Page 1

“Charm” goes to festival page 4

27°/18° Men’s basketball defeats NAU page 6

CALENDAR. . ...................... 2 EDITORIAL.. ...................... 3 A & E................................ 4 SPORTS........................... 6 HELP WANTED................... 9 VOL 83 ISSUE 53 FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2013 WWW.WSUSIGNPOST.COM

THE

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY

WSU police seek help finding missing student

By Raychel Johnson news editor I The Signpost

an adult,” said WSU Police Chief Dane LeBlanc. “Being an adult, he has a right to leave and not tell anybody and not want anyone to know where he’s going. He’s a student at Weber State, though, and we want to see if we can’t locate him and make sure he gets safe.” LeBlanc said the police have done everything they can possibly do, including canvasing hospitals, jails, airlines and homeless shelters, and putting out an Attempt to Locate notice. “He’s been known to frequent the trailheads (up by campus),” LeBlanc said. “We don’t know that he’s gone up

Hailing from 20 different junior high and high schools from around Northern Utah, Future Business Leaders of America held their Northern Region competition at Weber State University on Thursday morning. The competition lasted until the afternoon. Students ranging from freshmen to seniors participated in more than 44 business-related events. These events included Chi-testing competitions as well as public speaking on teams. Wildcats in Phi Beta Lambda volunteered and sponsored the event. PBL is the collegiate version of FBLA, and they are directly tied together. Harrison Spendlove, state PBL president, said the event is their annual fundraiser and took up to three months of planning. “We plan this every year,” Spendlove said. “This allows us to send students to our national convention, which is going to be in Anaheim this year. We tend to do pretty well. It takes a lot of work, a lot of manpower.”

See Help page 5

See FBLA page 5

By Cozette Jenkins editor-in-chief I The Signpost

The Weber State University Campus Police are asking for help from the WSU community to help locate missing student Juan Pablo Brant. Brant, 27, was last seen at approximately 3-3:30 p.m. on Jan. 4 at the Wells Fargo Bank at 4301 Harrison Blvd. in Ogden, according to a press release issued by University Communications. He was last seen wearing a white button-up dress shirt, black jacket and black jeans. He is 5 feet 10 inches tall and 170 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes. Brant has been known to leave his area of residence for several days at a time, but after he had been missing for the unusually long amount of 10 days, his roommates reported him missing to campus police. There is no indication of foul play, and no sign of suspicious activity has been identified. “This is one of those difficult cases, because Juan is 27 years old; he’s

Northern Utah FBLA competes at WSU

Brant

PHOTO BY RAYCHEL JOHNSON | THE SIGNPOST

Above: Syracuse High School students gather in the Shepherd Union Building on Thursday for the Northern Region Future Business Leaders of America competition. Below: Twenty different high schools came together in the ballrooms for FBLA’s Northern Region competition on Thursday.

Author calls for end of ‘fracking’ Graduate student

PHOTO BY TYLER BROWN | THE SIGNPOST

By Rosie Gerrish news reporter I The Signpost

As part of Weber State University’s Convocation Lecture Series and in conjunction with the yearlong, campus-wide Water Works series, WSU hosted a presentation by Sandra Steingraber, author of critically acclaimed novel “Living Downstream.” Steingraber, having served as an authority on how the environment links to cancer and human health, spoke PHOTO BY TYLER BROWN | THE SIGNPOST

Author Sandra Steingraber speaks in the Wildcat Theater on Thursday.

See Fracking page 8

Fair recruits student volunteers By John Bedford news reporter I The Signpost

Nonprofit tables at the Volunteer Fair this Wednesday filled the Shepherd Union Atrium to bring awareness to their causes. Students munched on muffins from the Weber County elections while music played from the Weber State University Community Involvement Center. WSU First Tech Challenge had one of its robots showcased on its table at the fair. The FTC is an organization that participates in robot competitions.

“We’re promoting the First Tech Challenge where students seventh (through) 12th grade build these robots and compete in a sports-like competition,” said Jenifer Stoddard, an FTC volunteer and electronics engineering major. “Right now we are looking for volunteers, referees and mentors to help set up and run things. We have this word, ‘coorpertition’ — working together but competing in a friendly manner.” The Wildlife Rehabilitation Center had birds such as Pete the screech owl at

PHOTO BY TYLER BROWN | THE SIGNPOST

Erin Adams with the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center holds a screech owl. the fair. Erin Adams, the secretary for the WRC and a WSU student, handled the bird. According to the WRC,

as a baby, the first thing Pete saw was a human she See Volunteer page 5

creates film for thesis By Laurie Reiner asst. news editor I The Signpost

Derrick Dean, a Weber State University graduate student, is doing a thesis project unlike any other in his department. He wrote, directed and produced a short film called “Beecher Baby Bouncer.” Dean is the only student in the Master of Professional Communication program who is creating a film for his thesis project. Students have the option to either write a paper about 30 pages long or do a project. Dean’s project was to make, market and distribute a film. “It’s something I could get out there to a lot of people,” Dean said. “It’s a great way to share your message in various mediums, and I would be able to incorporate everything I learned in a fun way.” Dean said the film is about a 30-year-old man who babysits for people and likes to cause chaos. One of the things he does while babysitting is hold babies and kittens over balconies and wait for the police to show up. The movie is about 20 minutes long. “The moral is basically getting people to learn that

they should be more careful with who they trust their children with,” Dean said. “You get a moral, a message, with a couple of good laughs as well.” Dean said he first got the idea for the film when he saw a picture of his friend playing in the park with his child. Dean said it was around the time when Michael Jackson held his child over his balcony, so Dean Photoshopped the picture to make it look like his friend was holding his child over a balcony. He posted the photo on a humor website and, when it received positive feedback, he decided he wanted to make a movie based on that concept. The film features actor Gilbert Gottfried and YouTube celebrity Randall. “I got in touch with their agent and figured it would be a great way to market the video,” Dean said. The other actors in the film are local actors. Dean said he know a lot of actors because he performs in plays. He said the project cost about $700 or $800 because of the equipment he had to rent, but most of his actors worked for free.

See Film page 5


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2013

FBLA continued from front Spendlove said there were at least 70 volunteer judges for the 43 competitions. According to Spendlove, FBLA-PBL is the largest national student organization, and last year it went international with chapters in China. Spendlove said FBLAPBL is in a partnership with March of Dimes, a national nonprofit organization that works to improve the health of mothers and premature babies. “What we’re doing is actually establishing what’s called a ‘Teddy Bear Den’ here at Weber State, through us being an affiliate with Weber State, to provide the basic needs for infants for mothers that are following certain guidelines for prenatal care to prevent premature births.” A dance featuring the live band Easy Money took place from 11 a.m.

Volunteer continued from front to 12 p.m., followed by the awards ceremony. Kristi Yamada, an adviser for the Syracuse High School FBLA, said the competition was a great opportunity for students to see the university and gain skills to use in the future. Yamada has been with the Syracuse FBLA for three years. “This is good practice for them here,” Yamada said. “. . . This is really nice of Weber to do, because it gives them the experience of presenting. It gives them good feedback, which is really nice.” Yamada described a few of the competitions as “fun for the students,” and said most of the students felt comfortable in public-speaking events when they were placed in teams. The students from Syracuse High School were involved in most of the events, but one student chose to do digital design.

“These kids make my day. We love it,” Yamada said. “Part of competitions is getting ready. We kind of make it fun — and always have food. They keep us young.” This was the first time many junior-high students were able to attend the regional competition. Joshua Wabel, a student from Syracuse Junior High, was one of these students. He said this was his first time competing, and that he felt good about his mock job interview and speech. “I want to go into an attorney at law,” said Wabel about his plans for after graduation. “My future plan, FBLA helped me (with), because a lot of the lawyer work is public speaking and knowing your topic and studying it and then being able to present on it.” Not every student who

attended the Northern Region competition actually contended for a prize. Samantha Christensen, president of Bonneville High School’s FBLA, said that this year, her main focus was to get her team hyped up for the regional competition. She didn’t compete herself. “Well, we pretty much get our students hyped up and excited to compete in this. We try to get together and make sure all of our stuff is perfect and good and ready,” Christensen said. She served as a mentor, giving her students advice on her past experience. She said Bonneville High School has a history of placing well at FBLA competitions. Christensen plans on becoming a Wildcat in the fall, with a major in criminal justice.

while.” Mathie did both the background music for the film and worked on an original song for the film. Dean wrote the lyrics for the song and Mathie wrote the music, and they hired a singer to do the vocals. Randall, best known for his honey badger video on YouTube, was also part of

the film. He played an angry caller who complains about the main character. “It was really funny and I was really happy to be a part of it,” Randall said. “I think big things are going to come from this guy.” Randall said he often works in small films and prefers them because it works well with his busy

schedule. “It’s a pleasure to be in some of the smaller films,” he said. “It all depends if I believe in the project and what it is trying to say.” Dean plans on graduating at the end of spring semester, and said he wants to pursue a career in film once he is out of school. While working on the film, Dean met with his professors on a regular basis to discuss the project. He said his professors think it is a great idea and have given him a lot of support. “Beecher Baby Bouncer” will be screened Feb. 11 and 20 in the WSU Wildcat Theater at 7:30 pm. There will be door prizes and a raffle. It costs $3 per person for admission. After the view-

Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

Film continued from front One of the people he worked with was Kevin Mathie, a WSU graduate, who did the music for the film. Mathie said he met Dean a few years ago while they were both working on a play. “I don’t think he realized I had the gear,” Mathie said. “I’ve known him for a

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f

Dean W. & Carol W. Hurst Artist in Residence

Hummie Mann Award winning film composer Hummie Mann will be on the Weber State University campus January 22-25.

imprinted on, rendering her unfit to be re-released into her natural habitat. In the year 2012, the WRC took in more than 2,000 animals, ranging from birds to small animals such as beavers and chipmunks. Of the animals brought to the WRC, 68 percent are released back into their natural habitats. The national average is 64 percent. “Our mission is pretty special,” said Jen Dummer, the WRC volunteer coordinator, who is double-majoring in zoology and sociology. “On one hand, we are rehabilitators, and on the other hand, we are educators. They cannot be separated. If you do just rehabilitation without education, then problems keep recurring. Ninety-five percent of what comes through our doors is due to people, things that people may not be very aware of, like lead poisoning by sinkers and bullets. We had several bald eagles die from lead poisoning.” Another organization at the fair was Catholic Community Services, Northern Utah’s largest pantry. Even though it was founded through the Catholic Church, people do not need to be Catholic or belong to any particular organization to receive food. “We are the charitable arm of the Catholic Church,” said Karina ings, the movie will be available online to rent or buy on places like Amazon or Dean’s website, Smuffking.com. Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

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Free Film Screenings

Hummie Mann’s credits include composition, orchestration, arranging, conducting and co-producing for a broad variety of entertainment media. Four of his films will be screened during his stay on campus. He will attend the screenings on January 22, 23 and 25. For more information contact Diane Stern 801-626-6570

All events are free and open to the public. Seating is limited. All screenings will be in room 113 of the Browning Center for the Performing Arts 1/22 After the Rain 7:30pm 1/23 The Second Civil War 7:30pm 1/24 Robin Hood: Men in Tights 7:30pm 1/25 Wooly Boys 7:30pm Public Presentation 1/24 noon Wildcat Theater - Shepherd Student Union - Free

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Martin, a volunteer at the church and a pre-engineering major, “and there is no religious affiliation to the services we offer. No preaching, just free food for those who need it.” Marie Grogan, who had a table for the Girls Scouts of Utah, has been volunteering there for 25 years. “Awesome organization for girls,” she said about the group. “Very positive, safe environment to succeed, and if you fail at something, it is a just a safe place to do that — a great organization, because girls are only competing with girls.” The Girl Scouts of Utah starts at kindergarten and goes all the way through high school. Girls develop skills such as money management, customer service and public speaking. To volunteer for the organization, people have to fill out an application and pass a background check. “We would love this age of individuals to be volunteers for this organization,” Grogan said. “The girls really identified with someone who is on that younger end of the scale. It’s a little more hip. Also, men can be assistant leaders and volunteer for Girl Scouts. Having a male role model for the girls that get involved in the stuff that’s important to them, I don’t think you can trade that for anything. When girls (and) their dads are involved in girl scouting, that is just awesome. ”

Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

Help continued from front

there, but since we know he likes to frequent them, we’re working with Search and Rescue to try to find him.” Search and Rescue will scan the hillside from a helicopter later this afternoon. “If anything turns up suspicious in that search, we’ll send Search and Rescue in on foot to investigate,” LeBlanc said. “But we really don’t know that he went up there at all. But we know he likes to frequent them, though probably more so in the summer.” The WSU Campus Police would like to speak with Brant or anyone who might have information related to his location and well-being. Anyone with possible leads can contact Detective Seth Cawley with WSU Campus Police at 801-626-6460. Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

Call 877-495-3099 www.CenturaOnline.com

► Django Unchained (Digital) (R) 10:45 12:35 2:25 4:15 6:05 7:55 9:40

Wildcat village is the place to live for convenience to classes and social events on campus. Plus, there is lots of parking! 3 new facilities provide the latest amenities in on campus living. Made to order restaurant, convenience store, gym, volleyball court, outdoor fire-pit, meeting hall, printer station and much more. For more information: Stop by the Stewart Wasatch Hall housing office Visit us at www.weber.edu/housing Call 801-626-7275

► Parental Guidence (Digital) (PG) 11:30 2:05 4:55 7:35 10:20

► Guilt Trip, The (Digital) (PG-13) 12:05 2:25 5:10 7:40 10:10

► Rise of the Guardians (Digital) (PG) 11:25 2:00 4:30 7:05 9:40

► Hobbit (3D) (PG-13) 2:50 10:10

► Skyfall (Digital) (PG-13) 12:00 3:20 6:45 10:05

► Hobbit (Digital) (PG-13) 11:10 1:00 4:40 6:30 8:20 ► Jack Reacher (Digital) (PG-13) 12:40 3:45 7:00 10:15

► Texas Chainsaw (3D) (R) 2:30 7:25 9:50 ► Texas Chainsaw (Digital) (R) 11:50 5:00

► Les Miserables (Digital) (PG-13) 11:00 2:40 6:15 9:45

► This Is 40 (Digital) (R) 12:45 4:00 7:10 10:25

► Monsters Inc. (3D) (G) 2:10 4:45 7:20 9:55

► Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 (Digital) (PG-13) 10:55 1:50 4:35 7:30 10:20

► Monsters Inc. (Digital) (G) 11:40

► Saturday, January 5 at 10:55am, Met Opera: Les Troyens to replace Twilight at 10:55, 1:50, and 4:35. ► Wednesday, January 9 at 6:30pm, Met Opera Encore: Un Ballo in Maschera to replace Twilight at 4:35, 7:30, 10:20.


Professors utilize online assets page 4

35°/28° Men’s basketball chalks up another victory page 6

CALENDAR. . ...................... 2 EDITORIAL.. ...................... 3 FEATURES.......................... 4 SPORTS........................... 6 HELP WANTED................... 9 VOL 83 ISSUE 54 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2013 WWW.WSUSIGNPOST.COM

THE

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY

March joins community, NAACP Ski patrol finds body on Mount Ogden

By Raychel Johnson news editor I The Signpost

The week of service presented by Weber State University to celebrate the life and service of Martin Luther King Jr. kicked off at the Marshall White Community Center in Ogden. The community center hosted the NAACP breakfast and freedom march, otherwise known as the Munch & March. Members of the WSU Student Association on the Diversity Board helped to organize the event that lasted from 8:30-11:30 a.m. on Monday. At the breakfast, Joseph Nicholas, president of the NAACP Ogden branch, handed out awards. Ryan Smith, the celebrations and traditions chair on the Diversity Board, read the Emancipation Proclamation, and Pastor Carey McCall of the New Zion Baptist Church in Ogden was the guest speaker. McCall spoke about King’s influence as a nonviolent man and how everyone should engage in service to honor him. “It’s because of Dr. King’s efforts, and the intuitiveness of those early pioneers for equality, that here in the city of Ogden

By Raychel Johnson news editor I The Signpost

PHOTO BY TYLER BROWN | THE SIGNPOST

Students walk in the Munch & March in downtown Ogden on Monday morning. See MLK page 5

Snowbasin ski patrol discovered a man’s dead body near the peak of Mount Ogden on Monday evening. Due to weather conditions, the body couldn’t be recovered until early this morning. According to Lt. Mark Lowther of the Weber County Sheriff’s Office, the body wasn’t dressed for the winter conditions. Although the man’s body still has not been identified, it was taken off Mount Ogden by helicopter and to the state medical examiner’s office in Salt Lake City. The body shows no cause of obvious death or signs of foul play, according to the Weber County Sheriff’s Office, and the man didn’t have any identification or backpack with him. There was no indication of how long the body had been up on the mountain before being discovered on Tuesday morning. “He definitely wasn’t dressed for the current conditions,” Lowther

said. “It’s right by where our towers are for our emergency radios for police and fire, and whenever that tower is serviced, it’s done by helicopter. You don’t drive up to this spot.”

“He definitely wasn’t dressed for the current conditions.” ­— Lt. Mark Lowther Weber County Sheriff’s Office

Lowther said hiking to the spot where the body was found would be very difficult and dangerous in the current weather conditions. Missing Persons, Weber State University campus police and other officials were all notified of the body’s discovery.

Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

Speakers talk on MLK in atrium WSU faculty move to Google By Trae Chappell news reporter I The Signpost

By Tyler Saal sr. news reporter I The Signpost

Starting March 1, Weber State University faculty and staff will switch from using Novell Groupwise to Google Apps for Education. WSU has used Novell Groupwise for the past 19 years. “This is a very large change,” said Ty Naylor, information technology communications, events, training and education coordinator. “It’s going to affect all faculty and staff — any employees of the university are going to be moving to Google Apps for Education.” Google Apps for Education is a cloud-based operation the university will utilize. The service will provide increased functionality in addition to all the features that faculty and staff already have with Groupwise. In addition to Gmail now, Naylor said, with Google Apps for Education, university faculty and staff will be able to video-conference with up to nine individuals, make calls and receive voicemails from their computers, send texts to others and collab-

orate on documents and projects. “I think the biggest thing is collaboration and sharing content,” Naylor said. “What really comes into play is now we can start adding more applications. We’ll now have the ability to grow with other applications and collaborate easier in the university.” According to Naylor, another large aspect of the transition is increased mobility. “We can now do everything on any device,” he said. “We can now have the same functionality on our iPhone or iPad or Android device as we do on our desktop, because we’re just going through a browser. It allows PCs and Macs and mobile devices all to work on the same playing field.” Naylor said another good thing about the new service is that now everything is hosted off-site. “So we’re not taxing the bandwidth of our computers here locally. We do have a storage capacity of 25 gigs for mail, which is a nice feature as well. So you can keep documents and other See Google page 5

Amir Jackson and Barry Gomberg spoke in the Shepherd Union Atrium about the importance of service and of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The Diversity Board with the Weber State University Student Association put on the event in the Shepherd Union Building. The event was for the Martin Luther King Jr. service week and a call to action to be involved in the community. Brenda Kowalewski, director of the Community Involvement Center, asked Jackson to give a speech at this event. The board showed Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech, “I Have a Dream.” After showing the full speech, Jackson walked onstage and gave his own speech he wrote for this event. Jackson spoke about the importance of service to a quiet crowd in the atrium and received loud applause when he finished. “Everyone came from a mother and father. They are different, but still human. Their story could be yours,” said Jackson while talking about the homeless and less-fortunate people. Hollie Campbell, who had just gotten out of class and was walking by, said she was hooked in by Mar-

PHOTO BY JEFF TAYLOR | THE SIGNPOST

Amir Jackson speaks about the importance of service in the Shepherd Union Atrium. tin Luther King Jr.’s speech and stayed to hear Jackson. “I am grateful for individuals with passionate hearts for what they believe in, because it helps enable my own heart to change,” said Campbell after hearing Jackson speak. Campbell said it was the first time she really sat down and listened to Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech and that she felt moved by it. Sandi Weber, who came to the atrium specifically for the event, works for the

Diversity Board. She wasn’t able to hear Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech, but caught Jackson’s words. “After Jackson’s speech, I felt the need to do, to take action, to make a difference and not just talk about things that need to change,” Weber said. The Diversity Board has been setting up events over the last few days sponsoring Martin Luther King Jr. Day. “There is nothing better than volunteering,” Weber said.

When the event was over, Jackson stayed around to talk to anyone who had questions or was curious about his speech. Jackson said the motivation for his speech came from watching Martin Luther King Jr.’s videos online and realizing how young he was. “Dr. King was young and at a college age, but had a huge impact,” Jackson said. “Someone listening to my speech could be the next Martin Luther King. Martin

See Speakers page 5


Editor discusses favorite microbe page 4

24°/18° Men’s basketball falls to University of Montana page 6

CALENDAR. . ...................... 2 EDITORIAL.. ...................... 3 B & S. . .............................. 4 SPORTS........................... 6 HELP WANTED.................. 11 VOL 83 ISSUE 56 MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 WWW.WSUSIGNPOST.COM

THE

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY

Family, friends mourn student’s death

Brant remembered as outdoor enthusiast By Raychel Johnson news editor I The Signpost

SOURCE: NAOMI BOREL

Weber State University student Juan Brant, 27, and his ex-girlfriend Naomi Borel.

Often finding his solace out in nature, Juan Pablo Brant, or “J.P.,” often went hiking and mountain biking to escape his day-to-day routines. Brant took philosophy classes at Weber State University, where he was a nontraditional student and an integrated studies major. After being reported missing for almost a week, Brant’s body was recovered from an area near the peak of Mount Ogden on Jan. 22. His friends and family members will continue to remember him as an

ever-curious conversationalist who loved to see the world. Brant, 27, was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A convert to the church, he attended the Ogden 16th Singles Ward. Trevor Amicone, a friend of Brant’s from church, said Brant was a deep thinker and always fun to talk to. “(He) always inspired you to think deeper about things,” Amicone said. “He was curious and he loved people. He loved getting to know people and getting to know the way they thought and getting to know what their per-

spective on life was.” Often mountaineering to Waterfall Canyon or Mount Ogden, Brant was an outdoor enthusiast. At church, he often talked about how he spent his week doing something outdoors. “He wanted to get away and get into a place where he could think,” Amicone said. “With the curious mind he had, he liked to wonder about things.” Brant kept a picture of Snowbasin and Mount Ogden in his pocket with a journal. According to Naomi Borel, an ex-girlfriend who resides in California, he See Brant page 8

Student fees to be divvied up among campus orgs.

By Cozette Jenkins editor-in-chief I The Signpost

The Student Fee Recommendation Committee is currently reviewing budget support requests from on-campus organizations and

Offering support for moms

must divvy up funding between them over the next few weeks. Many Weber State University organizations receive all or part of their funding through student fees. Each year, organizations and de-

dents’ fees to different on-campus entities that requested continued or additional student fee funding. Among the organizations that requested funding, Intercollegiate Athletics asked for a

base budget increase of $19,000 and to keep base funding it received this year but ended up not having to use. For the fiscal year of 201213, Athletics received an See Fees page 5

Hundreds attend techno dance By Trae Chappell news reporter I The Signpost

From scholarships to support groups, the Women’s Center at Weber State University offers a variety of resources when it comes to helping mothers achieve their education goals. “Come in and we’ll sit down,” said Carol Merrill, director for the Women’s Center at WSU. “We schedule appointment times, and we will provide to any student or potential student the resources they need on campus or in the community to help them be a more effective student.” Nancy Yazzie, a nursing student at WSU, spoke about how difficult it is being a mother and attending school. “You have that obligation to your work and to school and to get good grades and keep your scholarship, but your kids need you at home,” she said. “My kids absolutely love it when there’s no school for me.

Hundreds of students attended the Techno Traffic Lights Dance, which was hosted by Weber State University’s fraternity, Pi Theta Xi, on Friday night. Students came clad in traffic-light colors to announce their relationship statuses: green if they’re single, yellow if “it’s complicated” or red if they’re taken. Taylor Kipp, president of Pi Theta Xi, and other fraternity brothers hosted a booth in the Shepherd Union Building during the week leading up to the dance. The fraternity played techno music, handed out fliers and let every student passing by know about the event. “This dance is the major fundraiser for the whole year,” Kipp said. “It raises the funds we need to host more events for Weber State students.” In addition to the fraternity, the sorority on campus, Delta Chi Nu, helped advertise, sponsor and manage the event. “We as Greeks do events like this to break out of the typical stereotype of only throwing house parties,” said Tiarra Collins, president of Delta

See Mothers page 5

See Dance page 5

By Tyler Saal sr. news reporter I The Signpost

partments can request increases in their yearly budgets financed by student fees, or make a onetime request for the upcoming fiscal year only. For the 2013-14 fiscal year, the SFRC must allocate $210,000 of stu-

News in Brief NULC submission deadline extended The deadline for submissions for 2013’s National Undergraduate Literature Conference has been extended until Jan. 31. NULC, Weber State University’s annual literature conference, will take place at WSU April 2-6 this year and will feature writers Jay Parini, Phyllis Barber and Mario Chard. Undergraduate students are invited to submit research works in American, British or world literature, or creative works in Spanish or English — fiction, poetry or essays. More information on the conference can be found at www. nulc2013.com.

Workshop to help students file taxes Just in time for taxes and in conjunction with Weber State University’s Major Fest, the Nontraditional Student Center and Women’s Center have teamed up to sponsor “Maximizing Your Tax Return,” a workshop aimed at assisting WSU students in navigating taxes and tax season. The workshop will be presented by Eric Smith, assistant professor with the accounting department, and take place Feb. 4 from 4-6 p.m. in the Shepherd Union Lair. The workshop is free and everyone is welcome. For more information, prospective participants can contact the Nontraditional Student Center.

Author to present on Mormon pioneer food

PHOTOS BY TYLER BROWN| THE SIGNPOST

Dancing students fill the Shepherd Union Ballrooms for the Techno Traffic Light Dance.

Brock Cheney, WSU alumnus and author of “Plain But Wholesome,” a book examining the food of Mormon pioneers, will speak about his book today as part of the Weber Historical Society Spring 2013 lecture series and the Weber State University Alumni Association. The presentation will take place in the Social Science Building, Room 234 at 7 p.m. Cheney lives in Willard and teaches writing and literature in Utah public schools.


8

THE SIGNPOST

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

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Brant continued from front

SOURCE: NAOMI BOREL

(Top left) Juan Brant’s family, including his brothers and sisters, pose at a photo shoot. (Bottom left) Brant works in a computer lab with his sister Techi Brant. (Right) Brant poses with his twin sister Rossi Brant. said he was going to live there forever. Brant left that picture with Borel, and she said it was crazy that Snowbasin was his final home. Borel said she remembers Brant as a spiritual being who was highly connected to serving others. “He never asked for anything,” Borel said. “He always tried to give more of himself than anyone ever would, and really would give you the shirt off his back … (He) was so sweet

and innocent.” Monica Brant, Juan Brant’s mother, said he was the sixth child out of 14, and that he was raised all over the world, but came back to America to finish high school. Brant’s parents are missionaries and do services with many churches across the world. Monica Brant said her son had a specific love of language. He learned French and Spanish, and even picked up some Chinese and Russian when he lived

there with his family. A viewing will be held from 6-8 p.m. tonight at Leavitt’s Mortuary, 836 36th St. in Ogden. During the special memorial service, anyone may participate and have the opportunity to speak and pay their last respects. Friends and acquaintances of Brant’s are encouraged to attend. Donations will be accepted at Leavitt’s Mortuary to help defray costs. Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

Nominate the Best for Crystal Crest Air continued from page 4

crystal crest

emissions comes from, according to the office’s annual report. “It’s never good when they are telling pregnant women and children and the elderly to stay inside,” Bodine said. “It’s pretty incredible that we aren’t doing more.” Bodine said that, since the Climate Action Plan was put into position, the university has been doing better with sustainability. Since then, the university has saved more than $1 million in utility bills.

a w a r d s

Nominations: Jan. 30–Feb. 20 Go to weber.edu/crystalcrest to nominate your friends and your professors. Talent of the Year, Personality of the Year, Man of the Year, Woman of the Year, Wildcat Achievement, Volunteer Service, Master Teacher, Registered Organization, Friend of Students, Scholar of the Year

In recognito de excellentia

► Django Unchained (Digital) (R) 10:45 12:35 2:25 4:15 6:05 7:55 9:40

► Parental Guidence (Digital) (PG) 11:30 2:05 4:55 7:35 10:20

► Guilt Trip, The (Digital) (PG-13) 12:05 2:25 5:10 7:40 10:10

► Rise of the Guardians (Digital) (PG) 11:25 2:00 4:30 7:05 9:40

► Hobbit (3D) (PG-13) 2:50 10:10

► Skyfall (Digital) (PG-13) 12:00 3:20 6:45 10:05

► Hobbit (Digital) (PG-13) 11:10 1:00 4:40 6:30 8:20 ► Jack Reacher (Digital) (PG-13) 12:40 3:45 7:00 10:15

► Texas Chainsaw (3D) (R) 2:30 7:25 9:50 ► Texas Chainsaw (Digital) (R) 11:50 5:00

► Les Miserables (Digital) (PG-13) 11:00 2:40 6:15 9:45

► This Is 40 (Digital) (R) 12:45 4:00 7:10 10:25

► Monsters Inc. (3D) (G) 2:10 4:45 7:20 9:55

► Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 (Digital) (PG-13) 10:55 1:50 4:35 7:30 10:20

► Monsters Inc. (Digital) (G) 11:40

► Saturday, January 5 at 10:55am, Met Opera: Les Troyens to replace Twilight at 10:55, 1:50, and 4:35. ► Wednesday, January 9 at 6:30pm, Met Opera Encore: Un Ballo in Maschera to replace Twilight at 4:35, 7:30, 10:20.

Crimmel suggested that students look at www.airquality.utah.gov to understand the current health problems with the inversion. The website gives a day-byday analysis of the level of particle matter in the air per county. When the level reaches more than 55.5, it is considered unhealthy. “A lot of people think these issues don’t affect them personally,” Crimmel said. “It affects everybody. Others things you can escape, but air touches everybody.” The Environmental Issues Committee is also working on smoke-free zones on campus. In February, the issue will go to the faculty senate for approval. The committee conducted a survey of students about the smoke-free zones, and 90 percent said they were in

favor of them. “We are trying to support what the students would like to see,” Crimmel said. The Energy and Sustainability Office is also working on a few projects, including an upgrade in campus lighting and upgrading the insulin for the tunnels under the university. Both projects have been in the works for a few years. The lighting in the Dee Events Center was recently changed to LED lights, which use half the power. The office will also be hosting the annual Sustainability Summit on Feb. 28. It costs $10 to attend, and the event will help inform students about what they can do to be sustainable through a series of workshops.

Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

Taxation continued from page 4 April 1. Scholarships are available through the School of Accounting and Taxation of the Goddard School for students interested in becoming tax specialists. The priority deadline for scholarships is the same as

entrance to the program for fall semester, April 1. More information about scholarships and application requirements is available at www.weber. edu/MTax.

Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.


“Next to Normal” plays at Ziegfeld page 4

34°/20° Wildcats lose by 5 points at home page 6

CALENDAR. . ...................... 2 EDITORIAL.. ...................... 3 A & E................................ 4 SPORTS........................... 6 HELP WANTED................... 7 VOL 83 ISSUE 58 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 WWW.WSUSIGNPOST.COM

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WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY

WSUSA honors Juan Brant’s life By Raychel Johnson news editor I The Signpost

The Weber State University Student Association honored the life of Juan Brant by presenting Brant’s family an award on Wednesday night. The WSUSA created the monthly award, known as the Extra Mile Medallion, in 2012 as a way to honor student leaders who go above and beyond their calls of service. Although Brant wasn’t an elected student leader, he often showed compassion and cared for other students. Mandie Barnes, the leadership vice president, said the night was an emotional experience. “I think it touched everybody’s hearts, espe-

cially to hear his friend Mitch and his mom speak about the person he was,” Barnes said. “And maybe for some of us who didn’t know him on a personal level, we got to kind of relate to him. It was a really personal, emotional experience. It was neat.” Andrew Gardiner, WSU student president, read a declaration drafted specifically to commemorate Brant's life. The medallion, a silver-and-purple coin with WSUSA's logo, accompanied the declaration. “. . . Whereas the WSUSA Extra Mile Medallion was created as a symbol of exemplary service and dedication to Weber State University and her students, and whereas J.P. See Honors page 5

PHOTO BY TYLER BROWN | THE SIGNPOST

Weber State University student body president Andrew Gardiner presents the Extra Mile Medallion to Monica Brant in honor of her son Juan Brant on Wednesday night.

Teen prodigy preps for med school Career hunting By Tyler Saal

sr. news reporter I The Signpost

PHOTO BY RAYCHEL JOHNSON | THE SIGNPOST

Weber State University senior Jessica Brooke is preparing to enter medical school at age 15. Jessica will graduate this semester with a double major in zoology and math.

Jessica Brooke isn’t much different from many 15-year-olds. She enjoys hanging out with her friends. She goes to church on Sundays. She likes music — her favorite composer is Beethoven. She has to study hard for school. Unlike most 15-year-olds, though, Jessica’s school happens to be Weber State University, and Jessica is a senior double-majoring in zoology and math. Jessica first got started with higher education See Teen page 5

Professor presents on Great Salt Lake By Tyler Saal sr. news reporter I The Signpost

A huge snowstorm proved only a minor delay for Carla Trentelman, assistant professor of sociology at Weber State University, in sharing her research on the Great Salt Lake with the WSU community. Trentelman’s talk, “Big Smelly Salty Lake That I Call Home,” was originally scheduled for Jan. 10, but had to be rescheduled because of a particularly bad snowstorm that rolled through that night, closing the school. “I know that there were some folks who had talked about wanting to come, who were planning on coming that first time, but weren’t there,” Trentelman said. “I’m sure that (the weather) affected some of the attendance, but for something like this, I felt like the turnout was

decent.” The rescheduled talk took place on Wednesday night, given in conjunction with Water Works — WSU’s campus-wide focus on water and water issues — and “Basin and Range VI,” a series of related talks and art exhibits orchestrated by Caril Jennings, marketing director for the WSU Department of Performing Arts. Trentelman’s talk presented the sociological research she’s done on the Great Salt Lake, research examining how residents living near the lake feel about the large body of water and its impact on their lives. Trentelman said a lot of research has been done on the lake, but little, if any of it, has been sociological. Examining the lake from a sociological standpoint See Salt Lake page 5

PHOTO BY EDEN BUXTON | THE SIGNPOST

Weber State University senior Shayne Chambers speaks with human resources specialist Myranda Czubak from Orbit at the Career Fair on Thursday. Held biannually, the Career Fair gives students and recent graduates an opportunity to find potential jobs and internships. Career Services sponsored the event, and offers many other services to help Wildcats find jobs. For more information, visit www.weber.edu/careerservices.

Former congressmen to visit Ogden campus By Laurie Reiner asst. news editor I The Signpost

PHOTO BY TYLER BROWN | THE SIGNPOST

Carla Trentelman, Weber State University assistant professor of sociology, shares her research about the Great Salt Lake in the Shepherd Union Fireplace Lounge on Wednesday night.

Two senators will come to Weber State University on Feb. 4-5 to meet with students. The congressmen will visit classes and host a lunch where students will have the chance to meet them and ask questions.

Charles Djou, a Republican from Hawaii, and Richard Stallings, a Democrat from Idaho, are coming to WSU as a part of the Congress to Campus program. The program sends a representative from each See Congress page 5


WWW.WSUSIGNPOST.COM

THE SIGNPOST

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013

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Congress continued from front

Salt Lake continued from front focuses more on what people think about the lake, and Trentelman said her research is utilized by different organizations and divisions involved with the lake’s comprehensive management. “They were very interested in my research,” Trentelman said, “in terms of what it showed about recreation, what it showed about people’s feelings about the lake, sense of place, those sorts of things. And so they did use a chunk of my research in that comprehensive management plan.” Wednesday night’s talk was an opportunity for everyone to hear about her research. Trentelman received her Ph.D. from Utah State University, specializing in natural resource and environmental sociology, and began her research in connection with her doctorate. The research she’s done on the Great Salt Lake results from focus groups, a survey, and individual interviews with people with connections to the lake, many of whom live close to it. For example, one mis-

conception Trentelman brought up about the Great Salt Lake was that people either love it or hate it. She said that isn’t the

“Besides our beautiful mountains, the biggest feature about our neighborhood is the Great Salt Lake . . .” ­— Caril Jennings marketing director, performing arts department case. People vary greatly in their thoughts and attitudes about the lake, and it isn’t nearly as black and white as some might believe. Jennings set up the talk as part of “Basin and Range VI.” “I had a gallery from 2005 until 2011,” Jennings said, “so, for six and a half years, I had some shows

and I always did an annual show in January called ‘Basin and Range.’ I used it to pair up art and people who could talk about environmental issues in our community.” Jennings said “Basin and Range VI” has been a continuation of that program and is intended to coincide with Water Works to help raise awareness about both art and environmental issues. Because the Great Salt Lake is such a prominent geographic feature, Jennings asked Trentelman to speak on her research. “Besides our beautiful mountains, the biggest feature about our neighborhood is the Great Salt Lake, and I knew that Dr. Trentelman had done her sociology research on the lake, so that just seemed natural for me.” Trentelman said she plans to continue with her research on the Great Salt Lake. She’s had one piece published from the data, and said she’s now working on a bit more of a sophisticated analysis of the data for the next piece. Comment on this story at wsusignpost.com.

FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 6:00 PM | AUSTAD AUDITORIUM | BROWNING CENTER

SIMEON WRIGHT, COUSIN TO EMMETT TILL

party to school campuses. “Students can ask congressmen about how Congress works, and they can answer in an honest and open way,” said Leah Murray, an associate professor of political science who is helping organize the event. Murray said that, because they are no longer members of Congress, the senators can be more open when talking about Congress. “I think the reason why they have a low approval rate is because people don’t

understand what they do,” Murray said. The congressmen will visit two political science classes and the Monday student senate meeting. They will also talk to the students in the Community Involvement Center and students involved with the American Democracy Project. All students can attend the classes or the student senate meeting. A brown-bag lunch will be hosted for all students on Monday at 11:30 a.m. in the Social Science Building.

The congressmen will talk about internships in Washington D.C. and careers in politics. This is the first time congressmen have visited WSU through the Congress to Campus program. Murray said she hopes Congress to Campus will have more congressmen come to WSU in the future. “I’m hoping they have a good visit and that the students ask a lot of good questions,” she said.

U (University of Utah) medical school come down and teach special classes. They’re giving really good opportunities to the pre-med students.” So now Jessica is a 15-year-old pre-med student. In case all that didn’t seem like enough — all the physics, math and zoology — Jessica is also pursuing a music minor at WSU, focusing on piano performance. “I love music just to kind of get my mind off it, you know?” she said. “Not always be thinking about math and science. It’s a nice break, so I’m not all science.” Jessica said she doesn’t feel out of place at the university. “At first, when I was 12, I did,” she said. “But I was even tall then, and I was mature, and so a lot of people didn’t know I was 12. They thought I was underage, but they didn’t know I was 12. At first it was a little weird, but now it’s just become normal. I’ve done this for two and a half years now, so now it’s just normal. I don’t feel different.” She said she thinks WSU was a good choice. “I’m really liking it,” she said. “I love the people, and I love the community. The cold is different than Arizona, but I’m getting used to it, and my family’s adjusting well.” Rachel Brooke, Jessica’s mother, agreed that the adjustment has been smooth. “Other than the snow, we’re good,” Rachel Brooke said. “We’re used to wearing flipflops and sandals in the winter, but that’s OK. We’ve just traded them in for boots.” Rachel Brooke grew up in northern Utah, so much of Jessica’s extended family on her mother’s side still lives here. Rachel Brooke

said all her children were having a great time in Utah. “You know, visiting grandparents on the weekends and having family close by for holidays and things,” Rachel Brooke said. “It’s been a good adjustment.” Family is important to the Brookes. Jessica said she loves spending time with her parents and siblings — two sisters and one brother, all younger — and said she’d be very lonely without her family around. “I couldn’t do this without their support,” Jessica said. Rachel Brooke said she is really proud of her daughter. “She’s taken on a lot more than most, obviously most kids, and sometimes more than other adults do,” she said. “I think she’s set high goals and really accomplished a lot of what she wanted to do.” To accomplish all that, Jessica has to put in a lot of hard work. “Some people assume because I’m smart that I don’t have to put work in,” Jessica said, “which is absolutely not true.” But Jessica said all the work is definitely worth it. “I don’t think I’ve missed out on anything,” Jessica said. “I still have friends my same age; I still hang out. I’ve made great friends up here. I’m still a sister. I’m still very close to my siblings. I don’t regret it. I think it’s worth it, that I get to learn instead of just sit in a classroom for eight hours a day and just be sitting there bored in some classes or not learning in others. It’s good, even if it is stressful.”

ing friends with her son while he was a student and showing they care. Mitch Moise, Brant’s mentor and first friend in Utah, also spoke. Moise became a close friend of the family and took care of Brant. He said Brant led by example and reminded everyone to lead a simple and pure life. “Don’t focus on materialism," Moise said. “Focus on the things that matter. And the things that really matter are people.” Gardiner offered a

moment of silence. He said every student matters at WSU, and WSUSA doesn’t want anyone to feel excluded. “A missing student is a big deal,” Gardiner said. “. . . We just wanted to commemorate and help his family out over this time. . . . But the Student Association cares about the students, and we represent them and are always here for them in whatever need they may have.”

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Teen continued from front while still in Arizona as a 12-year-old going into eighth grade. Jessica said she was transferring schools, and the school to which she was transferring wanted her to retake a math class. She went to a community college, took a math placement test and placed high enough to register for the community college. “I just wanted to try it out, because I wanted to supplement my math class,” Jessica said. “I ended up trying it for a semester and loving it. So I decided just to keep going.” From there, Jessica graduated with two associate degrees, “one in arts and one in science.” She said she then wanted to continue with higher education. “I’ve always wanted to be a doctor,” Jessica said. “I want to help people, and I think that would be a really interesting job. I love learning, and I love the science. I love learning this kind of stuff, so I figured I would love doing it as a job and being able to help people.” So the next step was to work on her pre-med education. Jessica said she was looking around for pre-med schools and received offers for fullride scholarships from both Utah State University and WSU. She decided to go with WSU. “(WSU) has a good zoology program,” Jessica said. “They have a high placement into medical schools for their pre-med students.” Jessica said another reason for choosing WSU was the opportunities given to pre-med students. “We get to work with cadavers and stuff, which most undergraduate people don’t get to,” she said. “They have a lot of people from the

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Honors continued from front

et

EMMETT TILL EXHIBIT ON UNION BRIDGE FEBRUARY 5TH-15TH SPONSORED BY: THE DIVERSITY & INCLUSION INITIATIVE, CENTER FOR DIVERSITY & UNITY, THE MULTICULTURAL STUDENT CENTER, EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY & AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICE, NAACP OGDEN BRANCH, & TWO RIVERS HS WEBER DISTRICT FOR MORE INFORMATION: ADRIENNE ANDREWS 801-626-7243

showed the importance of building and maintaining relationships with all students, faculty and staff, no matter their background, and J.P. was well loved and respected by many students, faculty and staff at WSU, and now, therefore, the WSUSA hereby honors the life of Juan Pablo Brant for his exemplary life, an example of service, love, compassion and friendship to all students at Weber State.” Monica Brant expressed her thanks to WSU students for be-

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The Signpost 1/18/13, 1/23/13, 1/28/13, 2/1/13  

News Series done by Raychel Johnson with the first story by Cozette Jenkins

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