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Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services CYSS CONNECTIONS - June 2014

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CYSS CONNECTIONS

June 2014

CYSS Mission : To support readiness and quality of life by reducing the conflict between military mission requirements and parental responsibilities

FATHERS FOR GOOD

Monthly Highlights: National Child Vision Awareness Month Great Outdoors Month

If you were to search “fatherhood” on the Internet, you would find dozens of websites dedicated to teaching, encouraging, and supporting men in becoming more nurturing and involved fathers. Such advice is critical given that many TV sitcoms and animated shows continue to skew how men function as fathers. Even in the midst of all this confusion, there is a still one constant: Kids need their fathers as well as their mothers. Here are a few practical guidelines to achieve responsible fatherhood: 

♦♦♦♦♦ June 14 June 15

Be there. In study after study, kids consistently say they would like to have more time with their dads. Regardless of whether a dad shares a home with the children and their mother, the kids need dad time. Research indicates that father engagement can have both positive and negative effects on the social, behavioral, psychological, and cognitive outcomes of children. Thus, it is important that fathers stay on the positive side of the equation in order to make huge and irreplaceable difference in the lives of their children.

Flag Day Father’s Day 

Inside This Issue:

Be there throughout their childhood. There is no time in a child’s life that does not count. Research has shown that even infants know and respond to their fathers differently than they do to their mothers. The bond you make with a baby sets the foundation for a lifetime.

Child Programming

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School-Age Programming

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Youth Programming

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YLEAD Summits

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Command/Unit Events

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Blue Star Museums

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Community Events

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Resources

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CYSS Contacts & Tips

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Balance discipline with fun. Some dads make the mistake of being only the disciplinarian. Kids need to have fathers who know both how to set reasonable, firm limits and how to relax and have a good time. One of the toughest challenges for a Soldier father is being absent for significant periods of time due to battle assemblies, annual trainings, and deployments. Here are tips from the National Long Distance Relationship Building Institute on how to be a dad from a distance.  Make a video and/or audio tape of you reading bedtime stories. Send them to your child along with the book.  Arrange for flowers, pizza, etc. to be delivered to your child before or after a special even (a play, recital, sports game). Include a note telling them how proud you are of their accomplishment.  If both you and your child have access to the Internet, then go on a virtual field trip together. A couple of places to start would be NASA at www.nasa.gov or PBS at www.pbs.org. Both boys and girls need a role model for what it means to be adult and male. While it would be ideal for biological fathers to serve in this role, it does not occur in all situations. Fortunately, studies have shown that non-biological father figures can play an important role for children with absentee fathers. Luckily, Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the U.S. Armed Forces have partnered to help children of military families face such unique challenges. More information on this partnership and how Boys & Girls Clubs of America can provide military children with a mentor can be found at http://bgca.org/meetourpartners/Pages/MilitaryPartnership.aspx. Sources: Hartwell-Walker, Marie. "Be There, Be Yourself." Psych Central - Be There, Be Yourself. Psych Central, n.d. Web. 21 May 2014. <http://psychcentral.com/>. "20 Long Distance Activities for Dads at a Distance." 20 Long Distance Activities for Dads at a Distance. The National Long Distance Relationship Building Institute, n.d. Web. 21 May 2014. <http://www.fambooks.com/daads/ fathering.html>.

Written By: Jason Follett & Matthew Mundy, CYSS School and Youth Services Specialists, Odyssey TCI Contractors

This information has beenby provided by Army Reserve Child, YouthServices. & SchoolFor Services. This information has been provided Army Reserve Child, Youth & School more For more information on resources and programs, please visit: information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at WWW.ARFP.ORG 866-345-8248 visit: or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


CYSS CONNECTIONS - June 2014

2 CHILD PROGRAMMING (AGES 0-5)

PROMOTING LITERACY IN YOUNG CHILDREN Promoting early literacy in infants and toddlers can be fun and exciting. The process begins at birth with simply speaking to your newborn – the exciting time when your baby gazes into your eyes as you speak and you study each other’s facial movements and sounds. Mimicking coos and noises that your infant makes is another wonderful way to further their language and literacy development as well as strengthen your bond. Reading experiences can start from day one as well. It is not important that your child understands what is being said -- just the process of being read to on a regular basis will instill the building block for future learning. As your baby grows, they will want to explore books. Small board books, plastic books, or easy-to-clean cloth books with pictures and one or two words would be appropriate for this stage. Babies will want to mouth, throw, hit, and pull on the books, which are all ways for them to learn. As you read to them, show them the pictures and run your fingers across the words as you read. This helps children to eventually understand that you are reading the letters and not the pictures.

To facilitate learning parents can: 

Point out pictures that are associated with concrete items in the child’s everyday life. For example, if you have a cat or a dog, point it out as you read a story that might include these animals.

Allow your child to play in their food, smearing and wiping their fingers on their tray or use non toxic finger paints, or big crayons to encourage scribbling This also promotes pre-writing skills.

Teach your child about letters and words. Notice words and letters in the world around you. Read cereal boxes and favorite snacks, favorite restaurants such as the yellow arches, which means McDonalds, community signs, like stop and traffic lights. Post your child’s name in his or her room . All of these encourage letter recognition.

Use your child’s native language when you talk, read, write, play and sing. This will create a strong sense of self and support your child’s roots in addition to building a solid foundation of basic language concepts.

Parents should also inquire with their local libraries for information on story hour, these programs offer social opportunities for parents and children .

Additional resources for ideas with incorporating literacy into everyday life: 

For activities surrounding cooking, shopping and crafts with foods visit: http://www.raising-readers.org/documents/filelibrary/ literacyresources/FunwithFoodActivityGuide_F0524CECC7C54.pdf

For a more complete list of books and activities visit: raisingreaders.org

The Tumble Book Library, an online collection of books and games for young children through teenage years, can be accessed from myarmyonesource.com

For a list of interactive books for children up to age 2, visit: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/book-list/babys-firstbooks/great-books-squishing-lifting-and-playing-ages-0-2 Written by: Devon Perry and Joyce Hall, School Services and Youth Services Specialists Odyssey TCI Contractor This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


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SCHOOL-AGE (6-12) AND YOUTH-AGE (13-18) PROGRAMMING

Summer Reading Programs The benefits of reading a book are limitless! With reading comes comprehension and knowledge of the world in which we live. Therefore with knowledge comes empowerment to become successful at achieving goals. Reading can help relieve stress, improve concentration and focus for children who may have different behavior challenges and prevent summer learning loss. The power of a book can increase writing skills, expand vocabulary, and allow great communication skills to develop. Whether you are reading a book, magazine, newspaper, or keeping up with today’s trend by reading on your mobile devices, reading is an educational activity that is enjoyable. When reading is made to be fun, life-long readers are created. Below is a list of national reading programs in which Army Reserve families can take advantage of.

School-Age Programming 6-12 

2014 Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge: This is a free online program that gives you the tools to create a very personalized reading program for your children. As your child keeps a reading log online, they earn virtual rewards and the chance to win sweepstakes prizes. Some of the online resources include reading lists grouped by age and theme, book review and character scrapbook templates, and achievement certificates. This summer’s theme is “Reading Under the Stars.” For more free resources, visit: http://www.scholastic.com/ups/campaigns/src-2014#age_screener/cleanup YMCA Summer Learning Loss Prevention: The YMCA is operating programs to combat the achievement gap in 40 states throughout the USA. Their programs are run onsite and provide a balanced approach to reading with a mix of healthy eating, and recreation. Your child may benefit from tackling phonics, writing, and reading with their peers. The ideal participant is in 1st or 2nd grade, but local YMCA may be piloting a summer reading program for all ages. For more info, visit: http://www.ymca.net/ achievement-gap Barnes & Noble Imagination’s Destination Summer Reading (1-6th): Does your older child prefer reading comic books? While comics can be entertaining – they can be encouraged to read more challenging graphic novels – youth need to have a diversified reading list. B & N has developed a simple solution. Your child can read any eight books and log each on the Reading Journal. Once the Reading Journal is complete with eight titles, just bring the list into your local B & N store and choose a FREE BOOK. For more resources, visit: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/u/summer-reading/379003570/ PBS Raise a Reader! Promotes summer reading through educational activities like word scrambles and cross word puzzles. Raise a Reader! also provides early childhood literacy tips for parents. These resources are made even more available to you through their many mobile apps, and videos available on iTunes. For more information, visit: www.pbs.org/parents/education/read/

Youth-Age Programming 13-18 and Parents 

Education.com offers games, activities, free worksheets, and educational articles for everyone from preschool to high school and of course parents too. In addition to phonics & reading, letters & writing, you can find resources on science experiments, outdoor games, and tips to help evaluate and select preschool programs and K-12 schools. For more integrated educational tools, visit: www.education.com/

Your Local Public Library: You’ll have to check your local public library to find great reading opportunities for you and your child. Some of the larger libraries often invite children’s book authors to give a public reading of one of their bestsellers. This Each library also maintains a reading list that is compatible with school curriculums in the area. To get started, find your public library at http://www.publiclibraries.com/

Create Your Own Reading Challenge Program: Healthy competition can be good. A book club or reading contest can be a simple start. Get started by gathering your child’s friends, establish simple rules (start and end date, which books to read, prizes, etc.), and have fun.

New York Times Summer Reading Program: Join the prestigious New Times for the 5th Annual Summer Reading Contest. The contest will be every week, starting June 13 through August 15. Youth ages 13 to 19 years old are invited to read articles in The New York Times and write about why it interested them. A weekly winner will be chosen each Tuesday. The winners will get to have their work published in the New York Times! For more information, please visit: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/05/01/our-fifth-annual-new-york-timessummer-reading-contest/ Source: What’s Important in Reading? http://www.education.com/reference/article/important-reading-motivation-comprehension/

Written by: Vivian P. D’Andrande & Raychell W. Watson, School Services and Youth Services Specialists, Odyssey TCI Contractors This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


CYSS CONNECTIONS - June 2014

4 YOUTH PROGRAMMING (AGES 13-18)

Job / Internship 101 Seeking an internship or job while in high school demonstrates one can handle a challenge and provides valuable work experience. Whether answering phones or making deliveries, skills in customer service can be gained from entry level positions as well as learning to work under pressure, contributing to a team environment, and becoming knowledgeable of new computer programs. Having an internship or job can enrich one’s high school experience and work to your advantage when seeking post secondary education in a specific trade or a liberal arts degree. Internships and first jobs can also help you figure out what one wants to do, or at the very least, what one doesn’t want to do in the future. The challenge is how to acquire a job. Find the Right Job:  Consider how much time you have to commit to a job or internship. You may want to take into account your school schedule, other extra- curricular activities, and family commitments.  Ask yourself, what am I interested in? What do I excel in? Where do I like to spend my time? Do I want to get paid or do I just want the experience of working?  Once you have answered these questions, you can start to narrow down your search. You can hit the pavement, walk into some businesses that come to mind and ask about open positions or opportunities to intern. You can also search for job or internship opportunities online through store websites and job search engines. Resume Building:  Use the same standard font throughout your resume, like Arial. Text size can vary to make a job title stand out.  Your heading should contain your name and contact info. The body of your resume should include skills, education, work experience, and volunteer experience, all listed separately. As a student, it is understandable if you don’t have any relevant work experience. If this is the case, think about describing coursework, school projects, and extra-curricular activities. Match these experiences with skills listed in the job description.  Use concise language and action words to describe your responsibilities (e.g., responsible for updating patient records, maintained accurate cash flow at register, provided excellent customer service). For more information, visit: https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/ explore-careers/careers/how-to-create-your-resume  Resume writing workshops may be offered at your local library or community center. Interview Preparation:  Dress professionally. Take into consideration what company you are interviewing for and their work environment. Google, which is famous for their unconventional work environment, may be an appropriate place for a colorful, but professional ensemble. Many retail-clothing companies require their employees to wear their clothes while working - you may want to dress the part for the interview. This shows that you are aware of their product and will be compatible with the work environment.  Gather as much info about the company as possible. Many interviewers will start out asking what you know and why you want to work there.  Try to prepare three questions. The interviewer may answer all of them during the course of the interview, but at least have your questions with you in case they don’t. In addition to great work experience, having a job or internship in high school can help you figure out what you want to do, or at the very least, what you don’t want to do in the future. Finding a job or internship can seem daunting, but it is definitely within your reach. Check out your local businesses to see what job or internship opportunities are available to you. For additional help, visit your local library, employment office, or online job search websites. The College Board resume building resources: https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/explore-careers/careers/how-to-create-your-resume Written by: Vivian D’Andrade, Youth Services Specialist, Odyssey TCI Contractor This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


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Youth Leadership, Education And Development (YLEAD): Summer 2014 Dates & Cities Youth Leadership, Education and Development (YLEAD) summits supports CYSS’ mission, and provides an opportunity for Army Reserve teens to come together, learn new skills, and build new connections. At YLEAD, Army Reserve youth:  Connect with one another  Participate in activities that promote success at home, in school, and within the community.  Learn more about the Army Reserve  Find out how to make a difference in the lives of Army Reserve Families  Discover ways to become involved through partnerships with teens, adults, and communitybased programs. YLEAD participants engage in several sessions that promote resilience and leadership skills such as communication, decision making, exploring interests, and youth-adult partnerships. Team building activities help youth make connections and learn to work together. A service learning project is also conducted, and past YLEAD participants have done beach clean-ups, sorted and packed food at a food bank, and helped paint The Fisher House. Youth have the opportunity to visit the city where YLEAD is held through educational and fun outings. YLEAD is offered at no cost, as youth are placed on travel orders which cover transportation, lodging and meals. The youth then becomes a volunteer for the Command, and is able to apply lessons learned at the next Family Day, FRG meeting, Yellow Ribbon event or other Family Programs-approved event. YLEAD is open to Army Reserve teens ages 14-17 who reside in the states indicated for each region. Interested youth and parents can get more information about YLEAD at www.cyssevents.com/ylead.asp. Region

Date/Location

Southeast

23-27 June Raleigh, NC

AL, AR, TX, MS, FL, GA, LA, SC, NC, TN

West Coast CA, WA, OR, NV, AZ, ID, MT, UT, CO, NM, HI, AK

Atlantic Puerto Rico

Midwest WY, NE, MN, WI, IN, IL, IA, MI, KY, MO, ND, SD, KS, OK, OH

Northeast MA, NH, VT, ME, RI, CT, NY, NJ, MD, VA, DC, PA, WV, DE

CYSS POC

Registration Opens 27 April

Registration Closes 1 June

7-11 July Sacramento, CA

4 May

15 June

Camara Rajabari Camara.m.rajabari.ctr@mail.mil

24-27 July San Juan, Puerto Rico

18 May

29 June

Barbara Rodriguez Barbara.i.rodriguez.ctr@mail.mil

11-15 August Chicago, IL

11 May

20 July

LeeAnne Quashie Leeanne.quashie.ctr@mail.mil

20-24 August Pittsburgh, PA

22 May

27 July

Vicki Buck Vicki.j.buck.ctr@mail.mil

Danielle Peschon Danielle.s.peschon.ctr@mail.mil

This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


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COMMAND/UNIT UPDATES

E H T E V E! A S AT D

Kickstart the School Year with STEM (science, technology, engineering & math)

A day camp for Army Reserve youth entering grades 3-8 WHEN: Tuesday-Thursday, 5-7 June TIME: 0900-1400 daily WHERE: STARBASE on Joint Forces Training Base, Los Alamitos, CA **Registration will be available on the CYSS website soon: www.cyssevents.com** Questions? Contact Youth Services Specialist Ann Nacino Phone: 562.936.7633. Email: xania.d.nacino.ctr@mail.mil

This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


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Summer Opportunities: Blue Star Museums Army Reserve Soldiers and Families can take advantage of free admission to more than 2,000 (and counting) museums in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and American Samoa as part of the Blue Star Museums initiative. Blue Star Museums is a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and museums across America. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Star Museums represent not just fine arts museums, but also science museums, history museums, nature centers, and dozens of childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s museums. The program runs from Memorial Day, May 26, 2014 through Labor Day, September 1, 2014. The free admission program is available to any bearer of a Geneva Convention common access card (CAC), a DD Form 1173 ID card (dependent ID), or a DD Form 1173-1 ID card, which includes active duty U.S. military - Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, as well as members of the National Guard and Reserve, U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, NOAA Commissioned Corps - and up to five family members. Some special or limited-time museum exhibits may not be included in this free admission program. For questions on particular exhibits or museums, please contact the museum directly. To find participating museums and plan your trip, visit http:// arts.gov/national/blue-star-museums.

This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


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COMMUNITY EVENTS JUNE 2014 Please note that events listed in this newsletter, with the exception of AR CYSS events, are not endorsed by the Army Reserve and are provided only for community awareness.

If you need help locating summer camps in your area, be sure to contact your Command CYSS Specialist for assistance. 7 JUNE CREATION STATION, Rancho Los Cerritos, Long Beach, 1300-1600. There is a whole spectrum of colorful activities, from making a necklace to doing a weaving project, at this drop-in workshop, which has a "Rainbow Surprise" theme. 7 JUNE NATIONAL TRAILS DAY: KIDS HIKE, Arroyo Pescadero Park, Whittier, 0900-1100. Puente Hills Habitat Preservation Authority hosts a leisurely 2-mile hike around the Preserve. Kids can also make a pair of binoculars to help with their exploration efforts. 7 JUNE NATIVE GARDEN WORKDAY/BEACH CLEAN UP, Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, San Pedro, 0800-1000. Lend a hand for this monthly clean up and learn a little about the garden’s plants and animals. 7-8 JUNE SANTA MONICA TEEN FILM FESTIVAL, Miles Playhouse & Santa Monica Library. June 7 offers an evening of movies for youth 13 and older, while an afternoon all-ages program takes places on June 8. 28 June SUMMER LEARNING CELEBRATION, Children’s Museum in La Habra, 1000-1500. PBS SoCal is celebrating summer with fun and exciting resources that you can use at home to help your students stay sharp during the summer break. Join us for story time, literacy resources, special characters, and discover online and mobile games in the PBS SoCal Mobile Lab.

YOU MAY ALSO BE INTERESTED IN CHECKING THE FOLLOWING LINKS REGULARLY FOR EVENTS IN YOUR AREA: CYSS Events: https://www.arfp.org/index.php/programs/child-youth-a-school-services 4-H: www.4-h.org YMCA: www.ymca.net Operation Military Kids calendar for your state: www.operationmilitarykids.org/public/states.aspx This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


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RESOURCES AND WEB LINKS

Child Care Aware速 of America is working with the U.S. Military Services to help those who serve in the military find and afford

child care that suits their unique needs. Through the fee assistance program, families are eligible to receive monthly fee assistance to help offset the cost of child care in their communities. For more information visit, http://www.naccrra.org/military-families. Army Fee Assistance will be transferring to General Services Administration (GSA) 1 Oct 2014. For up to date information on the transition, please visit: www.armyfeeassistancenaccrra.org/ Army Respite Care The Army Respite Child Care will provide the family between 8 to 16 hours of hourly child care each month for each of the eligible children. Parents can use this time to run errands, attend appointments, or just take some well-deserved time out for themselves. The Army recognizes the challenges and extraordinary stress the parents and their families may be experiencing, and wants to help support them in meeting their unique child care needs. Eligibility: Deployed; Temporary Change of Station; Unaccompanied Permanent Change of Station; Temporary Duty; Wounded, Ill or Injured Status; Survivors of Fallen Warriors.

Boys and Girls Clubs of America's (BGCA) is a network of safe, neighborhood-based facilities, for children/teens to come together. Visit: www.bgca.org Military Kids Connect (MKC) is an online community of military children (ages 6-17 yr old) that provides access to ageappropriate resources to support children from pre-deployment, through a parent's or caregiver's return. Visit: www.militarykidsconnect.org Military Mentoring: Operation Bigs is a new mentoring program created by Big Brothers Big Sisters that is specifically for military kids. The Big Brothers Big Sisters MMP supports children of the deployed and non-deployed, children of the fallen and children of the wounded and disabled. The program serves children of veterans at selected locations. The MMP also engages Active Duty, Reserve or Retired/Separated Military personnel, as well as civilians as volunteer mentors. Visit: www.bbbs.org Operation: Military Kids (OMK) provides support and resources to military youth before, during, and after parents are deployed. Visit: www.operationmilitarykids.org Sittercity Welcomes Military Families! Sittercity membership at no cost for military families and offer access to a database of local babysitters, nannies, pet sitters, elder caregivers, etc. Memberships are funded by the DoD to help you find local sitters and military subsidized child care providers, and are available to Army, Marines, Navy and Air Force families, including Active Duty, Reserve, and Guard. Activate your membership today! Visit: www.sittercity.com/dod Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC) is a non-profit organization focusing on academic and school-related needs of military -connected youth. Visit: www.militarychild.org SOAR is designed for military families, and is easily accessible worldwide. Students take an assessment aligned to state standards, and SOAR directs them to individualized tutorials to improve skills where needed. Visit: http://www.soarathome.org/ or www.militaryimpactedschoolsassociation.org Tutor.com for U.S. Military Families - Get help from a professional tutor anytime you need it. FREE for Active Duty, National Guard and Reserve members in the Army, Marines, Navy or Air Force and their dependents. Tutors are online 24/7 and available to help in more than 16 subjects. Visit: www.tutor.com/military This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG


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The mission of Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services is to support readiness and quality of life by reducing the conflict between Military Mission requirements and parental responsibilities. Family Programs Director Ms. Maritza L. Ramirez (79th SSC) 4201 Saratoga Ave. Los Alamitos, CA 90720 Phone: 562.936.7612 Email: maritza.l.ramirez.civ@mail.mil

Contact Ms. Ramirez for assistance with:  Family Support Services  Family Programs Training

Youth Services Specialist (YSS) Ann Nacino Contractor: Odyssey-TCI JV, LLC (79th SSC, So CA, NV & AZ) 4201 Saratoga Ave. Los Alamitos, CA 90720 Phone: 562.936.7633 Email: xania.d.nacino.ctr@mail.mil

Contact Mrs. Nacino for assistance with:  Command/Unit Support  Weekend Events and Activities  Child Care Resources  Youth Programming  Teen Council

School Services Specialist (SSS) - Interim Ms. Flora M. Sherman Contractor: Odyssey-TCI JV, LLC 311th ESC - SoCAL & NV Phone: 951-251-7106 Email: flora.m.sherman.ctr@mail.mil

Contact Ms. Sherman for assistance with:  Command/Unit Support  Educational Events and Activities  Scholarship Information  College Prep  Academic/Tutoring Resources  School Support Services

If you are not part of the Command listed or do not reside in Southern California, contact one of the Family Programs staff members above and we will connect you with the Family Programs or CYSS in your area. This information has been provided by Army Reserve Child, Youth & School Services. For more information on resources and programs, please visit: HTTPS://WWW.ARFP.ORG/CYSS Fort Family Outreach & Support Center assistance is available 24/7 at 866-345-8248 or visit: WWW.ARFP.ORG

79cyssjune2014newsletter  

79 CYSS June 2014 NewsLetter

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