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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2010


ANNUAL REPORT EDITORIAL COMMITTEE Dr Teng Su Ching Dr Yong Wern Mei Mr Tan Ping Yang All names of children and youths mentioned in this report have been changed to protect their identities. Unique Entity Number: S62SS0057G


Contents PREVENTIVE Bully-Free Programme.................................................... 27 Children Service Centre................................................ 28 Compulsory Education Casework............................... 29 Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework........ 29 Project LADDER............................................................. 30 Tinkle Friend Helpline.................................................... 31

PUBLIC EDUCATION KidzLive............................................................................. 32 Research Studies.............................................................. 32 Theatre-in-Education...................................................... 33

REMEDIAL

Chairman’s Message........................................................ 4 Highlights of the Year..................................................... 6 Organisation Charts....................................................... 11 Chairpersons & National Day Award Winners......... 13 Committee Members 2010/2011.................................. 14

BeaconWorks................................................................... 34 Beyond Parental Control (BPC) Pre-Complaint Screening............................................... 34 BPC Pre-Complaint Counselling.................................. 34 BPC Investigation............................................................. 35 BPC Parents Mandated Order...................................... 35 BPC Statutory Supervision Order............................... 35 Buddy Care Programme................................................. 36 Children’s Medical Fund................................................. 36 Guidance Programme..................................................... 37 Youth Family Care Programme..................................... 37

Our Work

Donors, Volunteers and Staff

About Us

CAREGIVING Student Care Centre (Henderson).............................. 18 Sunbeam Place.................................................................. 19 Vulnerable Witness Support Programme................... 20

COMMUNITY Family Service Centre (Yishun)................................ 21 INSPIRE Fund.............................................................. 22

DEVELOPMENTAL Choo Choo Train............................................................ 23 Project CABIN................................................................. 24 Round Box........................................................................ 25 Sunbeam Friends Club.................................................... 25 Youth Centre (Jurong)................................................... 26

Ruth Wong Awardee ..................................................... 40 Gopal Haridas Awardees .............................................. 41 List of Awardees 2010.................................................... 43 Hear What They Say – Our Children, Youth and their Families.................................................................... 44 Hear What They Say – Our Volunteers...................... 46 Feature – Our Volunteers............................................. 48 Feature – Our Staff......................................................... 50

Facts and Figures Service Statistics ............................................................ 53 Financial Information Summary ................................... 55 Audited Financial Information 2010 . .......................... 56 Major Donors ................................................................. 58

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opportunities for our children and youth Happy and healthy; nurtured and protected. We are focused on supporting and caring for disadvantaged, abused, neglected children and youth of all races and religions. Through specialised care, education, family counselling and rehabilitation, our purpose is simple – to develop confident individuals who can reach their full potential.


About Us Our Patron-in-Chief

PRESIDENT S R NATHAN Patron for 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER & MINISTER FOR DEFENCE MR TEO CHEE HEAN

At Singapore Children’s Society, we help protect and nurture children and youth of all races and religions, especially needy children from disadvantaged families. We provide help through our six service categories of Caregiving, Community, Developmental, Preventive, Public Education and Remedial.

Our Mission To bring relief and happiness to children in need

Our Vision CAREGIVING SERVICES We take care of children and youth on behalf of their parents/guardians for a period of time.

COMMUNITY SERVICES We promote the welfare of children and youth through the fostering of a happy family life.

DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES We help educate and develop children and youth to become healthy and well rounded.

PREVENTIVE SERVICES

To be a leading-edge organisation in promoting the well-being of the child

Our Core Values • Compassion & Caring • Commitment • Professionalism • Integrity • Openness to Change

We help prevent children and youth from being harmed or at risk of delinquency, abuse and/or neglect.

PUBLIC EDUCATION We conduct forums and research related to children, youth and family to raise public awareness.

REMEDIAL SERVICES We provide rehabilitative services to children and youth, with guidance and counselling for their families.

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About Us CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

ingapore’s economy grew by a record 14.5% in 2010. A total of 112,500 jobs were created and unemployment rate fell to 2.2%, compared to 3.3% a year earlier. With strong economic recovery, especially in Asia, inflation pressures have increased. Rising prices were a major concern for low-income families in 2010 and will remain their biggest worry in 2011. We reached out to more low-income families to provide financial assistance in 2010 and will continue to do so in the new year. Besides helping with financial needs in 2010, we also stepped up our programmes to address our beneficiaries’ emotional and social well-being. I am glad to note that our programmes continued to resonate with our beneficiaries and supporters. The YouthGiG Concert attracted youths at risk from various schools to showcase their talents in dance and songs, the Bully-Free Forum and the weeklong Bully-Free campaign raised more awareness on “cyber bullying”. Professor Aline Wong delivered the Fourth Singapore Children’s Society Lecture with an in-depth presentation on generation gaps from the Baby Boomers to Generation Y. We believe that all these efforts coupled with our 59 programmes across our nine service centres will make a bigger impact and touch thousands of lives in the coming years. The Society’s total annual expenditure was $8.905 million, an increase of 8% over 2009, and our total income for the year was $10.815 million or 6% higher than 2009, giving us a surplus of $1.910 million. The good performance in income was largely attributed to the innovative efforts of our Appeals Standing Committee, which raised $7.955 million, an increase of 18% over 2009. The 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need programme which we launched in 2009, surpassed $1 million in annual income to reach $1.073 million, supported by 382 corporate donors. This was a remarkable achievement considering the challenges we faced as businesses were only starting to recover. My sincere thanks go to our Patron for 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need, Mr Teo Chee Hean, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Defence, for his support which helped us exceed our target.

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About Us CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

On 31 August 2010, we were formally certified as a Singapore Quality Class organisation. To me, this was not just a recognition of our service excellence, but also an affirmation of our professionalism and commitment to “bring relief and happiness to children in need”. Adding another feather to our cap, the National Council of Social Service also conferred on us the inaugural NCSS Outstanding VWO Award in Innovations (Special Mention) on 12 October 2010. One of our core values is “openness to change”, and this award is an endorsement on the Society’s upholding of this core value. For all our achievements, we are thankful to our volunteers and donors for their unstinting support. At our Awards Presentation Ceremony on 25 August 2010, we were honoured to recognise 42 volunteers and donors for their outstanding contributions to the work of our Society. Our Guest-of-Honour, Mr S Iswaran, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Trade and Industry and Ministry of Education, presented the Ruth Wong Award to Associate Professor Agnes Chang, and the Gopal Haridas Awards to OCBC Bank and SingTel. Congratulations to all our recipients once again! The theme for our 2010 Annual Report is “Maximising Potential”. It is important to note that all the work we do is ultimately to help our young beneficiaries reach their maximum potential in life. It is equally important to understand that in order to give our best to help, our volunteers and staff have to realise their own potential to contribute. I have no doubt we will be able to do that as we work closely together as a team. In conclusion, I wish to express my heartfelt appreciation and thanks to the Executive Committee, Standing Committee Members and staff. To the members, donors and well-wishers, your support is a great encouragement to all of us as we strive on in the new year, and see to it that many more children will have the opportunity to maximise their potential in life.

Mr Koh Choon Hui JP, BBM(L) Chairman Singapore Children’s Society

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About Us HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR 2010 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need Appreciation Dinner he Society held an appreciation dinner on 1 March to recognise the many corporate donors who participated in the 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need initiative which was launched in 2009. The initiative’s Patron, Mr Teo Chee Hean, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Defence, was the Guest-of-Honour.

YouthGiG 2010 nergetic youngsters from Youth Centre (Jurong) took to the stage on 2 July for the annual YouthGiG concert, a showcase of dynamism and talent organised by the young, for the young. Performers wowed a 300-strong crowd which included our Guest-of-Honour Ms Grace Fu, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of National Development and Ministry of Education, and MP for Jurong GRC.

Bully-Free Forum 2010 lose to 300 people attended the Bully-Free Forum which took place on 17 July. Associate Professor Ho Peng Kee, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Law and Ministry of Home Affairs, graced the event. Returning as the guest speaker was Professor Donna Cross, who spoke on cyber bullying and shared strategies on countering it.

Tribute to Volunteers ecognising the hard work and dedication of its many volunteers, Children’s Society paid tribute to them during the annual Tribute to Volunteers event. For this year, close to 120 volunteers were given a movie treat at GV Vivocity on 24 July, with the screening of the sci-fi action thriller Inception.

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About Us HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR 2010 Launch of Manjusri Project CABIN – The Lodge he Society’s 20th Project CABIN was launched at Manjusri Secondary School on 31 July, with Mr Lim Boon Heng, Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, officiating at the launch. A school-based drop-in facility for character and life skills development, CABINs provide a positive and conducive environment for youths.

Walk for our Children 2010 ites of various shapes and sizes greeted the participants at the annual Walk for our Children, which was held at West Coast Park on 1 August. Guest-of-Honour Professor S Jayakumar, Senior Minister and Co-ordinating Minister for National Security, flagged off the event which attracted 3,000 participants. Highlights included kite making and flying skills by professional kite fliers from eight countries.

Singapore Children’s Society Awards

he Children’s Society Annual Awards Dinner took place on 25 August, recognising 42 donors and volunteers for their outstanding dedication and generosity to furthering the Society’s mission of bringing relief and happiness to children in need. Mr S Iswaran, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Trade and Industry and Ministry of Education, was the Guest-of-Honour.

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About Us HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR 2010

Singapore Quality Class Award ingapore Children’s Society was endorsed as a Singapore Quality Class organisation by Spring Singapore’s Business Excellence Assessment Committee on 31 August.

18th ISPCAN International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect he International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) held its 18 th International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect in Honolulu this year. Three Research Officers from Singapore Children’s Society presented findings from recent studies at the congress.

Gala Dinner 2010 song titled One Heart, One Love for Our Children was written for Singapore Children’s Society by famed local singer-composer Clement Chow. It had its first public performance during the charity Gala Dinner held on 1 October at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. The Society’s Patron-in-Chief, His Excellency President SR Nathan, graced the event. Two autographed copies of President SR Nathan’s first book Why Am I Here? were auctioned that evening.

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About Us HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR 2010

NCSS Outstanding VWO Award 2010 in Innovations (Special Mention) he National Council of Social Service (NCSS) conferred the inaugural NCSS Outstanding VWO Award 2010 in Innovations (Special Mention) to Singapore Children’s Society. This award is presented to VWOs for innovation in practices, programmes and services.

Visit to Sunbeam Place by the Honourable Robyn McSweeney n 4 November, Sunbeam Place hosted a visit by the Honourable Robyn McSweeney, Minister for Child Protection, Community Services and Women’s Interest from Western Australia.

Fourth Singapore Children’s Society Lecture rofessor Aline Wong, Academic Advisor to SIM University, was the guest speaker at the fourth lecture held at Raffles Institution on 6 November. Speaking on the topic, From Generation to Generation: Growing Up in Singapore, Professor Wong took an enthralled audience through changes in the concepts and values of “childhood” and the significant local and international milestones that moulded our society.

Subordinate Courts’ award to Singapore Children’s Society n 12 November, the Subordinate Courts presented a Certificate of Appreciation to Children’s Society for its youth-related work, specifically the Buddy Care Programme and Youth Family Care Programme. The Society has been collaborating with the Juvenile Court on the Youth Family Care programme since 1998. In 2008, we started collaborating with the Juvenile Court and Cornerstone Community Services Centre on the Buddy Care Programme. Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

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About Us HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR 2010 Student Care Centre (Henderson) Graduation and Christmas Party his annual party brings children, parents, volunteers and staff together for an evening of camaraderie and fun. An added cause for celebration was that children who attended the Centre performed better at school this year. Primary Six children who were moving on to secondary school paid tribute to the volunteers and staff who made their experience at the Centre an unforgettable one.

Release of Parenting Guide on Babies and Ninth Research Monograph he Society’s Research and Outreach Centre released these two publications this year. The first in a series of parenting guides, Parenting Guide on Babies offers practical tips on infant care from birth to a year old. Subsequent guides will provide tips on toddlers, pre-schoolers and primary schoolers. The ninth research monograph titled Young Adults’ Recall of School Bullying is a retrospective study that looks at possible long-term effects of bullying on young adults after they leave school and enter society.

Singapore Children’s Society congratulates Mr Koh Choon Hui on his appointment on 7 April 2010 as Singapore Government Representative for children’s rights on the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children.

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About Us ORGANISATION CHARTS

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Chairman

Mr Koh Choon Hui

Vice Chairman

Prof Ho Lai Yun

Vice Chairman

Mr Tan Suee Chieh

Honorary Secretary

Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann

Honorary Treasurer

Mr Ho Lon Gee

Honorary Asst Secretary

Dr Cuthbert Teo

Honorary Asst Treasurer

Mr Wong Yew Meng

Members

Assoc Prof Agnes Chang Mr Alex Lee Ms Annie Gan Assoc Prof John Elliott Mr Kurt Wee Mr S C Lim (until Sep) Dr Stephanie Leonard Dr Teng Su Ching

Co-opted Member Nominated Members

Mr Peter Joe Chia Assoc Prof Daniel Fung Dr Lim Hwee Leng Mdm Rashidah Abdul Rasip

STANDING COMMITTEES

OTHER COMMITTEES

CHAIRMAN Appeals Information & Corporate Relations Research & Advocacy Social Work Service Sunbeam Place

Mr Kurt Wee

CHAIRMAN Audit

Dr Teng Su Ching

Prof Ho Lai Yun Mr Alex Lee Dr Stephanie Leonard

Mr S C Lim (until Sep) Mr Tan Suee Chieh (from Sep)

Awards Crisis Management Investment Remuneration

Prof Ho Lai Yun Mr Koh Choon Hui Mr Ho Lon Gee Mr Tan Suee Chieh

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About Us ORGANISATION CHARTS

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MANAGEMENT TEAM OFFICE BEARERS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mr Alfred Tan

HON SECRETARY HON TREASURER

CORPORATE SERVICES Director – Ms Tan Li Li

STANDING COMMITTEES

APPEALS

FUND RAISING Director – Mr Chia Boon Khiang

INFORMATION & CORPORATE RELATIONS

CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS Manager – Ms Diana Chng (until Oct) Senior Executive – Mr Tan Ping Yang

RESEARCH & ADVOCACY

RESEARCH & OUTREACH CENTRE Director – Ms Sue Cheng CHILDREN SERVICE CENTRE Head – Ms Ann Hui Peng FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE Director – Ms Koh Wah Khoon

SOCIAL WORK SERVICE

STUDENT CARE CENTRE Head – Ms Hong Kim Beng STUDENT SERVICE HUB Director – Ms Tan Bee Joo YOUTH CENTRE Head – Ms Christina Appadoo YOUTH SERVICE CENTRE Director – Dr Carol Balhetchet

SUNBEAM PLACE

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SUNBEAM PLACE Director – Dr Siew Lai Keun


About Us CHAIRPERSONS & NATIONAL DAY AWARD WINNERS

Chairpersons of Singapore Children’s Society For over five decades, we are privileged to have had highly dedicated professionals and civic-minded citizens heading Singapore Children’s Society.

Chairperson

Years served

Mrs K M Smyth

1952 – 1954

Dr G Haridas

1954 – 1956

Prof E S Monteiro

1956 – 1961

Mr J E Lloyd

1961 – 1963

Prof Wong Hock Boon

1963 – 1965

Mr Francis Thomas

1965 – 1970

Dr M G John

1970 – 1973

Dr Koh Eng Kheng

1973 – 1978

Mr Koh Choon Hui

1978 – Current

National Day Awardees The following members of our Society were honoured by the Singapore Government for their significant contributions to social service.

The Public Service Star (Bar) (Bintang Bakti Masyarakat (Lintang)

The Public Service Medal (Pingat Bakti Masyarakat)

1993

Dr Koh Eng Kheng

1980

Dr Koh Eng Kheng

2001

Mr Koh Choon Hui

1984

Mr Koh Choon Hui

2007

Mr S C Lim

1984

Mr Peter Joe Chia

1985

Ms Susan Verghese

1986

Dr Lim Hwee Leng

1986

Mr S C Lim

1987

Mr Safdar A Hussein

1988

Mr Leslie Yong

1989

Dr Stephanie Leonard

1991

Dr Ngiam Tee Liang

1994

Mr Gwee Lian Kheng

1996

Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann

1999

Mr Yeo Khee Gee

2000

Mr Yew Hang Meng

2003

Dr Teng Su Ching

2006

Prof Ho Lai Yun

2007

Assoc Prof John Elliott

The Public Service Star (Bintang Bakti Masyarakat) 1985

Dr Koh Eng Kheng

1991

Mr Koh Choon Hui

1992

Mr Peter Joe Chia

1994

Ms Susan Verghese

1995

Dr Lim Hwee Leng

1996

Mr Leslie Yong

1997

Mr S C Lim

1997

Dr Ngiam Tee Liang

2001

Dr Stephanie Leonard

2002

Mr Gwee Lian Kheng

2009

Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann

2010

Prof Ho Lai Yun

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Mr Koh Choon Hui Prof Ho Lai Yun

JP, BBM(L)

Mr Tan Suee Chieh BBM

Chairman

Advisor Chairman

Honorary Secretary

Member

Member

Honorary Treasurer

Dr Cuthbert Teo Eng Swee

Honorary Asst Secretary

Mr Wong Yew Meng

PBM

Honorary Asst Treasurer

Assoc Prof Agnes Chang

Member

Vice Chairman

Mr Alex Lee Ka But

Member

Vice Chairman Member Chairman

Ms Annie Gan

Member

Assoc Prof John Elliott

PBM

Member

Mr Kurt Wee Chorng Kien

Member

Mr S C Lim (until Sep)

Member

JP, BBM(L)

Dr Stephanie Leonard

BBM

JP, PBM

Member

Mr Peter Joe Chia

BBM

Co-opted Member

Assoc Prof Daniel Fung

Nominated Member

Dr Lim Hwee Leng

Nominated Member

BBM

Ms Rashidah Abdul Rasip

Nominated Member

Remuneration

Investment Member

Member Chairman

Member

Member

Member Chairman Member Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Member Member Chairman Member

Chairman

Member

Dr Teng Su Ching

Member Chairman (from Sep)

Mr Ho Lon Gee

JP

Crisis Management

Chairman Member

Vice Chairman

Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann

Audit

Awards

Sunbeam Place

Social Work Service

Chairman Vice Chairman

JP, BBM

Research & Advocacy

Information & Corporate Relations

NAME

Appeals

Executive

About Us COMMITTEE MEMBERS 2010/2011

Member

Member

Member

Chairman Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Chairman

Member Member Member

Singapore Children’s Society is governed by the Executive Committee which has overall responsibility for policy making and governance. Members of the Committees are volunteers and receive no monetary remuneration for their contribution.

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Mr Alfred Wong

Investment

Advisor

Assoc Prof Alice Seng

Member

Member

Mrs Amy Fam

Member

Mr Ang Choon Kiat

Advisor

Mr Bay Chin Chye

Member

Mr Brendon Yeo

Member

Dr Brian Yeo

Advisor

Mr Chan Chong Beng

Member

Mr Chan Eng Thai

Member

Ms Chang Rui Hua

Member

Dr Clarice Hong Pei Hsia

Advisor

Capt David Eliathamby

Observer

Mr Gwee Lian Kheng

Member

BBM

Mr Harry Chua Chin Nam

Member

Dr Isabella Wong

Member

Dr Ivan Polunin (until Dec)

Advisor

Dr Kevin Koh

Vice Chairman

Dr Lee Jee Mui

Member

Dr Lena Lee

Member

Dr Lim Lee Ching

Observer (from Sep)

Mrs Maria Shiu

Member

Mr Mohd Khairunan Bin Ali

Member

Mr Ning de Guzman Dr Ong Bee Ping

Audit

Sunbeam Place

Social Work Service

Research & Advocacy

NAME

Information & Corporate Relations

Appeals

About Us COMMITTEE MEMBERS 2010/2011

Member Advisor

PPA

Mr Philip Tan

Member

Prof Phua Kong Boo

Member

Member

Mr Richard Tong

Member

Capt Suresh Menon

Member

Ms Susan Verghese

BBM

Prof Tan Cheng Lim

PPA

Mr Thomas Ting

Member

Member

Member Member

Dr Warren Lee

Member

Ms Yap Bee Cheng Mr Yeo Khee Gee

Advisor

Member Member

PBM

Mr Yew Hang Meng Dr Yong Wern Mei

PBM

Member

Member Member

Member

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our services and programmes to flourish We tailor our programmes to provide social, emotional and psychological support for children, youth and their families in Singapore. We are reaching out to those in need with the help they need.


Our Work In 2010, about 57,000 children, youth and families benefited from our range of comprehensive programmes aimed at addressing different needs. These programmes spanning our six service categories are tailored to help needy children from disadvantaged families.

The six service categories are Caregiving, Community, Developmental, Preventive, Public Education and Remedial.

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Our Work CAREGIVING

Student Care Centre (Henderson) tudent Care Centre (Henderson) is a before-and-after school care service for primary school children who are mainly from low-income, single parent and/or distressed families, and who are left at home without adult supervision. The Centre provides a nurturing environment where children are given the opportunities to enhance their emotional, intellectual, social and physical development through various activities and programmes.

“Our children are eager to spread their wings. We do our very best to instil positive moral, social, and intellectual skills to help them be better persons, and prepare them for what the future holds.” Ms Hong Kim Beng, Head, Student Care Centre (Henderson)

Grooming of a Champion Grooming of a Champion was a key activity for the Centre this year. This four-and-a-half day life skills camp was the culmination of Project G&G (Grow and Glow) for 2010, a regular character development programme run by the Centre aimed at instilling good behaviour and positive attitude. The camp boosted the children’s confidence, self-discipline and communication skills through an interactive mix of team-building activities and talks. Through this journey of self-discovery, children also learnt strategies to control negative emotions, while encouraging positive actions and habits.

Satisfaction Survey In December 2010, a survey was done on the overall satisfaction level of children attending Student Care Centre (Henderson). The Centre received 100% satisfaction for the following: • Like to attend the Centre • Cleanliness of the Centre • Teachers in the Centre • Materials provided and activities organised by the Centre The Centre served 83 children in 2010.

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Our Work CAREGIVING

Sunbeam Place “I am keen to volunteer and it’s an excellent opportunity for me to share the skills of the abacus with the children who are very appreciative. It is really very satisfying to give to others and in return, you receive much more. The experience is definitely priceless.” Ms Khoo, secondary school teacher and abacus programme volunteer

unbeam Place is an approved home for abused and neglected children in need of safety and protection or whose parents are unable to provide proper care. Here, we provide a loving and caring environment for children aged between two and eighteen years. We also counsel and help children cope with their emotions of fear, anxiety, worry or guilt. Programmes offered at Sunbeam Place cater to the children’s emotional and developmental needs. In 2010, Sunbeam Place had 63 residents compared to 81 in 2009.

Group Home Guardians Recognising that children need adults’ attention complemented by positive activities for healthy emotional development, Sunbeam Place initiated the Group Home Guardians (GG) project this year, in addition to existing care arrangements. The primary objective is to provide a home-like, small group and focused environment to promote trust, autonomy, and a sense of happiness and well-being for children. Through bonding with them, the GGs would be looked upon as confidantes whom children can trust and share their troubles with. In turn, we will be better able to meet their emotional needs. The Group Home Guardians are qualified staff members who spend at least 30 minutes a day actively engaging children on a daily basis by playing games, supporting homework, watching TV, having meals together and teaching good habits and values. They also take on the role as adult authority figures who reinforce and model good behaviour. All activities and programmes in the Group Home Guardians project are based on the age, gender and interests of the children, as well as on available resources.

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Our Work CAREGIVING

Vulnerable Witness Support Programme he Vulnerable Witness Support Programme (VWSP) which was started in 1998 is an initiative of the Subordinate Courts working with Singapore Children’s Society, in collaboration with the Attorney-General’s Chambers and the Singapore Police Force. The aim of the VWSP is to provide emotional, non-evidentiary and practical support to vulnerable young witnesses.

“The service has helped me feel less nervous when attending the court hearing.” Child witness, aged 13

Testifying in court can be a stressful and frightening experience, especially so for children. This can result in their testimonials being undermined or deemed ineffective in an often adversarial legal system.

Hence, Children’s Society recruits and trains volunteers to help child-witnesses under the age of 16 who have to appear in court to give evidence. Trained volunteers are assigned to the child-witnesses, who may be victims as well, to help them deal with their fears and anxieties and to familiarise them with judicial procedures. Preparing child-witnesses to testify in court and manage a highly stressful situation will help them cope better with the court proceedings. This will lead to more positive outcomes. In 2010, 13 cases were referred to us.

Types of Cases

2009

2010

Outrage of modesty

7

10

Rape

3

1

Indecent act with child

Child abuse

Outrage of modesty and voluntarily causing hurt

Sexual assault by penetration

1

1

Sexual penetration of a minor

1

Carnal intercourse against the order of nature

1

1

Sexual assault by penetration and sexual exploitation of a minor

2

89%

of children under the programme said the court tour was useful.

100%

of children under the programme said that they felt more confident about coping with the court proceedings.

100%

of children under the programme said that they had been provided with adequate information when preparing for the court hearing.

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Our Work COMMUNITY

Family Service Centre (Yishun) t our Family Service Centre (Yishun), we promote a stable family life through various services and programmes. These include financial aid, casework and counselling, enhanced information and referral services, workshops, camps and programmes like Project Invest, LEAP (Let Every Aspect Progress) and EUREKA!

“I am spending more time with my children. I practise the SOLER listening technique I learnt at the Centre and maintain eye contact with my children. My husband has observed that I stopped shouting at them. He is happy with this change in me.”

The Centre received a total of 725 Enhanced Information and Referral Service (IRS) cases in 2010, Madam Rina, participant of which 414 cases received casework and counselling of Project Invest services. 239 were new or reopened cases, out of which 62% had a total household monthly income of $2,000 and below. This high percentage of low-income families corroborates with the three presenting problems of financial difficulties (40%), employment/career issues (10%), and housing/shelter issues (5%).

Top 5 Issues (New cases only)

2009

2010

Financial Issues

44%

40%

Marital Issues

9%

Housing/Shelter

5%

5%

Employment/Career

8%

10%

10%

12%

6%

Family Violence/Spousal Abuse Parenting/Child Management

Of the 414 cases, 245 were closed within the year. 210 (98%) of the 214 feedback respondents indicated that they were very satisfied with our Casework and Counselling services. In addition, Family Service Centre (Yishun) disburses The Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund * to needy students. In 2010, we disbursed $92,700 to 284 children from low-income families. * within the Family Service Centre’s service boundaries

REACH Programme The Centre started two new programmes this year. The first is REACH, which aims to improve the mental health of at-risk children below 19 years of age and living in the community. This is done through screening and collaboration with the Child Guidance Clinic’s (CGC) REACH mobile team to provide early detection, intervention and management, where necessary. Our REACH workers have undergone mental health training lectures and attachments at CGC to equip them with skills in early detection and intervention. Since its inception in April 2010, we identified and referred four cases to REACH for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and anxiety disorders.

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Our Work COMMUNITY

Storm Riders Storm Riders is an anger management intervention programme for children from Primaries Three to Five. They learn effective communication, emotional management and regulation techniques, as well as positive conflict resolution skills. The programme also targets the various cognitive-behavioural difficulties displayed by children with anger or behaviour problems in school or at home. By managing their emotions and behaviour positively, children are more positive towards the school and home environment, which in turn contributes to their academic, social and emotional development. The first run of Storm Riders was conducted at Sunbeam Place for 14 children, with over 92% of participants indicating that they had acquired anger management and problem-solving skills.

Highlights for 2010 • EUREKA! is a three-session programme that equips children between nine and ten with skills and knowledge on coping with various changes in life. Each two-hour session discusses topics such as “what is change?”, stress and emotional management, building resilience and adopting positive attitudes towards changes in life.

Three runs of EUREKA! were conducted this year, benefiting 69 children.

• Camp V-Nest aims to encourage positive values in children through fun and innovative games and activities. Twenty-two Anderson Junior College students volunteered as group facilitators who used their creativity to illustrate and reinforce the values of Respect, Caring and Responsibility.

This year, 93 children from the upper primary levels attended Camp V-Nest.

• For 2010, 48 children participated in LEAP (Let Every Aspect Progress), a programme that builds self-esteem and confidence of children through role-play, group discussions and experiential learning. • Project Invest is a fun four-session experiential course for parents (with children below 12 years old) who are keen to acquire parenting skills and knowledge. Topics include parenting styles, positive discipline and mental-emotional needs of children.

The programme saw two runs this year, with a total participation of 19 parents.

INSPIRE Fund ccess to info-communications technology is now an essential component of the Singapore education system. Recognising this, the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore introduced the NEU PC Plus programme where students, or persons with disabilities, from low-income families can own a new computer with bundled software and free threeyear broadband subscription at an affordable price. Should students from low-income families have difficulties with the co-payment, they can apply for the INSPIRE Fund administered by Children’s Society. This fund allows applicants to own a computer through performing community service. In 2009, our fund helped a total of 27 students from low-income families pay for their computers. For 2010, the INSPIRE fund benefited 253 students.

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our Work DEVELOPMENTAL

Choo Choo Train hoo Choo Train is a structured community outreach programme aimed at instilling in five and six-year-old children six positive moral values. At Kindergarten One, they learn about being kind, diligent and honest; and at Kindergarten Two, they are taught the values of being thankful, respectful and filial. These six universal values are applicable across all races and religions, and we strongly believe that these values will be guiding principles for the children later in life. Choo Choo Train sessions are currently held at all PAP Community Foundation (PCF) Centres in the Kaki Bukit ward at Bedok. Over a three-month duration, our staff make weekly trips to the PCF centres to introduce these values. We encourage children to practise behaviour that exhibits these values. The programme uses a combination of storytelling, puppetry, art and craft, role-plays and songs. By keeping each session varied and dynamic, Choo Choo Train is indeed a joyful, meaningful programme that engages young minds.

“Choo Choo Train has really helped the children to understand the meaning of the values taught and they enjoyed themselves.” Pre-school teacher, PAP Community Foundation

In 2010, there were 321 participants in the Choo Choo Train programme.

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Our Work DEVELOPMENTAL

Project CABIN roject CABIN is a school-based drop-in service that allows our social workers to reach out to youths more effectively as students spend the bulk of their time “Project CABIN has helped in school. me in many ways, especially in my The mission of Project CABIN is “A meeting point for discovery and friendship.” CABINs provide a place for youths to hang out after school hours to enjoy facilities such as Internet access, gaming consoles and board games, or engage in meaningful activities.

mindset. CABIN has taught me to empathise and show concern for the elderly. I am also more proactive in helping others, and I will continue to help where I can.” Diana, Choa Chu Kang Secondary School

Besides organising fun-filled activities, the social workers also conduct life skills workshops and training courses as well as provide counselling support for students in need. The largest CABIN to date was launched at Manjusri Secondary School on 31 July. Named The Lodge, it occupies a space of two classrooms and can accommodate 70-80 students at a time. There were 15 secondary schools running Project CABIN in 2010. This year, 5,564 students visited Project CABIN compared to 6,130 in 2009.

CABIN Club Since 2002, students from secondary schools participating in Project CABIN have had the option of joining CABIN Club as part of their Co-Curricular Activity. CABIN Club members are involved in planning and decision-making for the CABIN. Counsellors from Children’s Society and school teachers act as advisors to these students and groom them in leadership roles. Two CABIN Club members from New Town Secondary School and Bowen Secondary School, together with our CABIN Youth Worker, were part of the Singapore delegation for the 1st ASEAN Children’s Forum in Manila from 19 October to 23 October 2010. Together with delegates from ten ASEAN countries, a Term of Reference and Children’s Action Proposal were drawn up. These were presented at the ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Social Welfare Development in Brunei on 19 November 2010.

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Our Work DEVELOPMENTAL

Round Box ound Box is a drop-in centre that reaches out to youths through the medium of performing arts in an environment that is inviting, safe and conducive. By directing their energies towards positive endeavours, these young people are given the chance to discover their talents in activities such as hip-hop dance, jam sessions and drama. These talented youths are also encouraged to spread their wings by organising and promoting various competitions, and also through public performances at events such as the Children’s Charities Association Fair. In 2010, Round Box had 170 members.

“Round Box has made a great impact in my life. I really enjoy being here and being a part of Round Box. I would like to thank Children’s Society for the great opportunities. Thank you!” Siti, Round Box member

Sunbeam Friends Club

“My son has improved since he joined Sunbeam Friends Club. He now has better relationships with his friends, and is more cheerful and willing to communicate.” unbeam Friends Club brings fun and joy to children and youths from low-income families through recreational, interactive and social activities. Our aim is to instil positive values in children, improve their social skills as well as enrich their experiences. Children participate in activities such as art and craft, outdoor games, camps and outings. We also conduct personal development workshops on topics such as time management, friendship and staying healthy.

Madam Low, mother of a Sunbeam Friends Club member

Centres with Sunbeam Friends Club

Membership

Children Service Centre

80

Student Care Centre (Henderson)

30

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

85

Total Membership in 2010

195

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

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Our Work DEVELOPMENTAL

Youth Centre (Jurong)

outh Centre (Jurong) reaches out to youths living and studying in Jurong through the TeenStart and TeenzLife programmes. TeenzLife is a series of life skills workshops and talks conducted at neighbouring secondary schools. Topics covered include stress and anger management, bullying, boosting self-esteem, time management and dealing with relationship issues. TeenzLife aims to help teenagers understand themselves and provide them with skills to help them in their daily life. TeenStart is a drop-in programme where youths can visit the Centre and enjoy facilities such as a pool table, a dance studio and computers. They can also participate in activities such as manga art drawing, scrapbooking, guitar, an amazing race and makeup artistry. Our objective is to boost self-confidence through equipping youths with skills and knowledge.

“I have learnt new skills through the photography workshop organised at Youth Centre (Jurong). As photography is one of my hobbies, attending this workshop has inspired me to perhaps become a photographer one day.” Goh Shi Xuan, 14 years old

Service

2009

2010

TeenStart Membership

644

581

TeenStart Youth Outreach Activities

62 activities reaching out to 608 youths

59 activities reaching out to 547 youths

TeenzLife

70 sessions reaching out to 3,675 students

39 sessions reaching out to 1,681 students

a) 87% indicate that they have learnt at least one thing.

a) 85% indicate that they have learnt at least one thing.

b) 88% indicate that they will apply what they have learnt in real life.

b) 83% indicate that they will apply what they have learnt in real life.

121 participants

75 participants

YouthGiG

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our Work PREVENTIVE

Bully-Free Programme ingapore Children’s Society started the Bully-Free Programme in 2004 to address the issue of school bullying and its impact on those involved. The programme aims to promote a bully-free culture in schools where young minds can thrive. The Bully-Free Programme operates on three levels, namely Public Outreach, School Outreach and Bully-Free School-Based Intervention Programme.

“It is important to create a safe and secure environment where our pupils can interact responsibly and amicably. As part of our efforts to create such an environment, we have emphasised to our staff and pupils that every member of the school community must be treated with respect... our pupils have better awareness on how to interact with their peers and understand that bullying is an unacceptable behaviour.” Mr Lim Jit Hin, Vice-Principal (Park View Primary School)

Bully-Free Forum

Bully-Free Talks and Classroom Activity

The annual Bully-Free Forum is a public event aimed at raising awareness on the topic of school bullying among educators, social service practitioners and parents. This year’s Forum was held on 17 July, drawing 250 attendees. Gracing the forum was Guest-of-Honour, Associate Professor Ho Peng Kee, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Law and Ministry of Home Affairs.

In 2009, Children’s Society started Bully-Free talks at 23 primary schools. This year, we spoke at 18 primary schools and 18,291 students benefited from these assembly talks.

Donna Cross, Professor of Child and Adolescent Health of Edith Cowan University, Western Australia, returned to speak on a new form of bullying – cyber bullying. She provided examples of cyber bullying, the adverse physical and emotional effects on those affected, and elaborated on methods to protect oneself from cyber bullying.

Bully-Free Camp

To bring awareness to a higher level for the students, Children’s Society also came up with materials for primary and secondary school teachers to conduct and facilitate classroom discussions on bullying.

School-Based Intervention Programme The Bully-Free School-Based Intervention Programme is based on a whole-school approach. Schools implementing an anti-bullying policy involve educators and students in creating a safe and friendly school environment for students to excel in. This is done through platforms such as assembly sessions, recess activities and classroom activities.

The annual Bully-Free Camp is part of the programme’s School Outreach efforts, where students are trained to be effective Bully-Free Ambassadors during an engaging three-day camp. Nine primary schools participated in the camp held from 8 to 10 June 2010. In a programme packed with activities and fruitful discussions, students were equipped with knowledge on bullying – essential for their role as ambassadors spreading Bully-Free messages. Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

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Our Work PREVENTIVE

Children Service Centre

“At Children Service Centre, we encourage the children to grow up in a supportive and conducive environment, guided by strong universal values and nurtured with love. Along with the dedicated help from our volunteers and support from the grassroots, we run a series of regular programmes, workshops, support groups, talks and camps; all focusing on creating the optimum conditions to enhance the child’s overall learning.” Ms Ann Hui Peng, Head, Children Service Centre

hildren Service Centre reaches out to children between five and twelve years old who mainly come from dysfunctional or disadvantaged families. Many children lack supervision as both parents are working, and are likely to idle their time away or run the risk of dropping out of school. Through programmes such as KidzSHinE (Seeing Hope in Every Kid), Choo Choo Train, kidsREAD, Sunbeam Friends Club, Rainbows and H.O.P.E. (reacHing Out helPing familiEs), we impart positive values, encourage children to develop healthy self-esteem and minimise the risk of delinquent behaviour. Children Service Centre expanded in 2010, with a parallel increase in the number of beneficiaries and staff. From a team of three in 2007, it has grown to seven staff who reached out to 834 children this year. UBS AG Bank has been supporting the Centre financially and also through volunteer efforts – the bank’s staff conduct monthly “I can Read” sessions and did a 3D wall mural at the Centre. They also take the Sunbeam Friends Club children for monthly outings. In August, the children were given a chance to meet American Idol and other celebrities at the UBS Sun Festival.

KidzSHinE KidzSHinE was introduced in 2008 as a drop-in supervised study service for children who often lack parental supervision at home. The programme was revamped to group Primary Three and Four children together and Primary Five and Six children together, to better cater to their needs. Previously, children from all four levels were combined during the study sessions. A “Speak in English” campaign was initiated after observing that the children were speaking in their mother tongues, impeding peer communication and subject learning. After four months, they adopted English as their common language which enabled each child to befriend children of other races. Our volunteers also reported that it became easier for them to coach the children. Forty-eight children benefited from KidzSHinE in 2010.

Service

2009

2010

KidzSHinE – Children who achieved at least one learning point

91.67%

87.85%

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Our Work PREVENTIVE

Compulsory Education Casework ompulsory Education (CE) Act was implemented in 2003. Under the CE Act, a child of compulsory school age born after 1 January 1996 and who is a citizen of Singapore residing in Singapore, has to attend a national primary school regularly unless he has been exempted from compulsory education. Since 2003, the Society has been working with the Ministry of Education to facilitate children’s registration and/or regular attendance at school. Our caseworkers work closely with school personnel and other community agencies to integrate the children into the school system. 193 children have been referred to us since 2003. In 2010, 32 sat for their PSLE, of whom 30 were promoted to a secondary school.

Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework n 2006, Children’s Society was invited by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS) and People’s Association to develop training guidelines for Grassroots leaders who would call on households identified with children who are of pre-school age and are not yet registered at a pre-school. Subsequently, we provided the training for Grassroots leaders to call on these households. In 2009, we piloted outreach work and subsequently took up a contract to work directly with 61 families that needed support. Work with 56 of these families carried into 2010. New Ministry of Education contracts in 2010 put us in touch with another 450 families. While most of the families had registered their children before our first contact, a number of these families struggled with multiple problems, including financial hardship and housing issues. As at the start of 2011, work continues with 120 of these families. Altogether, we assisted in putting 49 children into a pre-school.

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Our Work PREVENTIVE

Project LADDER roject LADDER is a joint project with the Singapore Prison Service that allows children whose parents are incarcerated to maintain frequent contact through tele-visits from our Research and Outreach Centre at Bishan. The sessions present opportunities for our social workers to engage the families, especially their children, who can then be assessed to see if they are coping well with the change in family circumstances. In addition, we also refer families to appropriate community or government agencies for help relating to employment, financial and housing issues. We also ensure that school-going children have their needs met, e.g. having school uniforms or pocket money. Since the start of our programme in 2003, our facilities have been well utilised. We are happy that other organisations have set up similar centres subsequently in different parts of Singapore. In 2010, 217 children used our facilities compared to 160 in 2009.

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our Work PREVENTIVE

Tinkle Friend Helpline inkle Friend Helpline (1800-2744-788) is a national tollfree helpline for all primary school children who need a listening ear. Manned by trained volunteers, the helpline provides support, advice and information to lonely and distressed children especially in situations when their parents or main caregivers are unavailable. Boredom and school-related issues remain the most commonly cited reasons for calling the helpline. A total of 3,633 calls were made to Tinkle Friend Helpline in 2010.

Types of Calls Received

2009

2010

Bored and chit-chat

31.8%

34.8%

School related

14.5%

14.0%

Peer related

14.4%

11.9%

Family related

7.7%

6.5%

Sharing of happy events

4.6%

4.1%

Boy-girl relationships

0.5%

0.6%

Grief

0.4%

0.4%

Alleged child abuse

0.1%

0.2%

Enquiry about Tinkle Friend Helpline

1.7%

1.6%

Others

7.5%

11.0%

2009

2010

81%

75.2%

0.3%

0.5%

Unknown (usually because call was terminated abruptly)

18.7%

24.3%

Summary of Outreach Efforts

2009

2010

Number of school assembly talks conducted

24

29

Number of children reached through assembly talks

34,028

38,021

Number of students reached through BUZZ Tinkle Friend Newsletter

101,421 102,733

Feedback from Callers about Tinkle Friend Helpline Feel helped Did not feel helped

“I would like to thank Tinkle Friend for lending me a listening ear when I was upset over my quarrel with my best friend. Tinkle Friend is very friendly. I will continue to call if I have problems in the future.” Casey, aged nine, Tinkle Friend caller

Tinkle Friend Camp The theme this year was Tech-ie Gen – a fusion of the words “technology” and “generation” – and focused on the current generation of children who are constantly in touch with technology in its various forms. The camp taught participants the pros and cons of the Internet and how to be critical of material they encounter online. They also picked up cyber-wellness tips. This year, 175 children participated in the Tinkle Friend Camp while 75 attended in 2009.

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Our Work PUBLIC EDUCATION

KidzLive “The workshop is very useful to my son. I am thankful that the Society organises such meaningful programmes.” Madam Jumilah, mother of a seven-year-old Sunbeam Friends Club member hildren can be empowered to protect themselves from sexual abuse and KidzLive teaches them how to fend off inappropriate advances. These messages are brought to life through skits, centred on the acronym “N.O.T” which stands for “say No”, “walk Out” and “Tell a trusted adult”. In one of the sessions this year, five staff from the Society’s Research and Outreach Centre conducted KidzLive to 39 Sunbeam Friends Club children from Family Service Centre (Yishun) on 19 June 2010. Participating children were divided into two groups – lower and upper primary. Lower primary children learnt never to keep bad secrets and to differentiate between good and bad touches through a story and skit.  On the other hand, upper primary children worked in groups to apply what they had learnt through case study discussion. Eight parents took time off to attend this session to better understand what they could do to support their children and learn from the professional staff. In 2010, 80 children benefited from this programme.

Research Studies ingapore Children’s Society conducts research to help identify social trends and issues related to children, youth and families in Singapore. Findings are published in monographs and presented at appropriate platforms. Currently, three research studies are on-going:

Infant Attachment Study This longitudinal research study which started in 2004 is making good progress. The study is a collaboration with KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital to examine how child-rearing practices and choice of caregivers affect children’s attachment, temperament and development in terms of cognition, socialisation, emotion and language. Currently, two cohorts have been recruited and are being interviewed while a third cohort is currently being recruited. The study’s findings will benefit caregivers, child care professionals and policy makers.

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

We presented preliminary findings at the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) Congress in Hawaii in September 2010. We also put up a poster for the SingHealth Duke-NUS Scientific Congress in October 2010.

Youth Study This study explores how our youths today spend their time after school as well as the weekends. We hope to have a better understanding of and insights into the types of activities that appeal to our youths. The findings would have implications on programmes to engage our youths meaningfully.


Our Work PUBLIC EDUCATION

Public and Professional Perceptions of Child Abuse and Neglect in Singapore To fully understand child maltreatment as it presents itself in Singapore, there is a need to consider the prevailing attitudes, values and practices in our society. Children’s Society first conducted such perception studies on child maltreatment in 1994 among the public, and in 1997, on professionals who were likely to encounter child abuse and neglect. In those two studies, the average Singaporean and professionals in healthcare, law, education and social services shared their opinions on what they deemed abuse, and how they felt towards reporting abuse. The studies also tried to uncover any pattern of child maltreatment encountered by these members of the public and professionals. Many years have passed since the two studies and there have since been major changes to the policies and processes protecting children in Singapore. As such, the Society is replicating these two studies to examine any attitudinal changes over time. Besides uncovering shifts in perception, the current findings can also help ascertain if the Society’s public education and outreach attempts have been helpful, and provide us with clues to whether we should continue or change what we have been doing.

This is an ongoing study. The first survey on members of the public has been completed. The next survey on professionals will commence shortly. Besides highlighting any changes in the perceptions of professionals over time, the data to be gathered from this survey can also help uncover differences in opinions that may exist between these professionals and members of the public.

Research Grants Children’s Society gives out research grants to undergraduates and postgraduate students who do research study on issues related to children, youths and families as part of their course work. In 2010, a total of $9,122.52 was awarded to three successful applicants.

Theatre-in-Education hildren’s Society was approached by MCYS to conduct facilitation sessions for a new initiative called Theatre-in-Education. This programme uses theatre to raise awareness amongst upper primary students on family violence and child abuse. We embarked on this project in the last quarter of 2009. Staff from Research and Outreach Centre and Family Service Centre (Yishun) ran the follow-up facilitation sessions with the students immediately after the play. In 2010, the Society reached out to a total of 2,400 students in six schools.

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Our Work REMEDIAL

BeaconWorks eaconWorks is offered to youths who exhibit less serious delinquent behaviour at the Beyond Parental Control (BPC) Pre-Complaint Screening stage. It is a six-month diversional rehabilitative programme to help youths and families stabilise youth behaviour and existing relationship issues. By offering this diversionary programme, we reduce the possibility of further strain to the parent-child relationship. There were 24 cases in 2010 compared to 13 cases in 2009.

Beyond Parental Control (BPC) Pre-Complaint Screening nder Section 50 of the Children and Young Persons Act, Chapter 38 stipulates that a parent/guardian of a child/ young person (under the age of 16 years old) has the power to bring his or her charge before the Juvenile Court if the child is deemed Beyond Parental Control. Every Friday at the Juvenile Court, our team of social workers and counsellors screen complaints from parents wanting to pursue the BPC order. At this preliminary stage, we mediate minor relationship problems and redirect cases to diversional programmes or Family Service Centres for further intervention. In 2010, we screened 603 cases. Truancy, running away from home and late nights out remained the most common complaints lodged by parents. Mothers formed the majority of the complainants, with many cases citing multiple behavioural issues.

Most Common Behaviour Complaints Lodged by Parents/Guardians Behaviour Truancy Running away Late nights Smoking Violence Theft Overnights Moral risk Drinking Substance abuse Gangs Suicide/self harm Addiction Lying Gambling Vandalism Extortion Others

No. of Cases 415 344 339 311 230 212 208 145 100 84 76 70 56 22 18 11 2 201

BPC Pre-Complaint Counselling ases which require further assessment after the BPC screening stage are referred to the Pre-Complaint Counselling programme. Consisting of four to eight sessions of assessment and mediation, these counselling sessions allow families to resolve minor issues outside the Juvenile Court system. This year, families at the Pre-Complaint Counselling stage were invited to the BPC Family Day at the Park, held at the Botanical Gardens on 27 November. Participants mentioned that the event created an opportunity for them to bond in a soothing environment, and some parents indicated that they had not shared such closeness with their children for many years. There were 109 Pre-Complaint Counselling cases in 2010 compared to 117 in 2009.

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our Work REMEDIAL

BPC Investigation ur BPC cases require an independent investigative report to be submitted to the Juvenile Court by an MCYS-registered caseworker. While the youth is held in remand, the caseworker will then conduct an in-depth investigation into the youth’s family background, academic record, and social and emotional behaviour. This comprehensive report contains recommendations for the Juvenile Court’s consideration. For 2010, we investigated 35 BPC cases referred by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports.

BPC Parents Mandated Order arents are critical in moderating the behaviour of wayward children. Hence, the Juvenile Court mandates some parents whose children are under the Beyond Parental Control Court Order to attend counselling sessions and programmes. The sessions are designed to equip parents with effective parenting skills and knowledge. A bond of $1,000 or up to $5,000 is imposed on them to mandate their attendance at counselling sessions. Twenty-eight families went through this programme in 2010.

BPC Statutory Supervision Order he aim of the court order is to provide supervision and guidance for the child in his/her natural environment. Under the order, counsellors and social workers will supervise and counsel parents and wayward youth for a period of between one and three years. We organise various activities aimed at fostering stronger family unity, and encourage parents and youths to participate. The BPC Family Day is one such avenue for parents and youths to bond and pick up life skills such as effective communication and problem solving. We worked with 15 cases undergoing the BPC Statutory Supervision Order this year.

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Our Work REMEDIAL

Buddy Care Programme he Buddy Care Programme is an initiative of the Juvenile Court in partnership with Singapore Children’s Society and Cornerstone Community Services Centre. The principle of this programme is to have ‘youths mentoring youths’ with peers leading by example. The mentors are a group of trained youths aged between 18 and 30 years. These youth mentors befriend and support youths placed on court orders. Their positive involvement can have an enormous impact on youths who are at risk of becoming chronic offenders. In 2010, we matched two cases compared to four in 2009.

Children’s Medical Fund he Children’s Medical Fund aims to make quality medical treatment accessible to children, aged up to 19 years old, who are suffering from chronic and/or life threatening illnesses. Some of these required treatments or operations could be so expensive as to place a very heavy burden on the families, and in some cases might place the treatment beyond their reach if help is not given. Beneficiaries’ most common illnesses are liver diseases, growth hormone deficiency, haemophilia, muscular dystrophy, spinal deformity/scoliosis, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), cancers, epilepsy, cerebral palsy and developmental delays. In 2010, Singapore Children’s Society approved a total of $101,577.60 benefiting 14 patients, of whom seven were new applicants and seven were repeat applicants. Altogether, we served a total of 33 patients.

Fourteen-year-old Leonard suffered from severe scoliosis. The only child in his family, he attends Yishun Town Secondary School and is one of the top performers in his class. Leonard’s mother is widowed and works as a school cleaner, which pays her a monthly wage of $650. With the low income, Leonard and his mother do their best to live within their means, but the spinal surgery needed to alleviate Leonard’s scoliosis was financially out of their reach. Children’s Medical Fund stepped in to subsidise $10,374.00 (76.90%) for the spinal surgery, the rest was borne by Medisave and MediShield. Leonard’s mother called to share her happiness, and personally went down to the Society’s Family Service Centre (Yishun) to say “Thank you” for helping her son.

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our Work REMEDIAL

Guidance Programme he Guidance Programme is a six-month counselling and rehabilitative programme which helps first-time juvenile offenders referred by the Police recognise the severity of their actions and the consequences of a repeat offence. The programme also aims to educate youths and their families on how to prevent such occurrences through counselling, group work and constructive activities. In 2010, we handled 44 cases compared to 56 in 2009. Theft was the most common offence committed by both male and female youth. Male offenders formed a higher percentage, with the average age for both genders at between 15 and 16 years old. This year we conducted a “Moot Court” – simulated court proceedings – to help our youths in the Guidance Programme understand the juvenile justice system. This gave them an opportunity to empathise with victims and parents by seeing the consequences of their offences. Our Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh) conducted group work sessions for the parents and youths of the Guidance Programme. Sessions included talks on topics like Understanding Your Teenager, Communication, Choices and Consequences, among others. The youth and their families also got to decorate their own photo frames and make sushi together as part of the Family Day event. Through such activities, we hope to impart values such as love, responsibility, communication and respect for both youths and their parents.

Youth Family Care Programme hrough the Youth Family Care programme, we match volunteer mentor families to befriend, mentor and encourage delinquent youths who are under court orders. During the one-year term of contract, the mentor families serve as positive role models to the youths and their families. By building a relationship with the youth, the mentor families are able to guide the youths in making positive choices in life. We matched one case this year.

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our resources to help children From dedicated staff to volunteers and donors, our work and resources are entirely committed to making a difference in the lives of children in need.


Donors, Volunteers and Staff With their dedication and commitment, our staff, volunteers and donors work to make a difference in the lives of children in need. Some individuals have been involved for almost a lifetime while some corporate partners choose to support specific projects. Through a diverse range of activities, staff, volunteers and donors all contribute towards protecting the physical, social and emotional well-being of our children. This provides real and lasting changes, not only for the children and youths, but also for their families.

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Our People RUTH WONG AWARDEE 2010

Associate Professor Agnes Chang r Agnes Chang started volunteering at Singapore Children’s Society in 1999 as a member of the Social Work Service Standing Committee. In 2004, she was nominated to serve on the Executive Committee and in the same year, she also took on the role of Vice Chairman for the Social Work Service Standing Committee. A dedicated volunteer, Dr Chang has contributed much in steering the programmes and activities of Children’s Society over the past 10 years. Through her contacts in the education and social service sectors, she has helped the Society gain access to schools to conduct programmes and campaigns. Dr Chang also played a key role in helping to identify the suitable locations for our Youth Centre (Jurong) and Children Service Centre. Dr Chang was instrumental in setting up the Financial Assistance Committee and works closely with the Chairperson of the Committee. She is also involved in reviewing and approving applications for the Children’s Medical Fund subsidies. Understanding the need for new ideas and insights, Dr Chang has helped identify and recruit new volunteers to join the Society to serve on the Standing Committees or contribute their expertise in designing and delivering programmes. A cheerful and friendly person, Dr Chang is always ready to lend a listening ear and be a mentor to both staff and volunteers. For her dedication and voluntary service in the Executive Committee and Social Work Service Standing Committee, Singapore Children’s Society is honoured to bestow on Dr Chang our distinguished Ruth Wong Award for 2010.

40 Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our People GOPAL HARIDAS AWARDEES 2010

OCBC Bank CBC Bank has a Corporate Social Responsibility Programme focused on helping children and youths realise their full potential. The Bank adopted Singapore Children’s Society in 2004. In 2009, OCBC pledged another $2.5 million in donations to be disbursed over the next five years, bringing the Bank’s total contribution to $5 million over 10 years. These funds will be used to support our Society’s key programmes that help less fortunate children and youth, and is a testament to OCBC’s commitment to children, young people and education. Apart from OCBC Bank’s corporate donations, its employees also helped to raise funds through various staff donation initiatives and contributed their time to the Society. The Bank has a ready pool of more than 1,000 staff volunteers who regularly offer their time and skills to enrich the lives of our children and youth. Besides arranging various activities and outings to different places of interests such as participation in the OCBC Cycle Mighty Savers’ Kids Ride and having a day out at the Escape Theme Park, OCBC staff volunteers went the extra mile by helping with the refurbishment of Sunbeam Place, our residential home for abused, neglected or disadvantaged children. OCBC staff volunteers also embarked on additional fund-raising activities for the benefit of Children’s Society. The Bank’s Group Risk Management Division raised $88,000 through an internal fund-raising event and auction with the highest bidder securing a lunch-date with OCBC’s Chairman, Dr Cheong and CEO, Mr David Conner. The staff of Group Investment Banking Division also raised $17,000 where the proceeds were used to support the Bully-Free Forum and Project CABIN. In recognition of their commitment towards building a better life for our children and youths, Singapore Children’s Society is once again proud to confer the esteemed Gopal Haridas Award to OCBC Bank.

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Our People GOPAL HARIDAS AWARDEES 2010

SingTel Touching Lives Fund he Touching Lives Fund is SingTel’s annual philanthropy programme and the main thrust of the company’s Corporate Social Responsibility programme. In 2009, SingTel Touching Lives Fund raised $200,000 in support of our Tinkle Friend Helpline. It is a national toll-free helpline for primary school children in Singapore. Established in 1984, it aims to serve lonely and distressed children who need support and information, especially when their parents or main caregivers are unavailable. With the generous sponsorship by SingTel, Children’s Society has been able to conduct about 30 Tinkle Friend Helpline talks in schools each year. School children also receive stationery printed with important information like the Tinkle Friend Helpline number and its operating days and hours. Posters featuring information on the Helpline are also distributed to schools. The Fund also goes towards the production cost of our BUZZ newsletter. The newsletter is part of our continuing effort to reach out to more children. BUZZ has been supporting the emotional and developmental needs of children through the sharing of articles on life skills, interactive handicraft activities and educational games. In recognition of their commitment towards building a better life for our children and youth, Singapore Children’s Society is once again proud to confer the esteemed Gopal Haridas Award to SingTel.

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our People LIST OF AWARDEES 2010

Congratulations to the Recipients of the Singapore Children’s Society Awards 2010

Ruth Wong Award

Gold Award

Associate Professor Agnes Chang

Lee Foundation Singapore Totalisator Board

Gopal Haridas Award

Mr Eric Khoo Kim Hai

OCBC Bank

Air Line Pilots Association of Singapore

SingTel

The Late Mr Yong Thiam Loong Amway (Singapore) Pte Ltd

Platinum Service Award Mdm Angie Ng

Silver Award Singapore Petroleum Company Limited

Gold Service Award

The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf (S) Pte Ltd

Dr Warren Lee

Give2Asia

Ms Margaret Leong

Keppel FELS Ltd

Air Line Pilots Association of Singapore

Noble Group Limited

Ms Jasmine Kwan Kim Lim

Toh Kian Chui Foundation CSE Global Ltd

Silver Service Award

Dyna-Mac Engineering Services Pte Ltd

Seagate Technology

Samsung Asia Pte Ltd

Ms Soh Sze Jie

Mr Dieu Eng Luke

Ms Sherrine Teoh

Jurong Country Club

SIA Cargo

The Korean Chamber of Commerce in Singapore

Ms Lee Mei Ling Mr Ricky Ang Yap Koon & Mrs Sally Yap Chiew Guat

The Shaw Foundation, Singapore Wee Aik Koon Pte Ltd

Mr Douglas Choo Chiau Yeong & Mdm Patricia Leong Chee Wah

Mdm Tan Hong Luang

Ms Lily Chong

Singapore Academy Of Law

Mr Kong Voon Fah Yeung Ching Foundation

Platinum Award UBS AG POSB Bank

he annual Singapore Children’s Society Awards pays tribute to the many outstanding donors and volunteers. The top awards for volunteer service and donations are named after Dr Ruth Wong and Dr Gopal Haridas. Luminaries in their respective fields of education and paediatrics, they were long-serving volunteers and staunch supporters of the Society.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

43


Our People HEAR WHAT THEY SAY

Our Children, Youth and their Families I like Auntie Sok Lay because she always teaches me things that I do not know. I also teach her when she does not know something. She taught me how to treasure my friends. Rinah, beneficiary, Student Care Centre (Henderson)

During the role-play at the Communication group work session, I pretended to be the parent of a delinquent youth. Now I understand what my parents went through with me. I went home, hugged them and said sorry. Sam, beneficiary, Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

I enjoyed learning new things at Storm Riders. Now I know what to do with my emotions and feelings. I have also learnt to appreciate my family and friends more. Natasha, beneficiary, Family Service Centre (Yishun)

Five years ago I was a timid and shy 14-year-old. Today, I have blossomed into a fit, confident, outspoken and sociable person. I grew up to be an individual I would never have thought I would be. I am very grateful to the staff of Youth Centre (Jurong) as well as Singapore Children’s Society for believing in me and for giving me the opportunity to be the fine gentleman I am today. Rizal, beneficiary, Youth Centre (Jurong)

44 Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

Some of the other books we have read do not seem to focus on the specific things Ramona deals with. With the Parenting Guide on Babies, almost every topic details exactly what Ramona is going through. It’s uncanny! Dave, parent of Ramona, a newborn baby girl

In the past, Ben could not even write the alphabet because my husband and I are not English educated. After joining kidsREAD, Ben started to like reading and improved a lot in his English. His teacher later told me that prior to the programme, she could not even get Ben to read an entire story! Mdm Ong, parent of beneficiary, Children Service Centre


Our People HEAR WHAT THEY SAY

Mandy Lim – a beneficiary responsible beyond her years en-year-old Mandy Lim is the second child of five in her family. Her parents are divorced and her father is currently incarcerated. Her mother, 41-year-old Mandy is the one doing Madam Lim is dyslexic and works at everything, especially on a restaurant. Mandy and two other weekends when I have to siblings are also dyslexic. Student Care Centre (Henderson) came to know Madam Lim’s family in April 2010 when Mandy’s nine-year-old younger brother Danny was registered there. Like the oldest child Sam, Danny was very rebellious. But after three months at the Centre, Danny’s behaviour improved. When Mandy arrived to pick up Danny in June, our staff noticed cane marks on her. Quietly, they spoke with Madam Lim and learnt that Mandy was getting increasingly rude to her mother and taking advantage of her siblings. Madam Lim and the staff at Student Care Centre (Henderson) believed that Mandy could change for the better with care and guidance. She was then registered at the Centre. Over time, we found out that Mandy had been instrumental in caring for her siblings while her mother was away at work. Twelve-year-old Sam was too rebellious, so as the second oldest, Mandy took on this responsibility. Mandy’s daily routine includes picking up her siblings from childcare and walking them to their grandmother’s house for dinner. She then walks home with everyone after 11pm when Madam Lim finishes work. Mandy’s other roles involve taking her third and fourth siblings to a Dyslexic Association of Singapore Learning Centre three times a week, relaying complaints from her siblings’ teachers to her mother, caring for her three-year-old youngest brother with daily baths and diaper changes, attending to accidents at home, and doing laundry and household chores. Mandy’s sense of responsibility to her siblings runs deep. When Danny was hurt and bleeding profusely, Mandy rushed to her grandmother’s house for money before Madam Lim could send him to hospital.

work. She has been very helpful to me and is the only child who can help me. Without her I can’t work. Madam Lim, mother of Mandy

On another occasion, Danny went missing from school. When Mandy found out, she informed the staff at Student Care Centre (Henderson), who accompanied her to search for her brother. Mandy was relieved when he was found at a games arcade, but insisted on checking in on him before returning to the Centre. The staff at the Centre do what they can to help Madam Lim’s family. The Society reduced the fees for Mandy and Danny. Madam Lim also receives advice on resilience, parenting style and care for her children. With help from her CDC, she completed a skills upgrading course. Working on a freelance basis would enable her to spend more time with her children. Mandy and Danny are enrolled in character development programmes such as Project Grow and Glow, aimed at inculcating positive behaviour and attitudes. They are now more proactive in offering help to others. The Centre’s staff praise Mandy for her punctuality and for completing her school homework. While Mandy was initially uninterested in her work and found it difficult to control her temper, feedback from her school teachers and counsellors show that Mandy’s attitude and schoolwork have improved. The volunteers and staff at Student Care Centre (Henderson) are happy to see a positive change in Madam Lim’s family. Singapore Children’s Society will continue to care for and guide Mandy and Danny and other children like them.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

45


Our People HEAR WHAT THEY SAY

Our Volunteers I joined with the mindset that children are our greatest asset, and they should be given equal opportunities to develop, regardless of race or religion. Simply put, if I am able to positively influence one child’s life, I would consider myself successful. And when I think that this child would be helped by other volunteers in future, and in so doing – his or her life reaches new heights, it brings a smile to my face. Mei Chun, volunteer, Family Service Centre (Yishun)

Volunteering was an inspiring experience. It allowed me to learn a lot about myself and what I have to offer to the youth of today, and how much they need to be guided and inspired by us. Ms Sandre, volunteer, Youth Centre (Jurong)

Every week I look forward to the KidsREAD session, to meet with the children, read with them and watch them have fun. I also volunteered at the Project CABIN camp, and I admire the passion and professionalism of the staff and fellow volunteers. I will continue to be a volunteer with the Society, and will be on the lookout for more opportunities. Ibrahim, volunteer, Children Service Centre and Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

Being a volunteer is a great opportunity to give back to society. As an expat in Singapore, volunteering has helped me connect with the locals. It has given me a sense of belonging to the community. I have decided to pursue a career in the social service sector, especially in the areas of counselling and psychology. This shift in my career and mindset would not have been possible without the volunteering opportunity at Tinkle Friend Helpline. Ms Srividhya Sridhar, volunteer, Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

46 Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our People HEAR WHAT THEY SAY

My Volunteer Experience at Sunbeam Place y name is Joseph Martin Lim, a volunteer at Sunbeam Place. I first started volunteering there in January 2010. Currently, I visit the home three to four times a week tutoring four children on a one-on-one basis in Mathematics, English and Chemistry. I decided to volunteer at Sunbeam Place as I had a very moving experience as a camp counsellor at a camp for abused and neglected children. It made me realise just how much hardship these children go through – something I was blessed to have been shielded from. From there, I wanted to do more for such children, which led me to sign up as a volunteer with Singapore Children’s Society. Initially it was challenging, having to switch roles from a camp counsellor to a teacher. As a camp counsellor, your main concern is to facilitate and let children have fun and keep them out of trouble. As a teacher, however, you have to be firm with the rules, patient and yet approachable at the same time. Not forgetting that you constantly have to find ways to stimulate the children. While it was not easy adjusting to my new role, I have found that talking to children about their day before lessons allows them to open up. They become more receptive to you and realise that you are not out to be mean to them. Talking to them shows that you are not just a teacher, but also a friend. I admit that the children can be difficult to handle at times, but they make me feel proud. When they understand and improve in their work and believe in themselves, I am gratified knowing that what I do makes a difference. By spending time with these children, I discover they are special to me, and I believe in them. One may think that these children are lucky to receive such help. In all honesty, it is the other way around: I believe that I am very blessed to have met these children because they have helped me grow and learn. They have taught me patience, the art of discipline and fairness, and how to be more organised.

However, the greatest thing these children have taught me is the lesson of humility. One cannot teach a child if he is proud and expects the child to listen. That would only serve to make the child resentful. Rather, one must be willing to see from the child’s perspective and understand his or her needs. It is only when you can gain a child’s trust will they listen and heed what you say.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

47


Our People FEATURE

Our Volunteers ingapore Children’s Society owes much to the dedication of its volunteers, who have been instrumental in its formation, growth and success. Our volunteers come from all walks of life: there are students, working adults and groups of staff from organisations. But all share a common desire to reach out and improve the lives of children and youths. Volunteers work hand-in-hand with our staff in the delivery of our diverse range of services and programmes. Despite busy schedules, work and family commitments, these individuals wholeheartedly devote their time and energy to ensuring the smooth running of the programmes. Volunteers such as those who do reading sessions with children take time out once a week to conduct these sessions, and are committed to the full nine-month duration of the programme. Some of them have to undergo training to equip them with skills specific to their volunteer roles. Examples of trained volunteers would be those who man our Tinkle Friend Helpline, the Vulnerable Witness Support Programme and the Youth Family Care Programme. Our volunteers also bring cheer to our children by organising parties or taking them for excursions. The Air Line Pilots Association of Singapore, which has been volunteering with the Society since 1998, had brought some of our children for aircraft joyrides.

48 Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our People FEATURE

Members of the Executive Committee, who are volunteers, are elected at the Annual General Meeting of the Society. The Executive Committee sets policies and direction, while the Standing Committees, also comprising volunteers, oversee the various functions within our organisation such as social services, research and advocacy, fund-raising, Sunbeam Place, and information and corporate relations. Volunteers also assist with the administrative work at the Corporate Office’s various departments. They handle data entry, updating of databases as well as the folding and postage of appeal letters. The long-serving volunteers pictured here have helped out with the Society for more than 20 years. Many started out with the Used Stamps Project, which had volunteers cutting out used stamps from envelopes to be sold for fund-raising purposes. They now assist the Fund Raising Department with the preparation of appeal letters. Singapore Children’s Society is grateful to all its volunteers. It is through their tireless efforts and contributions that we are able to improve the lives of children, and provide the many opportunities for our beneficiaries to enrich their experience and broaden their horizons.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

49


Our People FEATURE

Our Staff he programmes and services at Singapore Children’s Society are run by full-time staff and volunteers. Most of the Society’s staff comprise social workers, counsellors and programme assistants.

Aside from casework and counselling, our social workers take on roles and duties specific to their assigned programmes. Social workers performing Beyond Parental Control Pre-Complaint Screening are stationed at the Juvenile Court every Friday afternoon, and those at Family Service Centre (Yishun) perform information and referral services for the community. Counsellors such as those at Sunbeam Place take care of the emotional needs of residents. Others involved A counsellor from Children Service Centre conducting a Choo Choo with Project CABIN conduct Train session at a PAP Community Foundation Centre in the Kaki group work for youth, and Bukit ward. Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework counsellors visit clients’ homes to counsel parents on the importance of early childhood education. Programme assistants take on the administrative and liaison work for their Centre’s programmes.

50

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Our People FEATURE

Our frontline social service staff are complemented by teams of support staff, who perform other operational functions of the Society. House parents take care of the daily needs of the children at Sunbeam Place – preparing them for school, supervising homework and ensuring the cleanliness of the living areas. In many ways, they act as surrogate parents to the children.

Social workers counsel and reach out to youth and their families to address issues that affect harmonious family relations.

The Corporate Services Department oversees all administrative and financial accounting tasks. Aside from soliciting donations, the Fund Raising Department organises various events through the course of the year.

Working as a team, the staff at Children’s Society are committed to helping our 57,000 beneficiaries better their lives and maximise their potential.

Our staff from Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah) bringing anti-bullying messages to life at this year’s Bully-Free Camp.

Singapore Children’s Society staff in a show of support at YouthGiG 2010, a showcase of talent run by youths, for the youths.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

51


results with gifts and donations It’s the generous donation of time and money that enable us to assist disadvantaged children and their families. Giving to our organisation positively impacts thousands of young people, helping them to lead happier, brighter lives.


Facts and Figures Service Statistics Our Range of Services

Centre

2009

2010

Children’s Camp

Children Service Centre

50

63

Children’s Day Celebration

Children Service Centre

60

52

Children’s Talk

Children Service Centre

9

30

Choo Choo Train

Children Service Centre

388

321

H.O.P.E (reacHing Out, helPing familiEs)

Children Service Centre

44

47

kidsREAD

Children Service Centre

40

50

KidzSHinE (Seeing Hope in Every Kid)

Children Service Centre

42

48

Overcoming Shyness

Children Service Centre

4

12

Parenting Talks & Workshops

Children Service Centre

106

62

Camp V-Nest

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

87

93

Casework & Counselling

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

490

414

Children’s Medical Fund

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

73

33

EUREKA!

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

68

69

Family Day

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

128

183

IRS (Enhanced Information Referral Service)

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

811

725

LEAP (Let Every Aspect Progress)

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

52

48

Project Invest

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

47

19

Supervised Studies

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

18

29

REACH *

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

0

4

Storm Riders *

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

0

14

Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Workshop

Research & Outreach Centre

123

0

Compulsory Education Casework

Research & Outreach Centre

71

39

KidzLive

Research & Outreach Centre

1,000

80

Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework

Research & Outreach Centre / Children Service Centre

131

499

Project LADDER

Research & Outreach Centre

160

217

Theatre-in-Education *

Research & Outreach Centre

0

2,400

Children Without Family Support *

Research & Outreach Centre

0

90

Singapore Children’s Society Lecture

Research & Outreach Centre

250

300

Family Day

Student Care Centre (Henderson)

128

64

Student Care

Student Care Centre (Henderson)

89

83

Parenting Talks & Workshops

Student Care Centre (Henderson)

0

22

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

53


Facts and Figures SERVICE STATISTICS

Our Range of Services

Centre

2009

2010

Bully-Free Camp

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

95

72

Bully-Free Campaign

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

22,000

18,826

Bully-Free School Talks

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

23,514

18,291

Bully-Free Forum

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

274

250

INSPIRE Fund

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

27

253

Project CABIN

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

6,130

5,564

Tinkle Friend Camp

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

75

175

Tinkle Friend Helpline

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

3,706

3,633

Vulnerable Witness Support Programme

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

15

13

Sunbeam Place Residents

Sunbeam Place

81

63

Sunbeam Place ex-Residents

Sunbeam Place

59

32

Parenting Talks & Workshops

Youth Centre (Jurong)

247

70

Project YOU CAN

Youth Centre (Jurong)

81

61

TeenStart

Youth Centre (Jurong)

644

581

TeenzLife

Youth Centre (Jurong)

3,675

1,681

YouthGiG

Youth Centre (Jurong)

121

75

BeaconWorks

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

13

24

BPC Investigation

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

81

35

BPC Parents Mandated Order

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

48

28

BPC Pre-Complaint Counselling

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

117

109

BPC Pre-Complaint Screening

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

752

603

BPC Statutory Supervision Order

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

32

15

Buddy Care Programme

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

4

2

Guidance Programme

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

56

44

Round Box

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

142

170

GP Family Day

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

50

57

Youth Family Care

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

1

1

Sunbeam Friends Club

Children Service Centre / Student Care Centre (Henderson) / Family Service Centre (Yishun)

164

195

TOTAL **

66,673

57,033

Direct Service

14,768

14,190

Public Education & Outreach

51,905

42,843

* We started these programmes in 2010. ** Total figures include numbers from direct service and public education and outreach programmes. Note: Singapore Children’s Society is committed to reaching out to children, youths and families in need via our range of services. The above data includes both primary and secondary services based on our six categories, namely Caregiving, Community, Developmental, Preventive, Public Education and Remedial services.

54

Beneficiaries include children, youths and their families.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Facts and Figures FINANCIAL INFORMATION SUMMARY

Breakdown of Total Income 2009

2010

65.7%

Donations

73.6%

19.1%

Grants

16.7%

15.2%

Others

9.7%

Breakdown of Total Expenses 2009

2010

72.6%

Service Programmes

69%

15.3%

General and Administration

15.3%

10.7%

Fund-raising

14.6%

1.4%

Publicity and Promotion

1.1%

Breakdown of Each Donation Dollar 2009

2010

58.2%

Service Programmes

56.8%

12.3%

General and Administration

12.6%

8.6%

Fund-raising

12%

1.2%

Publicity and Promotion

0.9%

19.7%

Surplus

17.7%

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

55


Facts and Figures AUDITED FINANCIAL INFORMATION 2010

Balance Sheet 2009 (S$’000)

2010 (S$’000)

492

413

30,821

34,957

31,313

35,370

Inventories

11

18

Deposits, Prepayments and Other Receivables

531

569

19,091

16,986

Current Assets

19,633

17,573

Total Assets

50,946

52,943

28,593

31,031

Professor S.S. Ratnam Memorial Fund

250

249

Quota Club Education Fund

20

0

ASSETS Property, Plant and Equipment Investments Non-Current Assets

Cash & Deposits

FUNDS AND RESERVE Accumulated Fund

Children’s Medical Fund (CMF)

21,145

20,677

INSPIRE Fund

139

100

Fair Value Reserve

-389

-60

49,758

51,997

Total Funds and Reserve LIABILITIES Deferred Capital Grant

29

0

Provision for Restoration Costs

113

113

1,046

833

1,188

946

50,946

52,943

Trade and Other Payables Total Liabilities Total Funds, Reserve and Liabilities

The Society is governed by the Executive Committee which is the final authority and has overall responsibility for policy making and governance. Members of the Committee are volunteers and receive no monetary remuneration for their contribution. The Society has in place a conflict of interest policy in its Code of Conduct. All members of the Committee and senior management are required to declare their interest periodically.

Reserves Policy Singapore Children’s Society will raise funds to support our current and future services to reach out to more children and families in need, up to a maximum of 5 times our projected future gross operating expenses. Such funds do not include funds specified for restricted use. Auditor: Lo Hock Ling & Co Key Bankers: DBS, OCBC, SCB, HSBC, UBS, UOB

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010


Facts and Figures AUDITED FINANCIAL INFORMATION 2010

Income & Expenditure Statement 2009 (S$’000)

2010 (S$’000)

6,714

7,955

Grants

1,952

Others

1,558 10,224

Income Donations *

Total Income

% Breakdown of Receipts 2009

2010

65.7%

73.6%

1,801

19.1%

16.7%

1,059

15.2%

9.7%

10,815

100%

100%

* Includes tax deductible donations income of $7,721,389 and $6,584,000 in 2010 and 2009 respectively.

% of Total Income

2009 (S$’000)

2010 (S$’000)

2009

2010

Service Programmes – Restricted #

1,221

692

11.9%

6.4%

Service Programmes

4,738

5,455

46.3%

50.4%

General and Administration

1,259

1,361

12.3%

12.6%

Expenditure

Publicity and Promotion

117

97

1.2%

0.9%

Fund-raising

880

1,300

8.6%

12%

Total Expenditure

8,215

8,905

80.3%

82.3%

Surplus of Income over Expenditure

2,009

1,910

19.7%

17.7%

#

This refers to expenses incurred for Children’s Medical Fund only.

Annual Remuneration of Top Three Management Staff No. of Management Staff Annual Remuneration

2009

2010

Between $100,001 to $150,000

2

2

Between $150,001 to $200,000

1

1

Note: Includes basic salary, bonuses, allowances and the employer’s contributions to Central Provident Fund.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

57


Facts and Figures MAJOR DONORS

Donors List S$100,000 and above Amway (Singapore) Pte Ltd DBS Bank Ltd OCBC Bank Tan Hong Luang Tan Kok Teng

S$50,000 to S$99,999 Children’s Charities Association Goodrich Global Pte Ltd HSBC Trustee (Singapore) Limited Noble Resources Pte Ltd NTUC Income Insurance Co-operative Limited UBS AG

S$20,000 to S$49,999 Amway (Singapore) Pte Ltd Composers & Authors Society of Singapore Ltd Herbalife Family Foundation Ho Hsiu Mei Huawei International Pte Ltd Keppel Corporation Limited Lee Foundation, Singapore Lee Ying Low Ngee Tong Lumitron (Pte) Limited MasterCard Asia/Pacific Pte Ltd MediaCorp Pte Ltd Peh Lai Huat Roche Singapore Pte Ltd Rose Marie Khoo Foundation Salesforce.com Foundation Singapore Totalisator Board The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf (S) Pte Ltd Vac-Tech Engineering Pte Ltd Wee Aik Koon Pte Ltd Xin Ming Hua Pte Ltd In Memory of the late Mr Wee Aik Koon

S$10,000 to S$19,999 Alfa Global Pte Ltd Ameroid Logistics (S) Pte Ltd AMK Hub Trust Angliss Singapore Pte Ltd Asia Chemicals Trading Pte Ltd Asia Polyurethane Mfg Pte Ltd Capita Pte Ltd Capital Auto Pte Ltd Chan Heng Keong Chan Heng Kian Chang Ser Heng Rodney Charles & Keith (Singapore) Pte Ltd Chew Poh Guan Thomas Choo Chiau Beng Chu Wei Hua Dato’ Low Tuck Kwong Deutsche Bank Dyna-Mac Engineering Services Pte Ltd

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Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

EMC Computer Systems (SA) Pte Ltd Exova (Singapore) Pte Ltd First Resources Limited Fortress Intelligence Pte Ltd General Insurance Association of Singapore Hong Leong Foundation IAI Asia Pte Ltd Integra Petrochemicals Pte Ltd IWA Design Pte Ltd Keppel FELS Limited Kim Eng Securities Pte Ltd Koh Boon Chin Glen Kuan Im Tng Temple (Joo Chiat) Kuok Khoon Hong Lee Pansy Candida Shuet Wan Lim Seng Peng Lin Yucheng Loh Chwee Chew Mooring Services Loy Sook Heng Maxi-Cash Group Pte Ltd Nanyang Primary School Nordic Maritime Pte Ltd Oh Min Sen Vernon Oh Choon Gan Eric Or Kim Peow Contractors (Pte) Ltd Pacific Motor Credit Pte Ltd Paul Ridley Thomas (Late) Pei Hwa Foundation Limited Playbox Distribution Pte Ltd PropNex Realty Pte Ltd PSB Academy Pte Ltd Qian Hu Corporation Limited Quek Roy Republic of Singapore Navy Resources Unlimited Pte Ltd S K Chemical Trading P L Seagate Technology International Sembas (Asia) Trading Pte Ltd Siah Gek Quee Simon Chrisandra Associates Pte Ltd Singapore Petroleum Company Limited Strain Robert Tan Eng Chye Union Contractors (S) Pte Ltd United Parcel Service Singapore Pte Ltd V3 Construction Pte Ltd Viking Engineering Pte Ltd Vina Satiadhi Wilmar International Ltd Winston Engineering Corporation Pte Ltd Wong Ai Ai

S$2,500 to S$9,999 AHE Pte Ltd Air Line Pilots Association Singapore Alcoa Foundation Amara Hotel Properties Pte Ltd Ang & Partners Aon Benfield Asia Pte Ltd Ascendas Funds Management (S) Ltd Asia Enterprises (Private) Limited Auric Pacific Group Limited Axa Insurance Singapore Pte Ltd


Facts and Figures MAJOR DONORS

Balestier Hill Secondary School BBR Construction Systems Pte Ltd BDO LLP Bestech Integrated Pte Ltd Bizlink Associate (S) Pte Ltd Boey Siew Kin Cambridge University Press Cathay Photo Store (Pte) Ltd CF Sharp Shipping Agencies Pte Ltd Chan Chee Choong Gerald Chan Hian Siang Chan Ai Ling Chan Sek Keong Charities Aid Foundation America Charities Aid Foundation- General Accounts Chartered Asset Management Pte Ltd Che Hian Khor Moral Uplifting Society (Singapore) Cheng Kwee Kiang Cheng Li Chang Chew Sun Huat Chia Kim Chua Chia Kim Suan Chiang Hock Seng Patrick Chiang Siew Hwa Chionh Chye Khye Chiu Liu Chian Chong How Tzek Chong Keen Loon David Choo Hsun Yang Choong Keng Sheong Chow Joo Ming Chua Kim Chiu Chua Buan Ling Alicia Chua Piang Sze Chua Hee Horng Roger Chung Lai Leng Ruth Citibank N.A Singapore Branch Citibank-YMCA Youth For Causes ComLaw LLC Community Service Projects Pte Ltd Cycle & Carriage France Pte Ltd David Brian Tokiwa Davis Langdon & Seah Singapore Pte Ltd D’Cruz Noel Gerald Dieu Eng Luke DP Architects Pte Ltd EEMS Asia Pte Ltd Eitan Pte Ltd Eliathamby David Devakumar Eng Seng Tech Pte Ltd ETG Pte Ltd Etonhouse Pre-School Pte Ltd (Mountbatten Branch) Far East Management Pte Ltd Fish & Co. Restaurants Pte Ltd Flynn Francis Peter Fong Kah Kuen Fortune Travel Pte Ltd Frank Mohn Singapore Pte Ltd Gain City Best-Electric Pte Ltd Galperti South East Asia Pte Ltd Gan Chee Khoon Benjamin Gan Ki Bridget Gan Wai Bernadette Gan Cheng Chan Gennal Industries Pte Ltd

GNS Storage Pte Ltd Goh Sze Cheng Goh Boon Leng Goh Siew Huat Patrick Goh Gaik Choo Peggy Govind Ramanathan Grimberg Joseph Guan Ho Construction Co. Pte Ltd Guy Carpenter & Co Pte Ltd Gwee Lian Kheng Hasbro Singapore Pte Ltd Henderson Secondary School Hewlett-Packard Singapore (Private) Ltd Hitachi Global Storage Technologies HLN Technologies Limited Ho Eng Tai Ho Peng Ann Ho Poh Ying Hoe Kee Hardware Pte Ltd HSBC Insurance (Singapore) Pte Ltd Hu Kwang Ren Peter I V Music Lounge Infineum Singapore Pte Ltd Integrated Lens Technology Pte Ltd Iouri Verchok James Perinpanayagam Jan Facade Technology Pte Ltd John While Springs (S) Pte Ltd June Chen Boon Kiaw Kelvin Blacklock Kemin Industries (Asia) Pte Ltd Keppel Offshore & Marine Kernel Oil Pte Ltd Kheng Cheng School Khoo-Oei Mavis Kim Woodford Kong Hwa School Koo Bon Sun and Park Edan Cho Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple Kwang Wee Wen Kwek Miang Cher Kwek Dick Kwok Kian Hee Kwok Lai Fong Evangeline Laguna National Golf & Country Club Lam Jackson Lars Sorensen Lau Choon Sam Patrick Lau Meng Hwa Le Champ (S.E.A) Pte Ltd Lee Choon Bok Lee Woon Shiu Lee Chong Kuan Lee I Wuen Lee Keng Heng Lee Teck Leng Robson Lee Wan Choy Lee Lay Choo Lee Lap Wah George Leong Meng Soon Henry Leverage Holdings Pte Ltd Liberty Insurance Pte Ltd Liew Onnah Life Insurance Association Lim Shu Jin

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

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Facts and Figures MAJOR DONORS

Lim Choon Lan Lim Soon Beng Lim Choo Hin Lim Oon Teik Eugene Lim Boon Huat Lim Sze Liang Ling Pek Ling Lipico Technologies Pte Ltd Liu Chow Yee Lo Hock Ling & Co. Loh Albert Loh Tzum Yung Loke Yuen Kin Ruby Long Tech Engineering Pte Ltd Lonpac Insurance Bhd Lsw Consulting Engineers Pte Ltd Lutfi Law Corporation Ma Kueng Healthcare Group Pte Ltd Marina Bay Sands Pte Ltd MCL Land Limited Mellford Pte Ltd Mercer (Singapore) Pte Ltd Messr Rajah & Tann LLP Michael A. Witt Mid-Continent Equipment Group Pte Ltd MSIG Insurance (Singapore) Pte Ltd Munich Management Pte Ltd Nadathur Fareast Pte Ltd NCS Pte Ltd NewGenn International Pte Ltd Ng Chun Jie Ngan Tang Joo Nichiren Shoshu Buddhist Association (Singapore) Nikon Singapore Pte Ltd Northern Trust Company, Singapore NSK International (Singapore) Pte Ltd Ntegrator Pte Ltd Oceanway-OES Shipping Pte Ltd OCS, SAFTI MI Ong Xun Ning Orchard Credit (Pte) Ltd Overseas Academic Link Pte Ltd Panasonic Systems Asia Pacific Poa Koon Koon Poa Kheng Bee Cynthia Power Partners Private Limited PrimeStaff Management Services Pte Ltd QBE Insurance (International) Ltd Quah Kee Swee Quek Siak How Raja Segaran Arumugam Roche Singapore Technical Operations Pte Ltd Ronald Howe Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Pte Ltd Saw Cheng Chye Scan-Bilt Pte Ltd Seet Iris Seng Kang Primary School Shanghai Asia Holdings Limited Shenton Investment Pte Ltd Shunmugam Jayakumar Si Hong Kuan Sim Chong Meng Desmond Sin Hong Hardware Pte Ltd

60 Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010

Singapore Dental Association Singapore Press Holdings Foundation Limited SJI Junior School Skychem Pte Ltd Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications International AB Branch Office Singapore Soon Kong Sin Soumen Mitra & Mitra Sushmita Source Manufacturing Pte Ltd Stamford Tyres International Pte Ltd Standard Chartered Bank, Singapore Suntec Food & Leisure Pte Ltd Sussie anak William Ketit Talwar Sanjiv Tan Tee Boon David Tan Teow Chye Tan Chee Kiong Terry Tan Phek Wan Tan Meng Wei Tan Wah Joo Tan Yang Guan Tan Hiap Tia Bruce Tan Joo Yiah Tan Hoe Siew Tanah Merah Country Club Tang Wai Mun Tang Gary Teh Khim Loo Tenet Insurance Co Ltd Teng Geok Bee Teo Cheng Peng Teo Hong Lian Teo Tat Beng Teo Lay-Sie Lace Teo Pei Sing Joseph Teow Hang Seng Tham Kum Fei Alan Tham Wei Chern The JYSK Group Pte Ltd Tiang Teng Hoong Richard TJ Systems (S) Pte Ltd Tokio Marine Insurance Singapore Ltd Trade Promoters International Pte Ltd Trimech Engineering Pte Ltd Triple-Max Engineering Pte Ltd Tuas Power Generation Pte Ltd UOL Group Limited Vantage Automotive Limited Vaz Lorrain Michael Wilson Global Trade Pte Ltd Wing Ship Marine Services Pte Ltd Wong Hock Boon (Late) Wong Tai Xcellink Pte Ltd Yahya Abdulhussain Lukmanji Saif Charity Trust Yang Kee Logistics Pte Ltd Yee Mei Lin Yeo Lian Sim Yeo Yee Han Yong Chin Hwee Zenitel Marine Asia Pte Ltd Zurich Insurance Company Ltd (Singapore Branch) In Memory of the late Mr Say Lip Hai


SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY CORPORATE OFFICE 298 Tiong Bahru Road #09-05 Central Plaza Singapore 168730 Tel: 6273 2010 Fax: 6273 2013

OUR SERVICE CENTRES Children Service Centre Blk 529 Bedok North St 3 #01-570 Singapore 460529 Tel: 6448 6658 Fax: 6448 9896

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah) Blk 91 Henderson Road #01-112 Singapore 150091 Tel: 6276 5077 Fax: 6276 5075

Family Service Centre (Yishun) Blk 107 Yishun Ring Road #01-233 Singapore 760107 Tel: 6753 7331 Fax: 6753 2697

Sunbeam Place 28 Hong San Terrace Singapore 688247 Tel: 6462 3477 Fax: 6462 3371

Research and Outreach Centre 9 Bishan Place, Junction 8 #05-02 Singapore 579837 Tel: 6358 0911 Fax: 6358 0936

Youth Centre (Jurong) Blk 552 Jurong West St 42 #01-321 Singapore 640552 Tel: 6566 6989 Fax: 6566 6386

Round Box One People.Sg 381 Toa Payoh Lorong 1 #01-12 Singapore 319758 Tel: 6259 3735 Fax: 6256 9443

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh) Blk 109 Toa Payoh Lorong 1 #01-316 Singapore 310109 Tel: 6253 1124 Fax: 6256 9443

Student Care Centre (Henderson) Blk 129 Bukit Merah View #01-174 Singapore 150129 Tel: 6278 7856 Fax: 6278 0191

Children’s Medical Fund Helpdesk Tel: 6753 1083 Tinkle Friend Helpline Tel: 1800 274 4788

For general enquiries, email info@childrensociety.org.sg

www.childrensociety.org.sg OUR MICROSITES: www.bullyfreecampaign.sg www.childrensociety.org.sg/fundraising www.1000e.org.sg UEN: S62SS0057G


Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2010