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OVER OVER 4 4MILLION MILLION Readers Weekly Readers Weekly Nationwide! Nationwide!

April 16, 2013 Published by PTK Corp.

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of the River Region

The NeatestLittle LittlePaper PaperEver EverRead Read The Neatest To place an Ad, call: (334) 202-7285 TIDBITS® SPARKLES WITH

DIAMONDS by Kathy Wolfe

“Diamonds are a girl’s best friend.” “Diamonds are forever.” “Diamonds in the rough.” Whatever you say about these precious gems, you can’t deny they are desirable! Tidbits has all the dirt on diamonds this week – read along and see! • The word “diamond” has its origins in the Greek language from the word Adamas, which translates “unconquerable and indestructible.” The Greeks believed them to be splinters of stars that had fallen to Earth and believed diamonds promoted strength, invincibility, and courage to those who wore them. • Ranked as the hardest natural substance on Earth, diamonds are composed entirely of carbon, the only gemstones composed of just one element. They are formed at high temperatures under intense pressure 87 to 120 miles (140 to 190 km) within the Earth’s mantle over billions of years. A volcanic eruption can often bring diamonds to the Earth’s surface. Although there are synthetic “diamonds,” there is no man-made way to reproduce the tremendous heat and pressure found deep within the Earth that creates diamonds. Millionaire publisher Malcolm Forbes had this to say about diamonds – “Diamonds are nothing more than chunks of coal that stuck to their jobs.” • Although diamonds are 58 times harder than the next hardest mineral on Earth, they are quite brittle and can be shattered by the single blow of a hammer. And if a diamond is placed in an oven at a temperature of 1405° F (763° C), it will disappear without leaving so much as an ash behind. • About 250 tons of earth must be mined to produce a single one-carat diamond. Over 130,000,000 carats weighing 57,000 lbs. (26,000 kg) of diamonds are mined every year – a value of about $9 billion. • Of all the diamonds to be found on Earth, only 20% of them are suitable for jewelry. The majority of diamonds are used for industrial drilling, grinding, cutting, and polishing tools. Diamonds are embedded into drill bits for drilling oil and gas wells through thousands of feet of rock. turn the page for more!

Vol 2 Issue 16 paul@riverregiontidbits.com


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Eat Fish, Live Longer Seniors older than 65 who have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood benefit from reduced mortality risk, specifically from heart disease, according to a study by the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Washington. The 16-year study gathered information on three specific types of fatty acid: docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is related to lower risk of death from heart disease; eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which is linked to lower risk of non-fatal heart attacks; and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), which is associated with lower risk of stroke death. The study concluded that adults with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood: --reduce their overall mortality risk by as much as 27 percent; --lower their risk of dying of heart disease by 35 percent; --can extend their lives an average of 2.2 years. This can be accomplished, the study said, by increasing the level of fatty-acid foods (fatty, oily fish) from little or none to a moderate amount, about two servings per week, or an average of 400 mg per day. Some researchers have declared the study faulty, however, because it didn’t specifically address the consumption of fish. It also excluded participants who took fish oil supplements and concentrated on the levels of fatty acid in the blood. If you’re curious about this study, ask your doctor if it would be appropriate for you to add one or two servings of fish per week to your diet. The types of fish classified as “fatty” include cold-water albacore tuna, trout, salmon, sardines, herring and mackerel. Other ways to get omega-3 include eggs, walnuts and canola oil. Matilda Charles regrets that he cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

Tidbits® of the River Region DIAMONDS (continued): • Diamonds were first discovered in India, but most diamond deposits are found in Africa and Russia. There are significant deposits in Brazil, Australia, and Canada, and in a few U.S. states, Arkansas, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana. There’s only one mine in the world where you can be a miner, located at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas, a 37.5-acre ancient volcanic crater. For $7, you can mine all day and keep anything you find. In 1990, one lucky park visitor found a diamond weighing 3.03 carats in the rough. After cutting, the gem was a perfect 1.09 carat. Don’t get your hopes up, however – gemologists estimate this was a one in a billion occurrence. • Although less than 1% of diamonds are mined in the U.S., America buys more than half of the world’s total production of quality gems. • A diamond’s value is based on the “Four C’s” – carat weight, clarity, color, and cut. A diamond’s carat is not the same as that of gold. Pure gold is considered 24 carats, while one diamond carat is 0.007055 oz. (200 mg). Not all diamonds are clear. The presence of impurities causes the gems to vary in color, as can heat or irradiation. Nitrogen in a stone produces a yellow color, while irradiation might produce green. Blue, red, brown, pink, orange, and even black might result from the presence of both irradiation and heat. Clear diamonds are the highest grade and value. • Diamonds lose about 50% of their original weight during the cutting and polishing process, changing a rough stone into a faceted gem. One diamond weighing two carats is worth double that of two one-carat diamonds. About 75% of all diamonds sold worldwide are round cut. Other popular cuts include the football-shaped marquise, the pear cut (which are rounded on one end with a tapering point on the other), and the emerald cut, a rectangular shape with cropped corners. • Although blue, green, and pink diamonds are extremely rare, they are not the rarest gems. That honor belongs to the pure red ruby. Diamonds

themselves aren’t actually rare at all, with thousands mined every year. • The world’s largest diamond was found in South Africa in 1905. Dubbed the Cullinan, it weighed 3106.75 carats uncut, three times the size of the next largest diamond, the Excelsior, also found in South Africa. The Cullinan was cut into the 530-carat Great Star of Africa and the 317-carat Lesser Star of Africa, along with 104 other diamonds of flawless color and clarity. Today they are all part of the British crown jewels. • The legendary Hope Diamond is a 45.52-carat deep blue stone famous for a supposed curse upon its owners. Its blue color is attributed to trace amounts of boron and nitrogen within its composition. When exposed to ultraviolet light, it produces a red phosphorescence, a “glow-in-the-dark” effect. The curse alleges that the gem brings tragedy to all who own it or wear it, but it’s likely that the stories were fabricated to heighten the diamond’s mystery and consequently, its value. However, legend has it that two owners committed suicide, another was killed by Russian revolutionists, one murdered by her sweetheart, and another thrown from a precipice. At one point, the gem was in the possession of Marie Antoinette and her husband King Louis XVI, who were guillotined. It’s believed that the Hope Diamond came from a mine in India, and was brought to Paris by a French gem merchant. It currently resides in the Smithsonian Institute, donated by diamond merchant Harry Winston in 1958. The irreplaceable gem is reportedly insured for $250 million. It’s displayed behind a 3-inchthick (76 mm) bulletproof glass in its own display room. • It’s become traditional to present one’s intended with a diamond when proposing marriage. This dates back to 1477 when Archduke Maximillian of Austria gifted Mary of Burgundy with a diamond upon their engagement. It’s also customary to wear engagement and wedding rings on the third finger of the left hand. This is because the ancient Egyptians believed that particular finger’s vein ran straight to the heart.


“Be known before you’re needed” Advertise with Tidbits (334) 202-7285 and put the carrots in plastic bags. Store them in the coldest part of the refrigerator with the highest humidity, they’ll last several months this way. To keep the carrots crisp and colorful, add a little bit of water in the bottom of the plastic storage bag; this will keep the carrots hydrated. Carrots should be stored away from fruits such as apples, peaches and pears that release ethylene gas, which causes carrots to become bitter. If carrots have become limp or dehydrated, cut off one of the ends and place the carrots, cut side down, in a bowl of ice water for about half an hour, to re-crisp them. The coarse, inner core of older carrots should be removed. This Herb Carrot and Mushroom Loaf is an unusual way to serve carrots. It’s a great side dish with roasted meats or fish, and makes a delicious main course for vegetarians. HERB CARROT AND WILD MUSHROOM LOAF

Carrots -- From Top to Bottom The carrot is a very versatile vegetable. It can be used as a starter, main course, dessert or just as a snack. Carrots can be eaten raw or cooked in almost any manner imaginable. Carrots help to maintain acidic and alkaline properties in the system. They provide important vitamins for eyes, skin, bones, heart and muscle health. Carrots also can act as a blood purifier, a diuretic and help to relieve flatulence or colic. The mineral content in carrots lie very close to the skin and should not be peeled or scraped off. When selecting carrots, make sure that they are a deep, rich color. The deeper the carrot’s color, the more beta-carotene it contains. If you’re buying the carrots with the leaves, select ones that they are moist and a bright green. Remove the carrot greenery as soon as possible because it robs the roots of moisture and vitamins. You can eat the green tops in a salad or use them similar to the way that you’d use fresh herbs to sprinkle on a dish. Carrots that are less than 8-inches long and relatively uniform in shape and size are the best selection. Carrots should not bend when gently tested. They also should be wellshaped, firm and smooth with no cracks. They should not look wilted. When grated, carrots should be quite juicy. Carrots are often sold with the tops removed. To judge the freshness, check the top of the carrot for darkening. Whether loose or in plastic bags, avoid carrots with green shoots sprouting out (not to be confused with their green tops) yellowed tips, soft spots or withering, as these are a sign of age. Carrots that have an excessive amount of new sprouts or leaves could have large or woody cores. Also avoid carrots with large green areas at or near their tops. This indicates sunburn damage. Before storing carrots, remove their green tops, rinse, drain

1/4 cup butter, plus 3 tablespoons for buttering pan and topping loaf 1 cup chopped onions 2 cloves garlic, minced 4 1/2 cups grated carrots 2 cups sliced, wild mushrooms (cremini, shiitake, porcini or Portobello) 1/2 cup chopped celery 1 1/2 tablespoons Italian seasoning 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 5 large eggs, lightly mixed 1 1/2 cups fresh, whole-wheat breadcrumbs 1 cup grated cheddar cheese 1. Preheat oven to 350 F. 2. In a large skillet, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook for 3 to 5 minutes until golden. Add garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Add carrots, mushrooms, celery, Italian seasoning, salt and pepper. Saute until vegetables are soft, about 5 minutes. 3. Pour carrot mixture into a large bowl. Add eggs to the bowl, and 1 cup of breadcrumbs and 1/2 cup of the cheese. Reserve remainder of breadcrumbs and cheese to sprinkle on the top of loaf. Mix the ingredients until well combined. 4. Spread the 2 tablespoons of the butter on the bottom and sides of a 9 x 5 inch, oblong baking pan. Spread the carrot mixture into the pan. Sprinkle with remaining cheese and breadcrumbs. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Remove foil, dot with the remaining tablespoon of butter, and bake for 5 to 7 minutes until brown on top. Makes 4 to 6 servings. Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children’s author, culinary historian and author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is “The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic Cookbook.” Her website is www.divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva!, on Facebook and go to Hulu.com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis.

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TidbitsÂŽ of the River Region

* On May 1, 1926, Ford Motor Company becomes one of the first companies in America to adopt a five-day, 40-hour week. In early 1914, Ford had announced it would pay workers a minimum wage of $5 per eighthour day, upped from a previous rate of $2.34 for nine hours. * On April 30, 1939, the New York World’s Fair opens in New York City on a 1,200-acre site at Flushing Meadow Park in Queens. Among the new technology exhibited was FM radio, robotics, fluorescent lighting and a crude fax machine. * On May 3, 1946, in Tokyo, the International Military Tribunals begins hearing the case against 28 Japanese military and government officials accused of committing war crimes during World War II. The trial ended with 25 of 28 Japanese defendants being found guilty. Of the three other defendants, two had died during the trial, and one was declared insane. * On May 5, 1955, the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) becomes a sovereign state when the United States, France and Great Britain end their military occupation, which had begun in 1945. With this action, West Germany was given the right to rearm and become a full-fledged member of the western alliance against the Soviet Union. * On May 2, 1964, an explosion of a charge assumed to have been placed by Viet Cong terrorists sinks the USNS Card at its dock in Saigon. No one was injured and the ship was eventually raised and repaired. The Card had arrived in Saigon two days earlier. * On May 4, 1970, at Kent State University in Ohio, students protesting the Vietnam War torch the ROTC building on campus, and Ohio Gov. James Rhodes called in the National Guard to restore order. The Guardsmen fired into the crowd, killing four and wounding 11. They were later brought to trial for the shootings, but found not guilty. * On April 29, 1986, in a game against the Seattle Mariners at Fenway Park, Roger Clemens of the Boston Red Sox becomes the first pitcher in Major League Baseball to strike out 20 batters in a nine-inning game. Ten years later, Clemens repeated the feat. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.


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Tommy Count ______ This week’s winner receives $25 Gift

Certificate to the Must Stop Cafe

Register to win at www.riverregiontidbits.com and click on “Tommy Tidbits” or click the QRCode above. Fill out the registration information and tell us how many times Tommy appears in ads in the paper for this week. From the correct entries, a winner will be selected. You must be 18 years of age to qualify. The gift certificates will range in value from $25 to $50 each week. Entries must be received at the website by midnight each Saturday evening or at PTK Corp, PO Box 264, Wetumpka, AL 36092.

Last Week’s Ads where

Tommy was hiding:

1. Diamond in the Ruff, p. 2 2. Plantation House Restaurant, p. 4 3. Montgomery Zoo, p, 6 4. R. W. Grah Construction, p. 8


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Tidbits® of the River Region

Spring Shrimp Salad This express-lane shrimp salad is ready in 30 minutes and bursting with fresh spring flavors thanks to artichokes, arugula, green onions and mint. 2 crusty dinner rolls, cut in half 1 lemon, plus wedges for serving 1 pound (16 to 20 count) large shrimp, peeled and deveined 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon olive oil 2 green onions, thinly sliced 1 package (5- to 6-ounce) baby arugula 2 packages (8 to 9 ounces each) frozen artichoke hearts 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped 1. In food processor, pulse rolls until coarse crumbs form. From lemon, grate 1 teaspoon peel and squeeze 1 tablespoon juice; in large bowl, toss peel, shrimp and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. 2. In 12-inch skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil on medium. Add onions; cook 1 minute. Add crumbs and 1/8 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Cook 5 minutes or until golden, stirring. Transfer to plate. In skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil. Cook shrimp 6 minutes or until opaque, turning once. 3. Divide arugula among 4 plates; top with shrimp. In skillet, heat remaining oil on medium-high. Add artichokes; cook 2 minutes or until golden. Add lemon juice, 1/4 cup water and 1/8 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Cook 4 minutes or until artichokes are hot. Remove from heat. Stir in half of mint; stir remaining into crumbs. Divide artichoke mixture and crumbs among plates. Serves 4. ¥ Each serving: About 290 calories, 12g total fat (2g saturated), 140mg cholesterol, 440mg sodium, 25g total carbs, 9g dietary fiber, 26g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefinder/. (c) 2013 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

by Samantha Weaver * It was beloved American humorist Will Rogers who made the following sage observation: “Everything is funny as long as it’s happening to somebody else.” * In 1952, in an otherwise rather uninteresting hockey game, Bill Mosienko, right wing for the Chicago Black Hawks, scored an amazing three goals against the New York Rangers in 21 seconds. * You probably know that the phrase “rack your brain” means to think hard, but did you ever wonder where the term originated? The rack being referred to is the medieval torture device on which victims were stretched, sometimes until limbs were dislocated. The idea is that when you’re thinking very hard, you’re undergoing a sort of mental torture. * The venerable diner saw its peak as a place for a casual meal in the late 1940s, when there were around 7,000 of them across the country. Today there are only about 2,000. * A fully mature oak tree gives off 7 tons of water every day through its leaves. * Farmers in Turkey marched on both the American and Soviet embassies in 1967, demanding reparations for crops that they lost to floods. Why were the Americans and Soviets to blame for floods in Turkey? The farmers claimed that the flights of spacecraft created “holes in the sky.” * The idea for the Tooth Fairy seems to have originated in Germany, but the tradition has changed over the years. Instead of putting the tooth under a pillow, Germans used to put the tooth in a rat hole in the hope that the new tooth would grow in to be as strong as the teeth of the rat. *** Thought for the Day: “I must say I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns it on, I go into the library and read a good book.” -- Groucho Marx (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.


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to clean up the stove and countertop. It works well because of its absorbency, and it saves money on expensive paper towels.” * To ripen a green tomato, wrap it in a sheet of newspaper or place it in a paper bag. It can then be left on the counter for several days to ripen. * To keep ice crystals from forming on the top of your quart of ice cream, just cut a square of plastic wrap and push it down onto the surface of the ice cream each time you scoop a bowlful out. It peels off easily when you’re ready for another helping, but there’s no ice! It works for me!” -- T.D. in Nebraska * White vinegar will clean fruit or foodcoloring stains from your hands -- and most other places, too! * F.J. of Texas writes: “Keep a fresh roll of unscented toilet tissue in the kitchen

* “If you add a teaspoon of sugar to your biscuit mix or to the dough for rolls, it will help them to brown well and they will come out of the oven with golden tops.” -- Jan R. of Michigan * “You can get five or six more uses out of a pump-top lotion bottle if you cut off the top to access the lotion inside that doesn’t come out of the pump once the level is too low. You’d be surprised how much is still in there! Send your tips to Now Here’s a Tip, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or email JoAnn at heresatip@yahoo.com. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

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Tidbits® of the River Region

To Your Good Health By Paul G. Donohue, M.D.

Age No Barrier to Heart Valve Repair Uncertain TimesPrivate Goes Public Again at Masters Comedian Groucho Marx once famously said, “I don’t care to belong to any club that will have me as a member.” And while that line was used by Groucho to hilarious effect throughout the years, as we are reminded come Masters time at Augusta, private golf clubs are -- surprise! -- exclusive. Many people today are surprised to learn that up until the 1970s, women were not only barred from country clubs, they were barred from private institutions like Princeton and Yale, and even restaurants like Peter Luger, the famed Brooklyn, N.Y., steakhouse. Of course, discrimination is never funny. Lawsuits have been waged over the years, riots have occurred, boycotts held and too many deaths to mention here. Former New York Times reporter Marcia Chambers and Vanderbilt University’s Journal of Transnational Law have done expansive work on the subject in regard to private-club memberships, and I’m certainly not here to belittle the subject. Still, let’s not forget that we live in a world where discrimination exists, and to think otherwise is foolish. Ms. Chambers would be the first to admit that there are a myriad of private clubs in New York City alone, never mind Shoal Creek, Ala. What’s interesting to note is that in some famous cases, when a group or subset of people has been denied access to clubs, they often begin their own clubs and then set upon excluding other people, too. Again, there are too many examples to point out, but Groucho’s remark is said to have been made to the membership board of the Hillcrest Country Club in Los Angeles. Marx was not Jewish, but the board allegedly agreed to waive that condition if he agreed not to use the swimming pool. Marx is said to have appealed on behalf of his daughter: “She’s halfJewish ... can she wade up to her knees?” Once, when asked what his handicap was during a pro-am at a private club, Sammy Davis Jr. looked at the reporter with disbelief. “Handicap? I’m a one-eyed, negro Jew!” Those Hollywood guys are a bunch of kidders, but the situation had a different edge when it came to the 1960 presidential election between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon. History shows Kennedy to be one of the leading presidents in terms of civil rights, but having grown up in an infamous family only one generation removed from the “Irish need not apply” and anti-Catholic discrimination days, he admitted associations were complicated matters. When Nixon was criticized for his membership in The Burning Tree Golf Club, Nixon all but stammered and fell all over himself trying to explain away the “exclusive” policies the club made no efforts to hide. A week later, when it was learned that Kennedy was in the club and was sponsored by Nixon to join only seven years earlier, Kennedy gave a good-natured smile and laughed at the reporters. “Hell,” he said. “They don’t even allow Catholics!” Mark Vasto is a veteran sportswriter who lives in Kansas City. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I had an echocardiogram. The findings are consistent with “moderate to severe aortic stenosis with trace mitral and tricuspid regurgitation and mild pulmonic insufficiency, with left atrial enlargement and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The ejection fraction is greater than 65 percent.” My doctor referred me to a cardiologist, who told me I need surgery. I am 86 years old and do not feel it would be safe. Will you explain in plain English what I have, and if surgery would lengthen my life span? -- M.I. ANSWER: Forget about the mitral, tricuspid and pulmonic heart valves. These three valves have an insignificant leak. Your aortic valve, however, is your main problem. The aortic valve closes after the heart pumps blood out to the rest of the body. Your valve is so narrow (stenosis) that it creates an obstacle to emptying the heart of blood. That has given rise to “diastolic dysfunction.” Your heart can’t fill with blood normally, as it should between heartbeats (diastole). It is less stretchable. The aortic valve trouble has caused it to thicken. Early on in aortic stenosis, all goes well. When the valve narrows to a critical size, about 1 square centimeter, symptoms arise, and heart damage progresses more rapidly. The three most important symptoms and signs of aortic stenosis are shortness of breath when up and about, chest pain with activity and fainting spells. Once these symptoms appear, a downhill course in heart health is to be expected. Even though you’re 86, age is not a contraindication

Paint Like a Pro By Samantha Mazzotta

Q: Hi, first-time painter here. My dad offered some advice to my roommate and I on painting our apartment, such as putting down dropcloths and stirring the paint really well. Is there any other key information we need so we do a good job? The landlord won’t be happy if we mess it up! -- Keri C., Tallahassee, Fla. A: Preparation is the biggest part of painting. It can be maddening getting everything ready to paint, but if you do it right, putting down each coat is really satisfying. You’ll doubtless hear much more advice from friends and relatives on how to do the best job, but here are some key points: --Get clearance from the landlord or building management before painting. Just as importantly, pay attention to and follow any specific instructions, such as which colors to use. --Prepare the room(s): Remove as much furniture and stuff as possible. Move what remains to the center of the room and cover with dropcloths or old sheets. Cover the floor or carpets with overlapping dropcloths. --Prepare the walls: Take down pictures and carefully remove nails and screws; fill the small holes with spackling compound and let dry for 24 hours before sanding smooth. --Remove cover plates from wall switches and outlets; cover window and door hardware with plastic or remove the hardware (if it’s easy to put back on). Cover light fixtures with

to surgery. If your health is otherwise good, you could be a candidate for it. Discuss with the doctor the surgery he has in mind. Ask if you might be able to receive a new valve inserted into the heart through a surface blood vessel by way of a catheter. No extensive incisions are made. It’s a less-traumatic procedure. Replacement of your heart valve will increase your life span and will do away with the severe symptoms that come from a narrowed aortic valve. The booklet on heart-valve disorders describes the more common causes of heart-valve problems and how they are treated. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Donohue -- No. 105W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE: What elevates a person’s white blood cell count? What can a person do about it? Mine has been high for a while. -- B.L. ANSWER: White blood cells are the body’s warriors. They fight germs and perform other tasks to protect the body from infection. The normal white blood cell count is 5,000 to 10,000. Infections, inflammation, trauma, some noninfectious illnesses, leukemia and stress (including emotional stress) raise the count. So do dehydration and cortisone medicines. If no illnesses are found, it’s not unusual to ignore the higher-than-normal count. If suspicions of hidden illness are high, then further testing has to be done -like a bone marrow test. A person can do nothing on his own to lower the count. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. (c) 2013 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved

plastic shopping bags and secure with masking tape. --Brush away loose plaster, cobwebs, dirt and peeling paint. Sand bumpy areas smooth using fine-grit sandpaper. Wash the walls with a sponge dampened in a light soap-and-water mix or wall-cleaning product, and let dry. --Use blue painter’s tape (which is less sticky than masking tape) to mask off window and door trim, and other areas where you don’t want paint to go. --Assemble all the stuff you need to paint: Not just an assortment of brushes and rollers, but paint trays, stirring sticks (usually available free with paint purchase) and old rags or towels for cleanup. --Save money not by picking the cheapest paint, but by purchasing the exact amount you need. How to do that? Measure the square footage of each wall (length times height) and total the numbers. --Use primer if you don’t know what type of paint is currently on the walls, or if you’re covering glossy paint with matte paint or vice versa, or if the old paint is darker than the new paint. Once prepped, you’re ready to paint! Follow some tried-andtrue methods for laying down paint: Start high and work on one wall at a time. Use a foam edger or a brush to paint a border about 3 inches wide where the wall meets the ceiling. Then start rolling on paint, using a “W” pattern in various directions until the wall is covered. Once the walls are done, paint the trim, windows and finally the doors, if you’re painting them. HOME TIP: To prevent tracking paint out of an area, wear a pair of old shoes while painting; step out of them and into clean shoes at the edge of the paint area when leaving. Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisisahammer.com. My new e-book, “101 Best Home Tips,” is available to download on Amazon Kindle! Pick it up it today for just 99 cents. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.


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Tidbits® of the River Region

1. Who was the last pitcher before Detroit’s Justin Verlander in 2011 to reach 20 wins before the end of August? 2. Name the last pitcher before Boston’s Josh Beckett in 2007 to win an All-Star Game and a World Series game in the same season. 3. Which two NFL quarterbacks combined to throw for 1,000 yards in a game in 2012? 4. When was the last time Baylor’s men’s basketball team reached the Final Four? 5. In 2013, San Jose’s Patrick Marleau became the second player in NHL history to start a season with four consecutive multigoal games. Who was the first? 6. Mikaela Shiffrin, at age 17, in 2013 became the youngest women’s alpine skiing world champion since 1985. Who did it then? 7. Who was the first heavyweight boxer to regain the undisputed world title?

1. Is the book of Titus in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. From Isaiah 45, whom did God ask, “Shall the clay say to him that fashioneth it”? Gideon, Peter, Cyrus, Elijah 3. For how many days did Goliath take his stand for a man to fight him? 2, 6, 10, 40 4. From Acts 5 and 12, how many times was Peter delivered from prison by an angel? 2, 5, 12, 70 5. Which Psalm is a Prayer of Moses, the man of God? 23, 90, 117, 150 6. Who sold his birthright for a pottage of lentils? Cain, Jacob, Esau, Abel


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Stir Up Puffy Paint for Rainy-Day Fun If April’s showers are keeping your kids inside, surprise them with rainy-day fun that will spark their creativity. Stir up several batches of puffy paint for paper using the simplest of ingredients: flour, salt and water. Add coloring, and the kids will be able to make doodles and designs that will have a sparkly “puff” effect as they dry. It’s an inexpensive, non-toxic concoction that’s not only easy to mix, but virtually messless because the paint is applied with a recycled squeeze bottle. Here’s the stuff you’ll need for two colors: 1 cup white flour 1 cup plain table salt 1 cup water poster paint or food coloring 2 plastic squeeze bottles with spout, such as recycled honey bear bottles Here’s the fun: In a medium-size mixing bowl, stir together the flour, salt and water until smooth. It should be thick and pourable like a milkshake. Divide the mixture into two bowls. Add some paint or a few drips of food coloring and stir each one until blended. If your mixtures are too thick, add water a half-teaspoon at a time. Pour into the two squeeze bottles. On a newspaper-covered work surface, squeeze the paint onto a sheet of heavy paper or poster board to create designs. When finished, set aside to dry. The paint will puff on its own as it dries. For best results, use the paint within two to three days. Fun things to paint: --Draw small designs on heavy notecard paper. Add envelopes and tie with a ribbon for a gift. Or, make a collection of gift tags by punching a hole in the corner and adding string. --Make a frame for a painting or photo using a recycled cereal box. Cut a cereal box into two rectangular shapes larger than what you are framing, with one piece slightly larger than the other. The larger of the two pieces is the frame and the small piece is the backing. Cut out the center of the frame to leave an opening for the art or photo to show. Now it’s time to decorate it! Paint the plain side of the frame by squeezing some puffy paint on it. Spread the paint out thinly with a paintbrush to cover the cardboard. Let dry, then squeeze fun designs on the painted frame. Let dry. Attach your photo or artwork to the backing with tape. Place the frame on top and tape in place. *** Donna Erickson’s award-winning series “Donna’s Day” is airing on public television nationwide. To find more of her creative family recipes and activities, visit www.donnasday.com and link to the NEW Donna’s Day Facebook fan page. Her latest book is “Donna Erickson’s Fabulous Funstuff for Families.” (c) 2013 Donna Erickson Distributed by King Features Synd.

Can Clincal Hypnosis Improve Your Health? Absolutely yes. Clinical hypnosis is both a natural alternative medicine and a therapeutic tool used in traditional medicine and psychology. It can produce physical and mental relaxation, eliminate unhealthy habits and long-term emotional problems. Clinical hypnosis can increase motivation, alter negative thoughts, attitudes and beliefs that lead to psychological suffering and lifestyle issues. Hypnotherapy has been used for decades in various specialties such as psychiatry, dentistry and obstetrics. Self-hypnosis can be taught to reinforce change and prevent relapse. The American Medical Asssociation approved clinical hypnosis in 1958 for its therapeutic effects in pain management. FREE Consultations at hypnosisworksnow.com.

334-213-0054

BIBLE TRIVIA ANSWERS:

1) New; 2) Cyrus; 3) 40; 4) 2; 5) 90; 6) Esau

1. Curt Schilling of Arizona in 2002. 2. Atlanta’s John Smoltz, in 1996. 3. Detroit’s Matthew Stafford (520 yards) and Green Bay’s Matt Flynn (480 yards). 4. It was 1950. 5. Ottawa’s Cy Denneny, in 1917. 6. American Diann Roffe-Steinrotter was 21 days younger when she won in 1985. 7. Floyd Patterson, who defeated Ingemar Johansson in 1960 to regain the crown.


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Tidbits® of the River Region

CRATERFEST GOLD STAR PARK

APRIL 20, 2013 10 AM - 7:30 PM

VIP PASSES AVAILABLE FOR SALE

KIDZ ZONE TRAIN RIDES SWINGS JAKES TRAILER BOUNCE HOUSE INFLATABLE SLIDE KIDS ART FACE PAINTING LOCAL AUTHORS PETTING ZOO PONY RIDES RON’S CRITTER KIDS KID’S GAMES MICKEY & MINNIE

“Pickin’ Wildflowers”

FREE EVENT Thanks to Our SPONSORS

Three Chord Country and American Rock & Roll Special GueSt Bradley Roberson

Bradley Roberson

A W ORKSHOP

FOR

B ROKEN

S OULS S INCE 1965

Schedule of eventS 5:00 - 9:00 Vendor Setup 9:00 - 5:00 Vendors Open 10:00 Kidz Zone Opens, M/C Dr. Sam of Bama Country kicks of event and Stage Opens 10:00 WES SHOW CHOIR 10:30 DAVE CAMERON 11:00 BRITT JOHNSON 12:00 FIBERGRASS BLUEGRASS BAND 1:00 BRADLEY ROBERSON AW

A W ORKSHOP

FOR

B ROKEN

S OULS S INCE 1965

B

S

S

1965

2:30 3:00 3:00 4:30 5:00 5:00 6:30 7:30

ANNOUNCEMENTS & DRAWINGS CHRIS STAPLETON ANNOUNCEMENTS - CRATER COMMISSION VIP with Keith Anderson Kidz Zone Closes, Vendors Close Our Headliner **KEITH ANDERSON** THANK YOU TO ALL Close of Show & Event AW

B

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1965

Tidbits of the River Region  

Vol 2 Issue 16

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