskoe Riesling 2012. This bright, fresh, mineral wine features zesty tones of tropical fruit. The Usadba Divnomorskoye winery, located on the shores of the Black Sea in the Krasnodar Territory, is part of the Abrau Durso holding and represents the company’s efforts to expand beyond sparkling wines. It is also said to have ties to the Russian president. Average price: $25

2

After a long day of staring at diamonds, shoppers may wish to search for some of their own at Barvikha Luxury Village. This exclusive oasis in Moscow’s fashionable Rublevka District features some 10 jewelry stores including Graff, Harry Winston, Bulgari, Chopard, de Grisogono, Mikimoto, Pasquale Bruni, Jacob & Co, Palmiero and Utopia. Rounding out the experience is a concert hall, four stylish restaurants and the Barvikha Hotel and Spa. This restaurant and cocktail lounge near the Russian Academy of Sciences features Moscow’s best views. The food is high-end, featuring delicacies from caviar and tartar to ceviche and Spanish ham. The main reason to come, however, is to enjoy a cocktail on the terrace while a panorama of the city unfolds below. ■JOE CRESCENTE

Vedernikov Krasnostop Zolotovsky Vintage 2012. The pride of the Vedernikov winery, this wine won a gold medal at the 2013 International Wine and Spirit Competition. The wine is made from local grapes that have no common ancestors with other grape varieties and is aged for 18 months in French oak. Full-bodied, with jamberry flavor and notes of menthol. Average price: $45

Burnier Krasnostop 2008. The Burnier winery, founded by a Swiss winemaker and his Russian wife, was the first to make a wine completely out of the region’s autochthonous Krasnostop grapes. Aged in oak barrels for 18 months, the wine must be decanted before drinking. It is a dry red with an aroma consisting of mature red fruit along with chocolate. Average price: $35

4

42

The longest is 16 km (10 miles), run-

The most scenic route is through the city center along the river (5 km).

cycling routes

ning from Muzeon to Victory Park.

READ MORE

The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal David E. Hoffmann, Doubleday, 2015 Once Upon a Time in Russia: The Rise of the Oligarchs Ben Mezrich, Simon & Schuster, 2015

Scan this code for more ideas of places to visit while in Moscow.

SPECIAL TO RBTH

7

bike paths

The Politics of War Commemoration in the U.K. and Russia Natalia Danilova, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015

5. Imbibing at Sky Lounge

3

BORED ON BOARD? 7 Books to Read

4. Shopping at Barvikha Luxury Village

1. Strolling down Tretyakovsky Proezd

Мoscow on Two Wheels

Helicopter tours enable visitors to see Moscow as Dmitry Medvedev sees it.

Lefkadia Reserve Red 2011. This wine has an interesting blend of Krasnostop, Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz grapes. It is aged in oak for 18 months. Its characteristics are bright and authentically strong, with tones of plum, blackberry, dogwood, blackcurrant and pepper. The wine matches well with meat and grilled vegetables. Average price: $35

5

Everyday Life in Russia Past and Present Ed. Choi Chatterjee et al. Indiana, 2015 Madonna From Russia Yuri Druzhnikov, Peter Owen, 2005 Reminiscences of Tolstoy By His Son Ilya Tolstoy, Century Company, 1914 Hotel Moscow: A Novel Talia Carner, William Morrow, 2015

12 Films to Watch Battle for Sevastopol, Sergei Mokritskiy, 2015

Admiral, Andrei Kravchuk, 2008

Leviathan, Andrei Zvyagintsev, 2014

The Barber of Siberia, Nikita Mikhalkov, 1998

Stalingrad, Fedor Bondarchuk, 2013 The Geographer Drank His Globe Away, Alexander Veledinsky, 2013 Soulless, Roman Prygunov, 2012

Love and Pigeons, Vladimir Menshov, 1984 Office Romance, Eldar Ryazanov, 19771 Solaris, Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972 The Cranes are Flying, Mikhail Kalatozov, 1957

Siberia, Monamour, Vyacheslav Ross, 2011

T R AV E L 2 M O S C O W. C O M

16 km

For every taste

Victory Park

The city’s bike rental system has 300 stations and 2,700 bicycles.

For nature lovers, there are bike paths in 50 of the city’s parks.

Gorky Park How to rent a bike

Pushkinskaya Embankment

Luzhniki Bridge

Register by - Logging on to www.velobike.ru - Using the mobile app - Signing up at the bike rental terminal station

Neskuchny Garden Pushkinskaya Embankment

For those who want to pick up speed, check out thecycling track at Krylatskoye Hills.

Sparrow Hills Andreevskaya Embankment

The city’s biggest cycling event is the Moscow Veloparade. More than 20,000 people participated in this year’s event, held in August.

For a romantic getaway, ride around the territory of Moscow State University and take in a view of the city from the observation deck.

Make the most of Moscow  
Make the most of Moscow  

This new issue of the RBTH supplement was distributed with The International New York Times on October 23, 2015

Advertisement