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ADDRESSES THE WORK OF RAYMOND MAJEWSKI


CONTENTS

ABOUT |page 5| CV |page 6| PORT BOUTIQUES |page 9| UNMET EXPECTATIONS IN DISCURSIVE ENVIRONMENTS |page 25| DANCE STUDIO |page 41| ASSEMBLED ADAPTATIONS |page 67| PUBLIC LIBRARY |page 77| MARTYRDOM OF AN ICON |page 88| BLOCK PARTY _ NYC |page 95| MILD APPREHENSIONS |page 103| DISNEY COLLEGE PROGRAM |page 115|


ABOUT MY WORK

My art and architecture work are not separate pieces but products of the process I follow. Experimenting with analog collage has oered new views on architectural composition and editing, demanding both visual and narrative coherence. Early stages of research set foundation standards for each piece, ensuing little deviation from concept; room for interpretation is welcomed. My work tends to derive from everyday interactions and intimacy with text, I have this thing for books, I cant explain it but I love them. In university I found myself employed by the art & architecture library for fours years throughout my studies, using this time wisely, I familiarized myself with the content, developing an arsenal of knowledge on the architectural discourse and allied arts. I try to use this and my love for history/urban studies/ social sciences and mass media to approach a brief, using what I know and taking pleasure in the curiosity of what can happen. Often on impulse and compulsion, my work and style is reliant upon my personality, overactive mind and untaped energy.

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Education B.S. Architectural Studies University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign May, 2016 graduate Publications “Martydom of an Icon” in LOBBY, Faith no.5 The Bartlett School of Architecture Exhibitions “Assembled Adaptations” Featured Artist | Bow Truss | Chicago, IL 2016 “Unmet Expectations in Discursive Environments” Featured Artist Ninth Letter [Plan B] Literary Publication 2016 “Mild Apprehensions” Featured Artist | Illinois School of Architecture Urbana Champaign, IL 2016 “Unmet Expectations in Discursive Environments” Gallery Exhibition Ricker Library of Architecture & Art | Urbana Champaign, IL 2016

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Experience Engineering Professional Development Study Disney College Program The Walt Disney Company | Orlando, FL fall 2016 Disney College Program The Walt Disney Company Walt Disney World | Orlando, FL fall 2016 - p Architectural Design Intern Arquitectonica International Corporation Miami, FL Summer 2016 Research | Content Management Intern Project GUT Project led by Florian Idenberg Principle of Architecture Firm “SO-IL” & David van der Leer Director of the “Van Alen Institute” Summer 2015 - p Radio DJ Pizza FM University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana Champaign, IL 2014 - 2016 Co-President | Creative | Graphic Designer QUIPIT University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana Champaign, IL 2013 - 2016 Library Assistant University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Ricker Library of Architecture & Art Champaign, IL 2013 - 2016 Resident Advisor | University Housing University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Champaign, IL 2013 - 2016

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a: a small fashionable hotel b: a small hotel within a large department store c: a small hotel that offers highly specialized services or products

Boutique, a small fashionable shop that offers highly specialized services or products. If boutiques are sold as a fashion, can it be said that boutique themselves are a trend such as our latest fashions? Perhaps so, though the services or goods offered are not inherently “boutique”, the practice of the individuals who occupy the space are what fashion such spaces/goods as boutique. If boutiques are inevitably a fashion trend, does it make sense to perceive and design a product through static form? Challenging the brief and the peculiar request for a “boutique hotel”, this design will set precedent as to what it means to understand a space as boutique. The product is not final for its form is responsive to conditions set by contemporary trends within the context of the site. The form may contrast the current built environment but its ability to adapt with desires of the site will aid prospective developers in their pursuits to densify Green Street student housing. The modules are seen as transient spaces meeting consumer needs what can be docked using the telescopic lift mounted upon the room. 9


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mechanical system


structural system

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top _ south elevation bottom _ east elevation


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site plan _ ground floor


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second floor _ lobby


third floor _ maintenance

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4th-11th floor _ occupant floors


basement _ mechanical systems - storage

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Section DWG and Module Model Picture In Progress

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model _ east elevation


model _ south elevation

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Unmet Expectations

[in Discursive Environments]

Composed of seven images, the series uses collage to link the unmet expectations of the user with the idiosyncratic nature of the architecture practice. Through subtraction of the surrounding environment and addition of an abstracted scale figure, visual rationalization is blurred. Addressing the follies often found within the architectural discourse, the images allude to twentieth century theory in playful nature, linking together disjointed thoughts through the process of collage, a discursive process in its own.

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sous les paves, la plage! [it was a good birthday]

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9-5 corporate daydream

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hypocrisy

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lust

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play

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manifestation

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Dance Studio

An exploration of process and social phenomena, the studio derived from an interest in sub cultural environments and their exploitation in mainstream culture. Inspiration was taken from 1980s skateboarding and the recent pushes from fashion powerhouses to distance their brand from traditional catwalks. During the time of the project, anxiety from social insecurities and inauthenticity shaped my representational composition; the image of the girl taking a selfie is an ode to the contemporary acknowledgement of architectural production and the overemphasis of aesthetics. The project goal was to seamlessly integrate building systems with the overall aesthetics of the design.

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The studio, located in Kickapoo State Recreational Area, lies deep within the woods, adjacen to what some know as Emerald Pond.

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floor plan

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section A

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section B

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The prisms provide _Wayfinding; guiding one to the studio from the parking lot, along the path leading to the studio. _Lighting; throughout the grid, some prisms are fabricated out of translucent material. At night, these luminescent prisms light the way as guides, as well as lighting the studio theatre space from the ground up, leaving the sloped room to engulf darkness. _Seating; allowing one to reposition themselves, enabling new views and intimacy between one and the space. _Structure; as the heights of the prisms rise in elevation, a transition from aesthetic to structure take place, supporting the roof and bridging aesthetics and structure.

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Night Impressions

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Conversations between the verticals of the prisms and the trees [Perspective from the viewing deck]

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interior study model

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Assembled Adaptations

Series inspired by the life and works of both, James Audubon and Carl Linnaeus. Oddity brought about after reading the Area X: The Southern Reach trilogy by David vander Meer. Traditionally a collage series of mine would encompass some sort of building for most of my stock images are clipped from architecture journals. After tumbling upon a few books reminding me of Audubon and Linnaeus, it seemed right to try and retrofit the forms and adapt the “organisms” to one another to form a new creation. I see this similar in a way to how architecture is formed today, odd bits from other works, refrenced and recalled to be adapted and paired in harmony with one another. Forming a “new” design... This series followed my time after reading and traveling to Area X. One is simply not the same after reading this trilogy.

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assemblage

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exploration

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Public Library

Focusing on the reader’s mind, the library follows the process one would take while immersing themselves into the narrative of a fictional story. The east elevation entrance is as explicit as the cover of a story, the aperture like opening give a select view of the main floor, a chosen impression of the interior. The impression is quite similar to the impressions given off by cover art/graphics. The landscape inside the library was carried over from the desires to read in environments far beyond the conventional space found in libraries. Perhaps childish but arguably imaginative and playful, the floor calls the reader’s attention, inviting one to sit and red on the green turf. The aperture like ports and play with transparency allows one to interpret the spaces and accept voyeurism as they would throughout a novel.

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south elevation

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east elevation

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ground floor _ commons area


second floor _ classrooms _ youth area

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basement one _ main stacks _ auditorium


basement two _ main stacks _ classrooms

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“Martydom of an Icon” _ LOBBY issue no.5 “Faith” The Bartlett School of Architecture Top: Cover illustration by Thomas Hedger Bottom: article illustrations Percie Edgeler

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Martyrdom of an Icon “The fall of the American shopping mall”

Driven by optimism and faith, Austrian born architect and planner, Victor Gruen thoroughly believed in the potential of the American shopping mall. Visions of mixed use developments ran throughout his imagination, fancying environments similar to that of Austrian main streets. Utopian in nature, the mall was to alleviate the decentralized sprawl of post war suburbia and reduce dependence on the automobile. Despite failure to encourage urban and social reconfigurations, the indulgences and pursuits of social capital thrived, the mall become the epicenter of hangout culture. Yet in 1978, years into retirement and serving as a planning consultant in Vienna, Gruen publically spoke against the mall, saying that… “I am often called the father of the shopping mall”, “I would like to take this opportunity to disclaim paternity once and for all. I refuse to pay alimony to those bastard developments. They destroyed our cities”

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What had led to this lack of faith and departure of belief in the mall? If Gruen had lived beyond 1980, would his impression of the mall have changed? Would movies such as Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) and Clueless (1995) be enough to disburden such hatred and embarrassment? A tad morbid but perhaps its best o that Gruen had passed when he had for America’s devout cult following of the secular religion of capitalism intensified. The mall has fallen with mercy to the free market and became its church, hosting rituals and services of consumerism, mass led by The Man himself. Yet here we are, mid-way through 2016 and identifying what seems to be the decline/end of the mall and the architype itself. Somewhere in the turn of the recent century, notable mall tenants slowly departed, leaving vacant storefronts with signs expressing apologies and promise of trendier shops. Internet junkies thrived on the opportunity to photograph the ruins and decay, posting stories on websites such as www.deadmalls.com and image galleries to Dead Malls Enthusiasts, a Facebook group of

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Mass media outlets such as CNN and The New York Times have done a wonderful job documenting the slow death of the mall; their reports have sent mild waves of hysteria to businesses and chains. Anchor stores close their doors far before sales dwindle, analytics claiming times of struggle seem to be enough to spook the chains. Is it possible that these reports are all exaggerations? Are the articles slowly committing atrocities far beyond their text, scripting fate of genocide upon the architype? It seems those responsible for exploiting the mall as a space of consumption are now responsible for the mass amounts of propaganda stating the mall is dead. Hidden in the decay one can occasionally stumble upon the rare article raising this exact question, is the death of the mall an exaggeration? One article written by Tim Worstall, a contributor to Forbes, spoke in light of these exaggerations, taking position that, “The malls that are doing well tend to be destinations. Those that aren’t tend to be places where people just go shopping.

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Critically reflecting upon the age old question of space and place. Is the mall, a space or a place? The common mall serves the flow of commodity and consumption, feeding into consumer desires. It is my belief that Gruen would define his mall as a space. Aware of the importance that social interaction plays in design, Gruen was attentive to space and its ability to provide experiences. The ability to spend a day at the mall and agency to selectively choose your experience is desirable. Today, malls are manipulative, designed to exploit consumer behavior for maximum profit. Combatting the unsustainable approach to the shopping mall, identification of what lies behind the motivations of the community is crucial. Consumer studies have fascinated themselves with behavioral studies based upon the post analysis of observations, leading developments of market strategies designed to feed on consumer insecurities. Gruen’s interventions in mall centers may have been based upon intuition and experiences in thriving social centers, but the push for social spaces was critical. These spaces did not dwell on the consumer but met the social needs of the community. The mall was to oer those who congregate, satisfaction in self for ways less inexpensive and materialistic than shopping.

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The momentum of the “dead mallâ€? may be too great to prevent at this point in time. The propaganda set forth by those who steroid fed the architype (Mall of America in mind) have succeeded. The Church of Capitalism had not needed to pray for forgiveness but simply cast away their sins. Perhaps the greatest cover up of contemporary architecture, one can reflect upon two distinctly dierent lives the mall lived throughout the decades; a life dedicated to the teachings and following of capitalism and one deeply invested in the desire to unite the suburban landscape.

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BLOCK PARTY _ NYC [PROJECT IN PROGRESS]

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Often times we alter our character to better fit contextual situations and those around us. These code-shifts in communication can play into how we speak, dress and act around others. This moment of inauthentic behavior can compromise the ego and characters many architects try so hard to maintain. If we have no prior history with an individual, what we hear in conversation is all we have to identify that being with. Perhaps this conversation happens to be the moment when the character is compromised, therefore our impression may deviate from that of someone with knowledge of the individual. In the discourse, architects often meet in gatherings, socializing and speaking jargon... hoping to one up the other. These ego bursts further inflate heads beyond the black turtleneck sweaters, shattering the black frames on their faces (Refer to any architecture institution hosting programs). Imagine events like this, rooms full of architects, meandering from group to group, spreading the latest gossip. How will Bjarke alter his character after grabbing finger sandwiches with Rem in route to speak with Phillip Johnson?

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Now abstract this party and view the room as a block or so in NYC, at this point you realize these conversations happen routinely in the built environment. When we design we consider the surroundings, considering an approach that compliments or contrasts the adjacent sites. My essay / analytical study will take into considerations these shifts in character and how the contextual surroundings altered the perceived character of the architect. I currently envision the deliverables as a collage / sketch sort of image illustrating the process of “reverse engineering� the rhetoric of the built environment. I wish to select a few buildings in close proximity to each other. After analyzing formal characteristics of the buildings I plan to deconstruct the formal aesthetics and make personified assumptions as to what the building tells of the architect. Only afterwards will I cross examine the results with the actual characters of the architect.

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I have been using collage to quickly mark up and visualize the text. The top view of manhattan and the neighborhoods within it have been helpful throughout the process. Using the surrounding context of the building, I can characterize the atmosphere of the “party�. i.e. Does one wear the same attire/outfit to an apartment party in the East Village as one would in the business district? Is it respectful to dress up or do you allow your personality to compromise the conventional attire?

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The reliance on aect and language throughout the project can benefit from the analysis of these conversations between buildings. Personifying the environment and expressions of the design may lead to deeper insight of how the design conversations developed. _ It may be humorous to think of Central Park as the dance floor of the party, the space dividing social clicks, yet not interfering with the wandering gazes.

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MILD APPREHENSIONS

All pieces in the series are assembled and paired with objects found both around and in thrift stores on campus. This study was to develop skills beyond the computer and analog collagetechnique. The immersion into spacial work opens new ways of thought when one approches traditional design process. The objects made may be bizarre and seem odd, this is understandable and perfectly fine for most work of mine tends to fringe upon these depths of mind. The attention to materiality, construction, scale and color presented many challenges along the way.

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DISNEY [college program 2016]

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Like many Disney College Program participants, I have been served my fair share of Disney Kool Aid. Though, unlike many, I have not drowned in the spectacle but treaded lightly in the depths of the kingdom. Entering the program, I came with specific goals and things I wished to accomplish. Having my eyes set on the splendor of the utopianesque nature of Walt Disney World, I felt it could offer me opportunities not many in my field have/ could experience. Walt Disney World may arguably be the only master plan of the 60s utopian/modernist ideal to be realized and meet promises addressed on the drafting board, encompassing designs identified as speculative and utopian. A menagerie of sorts, the collection of exotic typographic form continues to alienate guest, placing them in landscapes unknown. The affect designed between user and form is so highly calculated that the artificial nature of it undermines the voyeuristic tendencies of the guest. Admirably, Disney has upheld it’s promises and will continue to do so, for this reason alone I respect the company as an entertainment business. One day I’d like to take part in such action and utilize my skills to work in Walt Disney Imagineering to further thea magic. As an architectural thinker, critic, and Disney Cast Member, I have seen the extent and limitation of the magic. The facades can only bring the show so far, dependence on physical infrastructure is essential to immerse the guest in experience but the upkeep of non salient infrastructure such as custodial operations maintains the magic. Acknowledging the limitations of architecture has allowed me to better understand my role in the profession and replace my mouse ears with a critics cap. 117


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While watching “Impressions de France” at the France pavilion in Disney’s EPCOT Center, I often find myself in the front row of the theatre, fully turned, observing the crowd lost in the film showcasing the picturesque scenery of France. Soft Voyeurism like such is amusing and brings me great pleasure, there are specific scenes where you can for a split second witness alienation in the spectators face. The lack of sentiment and romanticized happenings in one’s life results in such awe. Most will never move beyond these representations and witness the landscapes for themselves. The film succeeds for it removes the guest from the park and places them within the film. Growing up an hour away from Walt Disney World, my family would always make trips out to the parks. I have been to each park so many times, I wouldn’t be able to tell you a definitive number of times I’ve been. Now that I work here, I have tried to remove myself from routines developed throughout the years of family vacations, immersing myself in new narratives guided by the thematic landscape of the park. Considering I do not have to pay for park admission, the goals of the day are so much different than that when I go with my family. On vacation, the goal of the day is to see all the E Class attractions and get as much done/ seen as possible, with my cast member gate pass, I now have the ability to explore the parks on my days off and reevaluate what it means to be a guest in a Disney park. Following the Theory of the

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Similar (almost identical) in graphical style to that of Guy Dubord’s “Naked City”, my reconfigured Magic Kingdom park map diagrams memory and affect between myself and the attractions. Throughout the years, my preference for rides has changed very little, the thematic nature of the park has maintained and held consistent effects on me.

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portfolio _ iteration 5