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June 12, 2012 Published by PTK Corp.

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of the River Region

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TIDBITS® BRINGS YOU

UNUSUAL WORDS, Part 2 by Kathy Wolfe This week, Tidbits continues with its lexiphanicism — showing off with big words! It’s time to learn more about these whatchamacallits and thingamajigs. • Those who love cats are ailurophilists, while those who love dogs are cynophilists. People who love all animals are referred to as philotherialists. • Misogamists and misopedists often go hand in hand. They hate marriage and children, respectively. Gamophobists don’t hate marriage; they’re just afraid of it. • Stop, thief! Look at the wide variety of terms used to describe these crooks — brigand, snaffler, kirkbuzzer, efter, ladrone or footpad. The snaffler is mainly a horse thief, while the kirkbuzzer robs only churches. The efter steals from theater customers while the performance is on, and ladrones and footpads are muggers who thieve while on foot. A specialized pickpocket who targets only churchgoers is referred to as an autem diver. • The Latin suffix “-aster” refers to anything with a lesser status, for example, a musicaster is a mediocre musician, while a militaster is a soldier without skills or abilities. The theologaster is a shallow theologian who has no deep spiritual thinking. turn the page for more!

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Vol 1 Issue 22 paul@riverregiontidbits.com


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Tidbits® of the River Region

UNUSUAL WORDS (continued): • P regnant women often have to endure allotriophagy, that craving for strange foods. Hopefully, they will choose items that are salutiferous, meaning conducive to health or well-being. • If you shilly-shally, dodder, quail, haw, demur or shrink before making a decision, you merely hesitate. Let’s say you’re diffident, gelid, reticent, chary or delitescent — you’re considered rather reserved. Now if someone calls you a miscreant, wastral, garmin, reprobate or varlet, consider yourself insulted. You’ve been labeled a scoundrel! • What do the words coquelicot, tilleul, smaragdine and smalt have in common? They are all names for different colors! Coquelicot is a brilliant poppy red; tilleul is a yellowish-green color; smaragdine is emerald green; and smalt is a deep blue. Speaking of colors, there is an actual name for those who fear the color purple — porphyrophobia. • Good words come in small packages! To aby means to make amends or atone for an offense. A wen is an enormously congested city. To soften something by soaking is to ret it. That broad sash we see wrapped around a kimono is an obi. And kir is a drink composed of black currant syrup and white wine. • Don’t confuse philalethists with philatelists. The former are lovers of truth, while the latter love collecting postage stamps. • How about that really boring person you meet at a party who has absolutely no conversational skills? This dull dude is a macrologist, and he frequently engages in battology — wearisome redundancy and trifling talk. He’s enough to give you a bad case of drapetomania, that uncontrollable urge to run away! • Some folks are famous for mentimutation — the act of changing their minds. Some might actually have hypobulia, which is an inability to come to a decision. • Do you have big feet? You’re sciapodous! How about great big ears? You’re macrotous! Maybe buck teeth, too? You’re a gubbertush! Is there a noticeable gap between those buck teeth? That’s called a diastema. Let’s add a buccula to the mix; that’s a double chin. • Everyone knows a breedbate, an individual who seems to enjoy starting arguments and stirring up controversy. Breedbates are occasionally suggilated — beaten black and blue! And how about that lazy loafer you know? He’s a drotchel, scobberlotcher, ragabash, lobcock, lollard or sluggard. • Over the baize and into the side pocket! Baize is the green felt-like cloth covering your pool table.

• At one time or another, everyone has had the misfortune of sitting behind a milver, a person who chatters non-stop through a movie. Related terms include pleniloquent (one who is full of talk) and blatteroon (a constant talker). Many of them have a cacoethes loquendi, that unquenchable desire to talk. No matter how you say it, you just wish they’d shut up! (Several of them are probably somniloquent as well, meaning they even talk in their sleep!) • The longest word in the English language is pneumonoultramicrosocpicsilicovolcanoc on-iosis, a disease resulting from over-exposure to ultra-microscopic silicone dust. Inhaling the dust found near volcanoes is a major cause of this disease. If this word frightens you, you may have hippopotomonstro-squippedaliophobia, the fear of long words. • When the time comes to absquatulate, it means it’s time to pull up stakes, to decamp and flee. • There are numerous kinds of beggars — A toothless beggar is a mumblecrust. One who pretends that his tongue has been cut out is a dommerer, while a female beggar who borrows or hires several children temporarily to arouse sympathy is an autem mort. There’s a whole new generation of beggars. The beggar whose parents are beggars is a palliard. If he bangs on a dish or cup to attract your attention, he’s a clapperdudgeon. No matter how you say it — mendicant, cadger, bezonian, panhandler, sponge, supplicant or gaberlunzie — He’s still a beggar. But, only a beggar monk can be a gyrovague. • W hat are you afraid of? If you are an epistaxiophobic, you are afraid of getting a nosebleed. Astrapophobics hide under the bed during thunder and lightning storms, while nosocomephobics have a fear of hospitals. Those suffering from pnigophobia are afraid of choking on fish bones, and koimetrophobics avoid cemeteries. Most people wouldn’t see anything unusual in being a little selacophobic or afraid of sharks. • When thinking of someone you know who is a workaholic, remember the technical term for someone who loves work is an ergophile. • Pity the poor fellow who’s married to an objurgatrix! His wife is a nagging, carping, fault-finding battle-ax of a woman. Other terms of endearment for this special lady include termagant, shrew, beldam, virago, harridan and xanthippe. • Something that causes cancer is said to be carcinogenic. Cariogenic items are much less serious — They cause dental cavities.


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Pain control suggestions are techniques that can alter the perception of pain. When the patient is hypnotized pain can be diminished, eliminated or it can be felt in some parts of the body and not in another. Direct suggestions for pain relief can be delivered when one is guided into deep hypnosis. Analgesia suggestions reduce or eliminate the pain, but they permit other sensations to remain. You may have a painful arm, and with analgesia the pain will be very much diminished, but you’ll still feel the arm, be aware of it, know that it’s in some way bothering you. You’ll feel the position it’s in, whether it’s hot or cold, and maybe some pressure or mild discomfort. It’s the anesthesia, not analgesia, that takes away all feelings. When you’re hypnotized and really focusing, you have a reduced awareness of your body, anyway, even before you are offered the analgesia suggestions of pain are already reduced. In future articles we will explore many aspects of pain management with hypnotherapy.


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To Your Good Health By Paul G. Donohue, M.D.

Suspicious Pap Smear Isn’t Death Sentence

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Will you please say a few words about the prognosis and treatment of cervical cancer? My daughter, 45, was told at a recent checkup that she has a few cells of this kind, and she is reacting as if she has received a death sentence. Since it was caught early, should her outlook be more cheerful? -- J.B. ANSWER: All women are indebted to Dr. George Papanicolaou, who developed the Pap smear for the early detection of cervical cancer. The cervix, by the way, is the necklike projection of the uterus into the vagina. It was the site for the most common cause of cancer death in women before the Pap smear came into wide use. That was in the early 1940s. Since then, deaths from cervical cancer have been cut in half, with about 4,200 deaths occurring annually and 12,200 new cases detected each year. Most of the deaths are in women who did not have Pap smear testing. I’m not clear what you mean by “a few cells of this kind.” If the cells obtained on a smear show lowgrade changes, a woman’s chances of having cervical cancer are close to zero. Follow-up smears are the only treatment needed. If the cells show high-grade changes, the doctor will perform a colposcopy. Colposcopy is an examination of the cervix with an instrument that has a magnifying lens so suspicious areas can be readily seen and biopsied. Results determine what the next steps should be. However, at

Tidbits® of the River Region these stages -- long before the cancer has spread -- it is still quite curable. Your daughter can trust her doctor to take the appropriate steps depending on the results of her Pap test. She does not face a death sentence. If she has any questions about her diagnosis, she should call her doctor for an explanation of her test results. The booklet on cervical cancer and Pap smears deals with these issues in detail. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Donohue -- No. 1102W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My husband and I are both 28. We have one child, a son. My husband felt a lump in his testicle and saw our family doctor. It turned out to be cancer. He was operated on. The doctor discussed many things with us, but we never discussed the prognosis. We need to know: What’s the usual life span of someone who has had testicular cancer? -- L.R. ANSWER: If your husband had a seminona, one of the common varieties of testicular cancer, and if it was in its early stages, your husband’s chances of living a long, full life are very high, over 95 percent. Your husband’s story is something that all young men should take to heart. Testicular cancer is a cancer of young men, most often males between the ages of 15 and 35. The earliest sign is a small, painless lump in the testicle. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. (c) 2012 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved

Do Pets Really Need Vaccinations? by Samantha Mazzotta DEAR PAW’S CORNER: A friend of mine told me that annual vaccinations for my cat and two dogs were unnecessary and a total scam. He said I only have to vaccinate them every three years and that veterinarians are just part of a big racket. What do you think? -- Janine H., Knoxville, Tenn. DEAR JANINE: I think you should talk to your pets’ veterinarian before making a decision that could negatively affect their health, and maybe yours. Vaccinations don’t just protect pets against rabies. They also receive vaccinations, particularly as puppies and kittens, for distemper, feline leukemia, parvovirus and a number of other serious and potentially fatal diseases. There are diseases that can also pass between pets and humans, and vaccinations can prevent them. “Pets can easily contract Giardia and Leptospirosis from standing water or damp grass,” said Dr. Meg Connelly of the Willard Veterinary Clinic in Quincy, Mass. “Many dogs love swimming in water, sniffing around

in the mud or rolling in the wet grass. Unfortunately, without immunization protection, these pets are at risk for contracting a serious or even fatal illness that can easily be spread to humans.” Keeping shots up to date is one of the best ways to prevent both your pets and you from becoming ill. And even though they seem pricey up front, they are nothing compared to the cost of medical care if a pet should become ill from a disease it could have been vaccinated against. Again, talk to your pets’ vet about which shots they need regularly and when they need to get them. If cost is a factor, many cities and towns sponsor low- or no-cost vaccination clinics that will get pets up to date with their shots for a reasonable price. Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner. com, or write to Paw’s Corner, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475. For more pet care-related advice and information, visit www.pawscorner.com. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.


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For Advertising Call (334) 202-7285

This week’s winner receives a $25.00 Gift Certificate from Smokin’ S Barbecue, 5826 Hwy 231, Wetumpka, AL 36092, (334)567-0605.

Register to win at www.riverregiontidbits.com and click on “Tommy Tidbits”. Fill out the registration information and tell us how many times Tommy appears in ads in the paper for this week. From the correct entries, a winner will be selected. You must be 18 years of age to qualify. The gift certificates will range in value from $25 to $50 each week. Entries must be received at the website by midnight each Saturday evening or at PTK Corp, PO Box 264, Wetumpka, AL 36092.

Last Week’s Ads where Tommy was hiding: 1. Subway, p. 1 2. Wetumpka Flea Market, p. 1 3. Karen’s Mane Tamers, p. 3 4. Thorn of the Rose, p. 3 5. US Agencies, p. 5 6. Stockyard Grill, p. 6

matinees on certain days of the week. Once you have your list of places that offer a senior discount and know what to expect, you’ll be more willing to ask for it. If you’re about to travel, ask about discounts for various modes of transport, as well as for rental cars and motels. Age Has Its Rewards If you’re a member of AARP, the opportunities widen. Go online to discounts.aarp. Now that summer is here and we’re all out and org and click through the offerings. You’ll about more often, we need to find ways to cut find shopping, dining, entertainment, home, our expenses. There are discounts available in technology, travel and more. Be sure to click more places than you’d suspect. on Local and put in your ZIP code for offers Asking for discounts locally can be a bit difnear you. Fifty percent discounts aren’t out of ficult if you’ve never done it. No one wants to the ordinary. stand in a checkout line talking with a cashier Once you start using the discounts you’ve about your age while others are waiting, but earned, be sure to ask everywhere. You’ve I’ve discovered the easiest way to get started: earned them! Make a list of all the places you generally go: grocery stores, retail shops, theaters, restauMatilda Charles regrets that she cannot rants, hair salons, bookstores and anywhere personally answer reader questions, but will else. incorporate them into her column whenCall them all up and ask whether they offer a ever possible. Write to her in care of King senior discount. Ask what the specific discount Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, age is, because some places use 55, or 60, or Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to 62 or even 65. Ask if there are any restriccolumnreply@gmail.com. tions. For example, grocery stores often limit the senior discounts to one day a week. Movie (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. theaters might give the discount only during


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Tidbits® of the River Region

1. Entering 2012, how many consecutive years had it been since the New York Yankees had a losing season? 2. Who is the only player to belt four home runs in two different World Series? 3. Name the last offensive rookie before center Maurkice Pouncey in 2010 to start every regular-season game for the Pittsburgh Steelers. 4. Who holds the record for most 3-point field goals made in the NCAA men’s basketball championship game? 5. Name two NHL goalies to have scored a goal in both a regular-season game and a playoff game. 6. When was the last time the U.S. won a gold medal in men’s track 5,000 meters? 7. Who held the record for biggest margin of victory in the LPGA Championship before Cristie Kerr won by 12 shots in 2010?

1. Is the book of Dan in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. Prudence, courage, temperance, justice, faith, hope and charity are the seven “what”? Deadly sins, Archangels, Virtues, Horsemen 3. From Genesis 31, who told Laban that he had gone 20 years without a decent sleep? Adam, Jacob, Moses, Noah 4. Which book of the New Testament (KJV) is divided into three parts (books)? Corinthians, Timothy, Peter, John 5. From Numbers 22, what prophet had a talking donkey to ride on? Nimrod, Rehoboam, Balaam, Zimri 6. What did Abraham name his son whom Hagar bore? Herod, Joshua, Asa, Ishmael

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BIBLE TRIVIA ANSWERS: 1) Neither; 2) Virtues; 3) Jacob; 4) John; 5) Balaam; 6) Ishmael

1. Nineteen seasons. 2. The Dodgers’ Duke Snider (1952, 1955). 3. Wide receiver Ron Shanklin, in 1970. 4. Indiana’s Steve Alford (1987), Oklahoma’s Dave Sieger (1988) and Kentucky’s Tony Delk (1996) all hit seven in a championship game. 5. Philadelphia’s Ron Hextall and New Jersey’s Martin Brodeur. 6. It was 1964 (Bob Schul). 7. Betsy King won by 11 strokes in 1992.


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Tidbits® of the River Region

—* “I love my windowbox planters, but I would always get dirt splashed on my windows or the sill when it rained. My friend advised me to put a shallow layer of small gravel over the dirt. It looks nice and there is no splatter after watering or rain.” Ð R.L. in Washington —* To soothe minor burns in the kitchen, use the cut side of a raw potato pressed into the burn area for a minute or two.

—* To remove sticky residue from photo frames, try hairspray. Spray on, let sit for just a minute, then wipe off.

—* “Personal appliances can get very dirty and can harbor many species of bacteria. One of the worst, in my opinion, is the cellphone. Make sure you clean it regularly by wiping front and back surfaces with a soft cloth dampened with alcohol. We touch our phones with our hands, and press them into our faces. It’s just smart to keep them clean.” -- W.D. in Indiana

—* “When you have small children, always hang a hand towel over the door of the bathroom so they can’t lock themselves in and get scalded with hot water.” -- J.R. in Virginia

—* Grilling season is in full swing. A great way to clean the grill surface is by using a wad of aluminum foil. It can be pressed into the grate to get all the gunk off, both before or after grilling.

(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

Send your tips to Now Here’s a Tip, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or e-mail JoAnn at heresatip@yahoo.com.

Tidbits of the River Region  

Vol 1 Issue 22

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