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REBECKAH BLOSSMAN 2008 - 2010 PORTFOLIO

1


2


TABLE OF CONTENTS DESIGN I

04 - 09

TECHNICS

10 - 15

REPRESENTATION I

16 - 21

DESIGN II

22 - 27

REPRESENTATION II

28 - 31

PAVILION

32 - 35

DESIGN III

36 - 41

3


4


DESIGN I The course is structured to introduce the techniques, concepts and culture of architectural production. Students are expected to learn and develop through a conceptual and technical framework, as aided by desk crits, pin-ups, and formal reviews. The course investigates cultural models-- something unrelated to architecture that the students must in some way apply to architecture. Project two is the design 9 inch by 9 inch cube. The project focused on the spatial organization of a set dimension. Project three is the design of a set of spaces with the ability to adapt to the human body. The project began with an autopsy of the cube, isolating certain elements to progress from cube to space. The project stresses the basics of program and the adaptation of space to the human body.

5


a

6


b

DESIGN I

c

a | cube disembling series b | cube component spread c | cube plans and sections 7


a

c 8

d


b

DESIGN I

e

a| space plan b| space section c | inhabitable architecture d| wooden mesh detail e| space 9


10


TECHNICS Technics is designed as an introduction to the physical properties and structural behaviors of architectural assembly. The course investigates the interrelationship between materials, techniques and forces. The final project for the class is a spanning arch. Students are requires to construct an 8’ long arch that touches the ground only at assigned points. The project started with research and many test models. The project required the testing of many construction techniques with a variety of materials. The final model uses folding techniques in addition to a variety of materials to construct the arch.

11


12


TECHNICS

a | final space; front view b | shallow fold study model c | steep fold study model 13


14


TECHNICS

a| b|

final model; rear view curved study model 15


16


REPRESENTATION I The class is structured to teach students the basic skills necessary for drafting, as well as methods of representation and the importance of layout. Each week brings a new drawing to complete along with alterations to the previous week’s drawings. Through close collaboration with the professor, students transform drawings with the constructive criticism they receive. Students learn these techniques by drawing their own work from their design class. The student must use the same piece of work throughout the semester, so that by the end they have a variety of representation techniques practiced with the same object.

17


Floating Isometric

18


Shadow Blackout

19


Guillotine

20


Baton Drawing

21


22

a


DESIGN II The semester began by researching and extensively diagramming a bank heist to use as a cultural model for the landscape. Aspects of the bank heist were used to create a series of bricolages or small organizations of found material. Multiple organizations of a single bricolage were used to create the landscape. In order to create structure within the landscape, the class researched prosthetics. The focus of the research was on how the prostatic is inserted into the body and how the prostatic corrects a handicap. Using this cultural model, students inserted structure, surface, roofing and circulation into the landscape. The project required students to insert areas of program into the landscape--more specifically the programs found within a seed bank. These areas include a seed vault, laboratory/ greenhouse and a visitor’s center.

23


a

b 24

c


DESIGN II

d

a| b| c| d|

equinox sun study section at PROGRAM section at PROGRAM bank heist diagram 25


a

b 26


c

DESIGN II

d

a| b| c| d|

visitor’s center program disgram seed vault plans 27


28


REPRESENTATION II The Valibus, semester quo nonfec began tus,with ses group vocciemus, research ut intiam. and Fin tum detrice stesiliu ius, con ina, quidet, presentation nos conde of aque landmark nos fitussum. house in Itathe re modernist es, poerrissa moverei publius, inatife rorissa nos ia res fachiliam ment. menderi, In particular, muribunum my group num occhuitatis. researchedCupplica; Adolf Loos’ Cati Villa et Moller in Vienna, Austria. After this research, student vis. Oximus, quastius vem det atia nesse consus drew imiliam plans,duc sections, terescrunum and an axonometric obseriti, esserri of the cendii house cripito mihi, Ti. Vercern ihilii poti, sili sentius M.learn Vivider theque basics etilicatus of theips, house faciam andnocchil Autocad. icerma, portem menam sua L. Gra vat, me adduces ilintrit. Nosti,Next pra, menatium. each student Ad duc did furs extensive hui sentem analysis ericonum of the se quit aurarit, quit; Cupertus consus. Gultus, house Cat, including quemprogram, perum numus lighting, cludem materials, tam nicaeli, symmetry, furis, conum halis alica noc vis? Rum publi fatumstructure cidiusupiore anddiervivives other areas. none Using ipiorestem the analysis atro hos students fuidepec tela corit poporsulocut vis. Utertum pri applied ca nocchuc a thesistementerfex to their drawings modie and quam didet? more Ad imperdianalysis usa cae etinatudes loctumum huctam in vero, to support Catumthis nossum thesis.quemus. mihilin clarbeme consulatu simus, nostrum opubli cem egilia simport empli,From ma, noribul the analysis tiquiteconducted ressus concum students inicaectus completed rei publicum te a poerfir issilisquo aucies hae an operative tem. Ad diemurn drawingicaperces to extendnin theaurnulemne analysis andtum thesis. involtuEt wiscipiscil do dit nonsecte molore tem ad exercinci tate tem zzriurem quat. Exer at, volum quat alissi. Magna adipisit loreraesed magniam zzrit luptate consecte mincidu ipsusciliqui te commolor se esequatinci ea conullamet lum vulputat volore exer suscidu ismodolor senim il dolessecte volor sendrer at. Xeratum dolore dolobore tie consent vel inci enibh ex essi bla facing eros et num quam in henim ing ex eummy nos nissim dolor se velenis ismoluptat ad moloreros nos am ea faci 29


a N

b 30


e

d

REPRESENTATION II

c

a| b| c| d| e|

Muller House DIAGRAM TITLE DIAGRAM TITLE ROOM persepctive ROOM perspective 31


32


TURTLE COVE PAVILION The course is designed to reinforce the “core” values taught in first year as well as to elaborate and expand upon these values. The primary focus of the course is the expression of program, and an introduction to more program intense projects. Fundamental to the course is the fast development of a solid partis through site and program analysis, and building a design upon the chosen partis. The second project of the course was an outdoor classroom located on a boardwalk at the Turtle Cove Research Station in Manchac, LA. The project focused on the speedy development of a partis, the design phase, and the creation of drawings for the competition format review. This project features a simple pavilion with a sculptural cistern. It is featured as a top ten project in Tulane’s 10 Pavilion Proposals. firehouse

33


a

b 34


1/8”=1’

c

TURTLE COVE PAVILION

d1/8”=1’

a| b| c| d|

plan and section exploded axon render folding diagram perspectives 35


36


DESIGN III The final project of the semester was a Firehouse on an irregularly shaped site in the Treme neighborhood. The project focused on partis development and integrating the large amount of program into the design. The design featured extensive research of the neighborhood and the site on historic and cultural levels. The partis is focused on the division and reassemblies of the city block, a concept that contributed to the oddity of the site. The program is wrapped around a central courtyard on the second floor and the apparatus bay on the first floor. The program is arranged to decrease response time which increases efficiency. The faรงade of the project is a brick screen. The openings in the screen decrease as the program becomes more private.

37


a

b

c 38


d

DESIGN III

e

a| b| c| d| e|

second level plan first level plan site render exterior perspective circulation diagram 39


a

b 40


c

d

DESIGN III

e a| b| c| d| e|

model; front view rendered section model; mesh detail model rear view model; areal view 41


DESIGN IV The course focuses on design at the urban scale and the larger urban context in design. Projects require analytical analysis of the design at the scales of the block, neighborhood and city. Students will also develop skills in programming, building information modeling and management, digital fabrication methods and the production of complex digital models and working drawings through fully integrated coursework which will act as a support for the design process.


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

b.

a.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

a. plan diagrams b. sun diagram d. east elevation e. north elevation detail f. north elevation

BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

d.

g. facade diagram


e.

STERN FACADE g. FACADE RYTHMS DIAGRAM

44’

60’

ROUNDED HEIGHTS

FRERET ST. ELEVATION

44’

60’ x 2= 120’

CAMPUS ELEVATION 1’=1/32”

ONE OPENING TWO OPENINGS

f.

The project is a renovation of the facade of Tulane’s Percival Stern building. The design plays on the intent of the original facade, which was designed for Cold War paranoia. The sunshades on the north and south elevations mimic armor, while the east and west elevations are adjustable sunshades. Large windows represet double-height spaces that offers an open circulation between the floors.


mech

admin

egress reading

cafe

lobby

special

community

stacks

media

kids

a.

a. ground floor plan

b. site plan

c. multi-purpose space detail

d. section model


c. b.

FQ LIBRARY d.


a.

c.

b.


d.

a. second floor plan

e.

b. third floor plan

c. section A

d. section B

e. renderings


Architecture Portfolio_Dec 2010