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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Someday, I will... I dream to be... Happiness is...

Knowing what our purpose is... I wish for more...

I hope to...


ANNUAL REPORT EDITORIAL COMMITTEE Dr Teng Su Ching Dr Yong Wern Mei Mr Tan Ping Yang All names of children and youths mentioned in this report have been changed to protect their identities. Unique Entity Number: S62SS0057G


CONTENTS About Us Chairman’s Message .................................... Highlights of the Year .................................. Organisation Charts .................................... Chairpersons & National Day Awards Recipients ....................................... Committee Members 2011/2012 .................

Our Volunteers  and  Donors 04 06 11 13 14

Ruth Wong Awardee ................................... Gopal Haridas Awardees ............................ List of Awardees 2011 .................................. Hear What They Say – Thoughts from our Volunteers, Children, Youth and their Families ............................................... Hear What They Say – A Heartwarming Experience at Marsiling ...............................

46 47 49 50 51

Our Work CAREGIVING Student Care Centre (Henderson) ............... 1 8 Sunbeam Place ............................................ 1 9 Vulnerable Witness Support Programme .... 20 COMMUNITY Family Service Centre (Yishun) .................... 22 iNSPIRE Fund ............................................... 23

Facts and  Figures Service Statistics ......................................... Financial Information Summary .................. Audited Financial Information 2011 ............ Major Donors ..............................................

53 55 56 58

DEVELOPMENTAL Children Service Centre .............................. Choo Choo Train .......................................... Project CABIN ............................................. Round Box ................................................... Sunbeam Friends Club................................. Youth Centre (Jurong) .................................

25 26 27 28 28 29

PREVENTIVE Bully-Free Programme ................................. Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Workshop .................................. Compulsory Education Casework ................ Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework .............................................. Project LADDER .......................................... Tinkle Friend Helpline..................................

31 32 32 32 33 34

PUBLIC EDUCATION KidzLive ....................................................... 3 6 Research Studies ......................................... 3 7 REMEDIAL Children’s Medical Fund .............................. BeaconWorks ............................................... Beyond Parental Control (BPC) Pre-Complaint Screening ............................ BPC Pre-Complaint Mediation .................... BPC Investigation ........................................ BPC Parents Mandated Order ..................... BPC Statutory Supervision Order ................ Youth Family Care Programme .................... Buddy Care Programme .............................. Guidance Programme ..................................

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Every child should have the freedom to dream, to believe that the sky’s the limit. Through specialised care, education, counselling and rehabilitation, we provide support and care for disadvantaged, abused and neglected children and youth, nurturing them on the path to fulfilling their potential.

I DREAM TO BE SOMEBODY, SOMEDAY. I want my parents to be proud of me!

We are born unique, each with our different talents and dreams. But as we find our place in society, we wonder:

HOW DO WE MEASURE SUCCESS AND WHICH PATH IS THE RIGHT ONE?


ABOUT US Our Patron-in-Chief

PRESIDENT TONY TAN KENG YAM Patron for 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need

MR TEO CHEE HEAN Deputy Prime Minister & Coordinating Minister for National Security & Minister for Home Affairs At Singapore Children’s Society, we help protect and nurture children and youth of all races and religions, especially needy children from disadvantaged families. We provide help through our six service categories of Caregiving, Community, Developmental, Preventive, Public Education and Remedial.

CAREGIVING SERVICES

PREVENTIVE SERVICES

We take care of children and youth on behalf of their parents/guardians for a period of time.

We help prevent children and youth from being harmed or at risk of delinquency, abuse and/or neglect.

COMMUNITY SERVICES

PUBLIC EDUCATION

We promote the welfare of children and youth through the fostering of a happy family life.

We conduct forums and research related to children, youth and family to raise public awareness.

DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES

REMEDIAL SERVICES

We help educate and develop children and youth to become healthy and well rounded.

We provide rehabilitative services to children and youth, with guidance and counselling for their families.

OUR MISSION

OUR CORE  VALUES

To bring relief and happiness to children in need

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OUR VISION To be a leading-edge organisation in promoting the well-being of the child

Compassion & Caring Commitment Professionalism Integrity Openness to Change

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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ABOUT US Chairman’s Message  

ingapore’s GDP grew by 4.9% in 2011. This was much lower than the robust growth of 14.5% in 2010. In view of the continued uncertain global financial outlook, the Ministry of Trade and Industry has projected a GDP growth of 1 to 3% for 2012.

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As the economy continues to slow, charities can expect a more challenging year ahead in fund-raising. In any economic downturn, it is the lower income families who are most affected. Therefore, Children’s Society is gearing up to meet the expected increase in demand for our services from the affected families in the year ahead. In 2011, we reached out to 67,574 beneficiaries, compared to 57,186 in 2010. We continued to expand in upstream social work, especially in our preventive and developmental services. Projects such as Choo Choo Train (a character development programme), Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework, Bully-Free Campaign, Project CABIN and our very successful drop-in centres at Youth Centre (Jurong) and Round Box, are some of the services that were very impactful in 2011 and will be further enhanced in 2012 and beyond. In July, the Society released A Guide to Youth Drop-in Centres, a publication where we share with other VWOs our best practices and key considerations for running a youth drop-in centre. This was borne out of NCSS’ 2008 endorsement of Singapore Children’s Society as a Centre of Specialisation in Youth Drop-in Centres, a testament to the professionalism of the programme and its staff. But we are not an organisation that rests on its laurels. A delegation of staff and committee members from the Society embarked on a short study trip to Hong Kong to learn more about the territory’s social services for children and youth. We have also reciprocated by hosting delegations from Hong Kong and sharing with them how we go about serving our beneficiaries. The Society’s total expenditure was $8.83 million, about 1% lower than 2010’s expenditure of $8.91 million. Prudent cost management helped us maintain our service capacity despite the higher numbers of children and families we reached out to.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


ABOUT US Chairman’s Message   Notwithstanding a very difficult year for fund-raising, we managed to raise a total of $7.71 million in 2011. Although this amount was slightly lower than the $7.95 million in donation income in 2010, I believe we did relatively well in view of the economic slowdown. The 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need Programme had again exceeded the $1 million mark with a total annual donation income of $1.03 million. We had 498 participating enterprises, compared to 382 the year before. Since we started this initiative in 2009, a total of $2.88 million has been raised. On 16 April 2011, the Executive Committee and senior staff attended a retreat to discuss our five-year strategic plan. A committee chaired by Mr Wong Yew Meng further met and agreed on the final five strategic thrusts for Children’s Society, namely:

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Expanding our advocacy reach Being a voice for the children Building a larger community of volunteers Going upstream to enhance our preventive programmes, and Talent development.

I believe these strategic thrusts will help us to be more focused and enable us to make a stronger impact on our society, especially for the children, youth and families in need. I am grateful to our volunteers and donors who have been our pillars of strength all these years. At our Awards Presentation Ceremony on 24 June 2011, we honoured 42 volunteers and donors for their unstinting support. Our Guest-of-Honour, Then-President S R Nathan, presented the Ruth Wong Award to Associate Professor Cuthbert Teo and the Gopal Haridas Awards to OCBC Bank and Mr Chan Chong Beng. Once again, congratulations to all recipients! I would also like to extend my heartfelt congratulations to Mr Peter Joe Chia for being a recipient of the Public Service Star (Bar) in 2011’s National Day Awards, for his untiring efforts and selfless service to Children’s Society. The theme for our 2011 Annual Report is “Heeding Our Young Voices.” Like many young persons in the world, our children and youths here do have the desire to be heard and to express their viewpoints concerning things that matter to them. As we cover wider ground to reach more children, it is our aim that Children’s Society be a strong voice for them in the years ahead and we will work towards that. We will be celebrating our 60th anniversary in 2012. Once again, I wish to express my deepest appreciation and thanks to the Executive Committee, Standing Committee members and staff for the countless hours they have dedicated themselves to the cause of Singapore Children’s Society. To the members, volunteers, donors and well-wishers, your support goes a long way in encouraging us to carry on serving the children and families in need, and giving them hope for the future.

Mr Koh Choon Hui JP PJG Chairman Singapore Children’s Society

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ABOUT US Highlights of  the  Year  2011  

Recognition at Inaugural Family Service Centre Seminar amily Service Centre (Yishun) was recognised for its commitment to information management through the use of the National Council of Social Service’s (NCSS) electronic case management system. Centre Director, Ms Koh Wah Khoon, received the certificate of appreciation from Dr Vasoo, one of the pioneers in the concept of family service centres.

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Photo courtesy of the National Council of Social Service.

1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need Appreciation Dinner n 10 March, the Society held an Appreciation Dinner at Marina Mandarin to thank 382 corporate partners who participated in the 1000 Enterprises fund-raising project. Among them were the Presenter of the project Noble Resources Pte Ltd, and the Society’s Community Partner OCBC Bank. The project’s Patron, Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean, was the Guest-of-Honour.

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Strategic Planning Retreat n 16 April, Children’s Society held a one-day Strategic Planning Retreat. The findings and recommendations gathered during the retreat provided valuable input into the formulation of our five strategic thrusts. By planning ahead and reviewing what we have been doing, the Society will continue to stay relevant and provide timely service to all our beneficiaries.

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YouthGIG 2011 outhGIG 2011 was held at Shuqun Secondary School on 8 July. The theme You(th) are Beautiful! was chosen to promote awareness of body image issues among youths, and to encourage them to love themselves for who they are. This annual concert is a showcase of talent organised by the youth of Youth Centre (Jurong) for their peers. Dr Amy Khor, Minister of State, Ministry of Health and Mayor, South West District, graced the event.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


ABOUT US Highlights of  the  Year  2011  

Bully-Free Forum 2011 he Bully-Free Forum was held at Republic Polytechnic on 16 July and was attended by an audience of almost 300. Dr Annis Fung Lai-chu, Assistant Professor of the Department of Applied Social Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the City University of Hong Kong, shared intervention strategies on managing bullies and their behaviour. Mr Heng Chee How, Senior Minister of State, Prime Minister’s Office, was the Guest-of-Honour.

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Launch of A Guide to Youth Drop-in Centres n 2008, the NCSS endorsed Singapore Children’s Society as a Centre of Specialisation in Youth Drop-in Centres. To share the Society’s best practices and expertise in the area of setting up and running youth drop-in centres, A Guide to Youth Drop-in Centres was launched on 27 July this year.

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Tribute to Volunteers hildren’s Society paid tribute to the hard work and dedication of its many volunteers during the annual Tribute to Volunteers event. Over 100 volunteers were given a movie treat at GV VivoCity on 8 October, with the screening of the action thriller Abduction.

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Launch of Pioneer Project CABIN – Pop-in Crib he Society’s 21st Project CABIN was launched at Pioneer Secondary School on 20 August, with Madam Halimah Yacob, Minister of State, Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports officiating at the launch. CABINs are school-based drop-in facilities for character and life skills development, and provide a positive and conducive environment for youths to flourish.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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ABOUT US Highlights of  the  Year  2011  

Walk for our Children 2011 his year’s Walk was held on 24 July at the Marina Barrage, set amidst the picturesque skyline of Marina Bay. A carnival boasting more than 30 stalls offering games, snacks and souvenirs kept the 3,300-strong crowd busy with fun-filled activities. The three-kilometre walk was flagged off by Guest-of-Honour Ms Grace Fu, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Information, Communications and the Arts; and Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources.

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Singapore Children’s Society Awards

he annual Singapore Children’s Society Awards was held on 24 June at the Pan Pacific Hotel, honouring the dedication and generosity of 42 volunteers and donors. ThenPresident S R Nathan and Mrs Nathan were the Guests-of-Honour who graced the occasion.

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Soccer Clinic with Liverpool Football Club ouths from Singapore Children’s Society Round Box youth drop-in centre and Youth Centre (Jurong) were invited to a soccer clinic where they had the chance to interact with players from Liverpool Football Club. The youths received coaching on football techniques from the Liverpool coach and players, and ended the session with a friendly match.

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Learning Trip to Hong Kong n July, a team of Children’s Society staff and committee members visited several Hong Kong NGOs that provide a comprehensive network of services for the children and youth there. Our delegation was introduced to the best practices of these NGOs in the areas of outreach service, drop-in facilities, residential homes and school-based social work.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


ABOUT US Highlights of  the  Year  2011  

Link-ups with Overseas Counterparts hrough the dedication of its volunteers and staff, the work of the Society is well known beyond the shores of Singapore. We were honoured to host visitors from the USA and Hong Kong. Our guests were in town to learn about our children and youth-related services, as well as the Sunbeam Place residential home.

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Fifth Singapore Children’s Society Lecture r Ho Kwon Ping, Executive Chairman of Banyan Tree Holdings Limited and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Singapore Management University, was the speaker at the fifth annual lecture held at Nanyang Polytechnic on 22 October. Mr Ho spoke on the topic Preparing Our Children for the World of Tomorrow, and shared his views on raising resilient children to face future challenges.

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Release of Parenting Guide on Toddlers he Research and Outreach Centre released the second in a series of parenting guides – the Parenting Guide on Toddlers. Through comic-style illustrations, the guide brings parents and caregivers through frequently encountered situations where the behaviour of the child could lead to frustration, and offers practical tips and advice on managing their child’s behaviour.

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Launch of e-CSEW Directory he e-CSEW (Children’s Social and Emotional Well-being) Directory (http://csewdirectory.childrensociety.org.sg) is an online initiative that consolidates programmes and publications targeted at children, youths and their caregivers by local social service agencies. Similar to a search engine, users can search based on subject matter, target audience or beneficiaries, or for programmes and publications specific to individual organisations.

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ABOUT US Highlights of  the  Year  2011  

Sharing of Infant Study Findings he findings of the first cohort of our Infant Study were put up as a poster presentation at the KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital’s 6th Annual Scientific Meeting. The findings were also presented at the 9th Asian Pacific Regional Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect in New Delhi, India.

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The Pixel Heart Project he Society launched its first online fund-raising initiative in November. The Pixel Heart Project (www.pixelheart.org.sg) enables companies to make online donations for a worthy cause by adopting 2,500 blocks of pixels on the website at $500 per block. When fully adopted, the blocks fill a big heart to signify the commitment of corporate donors to support children-in-need.

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Honours at National Day Awards 2011 Singapore Children’s Society congratulates its Chairman Mr Koh Choon Hui for being awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. Our warmest congratulations also to Executive Committee Member Mr Peter Joe Chia for being awarded the Public Service Star (Bar).

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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visionary st CI alw TA the social se art of TI rvice sec to ON r for more th a n three dec a Mr Koh Ch des, oon Hui nu rtu social serv ice agencie red several s beginnin the Singap g with ore Childre n’s Society he remains , where as the Cha irman till th His contrib is day. utions have touched th of many Sin e lives gaporeans. He facilitate reintegrati on of juven ile home re d the with their fa sidents milies and communit y and suppo rted the re habilitation offenders b of y setting u p the Inma Families Su tes’ pport Fund . Mr Koh als o made im portant co a t the na ti ntribu tions onal level. Mr Koh ha on the Boa s served rds of the Na tional C Social Serv ouncil of ice, the Co mmunit y C Medifund. hest and In 2010, M r Ko appointed as one of th h Choon Hui was e representa tives to the two Singapore A SE A N C o on the Pro mm mo Rights of W tion and Protec tion o ission f the omen and Children.


ABOUT US Organisation Charts   EXECUTIVE  COMMITTEE Chairman

Mr Koh Choon Hui

Vice Chairman

Prof Ho Lai Yun

Vice Chairman

Mr Tan Suee Chieh

Honorary Secretary

Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann

Honorary Treasurer

Ms Theresa Sim

Honorary Asst Secretary

Assoc Prof Cuthbert Teo

Honorary Asst Treasurer

Mr Ho Lon Gee

Members

Assoc Prof Agnes Chang Mr Alex Lee Ms Annie Gan Mr Kurt Wee Mdm Rashidah Abdul Rasip Dr Stephanie Leonard Dr Teng Su Ching Mr Wong Yew Meng

Co-opted Member Nominated Members

Mr Peter Joe Chia Assoc Prof Daniel Fung Assoc Prof John Elliott Dr Lim Hwee Leng

STANDING COMMITTEES

OTHER COMMITTEES

CHAIRMAN Appeals Information & Corporate Relations Research & Advocacy Social Work Service Sunbeam Place

Mr Kurt Wee Dr Teng Su Ching Prof Ho Lai Yun Mr Alex Lee Dr Stephanie Leonard

CHAIRMAN Audit Awards Crisis Management Investment Remuneration

Mr Tan Suee Chieh Prof Ho Lai Yun Mr Koh Choon Hui Mr Ho Lon Gee Mr Wong Yew Meng

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ABOUT US Organisation Charts  

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MANAGEMENT TEAM OFFICE BEARERS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mr Alfred Tan (since 1999)

HON SECRETARY HON TREASURER

CORPORATE SERVICES Director – Ms Tan Li Li

STANDING COMMITTEES

APPEALS

FUND-RAISING Director – Mr Chia Boon Khiang

INFORMATION & CORPORATE RELATIONS

CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS Manager – Mr Tan Ping Yang

RESEARCH & ADVOCACY

RESEARCH & OUTREACH CENTRE Director – Ms Sue Cheng CHILDREN SERVICE CENTRE Deputy Director – Ms Ann Hui Peng FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE Director – Ms Koh Wah Khoon STUDENT CARE CENTRE Head – Ms Hong Kim Beng

SOCIAL WORK SERVICE

STUDENT SERVICE HUB Director – Ms Tan Bee Joo (until June) Acting Head – Ms Chen Sheue Ling (from July) YOUTH CENTRE Head – Ms Christina Appadoo YOUTH SERVICE CENTRE Director – Dr Carol Balhetchet

SUNBEAM PLACE

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

SUNBEAM PLACE Director – Dr Siew Lai Keun


ABOUT US Chairpersons &  National  Day  Awards  Recipients  

Chairpersons of Singapore Children’s Society For almost sixty years, we are privileged to have had highly dedicated professionals and civic-minded citizens heading Singapore Children’s Society.

Chairperson

Years served

Mrs K M Smyth

1952 – 1954

Dr Gopal Haridas

1954 – 1956

Prof E S Monteiro

1956 – 1961

Mr J E Lloyd

1961 – 1963

Prof Wong Hock Boon

1963 – 1965

Mr Francis Thomas

1965 – 1970

Dr M G John

1970 – 1973

Dr Koh Eng Kheng

1973 – 1978

Mr Koh Choon Hui

1978 – Current

National Day Awards Recipients The following members of our Society were honoured by the Singapore Government for their significant contributions to social service.

The Meritorious Service Medal (Pingat Jasa Gemilang)

The Public Service Medal (Pingat Bakti Masyarakat)

2011

1980 1984 1984 1985 1986 1986 1987 1988 1989 1991 1994 1996 1999 2000 2003 2006 2007

Mr Koh Choon Hui

The Public Service Star (Bar) (Bintang Bakti Masyarakat (Lintang) 1993 2001 2007 2011

Dr Koh Eng Kheng Mr Koh Choon Hui Mr S C Lim Mr Peter Joe Chia

The Public Service Star (Bintang Bakti Masyarakat) 1985 1991 1992 1994 1995 1996 1997 1997 2001 2002 2009 2010

Dr Koh Eng Kheng Mr Koh Choon Hui Mr Peter Joe Chia Ms Susan Verghese Dr Lim Hwee Leng Mr Leslie Yong Mr S C Lim Dr Ngiam Tee Liang Dr Stephanie Leonard Mr Gwee Lian Kheng Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann Prof Ho Lai Yun

Dr Koh Eng Kheng Mr Koh Choon Hui Mr Peter Joe Chia Ms Susan Verghese Dr Lim Hwee Leng Mr S C Lim Mr Safdar A Husain Mr Leslie Yong Dr Stephanie Leonard Dr Ngiam Tee Liang Mr Gwee Lian Kheng Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann Mr Yeo Khee Gee Mr Yew Hang Meng Dr Teng Su Ching Prof Ho Lai Yun Assoc Prof John Elliott

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Mr Koh Choon Hui 1 Prof Ho Lai Yun

Chairman

JP, PJG

Remuneration

Investment

Chairman Member

(since 1978)

Vice Chairman

JP, BBM

Crisis Management

Audit

Awards

Sunbeam Place

Social Work Service

Research & Advocacy

Information & Corporate Relations

Name

Appeals

Executive

ABOUT US Committee Members  2011/2012  

Chairman

Advisor Chairman

Member Member Member

(since 2003)

Mr Tan Suee Chieh

Vice Chairman

Chairman

(since 2008)

Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann 2

BBM

Honorary Secretary

Member

Member

Member

Member

(since 1987)

Ms Theresa Sim

Honorary Treasurer

3

Member Member Member

(since 2011)

Assoc Prof Cuthbert Teo Eng Swee

Honorary Asst Secretary

Member Member

(since 2007)

Mr Ho Lon Gee

Honorary Asst Treasurer

Chairman

(since 2011)

Assoc Prof Agnes Chang

Member

Mr Alex Lee Ka But

Member

JP

Vice Chairman Vice Chairman Member Member Chairman

Ms Annie Gan

Member

Mr Kurt Wee Chorng Kien

Member Chairman

Mdm Rashidah Abdul Rasip

Member

Dr Stephanie Leonard

Member

Dr Teng Su Ching

BBM

JP, PBM

Mr Wong Yew Meng Mr Peter Joe Chia

PBM

BBM(L)

Assoc Prof Daniel Fung Assoc Prof John Elliott Dr Lim Hwee Leng

PBM

BBM

Member

Member

Member

Member Member

Member Member Member

Member Chairman Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Chairman

Member

Chairman

Co-opted Member Nominated Member

Member

Nominated Member

Member

Nominated Member

Member

Singapore Children’s Society is governed by the Executive Committee which has overall responsibility for policy making and governance. Members of the Committees are volunteers and receive no monetary remuneration for their contribution.

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1

Mr Koh Choon Hui is a Managing Director in the private sector.

2

Mrs Mae-Lim Hoon Ann is a Liaison Officer in government service.

3

Ms Theresa Sim is a Partner of an audit firm.

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


Mr Alfred Wong

Investment

Advisor

Assoc Prof Alice Seng

Member

Member

Mrs Amy Fam

Member

Mr Ang Choon Kiat

Advisor

Mr Bay Chin Chye

Member

Mr Brendon Yeo

Member

Assoc Prof Brian Yeo

Advisor

Mr Chan Chong Beng

Member

Mr Chan Eng Thai

Member

Ms Chang Rui Hua

Member

Dr Clarice Hong Pei Hsia

Advisor

Capt David Eliathamby

Observer

Mr Gwee Lian Kheng

Member

BBM

Mr Harry Chua Chin Nam

Member

Assoc Prof Isabella Wong Mr Kenneth Tan

Member Member

Dr Kevin Koh

Vice Chairman

Dr Lee Jee Mui

Member

Dr Lena Lee

Member

Dr Lim Lee Ching

Observer

Mrs Maria Shiu

Member

Mr Mohd Khairunan Bin Ali

Member

Mr Ning de Guzman Dr Ong Bee Ping

Audit

Sunbeam Place

Social Work Service

Research & Advocacy

Name

Information & Corporate Relations

Appeals

ABOUT US Committee Members  2011/2012  

Member Advisor

PPA

Mrs Pek-Quek Swee Hee

Member

Mr Philip Tan

Member

Prof Phua Kong Boo

Member

Member

Mr Richard Tong

Member

Capt Suresh Menon

Member

Ms Susan Verghese

BBM

Prof Tan Cheng Lim

PPA

Member

Member

Advisor Member

Ms Tan Khiaw Ngoh

Member

Mr Thomas Ting

Member

Dr Warren Lee

Member

Ms Yap Bee Cheng Mr Yeo Khee Gee

Member

PBM

Mr Yew Hang Meng Dr Yong Wern Mei

Member

PBM

Member

Member Member

Member

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Tackle challenges

head on

I WANT TO BE MORE SURE OF MYSELF, to have the support of those around me as I overcome the obstacles in my way.

Whether facing issues of school and peer pressure, or family and financial problems, having the right life skills can make all the difference. Our programmes focus on developing healthy social, emotional and psychological skills in young people, enabling them to confidently rise to life’s challenges.

I wish that I can always be happy with my friends and family.

BUT WHEN THERE IS UNHAPPINESS, I HOPE SOMEONE WILL HELP ME.


OUR WORK In 2011, 67,574 children, youth and families benefited from our comprehensive range of programmes aimed at addressing different needs. These programmes spanning our six service categories are tailored to help needy children from disadvantaged families.

THE SIX  SERVICE  CATEGORIES  ARE:

1 2 3 4 5 6

Caregiving Community Developmental Preventive Public Education Remedial

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OUR WORK Caregiving

Student Care Centre (Henderson) tudent Care Centre (Henderson) is a before-and-after school care service for primary school children who mainly come from low-income, single-parent and/or distressed families, and who are left at home without adult supervision.

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The Centre provides a nurturing environment where children are given opportunities to enhance their emotional, intellectual, social and physical development through various activities and programmes.

Kim Beng, g n o H ( g n o H “Miss tudent Care S e th f o d a e H ys listens to Centre) alwa ve problems. a us when we hany problem we e She can solv understandings face and mis friends. It’s like we have with ad our minds! she can re ing to her.” We like talk Angel, aged 12

ALERT Programme The ALERT Programme teaches children to be aware of their level of alertness and concentration and apply simple techniques to regulate these levels appropriately for activities such as playing sports, paying attention in class or performing daily tasks. Seven children from the Centre enrolled in the programme – five were hyperactive and/or attention deficit while the other two were reserved and listless. ALERT is conducted by an Institute of Mental Health (IMH) REACH team every Tuesday over six sessions. REACH (Response, Early Intervention and Assessment in Community Mental Health) is a programme under the National Mental Health Blueprint, serving the mental health needs of school-going children and adolescents. It is led by the IMH in collaboration with the Ministry of Education (MOE), voluntary welfare organisations, family doctors and NCSS. The children were taught how to self-regulate their levels of alertness and concentration through praise and a positive reward system. The Centre’s staff, participating children and their parents made firm commitments to work together to complete the programme. At the end, each child received a certificate of participation and enjoyed a mini-celebration. Aside from programmes, the children also enjoyed an excursion to the Zoo, learnt about caring for horses at Turf City, and picked up culinary skills. The Centre rounded off the year with its first bonding night at Aloha Changi resort. In 2011, Student Care Centre (Henderson) served 56 children.

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OUR WORK Caregiving

Sunbeam Place unbeam Place is a residential home and gazetted place of safety for abused and neglected children in need of protection or whose parents are unable to provide proper care.

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We provide a home-like and loving environment for children aged between 2 and 18 years, and also counsel and help them cope with their emotions of fear, anxiety, worry or guilt. The programmes offered at Sunbeam Place cater to the children’s emotional and developmental needs.

Placement Programme

“The greatest children have tathing these the lesson of hu ught me is cannot teach a milit y. One proud and expe child if he is ct listen. That wou s the child to to make the chilld only ser ve Rather, one mu d resentful. st to see from the be willing perspective and child’s his or her need understand when you can g s. It is only a trust will he or in a child’s and heed what she listen you say.” Joseph, volunte er tutor

This new programme offers part-time job opportunities within Sunbeam Place for residents of the home aged between 14 to 18 years old. The youths are keen on seeking part-time job opportunities but curfew restrictions at the home make it difficult to find a match. Therefore, the Placement Programme provides casual employment opportunities for the residents, and enables the staff to impart soft skills, basic work etiquette, resume-building and interview techniques to them. The youths can take up jobs such as gardening, storekeeping and administrative work (different from the household tasks that older children undertake as responsible household members). Wages are based on the type of work done as well as their job performance. Through the Placement Programme, Sunbeam Place aims to help residents discover their strengths; to reinforce a sense of responsibility and inculcate values that will stand them in good stead in life. Sunbeam Place had 94 residents in 2011 compared to 63 in 2010.

Against All Odds Loi Siang Hock was only one year and five months old when his mother Madam Yew had to make a hard decision. Facing financial, emotional and housing issues, his mother placed him in the care of the Society’s Convalescent Home (now Sunbeam Place) in July 1997 although she wanted to keep her child by her side. “The home would be able to provide a stable and nurturing environment for Siang Hock. I did not want him to be placed with a foster family as I am strongly attached to him. Also, I wanted to play a part in taking care of him. My plan was to first settle my financial and emotional difficulties and look for accommodation,” reflected Madam Yew, who maintained contact with Siang Hock all the while. Siang Hock entered Grace Orchard School in 2003 (when he was seven) and his diligence, enthusiasm and determination enabled him to improve in his studies. He was consistently praised by his teachers and scored well in Maths and English, earning him a Model Student award in 2005.

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OUR WORK Caregiving He enrolled in the Boys’ Brigade and had the honour of commanding his team during the school parade. He was also chosen to represent his school at a robotics competition in 2007. In 2010, Siang Hock was awarded Most Outstanding Prefect, Most Outstanding Student of the Level, and Most Outstanding Contributions to CCA (Boys’ Brigade and Basketball). Due to his accomplishments, he was selected to join his senior schoolmates for an Overseas Community Project (OCP) in Cambodia, making him the youngest student from the school to be selected for the OCP. Ever modest, Siang Hock acknowledges that the Society has done much to nurture him: “I want to say thank you to the aunties and my friends (counsellors and child development officers) at Sunbeam Place. They encouraged me when I felt sad and told me not to give up.” Madam Yew is proud of Siang Hock: “He has grown up to be so brave and independent. He can take public transport by himself and he learns quite quickly. I thank Children’s Society for helping him to be where he is today.”

Vulnerable Witness Support Programme “The volunteers are very supportive. They were with me while I was at the court hearing, and because of that I felt less worried. Attending the pre-trial court visit also gave me more confidence.” Child witness, aged 14

he Vulnerable Witness Support Programme (VWSP) which was started in 1998 is an initiative of the Subordinate Courts working with Singapore Children’s Society, in collaboration with the Attorney-General’s Chambers and the Singapore Police Force. The aim of the VWSP is to provide emotional, non-evidentiary and practical support to vulnerable young witnesses.

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Testifying in court can be especially stressful and frightening for children, which may result in their testimonials being deemed ineffective. Hence, Children’s Society recruits and trains volunteers to help child-witnesses under the age of 16 who have to give evidence in court. These trained volunteers are assigned to the child-witnesses, who may be victims as well, to help them deal with their fears and anxieties and to familiarise them with judicial procedures. Preparing child-witnesses to better cope with court proceedings and testifying in court would lead to more positive outcomes. Five cases were referred to us in 2011.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR WORK Caregiving

Not   Giving     In  to     Anger

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ric was angry with his mother. His family used to live together, go out and have fun. But for some time his mother and father hardly spoke to each other. Then one day his mother said that Dad would not be staying with them anymore.

He was angry that he did not have a family like his friends and classmates. He was embarrassed to talk about his family and sometimes this made him even angrier with his mother. He was angry that he was born smaller-sized than others as he had achondroplasia – a type of dwarfism. Some classmates teased him and called him names like “shortie”. Seeing how much taller his classmates were, Eric began to believe that he was handicapped and that nobody would want him. When Eric was enrolled at Student Care Centre (Henderson), the staff at the Centre noticed his intelligence, initiative in speaking to others and his sense of curiosity about the world around him. Over time, the staff observed that he was often restless and could not sit still when spoken to. The staff approached his mother to ask if Eric had been diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Through the course of the conversation, they found out that Eric often lashed out at his mother – scolding, cursing and pushing her away when he did not get what he wanted. After spending time with Eric, the counsellor at the Centre discovered the reasons for Eric’s anger. Despite the fact that he loves his mother, his confusion and assumptions led him to blame her for the divorce. With this in mind, the Centre worked with Eric and his mother to help overcome his issues. Eric was counselled for almost half a year, and during these sessions he was encouraged to reassess his assumptions that his mother was at fault. The staff were empathetic to Eric’s insecurity and provided him with an environment where he could explore his strengths and weaknesses and build his self-confidence. The Centre spoke with Eric’s mother, reassuring her that it was not her fault that her son had achondroplasia, and also gave her advice on raising a child with ADHD. She was also guided on where she could seek additional help for herself and her child. Aware that Eric missed spending time with his father, the Centre also facilitated his parents agreeing on access to Eric through phone calls and visits. Now Eric feels more secure and self-confident. He is accepted by his friends and is happier, often sharing his home-cooked food with others. Eric throws less tantrums and appreciates his mother more. Eric’s mother is also happier and more confident in her role as a mother to an achondroplasia child. She now enjoys his company and is not embarrassed to be seen with him. The positive change in his behaviour has spurred Eric’s mother to help other parents facing difficulties.


OUR WORK Community

Family Service Centre (Yishun) t Family Service Centre (Yishun), we promote a stable family life through various services and programmes. These include financial aid, casework and counselling, enhanced information and referral services, camps, workshops and programmes such as LEAP (Let Every Aspect Progress), EUREKA!, REACH and Storm Riders.

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In 2011, the Centre received a total of 773 Enhanced Information and Referral Service (IRS) cases, of which 438 received casework and counselling services. 269 were new or reopened cases, out of which 46% had a total household monthly income of $2,000 and below.

Top 5 Issues (New cases only) Financial Issues Marital Issues Family Issues Housing/Shelter Employment/Career Family Violence/Spousal Abuse Parenting/Child Management

2010

2011

40% – – 5% 10% 12% 6%

34% 8% 6% – – 16% 8%

“Your staff Pei Y is ver y kind andun sincere. She ta the initiative to kes c and see how I a all doing, and also m fin out more about ds my family so th additional help at ca be given. Thank n you Pei Yun a Children’s Sociend ty!” Madam Goh

Of the 438 cases, 223 were closed within the year. 213 (99%) of the 216 feedback respondents indicated that they were very satisfied with our casework and counselling services. Family Service Centre (Yishun) also disburses The Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund* to needy students. During the year, we disbursed $98,965 to 263 children from low-income families. * within the Family Service Centre’s service boundaries.

Highlights for 2011

22

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The objective of REACH is to improve the mental health of school-going children. This is done through screening and intervention in collaboration with the IMH Child Guidance Clinic’s REACH mobile team. For 2011, two cases were referred to REACH for assessment and intervention. Together with one case carried forward from the previous year, there were three active cases managed by the Centre.

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Storm Riders is an anger management intervention programme for children from Primaries Three to Five. They learn effective communication, emotional management and regulation techniques, as well as positive conflict resolution skills. In addition, various cognitive-behavioural difficulties displayed by children with anger or behavioural problems are also addressed. Two runs of Storm Riders were conducted at Jiemin and Xishan Primary Schools, benefiting a total of 26 children.

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR WORK Community

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EUREKA! equips children with skills and knowledge on coping with changes in life. The programme has been enhanced, bringing it to four sessions from three with more experiential activities to elicit greater participation. The target group has been expanded to include children from Primaries Two to Five as there are advantages in acquiring problem-solving skills earlier in life. Each two-hour session explores topics such as coping with changes, recognising and managing the feelings that arise from change, drawing on positive attitudes towards change and building resilience to cope with change. In 2011, 42 children benefited through two runs of EUREKA!

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Camp V-Nest aims to instil positive values in children through fun and innovative games and activities. Two runs of the camp were conducted at Xishan Primary School and at the Centre. Supported by 25 Meridian Junior College and 27 Nanyang Junior College students who assisted as camp facilitators, values such as Respect, Resilience and Responsibility were brought to life for 110 upper primary camp participants.

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For 2011, 39 children participated in LEAP (Let Every Aspect Progress), a programme that builds self-esteem and confidence through role-play, group discussions and experiential learning. Group facilitators help create a safe, supportive and non-judgemental environment for participants to achieve prescribed goals.

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Project Invest is a fun four-session experiential course for parents (with children below 12 years old) who are keen to strengthen the relationship with their children through acquiring parenting skills and knowledge. Topics include parenting styles, positive discipline and mental-emotional needs of children. Three runs of the programme were done during this year, with a total attendance of 37 parents.

iNSPIRE Fund ccess to info-communications technology is an essential component of the local education system. The NEU PC Plus programme by the Infocomm Development Authority helps students, or persons with disabilities, from low-income families own a new computer with bundled software as well as free three-year broadband subscription at an affordable price.

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Should students from low-income families have difficulties with the co-payment, they can apply for the iNSPIRE Fund administered by the Society. The fund enables them to own a computer through performing community service. In 2011, the iNSPIRE fund benefited 192 students. SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Community

M

adam Chan felt out of place in a seminar room with 14 other parents – they looked better educated and seemed more able at nurturing children. Despite her misgivings, nothing could dampen Madam Chan’s eagerness to be a better parent. She was determined to learn everything she could, for the sake of her child.

Madam Chan first came to Family Service Centre (Yishun) due to financial difficulties. Her husband lost his job and she had been a full-time homemaker for the past six years. While her husband searched for work, she poured her attention into tending to ten-year-old Wayne. Since pre-school, Wayne had difficulty catching up with his peers. He was failing academically and socially he was shy and withdrawn. Madam Chan felt isolated and at a loss. She feared that Wayne would be at an educational disadvantage, just like she was when she was young. After school, both mother and child would be confined to the desk stacked with assessment books. Madam Chan felt constantly anxious about Wayne’s future, and home became a pressure cooker of tasks and frustration. Wayne did not know how to express his difficulties, but he knew that he was feeling very trapped and unhappy inside.

Hearing My  Son’s  Voice -  The  Story  of  a  Mother’s  Journey The staff at Family Service Centre (Yishun) listened carefully to Madam Chan and assessed the needs of her family. Interim financial assistance was provided while the Centre supported the family in several other ways, but money alone would not solve their problems. Wayne was enrolled in Sunbeam Friends Club where he acquired social skills through child-friendly events. Madam Chan and her husband attended Project Invest (a parenting workshop) and were further supported by the counselling service. Through parent-child activities and outings, the family experienced more joy and laughter. After three months, Madam Chan told the Centre about the transformation within herself and in her family. She was better able to cope with her difficulties, and gained fresh perspective in better understanding her child. Madam Chan was delighted to realise that she need not be alone in her parenting journey. “Before this, I used to hear people say that in order to teach children, we need patience and love. We need to hear their voice… But I found it very hard to do. After hearing from the staff trainers and other parents at the workshop, I learnt that there were many little things I could change. I used to tell Wayne what to do because I wanted the best for him and would get angry when he could not understand the things I wanted to teach him. Now, I’ve learnt that I really need to consider his feelings and opinions.” Madam Chan started a new routine of regularly playing with her son, bringing Wayne out of the house and enjoying sports like badminton and cycling. She enjoyed a new-found closeness with Wayne and could see that he felt the same. The Centre staff asked Wayne how he felt about the changes at home. Feeling shy, he smiled and scribbled on paper: “In the past, I was unhappy. Now, I am happy.”


OUR WORK Developmental

Children Service Centre hildren Service Centre reaches out to children between 5 and 12 years old who mainly come from dysfunctional or disadvantaged families. These children often lack supervision as both parents are working, and are likely to spend their time unwisely or run the risk of dropping out of school.

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Through programmes such as KidzSHinE (Seeing Hope In Every kid), Choo Choo Train, kidsREAD, Sunbeam Friends Club, Rainbows and KidzHOPE (reacHing Out helPing familiEs), we impart positive values, encourage children to develop healthy self-esteem and minimise the risk of delinquent behaviour.

“It tugged at my heartstrings to see some of the frail aunties waving their hands to the music when the children were performing. They must have been delighted to have so many children in their midst! During the debrief session back at the Centre, some of the children asked about dementia, and we had a heart-to-heart conversation on the condition. This activity opened the children’s eyes and broadened their thinking.” Ms Ann Hui Peng, Head of Children Service Centre

The Centre’s annual Christmas Celebration was done differently this year, with the children hosting a party for senior citizens at the Salvation Army’s Bedok Multiservice Centre. Despite not having much interaction with the elderly, the children enthusiastically organised themselves into committees, each tasked with coordinating the different aspects of running the party. The children put in additional time for practising their performance item, and their parents were very supportive of this opportunity for the children to spread cheer to the elderly. On 22 December, 41 children brightened the day for the senior citizens with songs and dances, bringing festive cheer to the end of the year.

KidzHOPE The KidzHOPE (reacHing Out helPing familiEs) programme reaches out to children, building resilience and empowering them with a sense of hope. Working with students from Singapore Polytechnic’s Applied Drama and Psychology course, drama is used to bring children on an experiential learning journey on understanding human thoughts and behaviour. From this, the children are encouraged to make conscious and informed decisions in their choices and behaviour, and discover that there are many ways of solving problems. In April, KidzHOPE explored the theme of bullying with 34 children. Later in the year, 24 children considered the notion of happiness and evaluated what made them happy.

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Developmental

“Children in my class love this programme. They remember the songs learnt and values taught in the stories. Parents have also told me that their children love to share the stories told by Choo Choo Train teachers.” Ms Ida, PAP n Community Foundatio r he kindergarten teac

Choo Choo Train hoo Choo Train is a structured community outreach programme aimed at instilling in five and six-year-old children six positive moral values. At Kindergarten One, they learn about being kind, diligent and honest; and at Kindergarten Two, they are taught the values of being thankful, respectful and filial.

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These six universal values are applicable across all races and religions, and we strongly believe that these values will be guiding principles for the children later in life. The Choo Choo Train programme employs a combination of storytelling, puppetry, art and craft, role-plays and songs to keep each session lively and engaging for the children.

Choo Choo Train sessions are held at PAP Community Foundation (PCF) Centres in the Kaki Bukit ward. Over three months, our staff conduct weekly sessions at the PCF centres to introduce these values and encourage the children to apply these values in their daily life. There were 433 participants in the Choo Choo Train programme for 2011.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR WORK Developmental

Project CABIN “The social worker from Children’s Society is very pleasant and bubbly. She always greets everyone at the CABIN with a big ‘Hi!’ But what I appreciate most is that she really listens to us and understands our problems before offering us advice.” Claire, New Town Secondary School student

roject CABIN is a school-based drop-in service that allows our social workers to reach out to youths more effectively as they spend the bulk of their time in school. The mission of Project CABIN is “A meeting point of discovery, recovery and friendship.”

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CABINs provide a place for youths to hang out after school hours to enjoy facilities such as Internet access, gaming consoles and board games, or engage in meaningful activities. In addition to organising fun-filled activities, the youth workers conduct life skills workshops and training courses as well as provide counselling support for students in need. The latest Project CABIN to be launched was at Pioneer Secondary School on 20 August, with Madam Halimah Yacob, Minister of State, Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports gracing the event. Named Pop-in Crib, the CABIN offers students a cosy setting where they can relax with their friends. In 2011, there were 15 secondary schools running Project CABIN. 4,828 students visited Project CABIN compared to 5,564 in 2010.

CABIN Club Since 2002, students from secondary schools participating in Project CABIN have the option of joining CABIN Club as part of their Co-Curricular Activity (CCA). To date, CABIN Club is the only CCA in Singapore supported by a social service agency. It aims to instil in members “Care for the self, others and the larger community.” CABIN Club members are imparted with life skills and exposed to the social service sector. Members are involved in planning and decision-making for the CABIN; youth workers from Children’s Society and school teachers act as advisors to these students and groom them in leadership roles. Five schools offered CABIN Club as a CCA in 2011. SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Developmental

Round Box ound Box is a drop-in centre that reaches out to youths through the medium of performing arts in an environment that is inviting, safe and conducive.

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By focusing their energies towards positive endeavours, the youths are given opportunities to discover their talents in activities such as hip-hop dance, Capoeira, sports clinics and drama. These talented young people are encouraged to spread their wings by organising and promoting various competitions, and also through performances at public events such as the Children’s Charities Association Fair. Round Box had 276 members in 2011.

“My friends and I love high-energy activities and we were really thrilled with the Capoeira workshop. It made us push our limits and we felt good about ourselves when we could perform those amazing moves! I hope Round Box will continue to always have such exciting activities.” Hafi, Round Box member

Sunbeam Friends Club unbeam Friends Club brings fun and joy to children and youths from low-income families through recreational, interactive and social activities. Our aim is to instil positive values, improve social skills and broaden their horizons.

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Children participate in activities such as art and craft, outdoor games, camps and outings. We also conduct personal development workshops on topics such as time management, friendship and staying healthy.

thank you and “I would like to for teaching your volunteersmy two boys. moral values to tremendous We have seen eir behaviour th improvement in eir kindness and also in th pe you will o to others. We h and educate e continue to guid and we hope more children nefit too.” others can be ther of Sunbeam o m , ir a N m a d a M mbers Friends Club me

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Centres with Sunbeam Friends Club

Membership

Children Service Centre Student Care Centre (Henderson) Family Service Centre (Yishun)

78 50

Total Membership in 2011

73 201


OUR WORK Developmental

Youth Centre (Jurong) outh Centre (Jurong) reaches out to youths living and studying in Jurong through the TeenStart and TeenzLife programmes. Our objective is to boost the self-confidence of youths through equipping them with skills and knowledge. They also organise the annual YouthGIG concert, a platform for their peers to showcase their talents in performing arts.

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“In 2011, I faced lots my friendships and of problems in relationships. I wasespecially in my that I performed baso depressed and started to cut dly in school m visiting the Youth Ceyself. I stopped back one day becaus ntre but went being happy there! e I remembered I co counsellors and they nfided in the through that difficu helped me lt for their help, thingsperiod. If not turned out very ba could have dly for me...” Ling, 15 years old

TeenzLife is a series of life skills workshops and talks conducted at neighbouring secondary schools. The aim is to help teenagers understand themselves and provide them with skills to help them in their daily life. Topics include stress and anger management, time management, boosting self-esteem as well as dealing with relationship issues and bullying. TeenStart is a drop-in programme where youths visit the Centre and enjoy facilities such as a pool table, a dance studio and computers. They can also participate in activities such as manga art drawing, scrapbooking, Amazing Races and yoga classes. The youth also receive support and guidance from the counsellors when faced with issues pertaining to their personal, family, social or school life.

In 2011, the Centre started outreach work to upper primary students in the neighbouring schools. This was initiated because the issues that teenagers face emerge at a younger age, when they are pre-adolescents. The TweenzLife programme is a series of awareness talks and workshops, aimed at supporting young people in the areas of fulfilling their potential, maintaining self-esteem and avoiding health-damaging behaviours. It also includes a parents’ support component, where parenting talks help them understand and support their children through the transition from childhood to being a teenager. In September, Head of the Centre Ms Christina Appadoo held two sessions with a team of Yuhua Community Centre children’s camp facilitators, sharing her Centre’s experience in running camps. She also conducted a three-hour volunteer training workshop with the Community Centre’s Young Ladies’ Club, which was also involved with the camp. For both groups, Ms Appadoo covered the following topics: the roles of volunteers, communication with children and their developmental needs.

Service

2010

2011

TeenStart Membership

581

566

TeenStart Youth Outreach Activities

59 activities reaching out to 547 youths

122 activities reaching out to 1,284 youths

TeenzLife

39 sessions reaching out to 1,681 secondary school students

60 sessions reaching out to 7,864 secondary school students

TweenzLife

12 sessions reaching out to 3,115 primary school students

YouthGIG

75 participants

70 participants SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Developmental

Stepping   into  a

BIdN C A Broa en     to

One’s   Horizons

H

i, my name is Salinah and I am currently a second-year Mechatronics student at the Institute of Technical Education (ITE). I graduated from Pioneer Secondary School in 2009, and I am glad to share my experience in Project CABIN back in secondary school. Before I got to know about Project CABIN, I did not spend my time wisely – often hanging out at the park or roaming shopping centres with my friends. I was someone who was quite restless and disliked staying at home, and was very easily influenced – in a negative way.

My friends and I heard that something called a CABIN had been opened in school. We were curious because we heard that there were games to play and comfortable spots to chill out at. Initially we simply headed there to chat and relax. Then we got to know that staff from Children’s Society would drop by. We chatted with them, sharing about our daily life, our thoughts and feelings as well as our aspirations. We also talked about what made us worried or sad. We were invited to participate in workshops at the CABIN, and we picked up soft skills and things like how to plan camps and activities. My friends and I were given the task to plan a table soccer competition. It was a first for us, but the competition went smoothly and we met our learning objective: to build teamwork and communication between us and our juniors. Next, we organised a visit to an orphanage. At school, we prepared food for the children and planned activities. I injured myself while playing soccer with the children and even though I was in pain, I saw how happy they were to have us come over and visit them. The pain did not matter anymore when I realised how much more fortunate I was and that simple gestures can mean so much to others. Perhaps the most important lesson learnt was conflict resolution. My best friend and I were part of a camp organising committee, and she was designated the leader. During the planning, we had differences in opinions and things got heated. However, the CABIN staff who advised us while we were planning the camp helped us work things out. Taking one step back and considering the other person’s point of view goes a long way in avoiding arguments. Hanging out at the CABIN and taking part in the activities changed me for the better. The school teachers and staff from Children’s Society certainly inspired me. I really appreciate the times spent chatting with the staff from Children’s Society – their willingness to listen helped put me on the right track!


OUR WORK Preventive

Bully-Free Programme ingapore Children’s Society started the Bully-Free Programme in 2004 to address the issue of school bullying and its impact on those involved. The programme aims to promote a bully-free culture in schools where young minds can thrive. The Bully-Free Programme operates on three levels, namely Public Outreach, School Outreach and Bully-Free School-Based Intervention Programme.

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y-Free “As a Bull I’ll protect or, Ambassad are bullied and those whoake my school a help to m py place!” ha p mp y-Free Ca ll u B , n a g Me participant

Bully-Free Talks and Classroom Activity Children’s Society started Bully-Free Talks in 2009, with 23 primary schools taking part that year. For this year, 25,334 students from 23 primary schools benefited from these assembly talks.

Bully-Free Forum The annual Bully-Free Forum is a public event for educators, social service practitioners and parents, aimed at raising awareness on the topic of school bullying. About 300 attended this year’s Forum which was held on 16 July. Dr Annis Fung Lai-chu, Assistant Professor of the Department of Applied Social Studies of the City University of Hong Kong, was the guest speaker and shared tips on managing different profiles of bullies within the school setting. Gracing the forum was Guest-of-Honour Mr Heng Chee How, Senior Minister of State, Prime Minister’s Office.

To heighten awareness for students, the Society also came up with materials for primary and secondary school teachers to conduct and facilitate discussions on bullying.

School-Based Intervention Programme The Bully-Free School-Based Intervention Programme is based on a whole-school approach. Schools implementing anti-bullying policies involve educators and students in creating a safe and friendly school environment for students. This is done through platforms such as assembly sessions, classroom and recess activities for students and Bully-Free Networking Sessions for school staff.

Bully-Free Camp The annual Bully-Free Camp is part of the programme’s School Outreach efforts. During this engaging three-day camp, students are equipped with knowledge on dealing with bullying – essential for their role as Bully-Free Ambassadors. Ninety-six children from 11 primary schools took part in the camp held from 16 to 18 March 2011. Aside from topics on bullying, the camp touched on building positive friendships. Through meaningful activities and discussions, Bully-Free Ambassadors from each school were imparted with knowledge on cultivating and building healthy friendships. SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Preventive

Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Workshop he Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention (CANP) workshop aims to equip participants with a better understanding of the four types of child abuse and neglect. Participants are also taught to identify the signs and symptoms, as well as manage suspected abuse cases. This workshop has been conducted for secondary caregivers, such as teachers, to raise their awareness about child abuse.

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In 2011, 126 secondary caregivers attended the workshop.

Compulsory Education Casework he Compulsory Education (CE) Act was passed in 2003. Under the Act, a child of compulsory school age born after 1 January 1996 and is a citizen of Singapore residing in Singapore, has to attend a national primary school regularly unless he has been exempted from compulsory education.

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Since 2003, the Society has been working with MOE to facilitate children’s registration and/or regular attendance at school. Our caseworkers work closely with school personnel and other community agencies to integrate the children into the school system. Since the start of this service, 206 children have been referred to us. In 2011, 48 sat for their PSLE, among whom 15 were promoted to a secondary school, nine were admitted to Northlight School or Assumption Pathway School and 17 will be repeating Primary Six in 2012. Three of the remaining nine children have passed the CE liable age while the rest are being followed up by MOE.

Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework n 2006, Children’s Society was invited by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS) and People’s Association to develop a prototype for grassroots leaders who would call on households identified with children who are of pre-school age but are not yet registered at a pre-school. Subsequently, we provided the training for grassroots leaders to call on these households.

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In 2009, we piloted outreach work and took up a contract to work directly with families that needed support. In 2011, we approached 311 families to ensure that their children were registered at a pre-school to better prepare them for formal education. 191 of these children were cases carried forward from the previous year. At the same time, we conducted 14 sessions of workshops to better prepare grassroots leaders who were also involved in the outreach programme. A total of 452 grassroots leaders attended the workshops.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR WORK Preventive

Project LADDER roject LADDER is a joint project with the Singapore Prison Service that allows children whose parents are incarcerated to maintain frequent contact through tele-visits from our Research and Outreach Centre at Bishan. Tele-visits provide an alternative mode of visitation without the need for the family to travel to the prison institutions. It also allows families more choices of preferred days and times to visit.

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The sessions present opportunities for our social workers to engage with the families, especially the children, who can then be assessed if they are coping well with the change in family circumstances. We also refer families to appropriate community or government agencies for assistance relating to employment, financial and housing issues. At the same time, we ensure that school-going children have their needs met, such as having school uniforms or pocket money. Our facilities have been well utilised since the start of the programme in 2003, and we are pleased to note that other organisations have since set up similar facilities. In 2011, 134 children used our facilities compared to 217 in 2010.

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Preventive

Tinkle Friend Helpline inkle Friend Helpline (1800-2744-788) is a national toll-free helpline for primary school children who need a listening ear. Manned by trained volunteers, the helpline provides support, advice and information to lonely and distressed children especially in situations when their parents or main caregivers are unavailable.

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Boredom and school-related issues remain the most commonly cited reasons for calling the helpline. A total of 2,581 calls were made to Tinkle Friend Helpline in 2011.

d “I feel comforte le Tink whenever I call le to ab Friend. I am not in a m run about as I a ften o I wheelchair and I feel . have headaches d. te sad and frustra r y ve Tinkle Friend is s to n patient and liste not ay me although I m Just y. have much to sa kle in knowing that T sten d to li Friend is aroun etter.” b makes me feel , Tinkle Ravi, aged 12 a Friend c ller

Types of Calls Received

2010

2011

Bored and chit-chat School-related Peer-related Family-related Sharing of happy events Boy-girl relationships Grief Alleged child abuse Enquiry about Tinkle Friend Helpline Attempt to contact (caller tries to make conversation but line is disconnected) Others

34.8% 14.0% 11.9% 6.5% 4.1% 0.6% 0.4% 0.2% 1.6%

30.0% 16.2% 14.0% 8.2% 2.6% 1.1% 0.4% 0.4% 1.6%

14.9%

12.0%

11.0%

13.5%

Feedback from Callers about Tinkle Friend Helpline

2010

2011

Feel helped Did not feel helped

99.5% 0.5%

99.4% 0.6%

Summary of Outreach Efforts

2010

2011

29

28

38,021

27,767

Number of school assembly talks conducted Number of children reached through assembly talks Number of students reached through BUZZ Tinkle Friend Newsletter

Tinkle Friend Camp This year’s theme focuses on the different emotions that are widely experienced by people. Research has shown that the ability to read the emotions of others and to control their own emotional expressions will result in young children having greater social skills as they mature. Hence the camp’s objective seeks to teach the participants to identify, explore and manage their emotions as well as how to acknowledge others’ emotions and to render help when necessary. This year, 146 children participated in the Tinkle Friend Camp while 175 attended in 2010.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

102,733 103,160


OUR WORK Preventive

A Family’s  LADDER     of  Hope

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hen my husband was sentenced to 10 months’ imprisonment in November 2010, our lives were turned upside down. I was sick with worry: how was I supposed to stand on my own two feet? How was I going to support three innocent lives? How was I going to face our family, friends and neighbours? Every day I prayed for courage and support... for a way through the difficult times. One day, while waiting for my turn to visit my husband at Changi Prison, something caught my eye – a pamphlet from Singapore Children’s Society. I read it and realised that I needed to get help and support for the sake of my kids. I called and booked an appointment for a tele-visit session (Project LADDER) at the Society’s Research and Outreach Centre. We were welcomed by a warm smile and a firm handshake from Ben. We were shy, but he made us all feel at ease and slowly I opened up to him about the worries for my family. Especially so for my eldest son Sam, who was emotionally and mentally hurt by what had happened. Ben would come over to counsel my kids and ask how we were. With his help, we were one of 75 families who received aid from Radio Gives Back (an initiative from MediaCorp Radio).

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am Sam. I was 14 when my father was sent to prison. Uncle Ben guided me through the hard times: he counselled me, and helped us by recommending my family to good programmes such as Radio Gives Back, which helped us a lot. He also nominated our family to get paint to repaint our rooms… And the paint was not cheap! Before, I felt quite sad and after the counselling with Uncle Ben, he helped me to get through my troubles and told me not to think too much as I was still young. He would come all the way to my house to counsel me and sometimes treated me to lunch. He did a lot of activities with me to cheer me up.

It has been seven months since my husband’s release, and life is certainly better after the storm. No words can describe how thankful I am to Singapore Children’s Society.

Uncle Ben helped me realise that I should not make my mother worry, and also guided me through the problems I had with her. He made sure that we were able to get a tele-visit time slot if we wanted to speak to our father. So thank you Children’s Society, especially Uncle Ben!

Mabel

Sam


OUR WORK Public Education  

KidzLive idzLive is a programme which aims to educate children on how to protect themselves from sexual abuse. This 30-minute programme incorporates interactive elements to teach children to respect their bodies and differentiate between good and bad touches. During the session, staff also teach children to “Say no”, “Walk out” and to “Tell a trusted adult” if they are touched inappropriately.

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KidzLive has been running in primary schools since 2001, and has been reaching out to preschoolers from 2006. In 2011, 271 children benefited from KidzLive.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR WORK Public Education

Research Studies ingapore Children’s Society conducts research to help identify social trends and issues related to children, youths and families in Singapore. Findings are published in monographs and presented at appropriate platforms.

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Three research studies were ongoing in the year:

Public and Professional Perceptions of Child Abuse and Neglect in Singapore

Infant Attachment Study

To gain insight and understanding of what child abuse and neglect is to Singaporeans, there is a need to explore the prevailing attitudes, values and practices in our society. Children’s Society first conducted such perception studies on child maltreatment in 1994 among the public, and in 1997, on professionals who were likely to encounter child abuse and neglect. In those two studies, the average Singaporean and professionals in healthcare, law, education and social services shared their opinions on what they deemed to be abuse, and how they felt about reporting abuse.

In collaboration with KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital (KKH), this longitudinal study was started in 2004 to examine how child-rearing practices and choice of caregivers affect children’s attachment, temperament and development in terms of cognition, socialisation, emotion and language. The study is progressing well. Currently, work on one cohort has been completed while data collection for the remaining two cohorts is ongoing. Findings from this study will benefit caregivers, child care professionals and policy makers. Findings from the first cohort were presented at the 9th Asian Pacific Regional Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect in New Delhi, India, in October 2011. A poster was presented at the 6th KKH Annual Scientific Meeting in July 2011.

Youth Study This study has been completed. Through a series of focus groups conducted with secondary school students, this study explored how youths in Singapore spend their time after school as well as during the weekends. Having a better appreciation of the types of activities that appeal to our youths today, our findings will help us develop programmes to engage our youths meaningfully.

It has been many years since the two studies were conducted and there have since been major changes to the policies and processes protecting children in Singapore. Hence, the Society is replicating these two studies to examine any attitudinal changes over time. The study aims to investigate if the acceptability of certain harmful parenting practices has changed for Singaporeans over time. It also looks for differences in their attitudes towards reporting child abuse and neglect cases. Besides uncovering shifts in perception, the current findings can also help ascertain if the Society’s public education and outreach attempts have been helpful, and provide us with clues to whether we should continue or change what we have been doing. The study is still ongoing. The first survey on members of the public has been completed, while the survey on professionals will soon be completed.

Research Grants Children’s Society gives out research grants to undergraduates and postgraduate students who do research study on issues related to children, youths and families as part of their course work. In 2011, a total of $5,250 was awarded to five successful applicants. SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Public Education  

Reflections   from  an  Intern

DELP NEO H HINNA UI XUA 3rd ye N a r stud N ent at gee An nP Psycho oly technic, Comm logy and unity S er vices

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he internship experience at Singapore Children’s Society was certainly an enriching one. Looking back at the past four months, I realised that this experience helped me acquire a basic understanding of the working world, as well as enhanced my personal development. I was given many opportunities to participate in different projects at the Research and Outreach Centre – these included performing for KidzLive, accompanying social workers during their home visits, and helping to develop a Parenting Guide on pre-schoolers.

KidzLive is a programme that educates children on preventing sexual abuse. Through the programme, I came to understand the painstaking work involved in running a programme. Much effort was put into planning in order to bring across the objective of the programme. Feedback such as children’s responses and receptivity to the programme was used to fine-tune the programme’s delivery. Effectiveness of the programme was also evaluated to ensure that children acquired the knowledge in protecting themselves. Although this may appear simple, all of the aforementioned were done to cater specifically to the needs of the young children. I was attached to a social worker during one of his home visits. I could vividly recall my apprehension and uncertainty when interacting with a client for the first time, as I was afraid that I might ask inappropriate questions. Through this experience, I understood the role of the social worker in helping and responding to the client’s needs. Not only did the social worker pool available resources together to alleviate the client’s problems, counselling was vital in encouraging clients to express their feelings. The key is not just about resolving the client’s current situation, but also asking the right questions while assessing their situation, as well as equipping them with coping skills to manage their long-term difficulties. Last but not least, during the course of my internship I was tasked to assist with the research and development of a Parenting Guide on pre-schoolers – an effort to promote the well-being of children. While conceptualising the guide, I gained insights on what it was like to create such a guide for parents. Many considerations had to be taken into account, such as the manner in which the content was to be presented and the ease of understanding. Despite difficulties encountered while researching literature reviews for the Parenting Guide, I am glad that they were resolved through the guidance of my director, Ms Sue and supervisor, Ms Xiaoling. Though the internship has ended, the knowledge gained through this experience will last a lifetime. For this, I thank both Sue and Xiaoling for mentoring, guiding and caring for my fellow interns and me.


OUR WORK Remedial

Children’s Medical Fund he Children’s Medical Fund aims to make quality medical treatment accessible to children up to 19 years of age, who are suffering from chronic and/or life threatening illnesses. Some of these required treatments or operations can place a very heavy financial burden on families from middle to lower-income, and in some cases be beyond their reach if help is not given.

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Beneficiaries’ most common illnesses are liver diseases, growth hormone deficiency, haemophilia, muscular dystrophy, spinal deformity/scoliosis, obstructive sleep apnoea, cancers, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, developmental delays and hearing disabilities requiring cochlear implants/hearing aids. This year, Singapore Children’s Society approved a total of $179,630.87 in support of eight applicants, of which three were new and five were repeat applicants. Altogether, we served a total of 21 patients.

Jane’s Hearing Challenge Thirteen-year-old Jane is the only child in her family, currently schooling at Westwood Secondary School. Her father is a full-time taxi driver while her mother is a full-time beautician. They live in a four-room HDB flat, and the parents work hard to save and pay for their monthly expenses, which include the high maintenance cost of Jane’s hearing needs. Jane was born without any disabilities. However, when she was in nursery, she started to lose hearing in both ears. She was advised to use hearing aids but the condition of her left ear worsened and subsequently could not hear at all. When Jane was in Kindergarten One, she underwent a cochlear implant procedure in her left ear. Her family managed to pay for it on their own. Jane’s hearing improved and it achieved 95% quality of sound. Jane used a hearing aid for her right ear as well. But in 2009, her hearing deteriorated and she needed another cochlear implant. Afraid of responding incorrectly to people because of her poor hearing, Jane’s self-esteem faltered and she became very shy and quiet. Children’s Medical Fund helped the family by providing a $27,000 subsidy for the cochlear implant in Jane’s right ear. After a successful surgery, Jane had regular follow-ups with her audiologist. Her hearing improved and Jane started to regain her confidence. Jane’s father visited the Family Service Centre (Yishun), where the Fund is administered, to personally thank the Society for helping his daughter.

BeaconWorks eaconWorks is offered to youths who exhibit less serious delinquent behaviour at the Beyond Parental Control (BPC) Pre-Complaint Screening stage. It is a six-month diversional rehabilitative programme to help youths and families stabilise youth behaviour and existing relationship issues.

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By offering this diversionary programme, we reduce the possibility of further strain to the parent-child relationship. We handled 30 cases in 2011 and 28 cases in 2010. SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Remedial Â

Beyond Parental Control (BPC) Pre-Complaint Screening nder Section 50 of the Children and Young Persons Act, Chapter 38 stipulates that a parent/guardian of a child/young person (under the age of 16) has the power to bring his or her charge before the Juvenile Court if the child is deemed Beyond Parental Control.

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Every Friday at the Juvenile Court, our team of social workers and counsellors screen complaints from parents wanting to pursue the BPC order. At this preliminary stage, we mediate minor relationship issues and redirect cases to diversional programmes or Family Service Centres for further intervention. We screened 531 cases in 2011. Truancy, running away from home and staying out overnight remained the most common complaints lodged by parents. Mothers formed the majority of the complainants, with many cases citing multiple behavioural issues*.

* Most Common Behaviour Complaints Lodged by Parents/Guardians Behaviour Staying out overnight Truancy Running away Smoking Violence Theft Moral risk Drinking alcohol Substance abuse Suicide/self-harm Addiction Gangs Theft and loansharking Lying Pending police investigations Tattoos/piercings Defiance Vandalism Extortion Gambling

No. of Cases 425 354 335 276 223 217 119 72 58 52 47 41 27 26 21 20 19 6 5 4

BPC Pre-Complaint Mediation ases which require further assessment after the BPC screening stage are referred to the Pre-Complaint Mediation programme. Consisting of four to eight sessions of assessment and mediation, these sessions allow families to resolve minor issues outside the Juvenile Court system.

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2011 saw 112 Pre-Complaint Mediation cases compared to 89 in 2010.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR WORK Remedial

BPC Investigation ur BPC cases require independent investigative reports to be submitted to the Juvenile Court by MCYS-registered caseworkers. While the youth is held in safe custody in a closed institution, the caseworker will then conduct an in-depth investigation into the youth’s family background, academic record, as well as social and emotional behaviour. This comprehensive report contains recommendations for the Juvenile Court’s consideration. In 2011, we investigated 28 BPC cases.

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BPC Parents Mandated Order arents are critical in moderating the behaviour of wayward children. Hence, the Juvenile Court mandates some parents whose children are under the Beyond Parental Control Court Order to attend counselling sessions at our Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh) and programmes at various venues. The sessions are designed to equip parents with effective parenting skills and knowledge. A bond of $1,000 or up to $5,000 is imposed on them to mandate their attendance at counselling sessions. This year, 77 families went through the programme.

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BPC Statutory Supervision Order he aim of the court order is to provide supervision and guidance for the child in his/her natural environment. Under the order, our counsellors and social workers will supervise and counsel parents and wayward youth for a period of between one and three years.

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We organise various activities aimed at fostering stronger family unity, and encourage parents and youths to participate. The BPC Family Day is one such opportunity for parents and youths to bond and pick up life skills such as effective communication and problem solving. In 2011, we worked with a total of 44 cases.

Youth Family Care Programme he Youth Family Care programme is run in partnership with the Juvenile Court. We match volunteer mentor families to befriend, mentor and encourage delinquent youths who are under court orders.

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During the one-year term of contract, the mentor families serve as positive role models to the youths and their families. By building a relationship with the youths, the mentor families are able to guide them in making positive choices in life. For 2011, we matched three cases. SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR WORK Remedial

Buddy Care Programme he Buddy Care Programme is an initiative of the Juvenile Court in partnership with Singapore Children’s Society and Cornerstone Community Services Centre. The principle of this programme is to have ‘youths mentoring youths’ with peers leading by example.

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The mentors are a group of trained youths aged between 18 and 30 years. These youth mentors befriend and support youths placed on court orders. Their positive involvement can have a vast impact on youths who are at risk of becoming chronic offenders. We matched eight cases this year compared to two in 2010.

Guidance Programme he Guidance Programme is a six-month counselling and rehabilitative programme which helps first-time juvenile offenders referred by the Police recognise the severity of their actions and the consequences of a repeat offence. The programme also aims to educate youths and their families on how to prevent reoffending through counselling, group work and constructive activities.

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We conducted simulated court proceedings to help our youths in the Guidance Programme understand the juvenile justice system. This gave them an opportunity to empathise with victims and parents by seeing the consequences of their offences. Our Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh) ran group work sessions for the parents and youths of the Guidance Programme. Sessions included talks on topics like Understanding Your Teenager, Communication, Choices and Consequences, among others. In 2011, we handled 58 cases compared to 79 in the previous year. Theft was the most common offence committed by both male and female youth. Male offenders formed a higher percentage, with the average age for both genders at between 15 and 16 years old.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR WORK Remedial

Turning Point

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t 15, Dinesh was like any other adolescent with a need to experience freedom. However, he experimented with smoking, drinking and hanging out with a gang. His mother, Madam Kumar, became a single parent at the age of 30 when her husband left her. It was hard for Madam Kumar to juggle a cleaning job and cook for her two children while ensuring that they attended school daily. Dinesh did not help out, refusing to supervise his younger brother. Instead, he played truant and returned home late, occasionally getting involved in fights. His mother was at her wit’s end. And with the need to make ends meet, she had to leave Dinesh and his younger brother to their own devices most of the time. Late one evening, Dinesh and his friends decided to have some fun playing with the parked bicycles at the foot of the block. Unable to resist the temptation, Dinesh decided to steal a bicycle. In the process of dismantling the bicycle with his friends, a passer-by alerted the police and they were caught. Madam Kumar was in tears at the police station, unable to believe that Dinesh had tried to steal somebody else’s property. Dinesh could not understand his mother’s emotional outburst but felt that the only way to calm her was to agree to the structured six-month Guidance Programme suggested by the Police. As part of the intervention, he and his mother were expected to attend counselling at the Society’s Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh). Believing that he could cruise through the programme, Dinesh played along with the counsellor and spoke only when spoken to. He did not feel the need to volunteer detailed responses. As the programme progressed, Dinesh was prompted to visit his mother’s workplace to understand the work she did, then return to the counsellor for a sharing session. It would be a memorable day, for it was the first time that Dinesh saw his mother at work. As a cleaner at public-housing estates, Madam Kumar’s daily duties were to clean public toilets, the common areas and the rubbish disposal areas. Dinesh was stunned by the overpowering odour and the heavy manual labour that his mother had to undergo daily. Moved by his mother’s predicament, he also realised that she had not taken a single day off from work. During a family counselling session, Madam Kumar shared more on her experiences as a cleaner;  she revealed that her commitment to her job was the only way she could show love for her children by ensuring that there was always food on the table. Dinesh became closer to his younger brother and mother. His ambition was to get a job so that his mother would not have to work so hard. Seeing his new role in the family, Dinesh took up a part-time job at a fast food restaurant while awaiting his ‘N’ Level results. Dinesh now juggles both his part-time work and an Engineering course at ITE. Eighty per cent of his salary goes to his mother while the rest goes to his studies.


Happiness is being able to go places and having our

DREAMS COME TRUE!

We all need someone to believe in us, to look out for us and help guide us in the right direction. Our people are true guiding lights, passionate and devoted to being a positive influence in transforming young lives.

We should have more opportunities to showcase our creativity in school.

ARE EXAM RESULTS THE ONLY THINGS THAT MATTER?


OUR VOLUNTEERS AND DONORS Singapore Children’s  Society  owes  much  to  the   dedication  and  commitment  of  volunteers  and   donors,  who  strive  to  make  a  difference  in  the     lives  of  children  in  need. Some individuals have contributed for almost a lifetime while some corporate partners choose to support specific projects. Through a diverse range of activities, staff, volunteers and donors all come together to protect the physical, mental and emotional well-being of our children. This provides real and lasting changes, not only for the children and youths, but also for their families.

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR PEOPLE Ruth Wong  Awardee  2011

Associate Professor Cuthbert Teo ssociate Professor Cuthbert Teo serves in the Society’s Executive Committee as the Honorary Assistant Secretary. He is a Senior Consultant Forensic Pathologist and a Director of Operations of the Forensic Medicine Division, Health Sciences Authority. At the National University of Singapore, he is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Faculty of Science, and is also a Senior Lecturer at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine.

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He started volunteering at Singapore Children’s Society in 1999 as a member of the Research Committee under the Research and Advocacy Standing Committee, and became a member of the Standing Committee in 2004. In 2005, he was elected as a member of the Executive Committee, and in 2007 was elected to serve as the Honorary Assistant Secretary. Prof Teo enthusiastically lends his knowledge and expertise to the Society. Among his contributions, he is currently the Research Advisor to a study called Public and Professional’s Perceptions of Child Abuse and Neglect, conducted by the Research and Outreach Centre. As Research Advisor, his meticulousness and keen attention to detail have helped raise the bar and streamline the review of theses supported by the Society’s Research Grants. In 2010, he led a delegation of Research Officers to Hawaii to share research findings at the 18th International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect, an international platform for professionals to share expertise and mutual support in the prevention of child maltreatment. Other Committees in Singapore Children’s Society benefit from Prof Teo’s dedication and insight, such as the Financial Assistance Committee that reviews and renders financial aid to selected applicants. He is also a member of the Information and Corporate Relations Standing Committee, representing the Research and Advocacy Standing Committee. For his dedication and outstanding voluntary service in the Executive Committee and Research and Advocacy Standing Committee, Singapore Children’s Society is honoured to bestow on Associate Professor Cuthbert Teo our distinguished Ruth Wong Award.

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OUR PEOPLE Gopal Haridas  Awardees  2011

OCBC Bank CBC Bank has a Corporate Social Responsibility Programme focused on helping children and youths realise their full potential. The Bank selected Singapore Children’s Society as its charity partner in 2004 and donated S$2.5 million over a period of five years.

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In 2009, OCBC pledged another S$2.5 million in donations to be disbursed over the next five years, bringing the Bank’s total contribution to S$5 million over 10 years. These funds are used to support our Society’s key programmes to help less fortunate children and youth, and is testament to OCBC’s commitment to children, young people and education. Apart from OCBC Bank’s corporate donations, its employees also helped to raise funds through various staff donation initiatives and contributed their time to the Society’s projects. The Bank has a ready pool of more than 1,000 staff volunteers who regularly offer their time and skills to enrich the lives of our children and youth. In previous years, the Bank had helped with the refurbishment of Sunbeam Place – our residential home for abused, neglected or disadvantaged children; arranged outings to different places of interest such as participation in the OCBC Cycle Mighty Savers’ Kids Ride as well as a day out at the Escape Theme Park. In January this year, 70 staff volunteers from the Group Operations and Technology Division gave the Society’s Youth Centre (Jurong) a fresh new look by applying graffiti painting to the exterior walls. The Bank invited youths from the Centre to a graffiti painting workshop and worked hand-in-hand on this makeover. In support of our Bully-Free Forum 2011, 15 volunteers from the Bank’s various departments assisted with registration and logistics for the Forum. In recognition of its commitment towards building a better life for our children and youth, Singapore Children’s Society is once again proud to confer the esteemed Gopal Haridas Award on OCBC Bank.

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR PEOPLE Gopal Haridas  Awardees  2011

Mr Chan Chong Beng r Chan Chong Beng started volunteering at Singapore Children’s Society in 2008 as a member of the Appeals Standing Committee, which oversees the Society’s fund-raising initiatives. He is the Chairman of Goodrich Global Pte Ltd, a leading brand in the supply and distribution of wall covering, carpet, fabric and flooring in South East Asia. He is also Vice President, Awards & Projects of the Association of Small and Medium Enterprises, and has been the Chairman of the Singapore Prestige Brand Award since 2008.

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An active philanthropist in charity sponsorship, it was Mr Chan’s concern and passion for children’s causes that led him to volunteer at Children’s Society. In 2010, Mr Chan was the Chairman for the Gala Dinner Sub-Committee, which organised the charity fund-raiser that took place on 1st October that year. With his generosity and support, he rallied friends and associates to attend this dinner. Over S$700,000 was raised that evening, exceeding the Society’s expectations. In addition, Mr Chan was instrumental in helping Children’s Society be the beneficiary of Singapore Island Country Club and the Lexus Charity Golf 2010. He also recommended a number of his business associates to participate in the Society’s 1000 Enterprises for Children-in-Need project, a platform for businesses to widen or engage in corporate philanthropy through annual donation pledges and adopting Children’s Society as their official charity. For his commitment and exceptional service in the Appeals Standing Committee and Gala Dinner Sub-Committee, Singapore Children’s Society is proud to confer the esteemed Gopal Haridas Award on Mr Chan Chong Beng.

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


OUR PEOPLE List of  Awardees  2011

Congratulations to the Recipients of the Singapore Children’s Society Awards 2011 he annual Singapore Children’s Society Awards pays tribute to the many outstanding donors and volunteers. The top awards for volunteer service and donations are named after Dr Ruth Wong and Dr Gopal Haridas. Luminaries in their respective fields of education and paediatrics, they were long-serving volunteers and staunch supporters of the Society.

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Ruth Wong  Award

Gold Award

Associate Professor Cuthbert Teo

Air Line Pilots Association of Singapore Ms Annie Gan

Gopal Haridas  Award

Goodrich Global Pte Ltd

Mr Chan Chong Beng

MediaCorp Pte Ltd

OCBC Bank

Noble Group Limited NTUC Income Insurance Co-operative Limited

Platinum Service  Award

UBS AG

Dr Allan Hong Chee Boo Dr Ong Bee Ping

Silver Award The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf (S) Pte Ltd

Gold Service  Award

Composers & Authors Society of Singapore Ltd

Dr Lim Kim Whee

Herbalife Family Foundation

Mr Tan Suee Chieh

Mdm Ho Hsiu Mei

Mr Tay Chiew Teck

Huawei International Pte Ltd

Ms Karen Wong Mei Lin

Lee Foundation, Singapore Ms Lee Ying

Silver Service  Award

Mr Low Ngee Tong

Ms Chow Lye Yiong

Lumitron (Pte) Limited

Drew & Napier LLC

Nike Singapore Pte Ltd

OCBC Bank

Dr Peh Lai Huat

Rotary Club of Singapore North

Roche Singapore Pte Ltd

UBS AG

Rose Marie Khoo Foundation Salesforce.com Singapore Pte Ltd

Platinum Award

Singapore Totalisator Board

Amway (Singapore) Pte Ltd

Wee Aik Koon Pte Ltd

DBS Bank Ltd

Xin Ming Hua Pte Ltd

Mdm Tan Hong Luang Mr Tan Kok Teng

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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OUR PEOPLE Hear What  They  Say

Thoughts from our Volunteers, Children, Youth and their Families I believe education should be accessible to all and not a prerogative. It is a fun and g fulfilling experience helpin ged ile riv s-p children from les backgrounds at KidsREAD get English better acquainted with the ks and boo h language throug m to the s interaction. I hope it enable socially. fare well academically and

his g to t in m o c en ary I’ve be ce Prim lf in s e r myse Cent njoyed e I . o e five Tw h thes a lot c u m y ver rnt nd lea s years a l really mis and il w r I Cent e y too. e h t to e da coming urn on t e r o t d help I hope eer an ildren. t n u l o to v nd ch nties a u a e h t

ficiary,tre e n e b , a h Ais nt Care Cen Stude erson) (Hend

at the Charlotte, kidsREAD volunteer tre Cen e vic Ser Children

Att en You ding t hel th Ce he dra pe nt m a st d me l re (Ju a clas sa e ro o ar r dee pen y come n how ng) has t e dra ma d my u to lif to mak e. n and e me act dersta It has to ing pur ndin s a go scr ue my nd ins f pire ipt inte w d r Shau r e n, 17 iting. st in

year s old

The discussion were and sharing l. Real very helpfu , were shared situations t c e j the sub thus making tful. h nt and insig very releva

rticipant Ms Jasmine,epParogramme of Bully-Freraining Teacher’s T

Thanks to Storm Riders, my child does not throw as many tantrums anymore. He is able to calm himself down more effectively. Because of this, things are better at home.

Father of Storm Riders programme participant

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SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Volunteerin g at Youth Cent re (Jurong) ha s really been a great experience for me. Being a firs t-time volunteer a t youth cam ps, I wondered if I would g et along well with the yo u ths. Not only w ere the you friendly, th ths ey were ext remely talented. T heir friendli ness and willingn ess to mot ivate each other has left a d eep impression on me.

S Nanyang Techhennog Ye, volunteer from Arts from theloHgical University’s eart programme

in eering Volunt n re ’s e Child r o p a g he Sin ne of t o is y t Socie d your to spen s y a w if you better ecially p s e , e e in free tim e a differenc k ma , it is want to es. In addition iv d and l with kin re. others’ g in k r he nice wo eople t p d e always t a dedic gement

a apore Msaitny student g in S , w e r And Univer


OUR PEOPLE Hear What  They  Say

A Heartwarming Experience at Marsiling

WEDNESDAY 13 JULY was a special afternoon for us National Police Cadet Corps (NPCC) cadets. We arrived at \PM5IZ[QTQVOIZMI#\PMÆI\[IZW]VL][ TWWSMLTQSM\PM][]IT0,*ÆI\[UW[\ WN][TQ^MQV)N\MZI[PWZ\JZQMÅVO Ja5Z*MVNZWU\PM:M[MIZKPIVL Outreach Centre of Children’s Society), 1_I[[]ZXZQ[ML\WTMIZV\PI\\PMÆI\[ _M_MZMTWWSQVOI\_MZMITTWVM̉ZWWU ]VQ\[1V\PMÆI\_M_MZMOWQVO\W\PI\ LIaTQ^MLIOZIVLUW\PMZIVLPMZ grandson. The boy was very young; PQ[UW\PMZPILXI[[MLI_IaIVLPQ[ father was in jail. My heart went out to \PM[UITTJWa

“At firs t messie glance, her h st I had ouse w a I was d etermin ever seen. Ho s the wever, ed to m neat an ak d satisfa tidy. The end e this house ctory, produc if this, th e family not the best. t was Now th B ere is p had no space efore lenty o to walk to cook fs . , televisi eat, sleep, w pace for them on prog alk and ramme s comfo watch Sgt (N rtably.” PCC)   Matie n

We divided ourselves into groups and looked forward to tidying up the house. We took the lift up and along the way we saw that the corridors were long, dark IVLVIZZW_1ZMITQ[ML1_I[^MZaNWZ\]VI\M\WTQ^MQVIÆI\_Q\PJZQOP\TaTQ\IVL spacious corridors outside. 4WWSQVOI\\PM[QbMWN\PMOZIVLUW\PMZ¼[ÆI\1_I[[PWKSMLI[\PM_PWTMIXIZ\UMV\ _I[IJW]\I[JQOI[UaTQ^QVOZWWU1NMT\IVITUW[\W^MZ_PMTUQVO[ILVM[[I\\PM condition of it. Half the house had boxes stacked up to the ceiling. These boxes had VW\JMMV\W]KPMLNWZIJW]\IaMIZ<PMZM_I[M`\ZMUMTaTQ\\TM[XIKM\WUW^MIJW]\ 7V\WXWN\PI\\PMÆI\_I[^MZa[\]NNaIVLL][\a1\NMT\[]NNWKI\QVO ?MNWZUMLIP]UIVKPIQV\WUW^M\PMJW`M[W]\\W\PMKWZZQLWZIVL[\IQZ_MTT[W\PI\ \PMOZIVLUW\PMZKW]TL[WZ\W]\\PMJW`M[\PI\[PMVMMLMLIVLX]\I[QLM\PW[M\PI\ [PMLQLVW\QUUMLQI\MTaVMML;WUMWN\PMOQZT[\WWSZIO[\WKTMIV]X^MZaL][\aIVL LQZ\aJMTWVOQVO[)N\MZIVPW]ZWNTQN\QVOIVLUW^QVO\PMP]OMJW`M[_M\WWS\]ZV[\W take a short break and Mr Ben treated us to drinks. Shortly after, we got back to work IVL[\IKSML\PMJW`M[I\IKWZVMZWN\PM[UITTÆI\ 1\_I[TQSMXTIaQVO2MVOII[_M[PQN\MLIVLILR][\ML\PMJW`M[\WUI`QUQ[M[XIKM ?M_MZMKIZMN]TIVLTWWSMLW]\NWZWVMIVW\PMZI[_M[\IKSML\PMPMI^aJW`M[·[WUM helped to stabilise the ladder when a cadet was on it. We balanced the heavy boxes _Q\PMIKPW\PMZ¼[PMTX?MLQLVW\_IV\\WZQ[SLZWXXQVO\PMUI[\PMKWV\MV\[QV[QLM KW]TLJMNZIOQTMWZ^IT]IJTM?MUILM[]ZM\PI\\PM[\IKS[WNJW`M[_MZM[MK]ZMIVL would not fall on anyone. )T\PW]OP\QUM_I[TQUQ\ML_MLQL\PMJM[\\PI\_MKW]TL1PWXML_MPILUILM\PM TQ^M[WN\PMaW]VOJWaIVLPQ[OZIVLUW\PMZUWZMKWUNWZ\IJTM)\\PMMVLWN\PM day, they were very grateful for our help. After a long day of work, what energised UM_MZM\PM[UQTM[WV\PMNIKM[WN\PMXMWXTM_MPMTXML)VL1ZMUQVLMLUa[MTN\W treasure the things I have and not take things for granted. +76<:1*=<-,*A"

Sgt (NPCC)  Lim  Gao  Zhi Sgt  (NPCC)  Regina  Pang

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

51


Generous donations of time and money allow us to continue caring for young people in need, giving them the opportunity to benefit from our support programmes and activities. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ultimate bottom line.

d e s u c o F NTS

U O C T A H W N O

Knowing what our purpose is will shape our perspective on life and

I KNOW I CAN DO ANYTHING if I try hard enough!

WE HOPE TO HAVE CHANCES TO WORK TOWARDS OUR GOALS.


FACTS AND FIGURES SERVICE STATISTICS Our Range of Services

Centre

2010

2011

Children’s Camp

Children Service Centre

63

55

Children’s Day Celebration

Children Service Centre

52

49

Children’s Talk

Children Service Centre

30

66

Choo Choo Train

Children Service Centre

321

433

KidzHOPE (reacHing Out, helPing familiEs)

Children Service Centre

47

58

kidsREAD

Children Service Centre

50

25

KidzSHinE (Seeing Hope in Every Kid)

Children Service Centre

48

53

Overcoming Shyness

Children Service Centre

12

12

Parenting Talks & Workshops

Children Service Centre

62

49

Camp V-Nest

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

93

110

Casework & Counselling

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

414

438

Children’s Medical Fund

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

33

21

EUREKA!

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

69

42

Family Day

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

183

79

IRS (Enhanced Information Referral Service)

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

725

773

LEAP (Let Every Aspect Progress)

Family Service Centre (Yishun) / Children Service Centre

48

46

Project Invest

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

19

37

Supervised Studies

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

29

23

REACH

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

4

3

Storm Riders

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

14

26

Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Workshop

Research & Outreach Centre

0

126

Compulsory Education Casework

Research & Outreach Centre

39

30

KidzLive

Research & Outreach Centre

80

271

Pre-School Education Outreach and Casework

Research & Outreach Centre / Children Service Centre

499

311

Project LADDER

Research & Outreach Centre

217

134

Theatre-in-Education*

Research & Outreach Centre

2,400

0

Children Without Family Support*

Research & Outreach Centre

90

0

Singapore Children’s Society Lecture

Research & Outreach Centre

300

250

Community Outreach Events

Research & Outreach Centre

0

572

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

53


FACTS AND FIGURES Service Statistics Our Range of Services

Centre

2010

2011

Family Day

Student Care Centre (Henderson)

64

51

Student Care

Student Care Centre (Henderson)

83

56

Parenting Talks & Workshops

Student Care Centre (Henderson)

22

19

Bully-Free Camp

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

72

96

Bully-Free Campaign

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

18,826

16,657

Bully-Free School Talks

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

18,291

25,334

Bully-Free Forum

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

250

294

iNSPIRE Fund

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

253

192

Project CABIN

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

5,564

4,828

Tinkle Friend Camp

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

175

146

Tinkle Friend Helpline

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

3,633

2,581

Vulnerable Witness Support Programme

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

13

5

Sunbeam Place Residents

Sunbeam Place

63

94

Sunbeam Place ex-Residents

Sunbeam Place

32

37

Parenting Talks & Workshops

Youth Centre (Jurong)

70

56

Project YOU CAN*

Youth Centre (Jurong)

61

0

TeenStart

Youth Centre (Jurong)

581

566

TeenzLife

Youth Centre (Jurong)

1,681

7,864

TweenzLife**

Youth Centre (Jurong)

0

3,115

YouthGIG

Youth Centre (Jurong)

75

70

BeaconWorks

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

28

30

BPC Investigation

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

32

28

BPC Parents Mandated Order

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

106

77

BPC Pre-Complaint Mediation

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

89

112

BPC Pre-Complaint Screening

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

617

531

BPC Statutory Supervision Order

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

60

44

Buddy Care Programme

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

2

8

Guidance Programme

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

79

58

Round Box

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

170

276

GP Family Day

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

57

53

Youth Family Care

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

1

3

Sunbeam Friends Club

Children Service Centre / Student Care Centre (Henderson) / Family Service Centre (Yishun)

195

201

TOTAL***

57,186

67,574

Direct Service

14,343

12,302

Public Education & Outreach

42,843

55,272

* These programmes were one-off or ended in 2011. ** We started this programme in 2011. *** Total figures include numbers from direct service and public education and outreach programmes. Note: Singapore Children’s Society is committed to reaching out to children, youths and families in need via our range of services. The above data includes both primary and secondary services based on our six categories, namely Caregiving, Community, Developmental, Preventive, Public Education and Remedial services. Beneficiaries include children, youths and their families.

54

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


FACTS AND FIGURES Financial Information  Summary

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL INCOME 2010

2011

73.6%

Donations

73.5%

16.7%

Grants

17.1%

9.7%

Others

9.4%

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL EXPENSES 2010

2011

69%

Service Programmes

66.9%

15.3%

General and Administration

15%

14.6%

Fund-raising

16.2%

1.1%

Publicity and Promotion

1.9%

BREAKDOWN OF EACH DONATION DOLLAR 2010

2011

56.8%

Service Programmes

56.3%

12.6%

General and Administration

12.6%

12%

Fund-raising

13.6

0.9%

Publicity and Promotion

1.6%

17.7%

Surplus

15.9%

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

55


FACTS AND FIGURES Audited Financial  Information  2011

BALANCE SHEET 2010

2011

(S$’000)

(S$’000)

413

301

34,957

8,583

35,370

8,884

Investments

0

27,900

Inventories

18

12

Deposits, Prepayments and Other Receivables

569

591

16,986

16,769

Current Assets

17,573

45,272

Total Assets

52,943

54,156

31,031

32,611

249

247

20,677

20,801

iNSPIRE Fund

100

73

Fair Value Reserve

-60

-586

51,997

53,146

Provision for Restoration Costs

113

113

Trade and Other Payables

833

897

946

1,010

52,943

54,156

ASSETS Property, Plant and Equipment Investments Non-Current Assets

Cash & Deposits

FUNDS AND RESERVES Accumulated Fund Professor S.S. Ratnam Memorial Fund Children’s Medical Fund (CMF)

Total Funds and Reserves LIABILITIES

Total Liabilities Total Funds, Reserves and Liabilities

The Society is governed by the Executive Committee which is the final authority and has overall responsibility for policy making and governance. Members of the Committee are volunteers and receive no monetary remuneration for their contribution. The Society has in place a conflict of interest policy in its Code of Conduct. All members of the Committee and senior management are required to declare their interest periodically.

Reserves Policy Singapore Children’s Society will raise funds to support our current and future services to reach out to more children and families in need, up to a maximum of 5 times our projected future gross operating expenses. Such funds do not include funds specified for restricted use. Auditor: Lo Hock Ling & Co Key Bankers: CitiBank, DBS, OCBC, SCB, HSBC, UBS, UOB

56

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011


FACTS AND FIGURES Audited Financial  Information  2011

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT

Income

2010

% Breakdown of Receipts

2011

(S$’000)

(S$’000)

2010

2011

Donations *

7,955

7,717

73.6%

73.5%

Grants

1,801

1,799

16.7%

17.1%

Others

1,059

991

9.7%

9.4%

10,815

10,507

100%

100%

Total Income

* Includes tax deductible donations income of $6,826,476 and $7,721,389 in 2011 and 2010 respectively.

Expenditure

% of Total Income

2011

(S$’000)

(S$’000)

2010

2011

692

334

6.4%

3.2%

Service Programmes

5,455

5,574

50.4%

53.1%

General and Administration

1,361

1,322

12.6%

12.6%

97

168

0.9%

1.6%

Fund-raising

1,300

1,434

12.0%

13.6%

Total Expenditure

8,905

8,832

82.3%

84.1%

Surplus of Income over Expenditure

1,910

1,675

17.7%

15.9%

Service Programmes – Restricted #

Publicity and Promotion

#

2010

This refers to expenses incurred for Children’s Medical Fund only.

ANNUAL REMUNERATION OF TOP THREE MANAGEMENT STAFF No. of Management Staff Annual Remuneration

2010

2011

Between $100,001 to $150,000

2

2

Between $150,001 to $200,000

1

1

Note: Includes basic salary, bonuses, allowances and the employer’s contributions to Central Provident Fund.

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

57


FACTS AND FIGURES Major Donors

Donors List S$100,000 and above Children’s Charities Association Oversea-Chinese Banking Corporation Limited Tan Kok Teng In Memory of the late Mr Yong Thiam Loong

S$50,000 to S$99,999 Air Line Pilots Association Singapore Amway (Singapore) Pte Ltd Noble Group Limited M1 Limited NTUC Income Insurance Co-operative Limited Singapore Totalisator Board

S$20,000 to S$49,999 CapitaLand Hope Foundation Chan Heng Kian KLA-Tencor (Singapore) Pte Ltd Lee Foundation, Singapore Lee Kim Boon MasterCard Asia/Pacific Pte Ltd Peh Lai Huat Rose Marie Khoo Foundation Rotary Engineering Limited Salesforce.com Singapore Pte Ltd Singapore Island Country Club The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf (S) Pte Ltd Union Contractors (S) Pte Ltd Winning Alliance (S) Pte Ltd

S$10,000 to S$19,999 Abwin Pte Ltd Alcatel-Lucent Singapore Pte Ltd Alfa Global Pte Ltd ALX Pte Ltd Anand Nadathur Anbros Industries (S) Pte Ltd Asia Chemicals Trading Pte Ltd Asia Polyurethane Mfg Pte Ltd Boh Chek Kwong Albert Capita Pte Ltd Chee Wee Kiong

58

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Chevron Singapore Pte Ltd Choo Chiau Beng Citi-YMCA Youth For Causes – Esperanza for Sols Davinder Singh S/O Amar Singh Geo-Chem Far East Pte Ltd Grundfos (Singapore) Pte Ltd Ho Lee Group Pte Ltd IAI Asia Pte Ltd IC Vision Pte Ltd Integra Petrochemicals Pte Ltd Isaac Manasseh Meyer Trust Fund Jong Yock Kee Kalwani Manoj Dharmadas Keppel Corporation Limited Keppel Offshore & Marine Limited Koh Glen Kuan Im Tng Temple (Joo Chiat) Kuok Khoon Hong Kwan Yew Loon Lee Ying Leverage Holdings Pte Ltd Lim Kee Eng Shirley Lim Sam San Lim Sze Liang Low Tuck Kwong Lubritrade Trading Pte Ltd Ma Kuang Healthcare Group Pte Ltd Map Pacific Pte Ltd Mobileedge Asia Pacific (S) Pte Ltd MQ Communications Pte Ltd Nanyang Primary School Pacific Motor Credit Pte Ltd PAP Community Foundation PlayBox Distribution Pte Ltd PropNex Realty Pte Ltd Redtec Industries Pte Ltd Republic of Singapore Navy Roche Singapore Pte Ltd Seah Lynette Sembas (Asia) Trading Pte Ltd Siah Gek Quee Singapore Petroleum Company Limited SK Chemical Trading Pte Ltd Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications International AB Branch Office Singapore Sterling Law Corporation


FACTS AND FIGURES Major Donors SteveTay Pte Ltd Tan Cheng Soo Eddie Teo Chee Hean Tham Kum Fei Alan THK Powertools (S) Pte Ltd Toh Hock Hoo UBS AG United Bunkering & Trading (Asia) Pte Ltd V3 Construction Pte Ltd Viking Engineering Pte Ltd Vina Satiadhi Wee Eu Liang Yip Seng Cheong Leo In Memory of the late Mdm Lye Theresa alias Theresa Lam Nee Lye Theresa alias Theresa Lye

S$2,500 to S$9,999 Andre Philip Ess Ascendas Funds Management (S) Ltd Ashurst LLP Asia Enterprises (Private) Limited Balestier Hill Secondary School BDO LLP Bengawan Solo Pte Ltd Bestech Integrated Pte Ltd Boey Siew Kin Bukit View Primary School Cathay Photo Store (Pte) Ltd CentiForce Instruments Pte Ltd Chan Emily Chan Hian Siang Chan Sek Keong Charities Aid Foundation – General Accounts Chay Oh Moh Cheng Yoke Ping Chew Sun Huat Chia Khoy Heung Steven Chionh Chye Khye Chong Mong Ting Chow Joo Ming Chua Buan Ling Alicia Chua Kim Chiu Citi-YMCA Youth For Causes – chilDREAM Citi-YMCA Youth For Causes – H.O.P.E Citi-YMCA Youth For Causes – Little Sparks Citi-YMCA Youth For Causes – Project ignite Citi-YMCA Youth For Causes – We Heart Kids (Action for Aid Team 2011) Corporate Greetings (S) Pte Ltd DBS Bank Ltd

Dematic S.E.A. Pte Ltd DHL Global Management (Asia Pacific) Pte Ltd Diallo Amadou D’perception Singapore Pte Ltd Drew & Napier LLC Dyna-Mac Engineering Services Pte Ltd Eliathamby David Devakumar Estron Marketing Pte Ltd ETG Pte Ltd Etonhouse Pre-School Pte Ltd (Mountbatten Branch) Expats Furniture Rental Pte Ltd ExxonMobil Asia Pacific Pte Ltd Foundation Communications Pte Ltd Frank Mohn Singapore Pte Ltd Gan Eng Seng Primary School Garan Pavan Mano GNS Storage Pte Ltd Goh Gaik Choo Peggy Goh Siew Guat Brenda Goh Teck Jin Gongshang Primary School Govind Ramanathan GS Technology Pte Ltd Hah Hen Khean Haven Automation Industries (S) Pte Ltd Heptagon Micro Optics Pte Ltd Hewlett-Packard Singapore (Private) Ltd Ho Hin Tin Ho Khai Weng Ho Koon Lian Irene Hoe Kee Hardware Pte Ltd Hong Leong Foundation How Shee Loon Aloysious Alan Huang Aijuan Infinity Projects Pte Ltd IWA Design Pte Ltd Joanna Siy Cheng Jong Khee Chen Alex June Chen Boon Kiaw Karma Subhashita Buddhist Workshop Ken-Pal (S) Pte Ltd Kim (Maxus Global) Kok Kah Meng Kok Tat Onn Marcus Kulicke & Soffa (S.E.A.) Pte Ltd Kwan Yong Construction Pte Ltd Labivf Asia Pte Ltd Lakeside Primary School Lau Choon Sam Patrick Lau Meng Hwa

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

59


FACTS AND FIGURES Major Donors Lau Yong Lee Choon Bok Lee Kheow Ann Lee Lap Wah George Lee Yip Phi George Leng Fei Lim Boon Huat Lim Boon Seong Lim Geok Hwa Liu Chow Yee Loh Albert Loh Cheng Yean Loke Weng Foo Loke Yuen Kin Ruby McDonald’s Restaurants Pte Ltd MCL Land Limited Mercer (Singapore) Pte Ltd Michael A. Witt MINDEF Financial Services Centre Morgan Stanley Asia (Singapore) Pte Ltd Motorola Mobility Singapore Pte Ltd Mount Pleasant Referral Clinic Pte Ltd Naresh Kumar New Art Interior Pte Ltd Ng Chun Jie Ng Keng Chu Michelle Ng Wei Yong Ngee Ann Secondary School (Sec 3R6 Class) Nokia-Siemens Networks Singapore Pte Ltd Ntegrator Pte Ltd Oh Min Sen Vernon Overseas Academic Link Pte Ltd Panoil Petroleum Pte Ltd Pascal Demierre Phan Vi Tri Power Partners Private Limited QCI Lab Engineering Pte Ltd Quek Cheng Chye Ronnie Ramasamy S/O Karuppan Chettiar Rao Guozhong Ree Simon RPI Quantity Surveyors Pte Ltd SATS Staff Association Scan-Bilt Pte Ltd SDV Logistics (Singapore) Pte Ltd Seagate Technology International Sembcorp Industrial Parks Ltd Seng Kang Primary School Shenton Investment Pte Ltd Sim Bee Lian

60

SINGAPORE CHILDREN’S SOCIETY ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Sim Chong Meng Desmond Sin Hong Hardware Pte Ltd Singapore Airlines Cargo Pte Ltd Singapore Shipping Association Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd Skychem Pte Ltd Soon Kong Sin Soumen Mitra & Mitra Sushmita Source Manufacturing Pte Ltd St Joseph’s Institute Junior Starlit Engineering Services Pte Ltd Strain Robert Sunil K Gupta Swee Kwoh Yong Tampines Chinese Temple Tan Chin Tuan Foundation Tan Ching Guei Tan Ean Kiam Foundation Tan Lay Hoon Tan Wee Tek Jimmy Tan Wei Shyan Tan Yang Guan Tan Yeow Chew Teo Cheng Peng Teo Seng San Teo Wei Fung The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited Thong Hoi Non Tjang Hui Hwan Trends N Trendies Pte Ltd UOL Group Limited Wilson Global Trade Pte Ltd Wing Ship Marine Services Pte Ltd Wong Junwan Valerie Wong Poh Swan World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd XZ Management Pte Ltd Yahya Abdulhussain Lukmanji Saif Charity Trust Yap Kong Meng Yeow Aik Liang Daniel Zenitel Marine Asia Pte Ltd Zicom Private Limited Zouk Management Pte Ltd Zuellig Pharma Pte Ltd


SINGAPORE   CHILDREN’S     SOCIETY CORPORATE OFFICE 298 Tiong Bahru Road #09-05 Central Plaza Singapore 168730 Tel: 6273 2010 Fax: 6273 2013

OUR SERVICE CENTRES Children Service Centre

Student Service Hub (Bukit Merah)

Blk 529 Bedok North St 3 #01-570 Singapore 460529 Tel: 6448 6658 Fax: 6448 9896

Blk 91 Henderson Road #01-112 Singapore 150091 Tel: 6276 5077 Fax: 6276 5075

Family Service Centre (Yishun)

Sunbeam Place

Blk 107 Yishun Ring Road #01-233 Singapore 760107 Tel: 6753 7331 Fax: 6753 2697

28 Hong San Terrace Singapore 688247 Tel: 6462 3477 Fax: 6462 3371

Research and Outreach Centre

Youth Centre (Jurong)

9 Bishan Place, Junction 8 #05-02 Singapore 579837 Tel: 6358 0911 Fax: 6358 0936

Blk 552 Jurong West St 42 #01-321 Singapore 640552 Tel: 6566 6989 Fax: 6566 6386

Round Box

Youth Service Centre (Toa Payoh)

One People.Sg 381 Toa Payoh Lorong 1 #01-12 Singapore 319758 Tel: 6259 3735 Fax: 6256 9443

Blk 109 Toa Payoh Lorong 1 #01-316 Singapore 310109 Tel: 6253 1124 Fax: 6256 9443

Children’s Medical Fund Helpdesk Student Care Centre (Henderson)

Tel: 6753 1083

Blk 129 Bukit Merah View #01-174 Singapore 150129 Tel: 6278 7856 Fax: 6278 0191

Tinkle Friend Helpline Tel: 1800 274 4788

For general enquiries, email info@childrensociety.org.sg

www.childrensociety.org.sg OUR MICROSITES: www.bullyfreecampaign.sg www.childrensociety.org.sg/fundraising www.1000e.org.sg UEN: S62SS0057G

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2011  

A razorSHARK design. 2012, March.

Singapore Children’s Society Annual Report 2011  

A razorSHARK design. 2012, March.