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RURAL landscape various levels of this exposure to the coast. In an effort to provide a wider palette of existing vernacular cues, several sites have been chosen across the region, each bringing their own unique qualities to the overall analysis of the coastal environment Kaikóura offers. The definition of the coast needs to be understood in relation to the specific environment of Kaikóura and to the research of the vernacular landscape. The first piece of field work creates a measure of how this coastal influence operates within the vernacular landscape. Vernacular definition Vernacular is a term that references the built traditions of a specific location.These are often architectural, in being built forms or the use of particular materials, but it is also related to the landscape, in observing a tradition of gardening and managing such spaces. Vernacular has been looked to in this research because of the relationship these environments have with their context. Having an understated nature, something that is vernacular is able to sit comfortably in an existing environment. Vernacular ‘...show(s) an instinctive command of particular materials … which the trained architect, by his very sophistication, is unable to equal.’ (Hitchcock, 1963). Hitchcock’s statement draws distinction of the undesigned vernacular and the designed spaces created by the architect. Vernacular is in essence the built products of local tradition. It is the outcome of social and cultural process and it responds innately to a locality in both the use of materials and building techniques. Vernacular is discussed in terms of tradition and its relationship to designed environments Vernacular tradition ‘Vernacular traditions are dynamic and generated through a continuous and dialectic interplay of stasis and change, precedent and creativity, stability and innovation.’ (Asquith & Vellinga, 2006). Vernacular traditions need to be considered as a process of time and not merely for their current physical and material presence. In many ways vernacular operates at the convergence of influences in a not so different way to ecology. Recognition of the way vernacular environments have evolved and are consistently changing is crucial to understanding and predicting in future ways in which they may grow. “Tradition is important when it contains moments of change, when it is not just outward form and when it implies an idea of what goes on inside a building, of conflicts and a potential for innovation. Otherwise tradition just means being stuck in a rut.” (Siza, Bouman, & van Toorn, 2011). Reiterating Asquith and Vellinga’s statement, Siza’s view gives a way forward, to suggest innovation through the interpretation of the traditional, vernacular spaces. Looking backwards is often the first step to moving forwards. This serves as a reminder that vernacular patterns need to be reimagined and made applicable for their use in landscape architecture. Vernacular environments are produced as a tradition of incremental changes to an environment that create a recognisable pattern. It is a patient adjustment to changing dynamics; there is not the fixation on long-term goals as there is in landscape architecture. This process of change responds to sometimes quite specific and small changes in the environment. It is the nature of these adaptations and the grooming and maintenance to upkeep them that distinguishes a vernacular landscape from a designed landscape. The traditions of a vernacular environment are linked to local techniques and cultural process. These traditions bring together ideas across time and as a process have been compared to ecology. Traditions also suggest innovation. Innovation is important when considering these processes in relation to design. The vernacular landscape and designed space The vernacular landscape is understood as being an undesigned environment. As a concept, vernacular relies on such a definition, but in reality is a designed landscape not contributing to shaping a vernacular environment just as much as an undesigned landscape? It also raises the issue of how can this distinction be observed in the environment. Some designed creations may appear to be more vernacular than those that are undesigned. The most useful definition for understanding such an environment is in the set of consistencies that can be found within such an environment. ‘The important point in attempting to create regionally recognizable cultural landscapes is not that vernacular design is created without architects, but rather that vernacular design is achieved through a system of shared rules ... by being culture and place specific’. (Heath, 2009) It is these consistencies across an environment that must be analysed within a vernacular study. Understanding the patterns in relation to specific environments will suggest as to why those changes have been made. The vernacular landscape encompasses a broad scope of environments, built elements, planting and infrastructure. To distinguish what

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Ifla50 proceedings part a  

Part A of peer reviewed papers on landscape architecture topics on the International Federation of Landscape Architects 50th World Congress...

Ifla50 proceedings part a  

Part A of peer reviewed papers on landscape architecture topics on the International Federation of Landscape Architects 50th World Congress...

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