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ROSHELLE

BORN


MADHAVPURA MARKETPLACE, AHMEDABAD, INDIA Manu Sobti, PhD, University-Wisconsin at Milwaukee mpsobti@alum.mit.edu Ahmedabad, India

How do you approach design in a foreign context? For a site entrenched in history and memory? For a people struggling to come to terms with the need for new infrastructures and subsequent loss of familiar space? Established 4 centuries ago, Madhavpura Market is entrenched in history despite the rapidly changing urban environment in which it exists. The wholesale market obstinately survives in the midst of an urban legislation that cares little for history or memory. The once advantageous location on the axes of 2 majors streets outside the city wall has been engulfed by the growing congestion of the old city, + the emergence of digital clearinghouses for goods has the potential to revolutionize the marketplace, or even eliminate its necessity completely. An intervention in Madhavpura Market must deal with the conflict, contestation, adjustment + reconciliation between the past, present + future; it must concurrently esteem, embrace + innovate. The proposal has no intention of streamlining or making ‘efficient’ the perceived chaos of the market, and through the application of a range of design processes, dissected the western perspective of chaos as a means to understand a complex foreign environment.


india ahmedabad Population City: 4,269,846 Density: 58,205/sq mi Metro: 5,680,566

1

goods are transported from the countryside to the city

goods are stored and 2 sold at the madhavpura wholesale market 3

4

taxes applied only on the trucks entering the walled city

1

goods are transported from the countryside to the city

2 all trucks are taxed prior to entering the city ever morning; by law, trucks are no longer allowed to drive the city streets from 9 am to 5pm 3 multiple trucks navigate the congested city streets 4 goods are stored and sold at the madhavpura wholesale market; drivers remain at the market until 5pm when they are able to leave 5

goods are distributed throughout the city

trucks transport the goods to the city center

then.

now.


In collaboration with architecture and urban planning students from CEPT University, we compiled and made visual historical research, interviews, movement patterns, inherent hierarchies, embeddedness, incremental growth, urban edges, spaces and activities, formal characteristics, and climatic responses. In response to this project, I devised a book of patterns and diagrams as a means to comprehend the complex, dynamic foreign environment and create a framework through which design strategies could be developed, layering on new patterns of sustainability and adaptability.


THE REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION OF ALASKAN THREESPINE STICKLEBACK Dr. Jeffrey McKinnon, University-Wisconsin at Whitewater Seward, AK

I’m crazy curious--from business to culture, art and science. So when I saw a flier in college for an opportunity to travel to Alaska on a research grant, I bit. Alongside a team of Evolutionary Biologists, I researched the Reproductive Isolation of Alaskan Threespine Stickleback. Over the course of this adventure--diving in calved-in glaciers and snorkeling through marshes in drysuits, collecting and analyzing field work and lab data--I first learned the value of hard work, collaboration, and the rigor of scientific research, but more importantly I developed a reverence for the complexity and dynamism of the biological systems around us. [Research published in Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 17, Issue 10, 480-488, 1 October 2002]


Anadromous

White Japan Pacific

Lake Resident

Freshwater Stream Resident

VANCOUVER IS, B.C.

Limnetic

Benthic

VANCOUVER IS, B.C.

Red

Black

PENINSULA, WA

SEWARD, AK

Typical Marine

NOVA SCOTIA

Sea of Japan

HOKKAIDO, JAPAN


BRUCE MAU DESIGN : IN GOOD WE TRUST Whitney Gellar, Design + Research Lead gellar@brucemaudesign.com Denver, CO

DENVER IN ART. BIENNIAL GOOD IDEAS. OF THE WE ACTION. AMERICAS TRUST 2010 Massive change, cultural possibility, positive innovation, and audacious action. Last summer, I was selected through a competitive design charrette for a Research and Design Internship with the global arts and design services firm Bruce Mau Design. During this experience, I focused on visual identity and branding, environmental graphics, exhibition development and design, and cultural and business programming. In collaboration with a group of smart, interdisciplinary designers we developed cultural cartography methodologies meant to streamline the research, collection, and presentation of <New Now> innovators, technologies and processes. Using the information and visualizations we constructed 7 exhibition experiences and cultural programming were strategized for 7 themes over 7 weeks in Denver to launch 7 possibilities for the 21st century. The project culminated in the launch of In Good We Trust: Denver Biennial of the Americas, a momentum building lecture series and workshop produced, mediated, and documented by BMD for an international community of ambassadors and innovators.


flocking pigeons parametric design native american weaving patterns cyclic universe

algorithms

clickstream data Through a sophisticated recruitment process, choose a focus group of 100 innovators across a diverse range of fields and locations throughout the world and record their clickstream data through an application installed on their computer. The resulting data and maps will be suggestive of initial interests in ideas across disciplines.

“EVERYWHERE I GO I SAY ‘YOU GOTTA COME TO DENVER’.”

Proof: Gives tangibility to a movement- a visible spirit of innovation

Possibility: Provides a launch platform for global change

When we show people what we are doing here, consistently, almost to a person, people say “Oh my goodness, we have to go to Denver, how do we do this.” It has been an extraordinary experience over the last few months as we have focused on finding the extraordinary people to be part of this. At right is a list of a number of those people. It is an unorthodox list, of course. One of the things we are focusing on is the notion of “Artscientist.” There is a great book called “ArtScience” that describes how art and science diverged and developed their own specialized cultures and languages, but are now reunifying to create a new kind of dialog. If you think about design, everything we do must be about both art and science. It must be about making things beautiful and compelling, but it also must stand on a foundation of innovation and technology.


MAKE CHANGE: CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD Neil Frankel, FAIA, Frankel+Coleman neil@frankelcoleman.com Chicago, IL

650 people were asked in January 2009 words to describe financial institutions.

Greedy, impersonal, opportunistic and distant, the financial services industry needs a design bailout. Last spring, I was selected as 1 of 14 students for a Distinguished Critic Design Studio in Chicago with Neil Frankel, FAIA, that focused on the connection between social research and design excellence for the architectural interior environment. The studio served as consultants for a credit union design-build firm, unpacking consumer perceptions of financial service institutions in the wake of the recession, dissecting and reshaping the credit union business model to identify key opportunities within this context and addressing these in comprehensive brand experience. Make Change confronts current issues in the financial industry by designing a credit union that serves the greater good. Through a unique combination of both financial + philanthropic endeavors, Make Change strengthens relationships between members, and with the physical space, reestablishing a lost connection between communities and their financial institutions. At the gateway to Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial district from the major commuter networks, Make Change is a highly visible, optimistic vision for the future of the industry.


GREEDY IMPERSONAL 32%

32%

OPPORTUNISTIC

26%

DISTANT

22%

TRUSTWORTHY

15%

HONEST10% ETHICAL 5%

3% TRANSPARENT 3% SYMPATHETIC

Cohn & Wolfe Financial Confidence Survey, “New U.S. Consumer Survey Shows High Distrust of Financial Services Companies.” Business Wire. Jan 2009


ORG

MAKE CHANGE.

A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

MAKE CHANGE.

ORG ORG

MAKE CHANGE.

ORG

A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

A CREDIT UNION SERVING THE GREATER GOOD

Toss the “ATM inside sign.” Through Custom-designed personal finance kiosks, individuals interact with financial professionals 24/7, in accordance with Gen Ys needs. In addition to traditional financial transactions, individuals have the power to plan and communicate volunteer opportunities and donate time or money, which is then translated to dynamic LED red line “graphs” projecting from each kiosk out into the street. This dynamic line serves as a graphic representation of each respective kiosks’ contribution to the greater good, increasing visibility of the kiosk, Greater Good Projects, and Make Change as the new face of the financial services industry.


MELTWATER: CARBON +/- HOUSE Chris Cornelius, Professor, University-Wisconsin at Milwaukee Solar Decathlon Competition 2009 Washington, D.C.

MELTWATER IS: MILWAUKEE.

UW-Milwaukee was selected as 1 of 20 colleges to participate in an international competition hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy to design, build, and operate the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered house. The project is carried out over the course of 6 semesters, culminating in the construction of the home on the National Mall in Washington D.C., October 9, 2009. Following the competition, the home will be re-constructed at a site in the Menomenee River Valley, Milwaukee, WI as a educational facility.

MELTWATER IS: EARTH-SHAPING STRENGTH.

The concept of the home is wedded to our region, as meltwater landforms makeup much of our recognizable landscape. Using nature as a model, the form of the roof signifies the carving away of the earth’s surface while the facade represents the layers of subsurface stratification. The sustainably harvested white pine from the Aldo Leopold Foundation forms the topographical façade sweeping across the front of the building, reminding us where the building and its makers come from, an indelible tie to our region. The powerful change-of-state involved in melting the glaciers during the Wisconsin Glaciation Period provided the model for the home’s many multifunctional components that adapt to the changing needs of its inhabitants. The form and potential of the home takes on the strength characterized by the natural processes that reworked our regional landscape.

MELTWATER IS: ENERGY COLLECTION, RELEASE + RECIPROCITY.

Using nature as a resource, Meltwater harnesses infinite solar power and fosters the collection of our finite freshwater supply. The distinct valley of the roof and the prominent placement of the photovoltaic panels communicate the value placed on these resources in the functioning of the home and our environment. Additionally, each material was carefully chosen with respect to the location of origin and quality in order to create a home that is both sustainable and has the ability to capture the essence of our region. Created of our region and for our region, Meltwater addresses the resources and needs specific to our place.


ed sh er at w

summer

winter


0 1’

3’

6’

SHEAR

extra seating television dishwasher

stove

sink

sliding door

OGIVE

cooling g

murphy bed

MORAINE

din din ining ing ng g tta able ble e

FLOAT

island

washer+dryer

BERG

wardrobe do not disturb

fridge+freezer


polycarb l 72

door lass ing g 0 fold 1,25

ws + doorss 1 winnndows 186

su sta ina bly ha rve ste dl um be r1 13

55 50 m mi 100 m mi

200 mi m

300 mi m

400 mi 4

500 mi

construction costs

lifecycle financial trends

0.6%

Division 2—Site Work

$725

9.5%

Division 3—Concrete

12,000

6,000

Division 12—Furnishings

12,000

Division 15 & 16—Mechanical & Electrical

20,000

Division 22—Plumbing

7,000

projected costs

re

5.5%

((-)) of

7,000

Division 11—Equipment

ro

15,000

Division 9—Finishes

alt

Division 8—Openings

ph

9.5% 15.8%

20,000

as

4.7%

27,000

Division 7—Thermal &Moisture Protection

ce

5.5%

0

Division 6—Wood &Plastics

vin yl sid in g

11.8%

Division 5—Metals

pla

15.8%

re pla ce

0.0% 21.3%

1,000 1 000 mi

Sub Total: 10% Contingency

780 S.F. 1 bedroom, 1bath

126,725 12,673

Total:

$139,398

0.4% 5.0% 2.2% 11.8% 10.0% 13.2% 5.2% 6.9% 4.7% 37.5% 3

Division 2—Site Work

$716

Division 3—Concrete

10,072

Division 5—Metals

4,427

Division 6—Wood &Plastics

23,592

Division 7—Thermal &Moisture Protection

19,890

Division 8—Openings

26,399

Division 9—Finishes

10,297

Division 11—Equipment

13,725

Division 12—Furnishings

9,360

Division 15 & 16—Mechanical & Electrical 3.1%

Division 22—Plumbing

6,469

Sub Total: 10% Contingency on Hard Construction

780 S.F. 1 bedroom, 1bath

PV System: $44,098.36

Solar Hot Water System: $17,246.00

Total:

74,844

199,791 6,899 $206,690

$265 per sq ft

$ g 11, pa ove 025 yb rn ac me k n t

$179 per sq ft

((+)) projected revenue

ing mb plu

es tur fix

27 73 s.i.p. p.. panelss


AN | ARCHITECTURE : CATALYTIC UN-MAKING Mark Sexton, FAIA M. Arch Thesis Advisor msexton@ksarch.com Chicago, IL

Waterview Tower

Chicago, IL

Currently there are over 100 stalled building projects worldwide. Unfortunately, a vast majority of our architectural inquiry focuses on successive stages of growth, ignoring the opportunities in the interludes and un-making. The intervention proposes a phased sculptural deconstruction and material reutilzation of an unfinished super-tall, reversing the fundamental object-centered hubris of the mega-project to that of an integrated cultural catalyst, in service to the surrounding urban context. The phased sculptural deconstruction serves as a sensitive receptor to changes over time and space, simultaneously activating the current framework and unlocking the site for future development. A cultural catalyst, curiosity and script for the reutilization of building materials, the intervention challenges conceptions of architecture, art and growth. As the building is sculpturally deconstructed the circumstances of the project and demolition are no longer viewed as a negative process but a celebration for cultural creation, urban revitalization, identity building, and positive momentum, opening up the site to future possibilities.


26

story urban ruin

142 stalled projects worldwide 1000m

500m

250m

er w To t’l In lm 3 e Pa rr p To m 1 ru 201 ma 1 e T ai na 01 e 2 Th ub Pa y 2 orr t os D e Ci a T nd sd a m 1 ro am na 01 Co Fa an Pa y 2 el + P e it t C o sd a H ro am ns 1 Fa an so 01 P ea k 2 S r ur Yo Fo ew N on ne si a Vi risb B ra er w ne To ta r M a i os I& ub e C 10 owe D rr 20 T To o de an iag Tra Gr ant t’l S In 10 0 jin 2 an jin Ti ian 10 T a 20 II si w ra co um i Eu os ar 11 M et 20 an ity Pl C er e a rr am ow T To an P ew vi r2 er o e at ag w W hic a To C ar r T m a i pe La b ra Du ysc Sk e ai Th b I Du m l iu ra ar 11 nt et 20 Ce an ity re Pl C or e a rr am aT To an am011 wer P n Pa 2 To e City al s d a pit ro am Ca 10 0 Fa n e Pa r 2 ua ity S q C er 1 e ait Th uw Tow r K ra Ct Ta on m ai nti e La b Du nv Co 012 ha a 2 Do oh ire D Sp 14 o 20 ag o ic ag Ch ic er Ch w To el 20 he i 20 ak a N ub D

ll 20 buildings b ildi ld id on hold h ld tallest worldwide (Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat)


1

speculation//spectacle

25’

an-ar-chi-tec-ture [an-ahr-ki-tek-cher] noun

1. A response to ‘surface’ design 2. Completion through removal 3. Completion through collapse 4. Completion through emptiness Quote from notecard 1146, undated, estate of Gordon Matta-Clark, on deposit at the CCA, Montreal.


2

disintegration//integration

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2012

THE RECESSION IS OVER!!!!

3

conclude//continue


NROB

ELLEHSOR


Born Portfolio 2010