Page 1

Education: More Choices Than Ever. . . 86

New Home & Garden Section. . . . 110

Celebrating Women Leaders. . . . 46

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

THE EDUCATION EDITION

HONORING

WOMEN IN BUSINESS The Interview: Joe Howard

Putting the “super” in superintendent

In Every Edition:

EMBRY-RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSITY POISED FOR THE FUTURE Forging new standards of excellence

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New Home & Garden Section . . . 110

Education: More Choices Than Ever . . .86

Contents

Celebrating Women Leaders . . . .46

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

THE EDUCATION EDITION

Fall 2017

THE EDUCATION EDITION

HONORING

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Features:

The Interview: Joe Howard

Putting the “super” in superintendent

In Every Edition:

EMBRY-RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSITY POISED FOR THE FUTURE Forging new standards of excellence

PRESCOT TLIVINGMAG.COM

$4.95 Complimentary • FALL 2017

The LIVING Interview: Joe Howard

22

Women in Business

46

Education Special Section

86

Superintendent, Prescott Unified School District

PRE S COT T • PRE S COT T VA L L E Y • CHIN O VA L L E Y • DE W E Y-HUMB OL DT

ABOUT THE COVER: Dr. Frank Ayers, Chancellor, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and his wife, Debbie, stand in front of the recently completed $21.5 million STEM Education Center and Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium. The state-of-the-art science facility features computing, simulation and robotics labs as well as a community-accessible planetarium with more than 120 seats. An Oct. 6 donor celebration and ribbon cutting marks the grand opening of the center, which will bring students leading-edge technology and equipment to tackle the real-world problems of today and tomorrow.

110

Home & Garden

Photo credit: Connor McShane, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Economy & Local Business

Health, Wealth & Education

Travel, Dining & Entertainment

Prescott Entertainment District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Out & About plus photo contest winners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Jersey Lilly Saloon. . . . . . . . . . . 128

Connecting Our Community, ACF of Yavapai County. . . . . . . . 36

A Journey from Pain-Filled to Pain-Free. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

We’re Falling for Fall . . . . . . . . 134

Rotary Delivers Results . . . . . . . . 41

The Importance of Working with a Fiduciary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Hassayampa Inn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Someone in Their Corner. . . . . . 82

Never a Dull Moment! . . . . . . 139 10 Questions with Sandy Moss. . . . . . . . . . . 150

PRE SCOT TLIVINGMAG .COM


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A DV E RT I S E R I N D E X AAEC High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 American Financial Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

PRE SCOT TLIVINGMAG .COM

Arizona Heart Rhythm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

PUBLISHER Elaine Earle, CPA

Arrow Roofing Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bea Lueck MANAGING EDITOR Katie Mayer CONTRIBUTING WRITER Ray Newton ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES Susan Cohen Debbie Cortez CREATIVE DIRECTOR/GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tim Clarke SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jake Pagano PHOTOGRAPHER Jerry Chinn DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER Carrie Vargas DISTRIBUTION Jon Flinner ADVERTISING INQUIRIES info@roxco.com COMMENTS & IDEAS editor@roxco.com CALENDAR INQUIRES calendar@roxco.com 1129 Iron Springs Rd., Ste. 210

Bella by Leah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Bensch Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Blind Brothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Bloomtree Realty - John Gordon PLLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Boys & Girls Club of Central Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Broken Horn D Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Carman Law Firm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 CASA of Yavapai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 City of Prescott - Heritage Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Cliff Castle Casino Hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Coldwell Banker Residential - Peter Fife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Culver’s of Prescott Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Firesky Real Estate - Leland Moreno-Hilburn . . . . . . . 114 Forest Villas Hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Framers Market & Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Frontier Financial of Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Great Lakes Airlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Hassayampa Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Helken & Horn Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Humboldt Unified School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Prescott, AZ 86305 • 928.777.2397

Jersey Lilly Saloon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

Corporate Office:

KAZT Channel 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

442 W. Kortsen Rd, Ste 101

KNAU Arizona Public Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Casa Grande, AZ 85122 520.426.2074

Lamb Cadillac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Legacy Real Estate Partners - Talking Rock Ranch Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Mengarelli for Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Merry Maids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Prescott LIVING is published by Raxx Direct Marketing. Editorial content is provided by affiliates of Raxx Direct Marketing, community members and local organizations. The publishers of Prescott LIVING assume no responsibility for errors or omissions of any advertisement beyond the actual cost of the advertisement. In no event shall the publishers be liable for any consequential damages in excess of the cost of the advertisement. Prescott LIVING shall not be liable for inaccuracies, errors, omissions, or damages from the use of information contained herein. Submitted articles do not reflect the opinions of the owners or management of Prescott LIVING Information contained within submitted articles had not been verified for accuracy and readers are responsible for forming their own opinions. Real estate PRE Sinformation COT T LI V ING ING • 9-1-17 THE INTERV IE W to current availability and pricing. 10 PRES is as of and is subject

Mortimer Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 National Realty of Prescott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Northern Arizona Social LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Old Firehouse Plaza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 155, 156 THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Olsen’s Grain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Publisher’s Letter

PK BootMaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Ponderosa Hotel Group - Residence Inn by Marriott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Prescott College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Prescott Home Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Prescott Police Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Prescott Unified School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Prescott Western Heritage Foundation Inc . . . . . . . . . 131 R.E. and Sons Landscaping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Raskin’s Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Realty Executives Northern AZ - Don Bonnell . . . . . . . 115 Realty One Group - Donna Baade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Realty ONE Group Mountain Desert - Cindi LaSalle-Shanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Renovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 ROX Expeditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 ROX Media Group - Digital Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Sharlot Hall Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Smoki Museum - American Indian Art & Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Steve Blair for City Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Stoneridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TeamLogicIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 TFC Estate & Doc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 The Natural Healing Garden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 The Norkus Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Thumb Butte Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Tiensvold Shaffer Wenzels CPA’s PLLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Totally Floored . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Trinity Christian School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Two Mamas’ Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Wedbush Securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 West USA Realty - Ronnie DeBenedetta . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 West Yavapai Guidance Clinic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Yavapai College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Yavapai Humane Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

CELEBRATING CHANGE

I

keep finding myself thinking about fall in Prescott – the sights, the smells, the way fall feels. It’s a first hint of the season that reveals itself with an unexpected crisp breeze, a few leaves turning to rust and the sun lingering just a bit longer below the horizon in the morning. It’s a time of transformation – much like Prescott Elaine Earle itself, in many ways. In this issue, we celebrate that change – and we invite you to celebrate with us. From the simple wonders of the changing seasons to the amazing residents at the forefront of change in our community, you will find it all in the pages of this expanded edition as well as on our cover. Did you know that 10 million women in our country today own businesses, and that these companies account for $1.4 trillion in receipts every year? Amazing. Some of these incredible women are featured in our “Women in Business” section. Others bring leadership to our community by way of nonprofits, government, education and health care. On Aug. 15, we gathered with many of these woman at the Jersey Lilly Saloon (also featured this issue!) to celebrate our collective contributions. I was amazed by these leaders, and I can’t wait for you to “meet” them, too. But I can’t think about leadership without also talking about Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. The university recently completed its state-of-the-art STEM Education Center and Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium, and we were lucky enough to get a sneak peek. The science facility is at the leading-edge and preparing students for careers of the future in computing, simulation and robotics, among other fields. And while I’m on the topic of change and education, this is our “education issue,” so check out the interview with our PUSD Superintendent Joe Howard, whose innovative changes in the district earned him a top award. Also, if you’re like me and you love fall, then don’t close this issue without sipping a pumpkin spice latte and indulging in our new Home & Garden section. The “Best Fall-Colored Trees to Plant Now” will have you dreaming of a yard makeover! And finally – at the risk of coming off like those stores that insist on putting out Christmas decorations way too early, I leave you with this – our December issue will get you in the holiday spirit with an events feature on the “12 Days of Christmas.” And because I’ll always be a CPA at heart, we’re bringing an important financial planning special section to help with year-end money management, too. Enjoy! Elaine Earle Publisher Prescott LIVING Magazine

S COT T LI V ING PUBLISHER S LE T TER • PRE PRESCOT VING

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! o l l e H We’re ROX Media Group P

rescott LIVING Magazine is brought to you by ROX Media Group, a multimedia organization providing an annual portfolio of 3.6 million print copies of community, custom and travel publications throughout Arizona and in neighboring states. Our publications collectively reach 10 million consumers who reside in or travel to Arizona every year, and bring engaging local content to the communities and marketing partners we serve.

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In addition to this publication you hold in your hand, ROX Media Group has been serving the Prescott area with our publications Quad-City Smart Shopper and TravelHost Arizona beginning in 2013 and we are also the proud publisher of the Visitor Guide – Greater Prescott Area, which is published for the City of Prescott Office of Tourism. We are honored to expand our relationship with your community through this bimonthly publication. You can visit us any time at our temporary local office, located at 1129 Iron Springs Road, as we renovate and prepare for the grand opening of our new building at 130 N. Granite St. in Prescott or call us at 928-460-2541.

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PRE S COT T LI V ING

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THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION •• FALL 2017


Elaine Earle

Elaine is an accomplished publisher and management professional with 20 years of experience as a Certified Public Accountant and publisher of a diverse set of marketing products. Elaine and her team bring a “one firm” solution to clients. She has a passion for traveling and has been to over 30 countries.

Publisher

Tim Clarke

Creative Director

Bea Lueck

General Manager & Managing Editor

Tim is a digital design professional with more than 25 years of experience. Tim is responsible for all creative consulting, magazine design, print production and web development for Contract Media Group and RAXX Direct Marketing. He manages production for multiple publications as well as multiple Drupal and Wordpress sites for clients.

Katie Mayer

Editor & Project Manager

Julie is a marketing professional with 20 years of experience working in client and agency settings. Julie has created and managed marketing strategies across many industries, designed to meet client objectives and stay within an established budget.

Julie Turetzky

Carrie Vargas

Public Relations & Marketing Manager

Jake Pagano

Senior Graphic Designer

Susan Cohen

Sr. Account Executive

Bea is the general manager and managing editor of ROX Media Group. She handles the various day-to-day activities necessary to take the publications from concept to print and distribution. She has over 22 years of experience in multiple advertising media, including print, direct mail, television and web.

Digital Marketing Manager

Jake Pagano is an experienced and driven graphic designer whose creative design work can be found in dozens of consumer, travel and lifestyle publications throughout Arizona. Jake is currently responsible for a number of publications at ROX Media Group including Quad-City Smart Shopper, Sun Health LiveWell and 928 Homes. Susan Cohen brings over 30 years of experience in medical marketing and sales to ROX Media Group. In her role, she represents Prescott LIVING Magazine, Quad-City Smart Shopper, TravelHost Arizona and the Visitor Guide – Greater Prescott Area. Susan is known for her great personality, and enjoys working with the business community to promote their products and services among readers locally and throughout Arizona.

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Jerry Chinn

Photographer & Videographer

Jon Flinner

Distribution & Account Executive

Katie is an accomplished senior copywriter and editor with 12 years of experience working with everything from daily print newspapers to magazines and trade publications. She is also an award-winning journalist and guest lecturer at her alma mater, the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. Carrie is a digital media and marketing fanatic who works with clients to design digital media campaigns aligned with business goals. Carrie knows digital marketing is vital in today’s fast paced online world and that it is imperative to create the right plan to garner new clients, customers or business leads. Carrie holds a bachelor’s degree in speech communications from San Francisco State University.

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Jerry’s an award-winning photographer/ filmmaker, with a formal arts education and 30-plus years as a photo-illustrator and crewing on Hollywood film and television productions. Relocating to Prescott in 1990, Jerry has since produced documentary films and pursued his passion for travel, which includes leading expeditions to Africa, Asia and the Americas. Jon Flinner is an Account Executive at Rox Media Group and has over ten years in sales and customer service experience. Jon is also the distribution manager for both Quad-City Smart Shopper and Prescott LIVING Magazine. He moved from San Diego with his family in the summer of 2004 to the Prescott area and has since resided in Arizona.

PRE S COT T LI V ING

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VOICES of the Community At Prescott LIVING Magazine, our slogan is “The Voice of the Community,” because we believe that the stories in our local region are best told by the people, companies, nonprofits and governments that comprise our community. Here are the “voices” who helped make this issue possible!

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Dr. Frank Ayers

Krista Carman

Chancellor, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Dr. Frank Ayers is the chancellor of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Prescott campus and is responsible for leading more than 2,600 students and 400 employees. Prior to Embry-Riddle, then-Colonel Ayers served in the U.S. Air Force for 26 years. He has logged more than 6,000 flight hours in a variety of aircraft types.

Attorney, Carman Law Firm Krista Carman is an attorney with the Carman Law Firm. She is passionate about her community and is the president of the Prescott Unified School District Education Foundation. Krista is married to André, and they have four biological and two foster children.

Martha Baden

Tim Carter

Manager, Public Services, Prescott Public Library Martha is library manager, public services at Prescott Public Library. Still enjoying a lifelong love of connecting people with information they need and books they’ll love, she has worked in school or public libraries in four states over the last 20 years.

School Superintendent Yavapai County Education Service Agency Tim is a lifelong Arizonan, residing in Prescott since 1979. He is in his 43rd year as an educator, serving as a teacher-coach, before serving as the principal of Prescott High School for 12 years. He has served as the elected Yavapai County School Superintendent since 2005.

Melanie Banayat

Quinci Castleberry

Founder & CEO, WingSpace, LLC. Melanie Banayat is the founder & CEO of WingSpace, LLC., and board certified holistic health coach, author, speaker, workshop facilitator and professional artist. Being a “location independent” worker for over 35 years, Melanie is in the process of opening a coworking space in Prescott where independent workers can work together under one roof.

Program Manager, CASA of Yavapai County Quinci Castleberry is the Program Manager for CASA of Yavapai County. Quinci started out as a CASA volunteer in 2012, then joined the staff in 2013. Her goal is to have a Court Appointed Special Advocate assigned to every child in care in Yavapai County.

Debora Black

Margo Christensen

Chief of Police, City of Prescott Chief Black was appointed chief of police for the City of Prescott in July 2016. Prior to this, she was the chief of police for the City of Glendale, Arizona, where she served since first joining as assistant chief in 2006. Chief Black began her career in 1980 as a patrol officer with Phoenix Police Department. She has been awarded the Medal of Valor, three Medals of Lifesaving and two Police Chief’s Unit Awards.

Vice President of Marketing and Public Relations Ponderosa Hotel Management Services Margo is vice president of marketing and public relations for Ponderosa Hotel Management Services, LLC. As well, serves on the board of directors for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce and the Arizona Lodging and Tourism Association. She is also a founding member of the City of Prescott Tourism Advisory Committee.

Rita Carey Rubin, MS, RD, CDE

Tim Diesch

Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator Yavapai Regional Medical Center Rita is a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator with the Preventive Medicine Team at Yavapai Regional Medical Center in Prescott, Arizona. Rita is also the host of Yavapai Regional Medical Center’s popular nutrition program “Your Healthy Kitchen.”

Marketing Specialist, Yavapai College Tim has worked in marketing, advertising and tourism promotion in Prescott since 2003. Clients served include the City of Prescott, Prescott Frontier Days and The World’s Oldest Rodeo, The Phippen Museum and Sharlot Hall Museum. Tim has worked to promote enrollment at Yavapai College for the past four years.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


John Flicker

Sheri L. Heiney

President, Prescott College Formerly the president of the National Audubon Society, John has transitioned from protecting birds to helping sustain a private liberal arts school in Northern Arizona, serving as president of Prescott College. Flicker also worked at the Nature Conservancy for 21 years.

President/CEO, Prescott Chamber of Commerce Sheri was hired as the President/CEO of the Prescott Chamber of Commerce in January 2017. She moved to Arizona from Michigan, and has over 23 years of chamber professional experience.

Dennis Gallagher

Joe Howard

Founder and President, Prescott Western Heritage Foundation Dennis is the founder and president of the Prescott Western Heritage Foundation, Inc., a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, whose mission is to preserve and promote our Western heritage. He is also a Western artist/bronze sculptor, and an active volunteer for numerous community events. He and his wife, MaryAnn, have been married 50 years and have resided in Prescott for 10 years.

Superintendent, Prescott Unified School District A Prescott High School alum, Joe has been in the Prescott area for 30 years total. Joe started his teaching career in Chino Valley, then became the principal at Prescott Mile High Middle School. He then served for five years as assistant superintendent. Joe is currently in his first year of superintendency and is focused on success for all students.

Cindy Gresser

Jason Kadah

Executive Director, The Smoki Museum Cindy Gresser is the Executive Director of The Smoki Museum. Currently, she also serves the City of Prescott as the Chair of the Art in Public Places Committee. She is involved in many community activities including The Rotary Club of Prescott, Prescott Area Arts and Humanities Council and the Prescott Corral of Westerners.

Communications and Marketing Director, EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University Jason Kadah is the communications and marketing director at Embry-Riddle. Prior to joining ERAU in 2014, he was a television meteorologist and news reporter for more than 15 years for a variety of local TV stations across the country, including the Phoenix/Prescott market.

Sandy Griffis

Ken Lain

Executive Director, Yavapai County Contractors Association Sandy is executive director of Yavapai County Contractors Association, and has lived in the Prescott area for 21 years. Sandy has a bachelor’s degree in journalism and an MBA in business with a minor in music from San Diego State.

Owner, Watters Garden Center Ken grew up in Prescott, attended Yavapai College and obtained his degrees from ASU. He married his college sweetheart Lisa Watters-Lain and has four children. His garden advice can be heard each week on the radio. Throughout the week, Ken can be found at Watters Garden Center.

Dr. Mary Ellen Halvorson

Dennis B. Light

Founder and Superintendent, Tri-City College Prep High School Mary Ellen, founder and superintendent of Tri-City College Prep High School, received her Doctor of Education from California Coast University. After graduating from NAU, she began her teaching career with Prescott Unified School District. She has also taught at Yavapai Community College and directed programs for the Yavapai Prescott Indian Tribe.

Fire Chief, Prescott Fire Department Dennis B. Light is the fire chief with the City of Prescott and a graduate of the National Fire Academy Executive Fire Officer Program and ASU Certified Public Manager Program. He is also a Certified Fire Officer via the Center for Public Safety Excellence.

Richard Heath

Kyle Maestri

Executive Director, NAU-Prescott Valley campus Richard is the executive director of the NAU-Prescott Valley campus and administrative lead for the Community Development and Sustainability (CDSY) Program. He has worked full-time for NAU since October 2016. He has 27 years of experience working in community and economic development and organizational management.

Headmaster, Trinity Christian School Kyle Maestri is the headmaster of Trinity Christian School (K-12). He is a teacher, mentor and leader at heart. His undergraduate studies are in philosophy and theology and his graduate degree is in educational leadership. He and his wife, Anni, live in Chino Valley with their four daughters.

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

See more Voices on the next page... PRE S COT T LI V ING

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VOICES of the Community Continued...

PrescottLivingMag.com/Voices Follow us on Facebook at PrescottLivingMagazine

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Sandy Moss

Melissa Ruffner

Sandy & Friends Host, AZTV Sandy moved to Prescott in the early 90s, and became a reporter at The Daily Courier. After 10 years, she went to work for a local radio station doing broadcasting, including a live, hour-long daily show “Q&A with Sandy Moss.” In 2014, she became the host of AZTV’s “Morning Scramble,” now “Sandy and Friends.” In 2012, she published the book “The Terrible Loyalty.”

Historian and Author Melissa was born in Prescott and is the progeny of pioneers and peacekeepers, miners, historians, authors, teachers, entertainers, community activists and volunteers. She encourages you to choose a way to contribute to “Everybody’s Hometown” and use Prescott LIVING as your handbook.

Ray Newton

John Scholl

Journalist and Professor-Administrator Emeritus, Northern Arizona University A veteran of mass media ranging from weekly and daily newspapers to directing writing workshops for the Reader’s Digest, from book editing to book writing — Ray has been there. He is a professor-administrator emeritus from Northern Arizona University, now retired and residing in Prescott with his wife, Patty.

Superintendent, Chino Valley Unified School District John is starting his second year as superintendent with Chino Valley Schools, having just completed his 20th year with the District. During his tenure at CVUSD he has also served as a teacher, coach, assistant principal and business manager. John is married and has a daughter who currently attends ASU.

Harry Oberg

Jane Anne Shimizu

Mayor, City of Prescott Harry was born in Laramie, Wyoming in 1947. He grew up in Prescott, Arizona. After being drafted in 1966, Harry served 33 years in the U.S. Army and Army National Guard. Harry and his wife Jeanna returned to Prescott in 2007 and he was elected Mayor in August 2015.

Marketing Director, Gunsite Academy Jane Anne Shimizu is the Marketing Director of Gunsite Academy. She has been involved with the shooting sports since the early 90s. Jane Anne is an ardent supporter of the Second Amendment and believes in safe responsible gun ownership through training.

Billie Orr, EdD

Harvey Skoog

City Council Member, City of Prescott Billie Orr, EdD, currently serves on the Prescott City Council and had professional careers in banking, education and nonprofits. She has spent decades advocating for children, parents, teachers and high academic standards at the local, state and national levels.

Mayor, Prescott Valley Harvey Skoog served as Prescott Valley Mayor from 1993 to 1998, and was again elected in 2004. He was re-elected in 2005, 2009 and again in 2013. His current term expires in December 2018. He was most recently a tax accountant and business consultant and has served in many leadership roles on various industry and government boards.

Jim Robb

Helen Stephenson

Consultant Economic Development, City of Prescott Jim is an experienced senior executive, business development professional and deal-maker, who has helped raise hundreds of millions of dollars for organizations over the last 20 years. He is connected to senior executives across private equity, venture capital and over a dozen industries.

Film and Media Arts Director, Yavapai College Helen Stephenson is the film and media arts director at Yavapai College. She is YouTube certified and teaches the YouTube content and marketing class for FMA. Her “volunteer gig” is running the Prescott Film Festival, where she serves as founder and executive director. She lives in Yavapai County with her husband, Don, and daughter, Danielle.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Coming December 2017 Dan Streeter Superintendent, Humboldt Unified School District Dan is serving in his third year as superintendent for the largest school district in Yavapai County. Prior to this, he served as an assistant superintendent and principal for HUSD. Streeter currently serves as a board member for the Prescott Valley Economic Development Foundation, Prescott Valley Chamber of Commerce, Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters and Support our Schools AZ.

Charlie Tardibuono Executive Vice President, Business and Technology Development for the Robb Group Charlie is an experienced business development professional and technologist, who has built large and small technology companies and departments in many industries, founded businesses and led organizations at C-level positions. Charlie is working in partnership with Jim Robb to write the next component of the economic development plan for the Greater Prescott Area focusing on the technology industry.

Fred Veil Executive Director, Sharlot Hall Museum Fred is the executive director of the Sharlot Hall Museum. He is a Marine Corps veteran and former Sheriff of the Prescott Corral of Westerners International, he conceived and organized the Western History Symposium. He is a board member of the Arizona History Convention and member of the Tourism Advisory Committee for the City of Prescott.

Tori Ward ROX Travel, Cruise and Resort Specialist Victoria “Tori” Ward is a cruise and resort specialist with a master’s degree in political science. She has completed more than 30 certification courses with the cruise and tour industry including the most advanced certification, Commodore, from Princess Cruise Lines. Tori is a member of the Cruise Line International Association.

Patrick Wellert Principal, Arizona Agribusiness & Equine Center Patrick Wellert is in his fifth year as principal at AAEC – Prescott Valley. He is proud to call this area his home for the last 16 years, since graduating from The University of Arizona. He is married to the love of his life, Leanne, and together they have one son. Patrick strives to always do what is best for kids.

Prescott Parks & Rec Department • Samara Rice-Cummings, Recreation Services Administrative Specialist • Patti Crouse, Recreation Services Administrative Coordinator • Rick Hormann, Recreation Services Supervisor • Michelle Stacy-Schroeder, Recreation Services Coordinator • Kelly Tolbert. Recreation Services Coordinator

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

HOLIDAY EDITION Featuring

The 12 Days of Christmas Special Events, Holiday Traditions, Gift Ideas, Food & Dining and more! Plus

Financial Planning, Wealth Management & Year-End Tax Tips

Don’t miss your opportunity to feature your business info@roxco.com 928-460-2541 PRE S COT T LI V ING

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Submit your events online at prescottlivingmag.com OCTOBER

1

Taste of the Wild - 2:00 PM-6:00 PM - Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary - 1403 Heritage Park Rd., Prescott. $75/ person. Tastes from local restaurants, wineries & breweries. 21 & over.

5

Open House at Prescott Area Shelter Services - 1:00 PM-5:00 PM - 336 N. Rush St., Prescott. Learn more about how we serve our community.

7

RAM Turquoise Circuit Rodeo Finals - 5:30 PM - Prescott Valley Event Center - 3201 N. Main St. Doors open at 5:30, event starts at 7PM. Tickets start at $10.

8

10th Annual Prescott Area Artists’ Studio Tour - 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Greater Prescott area - Call 928583-5019 for locations or visit www. prescottstudiotour.com. Free, self-guided Artists studio tour. Sponsored by Mountain Artists Guild.

7

Wings Out West Air Show - 9:00 AM2:00 PM - Prescott Airport (Ernest A. Love Field) - 6546 Crystal Ln.

7

FallFest In The Park Arts & Craft Show - 9:00 AM-5:00 PM Courthouse Plaza - 120 S. Cortez St., Prescott

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Pony Only Mustang Cruise - 10:00 AM-3:00 PM - WalMart Shopping Center - Hwy. 69, next to In-n-Out Burger. Free admission. 39th Annual Folk Music Festival 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Sharlot Hall Museum - 415 W. Gurley St., Prescott

7

Mirage - Visions of Fleetwood Mac - 7:00 PM - Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center - 117 E. Gurley St., Ste., 115. $22-$25.

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FallFest In The Park Arts & Craft Show - 9:00 AM-4:00 PM - Courthouse Plaza - 120 S. Cortez St., Prescott

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Chris Botti - 7:30 PM - Yavapai College Performing Arts Center - 1100 E. Sheldon St., Prescott. Tickets from $42.

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Seniors & Caregivers Conference & Expo - 10:00 AM-3:00 PM Liberty Traditional School - 3300 N. Lake Valley Rd., Prescott Valley. Free admission.

15

Arcosanti Bluegrass Festival 10:00 AM-7:00 PM - Arcosanti - 13555 S. Cross L Rd., Mayer. Sun. 10/14 9AM - 12PM. $12 for adults for 2-day performance, FREE for 16 & under. Deep Well Ranch: Impact on Our Aquifer and the Verde River 10:00 AM-12:00 PM - Granite Peak UU Building - 882 Sunset Ave., Prescott. 928-445-4218.

14

6th Annual Hope Fest Arizona - 10:00 AM-8:00 PM - Prescott Courthouse Plaza. Food, vendors & more. FREE family fun zone.

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Costumes For Kids 5K - Halloween Fun Run - 10:00 AM-1:00 PM - Prescott Courthouse Square. Prizes for best costumes and best group, kids activities and more! $25/adult, Children 16 & under FREE, Foster Familes FREE.

15

StoneRidge Wedding Showcase - 10:00 AM-3:00 PM - Prescott Club @ StoneRidge - 1601 N. Bluff Top Dr., Prescott Valley. Free admission.

The Big Sting - It’s a Country Thing - 11:00 AM-10:30 PM - Watson Lake, Prescott. Visit www. thebigsting.com for hours. Day passes Fri. & Sat. $25, parking $5.

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I Was Born Here with Mick Shepard - 5:30 PM - Phippen Museum - 4701 Highway 89 North, Prescott. Cost $30, Members $25.

The Art Of Brewing Your Own Kombucha - 9:00 AM - Modern Herbal Nectar Apothecary - 219 W. Gurley St., Prescott. $30 registration due by Oct. 7th, 928-445-4565.

Prescott Ghost Talk Too - 6:00 PM - Prescott Center for the Arts, Stage Too Theatre - N. Cortez St. Alley / Beside Perigrine. $17 Adults, $14 Students. Shows also begin at 7:30 PM & 9:00 PM

"Bringing Something New into the World Through Creative Service" 2015 Will Rogers Award winner bestowed by The Academy of Western Artists

(928) 442-1213 www.pkbootmaker.com Prescott National Forest in the Arizona Territory 18


OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

October/November 2017 OCTOBER (continued)

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Financial Planning Day - 9:00 AM12:00 PM - Prescott Library - 215 E. Goodwin St.

Library - 215 E. Goodwin St. Children ages 5-12. Costumes are encouraged!

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Wicked Prescott with Parker Anderson - 1:00 PM - Phippen Museum - 4701 Highway 89 North, Prescott

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Chino Valley Fall Fest 2017 - 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Chamber-in their park - 175 E. Road 2 South, Chino Valley. $3 Gate fee. Children under 10 FREE. Prescott Pizza Palooza / Pizza Competition Plus! - 11:00 AM-3:00 PM - Courthouse Square - 120 S. Cortez St., Prescott. Adults $15 for 10 tastings, 14 & under $7 for 5 tastings.

Haunted House for Kids - 4:00 PM-5:00 PM - Prescott Public

Haunted House for Teens - 5:30 PM-7:00 PM - Prescott Public Library - 215 E. Goodwin St. Teens ages 13 & up. Costumes are encouraged!

Prescott Celtic Concert Series Presents: Jim Malcolm from Perth, Scotland - 6:30 PM - Tinity Presbyterian Church - 630 Park Ave. General admission: $20; College students: $10; Under 19: FREE0. Scotty McCreery - 7:30 PM-9:30 PM - Yavapai College Performing Arts Center - 1100 E. Sheldon St., Prescott. Tickets from $39. Prescott Ghost Talk Too - 6:00 PM - Prescott Center for the

Arts, Stage Too Theatre - N. Cortez St. Alley / Beside Perigrine. $17 Adults, $14 Students. Shows also begin at 7:30 PM & 9:00 PM

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Halloween Ball / Wes Williams Band “Life is Good, Listen to your Soul” - 8:00 PM - Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center - 117 E. Gurley St., Ste., 115. Costume contest & prizes.

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Cornerstone Family Fall Festival 10:00 AM-2:00 PM - Cornerstone Family Chiropractic - 2225 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. A. Free for all ages!

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The Great Prescott Pumpkin Patch - 11:00 AM-2:00 PM - Downtown Prescott - 120 Cortez St. $5 entry safe candy. Costume contest, scream contest, pumpkin carving.

A Taste for Mission - 3:00 PM5:00 PM - St. Luke’s Episcopal Church - 2000 Shephers Ln., Prescott. $30. Tasting & silent auction.

Pumpkin Party - 10:30 AM-11:15 AM - Town of Chino Valley Children’s Library - 1020 Palomino Rd.

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Trick-or-Treat for Little Ones 10:00 AM-10:30 AM - Prescott Public Library - 215 E. Goodwin St. Children ages 0-5. Costumes are encouraged!

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Boo At The Zoo - 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary - 1403 Heritage Park Rd., Prescott. Members: $4, Non-member: $6. Dress in costumes for a fun, safe Trick-orTreat night!10:30 AM - Watters Garden Center 1815 Iron Springs Rd., Prescott

NOVEMBER

3

Coloring Classes for Adults - 1:00 PM-3:00 PM - Prescott Valley Public Library - 7401 E. Civic Circle, 1st floor.

4

Dia de los Muertos: A Celebration of Life and Death with Elena Diaz

Bjorkquist - 1:00 PM - Phippen Museum 4701 Highway 89 North, Prescott

5

Hotel Vendome Centennial Celebration: Open House - 1:00 PM-5:00 PM - Hotel Vendome - 230 S.

Cortez St., Prescott.

5

Phoenix Symphony In Prescott 3:00 PM-5:00 PM - Yavapai College Performing Arts Center - 1100 E. Sheldon St., Prescott. Tickets: $29 - $42.

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PVPL’s Everyone Improv - 5:30 PM-7:30 PM - Prescott Valley Public Library - 7401 E. Civic Circle. Free. continued on page 109...

Providing Personalized Service

to Clients In the Prescott Area

246 S. Cortez Street Prescott, AZ 86303

www.carmanlf.com 928.445.8056 19


THE PRESCOTT Stories by Ray Newton

PHOTO BY LAUREN WITTE

• PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LLEY • CHINO VA LLEY • DEWEY-HUMBOLDT • PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LLEY • CHINO V

City of Prescott supporting technology, cyber symposia

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s part of its emphasis up on st reng t hen i ng the Quad-City business economy, the City of Prescott partnered with several local and state organizations to bring two distinct “heavy-hitter” symposia to Prescott in August and September. The first was the Arizona Technology Council (ATC), held Aug. 14-15. More than 120 leaders from Arizona top technology businesses and corporations gathered during a retreat to share ideas and discuss future expansion of various enterprises. Led by Steve Zylstra, ATC president and CEO, speakers and panelists represented corporate, business, academic and governmental expertise from throughout Arizona and the Southwest. They gathered for

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intense sessions at the Prescott Resort. The second symposium, a month later, was the Cyber Awareness Executive Symposia, held Sept 16. Its purpose was to bring together diverse leaders, executives and individuals from higher education, aerospace, manufacturing, finance, state and government and other public and private groups in the state. More than 60 authorities convened on the campus of Embr y-R idd le Aeronaut ical University. They met at its newly dedicated $22 million STEM Education Center and Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium. While there, they heard Chancellor Frank Ayers and John Haass, Ph.D., describe the unique cybersecurity and intel-

ligence degree program which is offered at the university. Participants also heard about how cybersecurity affects virtually every level of economic, scientific, environmental and educational segments of society throughout the world. Symposia were organized and supported by City of Prescott City of Prescott elected leaders and executive staff members partnered with several local organizations to organize both symposia, said Jim Robb, City of Prescott Economic Development Consultant. “Mayor Oberg and the City Council, with agreement from city staff, have set an objective of developing a sophisticated technological and cybersecurity and intelligence environ-

ment within the greater community,” Robb said. “The intent (is) to attract high tech, new tech and cyber tech firms to the region to start branches or new business operations.” Robb continued, “Creating that kind of economic environment in the greater community will provide high paying jobs for our younger people and let them stay here in Prescott, where they can grow with the economy. All this is part of the short and long-range economic development plan for the city.” Robb praised the various local groups and organizations that partner with the city in helping support the two symposia. “We already are planning ahead for similar opportunities in coming months,” he said. THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


PIONEER

Visit PrescottLivingMag.com for Up-to-date Local News from Prescott LIVING Magazine

VA LLEY • DEWEY-HUMBOLDT • PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LLEY • CHINO VA LLEY • DEWEY-HUMBOLDT • PR ESCOT T •

Use of new pickleball courts has exceeded expectations

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ity of Prescott Parks & Recreation personnel said they had no idea the eight new pickleball courts constructed near Pioneer Parkway would appeal to so many people — locals and out-oftowners. Recreational and tournament play began on the eight new courts almost immediately after they were opened in June, Parks and Recreation staff said. The inaugural week saw more than 200 players from throughout Arizona descend on Prescott in mid-June. “It hasn’t slowed since,” said Bob Atherton, the Northern Arizona District Representative for the U.S. Pickleball Association. “Ever y weekday and certainly every weekend, even when we have some monsoons, the courts are busy,” he said. “We’ve got play for singles, doubles and mixed-doubles. People love this game, and new people are joining us every week. We have tournaments going on all the time, too.” He added, “Now that it’s getting cooler, we expect even

IMAGE COURTESY OF RICK HORMANN AND CITY OF PRESCOTT

more.” Atherton said that players range in age from young to old, but most are seniors. “We’re really pleased that so many people are signing up

for lessons, too,” he said. “This game proves that you can get good exercise, have an enjoyable experience with little or no expense and make new friends while you have a lot of laughs.”

More information is available about Prescott Pickleball A ssociation Programs at Prescottpickleball.com

Deep Well Ranch development under consideration

P

lans for the long-term development of a 1,800acre multiuse residential and commercial project have been presented before several community meetings and City Council and city planning and zoning officials during the past several months. Trevor Barger, Chief Executive Officer of Espiritu Loci, a FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Scottsdale-based firm, has been representing Chamberlain Development and the James Family during many of these presentations. Proposed to be built at the northeast edge of Prescott, west of the Prescott Municipal Airport and near Highway 89 going north to Chino Valley, the project will be on what is currently

vacant land. That acreage is just a small portion of the 19,000acre James Ranch. Barger and his associates emphasize that the current proposal is being reviewed at virtually every possible level before any action will occur. In August, the City of Prescott Planning and Zoning Commission conducted several meet-

ings, including hosting public hearings at Prescott City Hall. The proposal has been controversial to some in the greater community. Some individuals have been critical of the proposed density of the devel-

continued on page 138... See more news on pages 31 & 85 PRE S COT T LI V ING

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Jenna, Joe, Jonah and Jason in the early days.


The LIVING Interview

Joe Howard

SUPERINTENDENT, PRESCOTT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Interview by Ray Newton

J

oe Howard cares about Prescott’s students – and it shows. Following his second year as superintendent, (he is now in his third year) he received the prestigious Distinguished Administrator award from Arizona School Administrators. And he continues to make a difference every day. Through his mission to create a good work culture for faculty and staff, partner with the local community and – most importantly – give students all they need to succeed, Howard is bringing leadership and results to the nearly 150-year-old school district. An advocate of public education, a family man and longtime Prescott local, Howard puts the “super” in superintendent.

PRESCOTT LIVING: Thank you for sitting down with us! You and your family have been involved in education for many years. Your father Jim Howard was superintendent of schools in Prescott for years. How did your family influence you and your career? JOE HOWARD: I think it’s huge, Ray. My dad still says, all the time, it’s the most important profession in the world. You know, I think some of it was like osmosis. When it came time to choose my career, I remember right where I was. I went to Phoenix College, before NAU, on a wrestling scholarship. I was taking a creative writing class at night, and I said, “Well, I think it’s time to decide what I should do with my career.” And it took about two seconds. I said, “I’m going to be a teacher. It’s the most important thing in the world.” My mom was an incredible elementary teacher. They’ve been a huge influence on me and still are. We’ll still have family discussions about what’s happening in education. It was like the family business. I feel the way about PUSD like I do about my home and my family. You do the best thing that you can for those folks and for yourself and for your community, and so I think that definitely was inherited, to a large extent.

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PRESCOTT LIVING: Joe, you’ve had opportunities to move your career elsewhere. Why have you stayed in Prescott? JOE HOWARD: Oh gosh. I can probably answer it the same way so many people do in Prescott. I mean, there are so many things to love about Prescott. First of all, this morning, my wife and I rolled out of our front gate on our mountain bikes at 5:00 in the morning. We just had some fresh rains, and it was beautiful. I met my wife, Jenna, in Seattle. I was a crab fisherman in Alaska and I took the boat down to do shipyard work, and I was living on the boat, and met her there. I was substitute teaching there, got a job offer as a head wrestling coach and a teacher there. My wife said, “Hey, look, you’re the one starting the career. What do you want to do?” And I said, “I want to raise kids in the greatest place in the world to raise kids.” And so we came to Prescott to raise our kids. But I’ll tell you now, this has come full circle, and in just a few days, I’m going to be looking at 500 staff members and welcoming them back to the school year and I’m going to thank them for creating this beautiful atmosphere for my kids to grow up in. PRESCOTT LIVING: And your job is more

than the paycheck? JOE HOWARD: Yes. It’s a passion. I’ll go so far as to say it’s a calling. We’ve been through some tough times here in PUSD over the last 10 years, especially with the downturn of the economy. I came into the district office – this will be my eighth year in the district office and third as superintendent – and in the last seven years, we cut around 250 people and closed two buildings. That was pretty hard, but we were losing great people, saying, “Look, if Arizona doesn’t support what we do, we’re going to go somewhere else,” and they would leave and I would say, “Hey, somebody’s got to stay here.” We’ve got 4,000 kids. This is a beautiful community. And, lots of us did. You know, we never stop doing great things for kids. Not once. Not even in the toughest of times. So, I’m pretty proud to just be a part of that and to be around these folks. PRESCOTT LIVING: What I’m hearing is it’s a team effort. But where have you, as Joe Howard, had real influence? That’s a tough one. JOE HOWARD: Hmm…that is a tough one. I’ll talk about my leadership style. You know, as a wrestling coach, as a teacher, as a principal, now as a superintendent, I’ve gone into situations and kind of taken a look at where we are and where we should go, and you do that by listening to people and building that team and listening to what their concerns are. I’ve just learned from the people around me. We figured this out together, but you know, you start believing in yourself and you start talking about what you want it to look like and you create that expectation and then it turns and that vision is fulfilled, because I be-

PRE S COT T LI V ING

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The LIVING Interview (continued) lieve it. And then, pretty soon, you believe it. We believe it together. We say it to the kids; we say it to the parents; we say it to the teachers and all over the community, and then it becomes real. So that’s one way to describe my leadership style, I’d say. PRESCOTT LIVING: Is there ever a day off? JOE HOWARD: [Chuckles] Yeah, sure. I mean you have to. Now this last vacation that I just took, for some reason, I didn’t shake work very well. But, we love the outdoors, so we like to sail. Somebody gave us a sailboat, and we turned it into something that we could take to the Sea of Cortez and Lake Pleasant – that kind of thing. We also like to ride mountain bikes and hike. We do backpack trips and things like that. That sort of refuels me when we get out there, and what I found is I can gain perspective by getting away from my daily life and immersing myself in something completely different, like climbing a crazy hard mountain with a backpack on and, you know, getting poured on rain and [chuckles] sleeping in a puddle. But, yes, people call me day and night, and I encourage that. You know, or people say, “Oh I don’t want to bother you on your cellphone,” and I go, “No, here, this is my cell phone number. If you need something, call me. That’s my job.” It’s the city that never sleeps. Prescott High School is almost open 24/7, but we also want to be a center of the community. We encourage our folks and we encourage our principals to open up to the public and, you know, if we’re not doing something in Ruth Street Theatre, well, let’s have the community doing something in the the-

2015 Grand Canyon Hike

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ater. We like our buildings to be full. PRESCOTT LIVING: You came here in 1996. How many schools were there, then? The schools have had a tough time. JOE HOWARD: So in ‘96, we had six elementary, two middle schools and a high school. We then had 750 staff members. Now we have around 500. PRESCOTT LIVING: What is your current school enrollment? JOE HOWARD: Um, we’re just below 4,000, around 3,890. PRESCOTT LIVING: Is enrollment increasing? JOE HOWARD: We had a good bump last year in enrollment, and this year we have leveled out. PRESCOTT LIVING: How many employees do you currently have? How many faculty members? How many professional staff and maintenance/custodial? JOE HOWARD: We have fewer than 500, so almost around 250 teachers and around 250 classified staff, I’ll call it. We have contracted out for food service, and just last year, we started contracting out with custodial. We heard from the community, “Why don’t you do more of this?” And so we looked into it, and to get it where it made sense. PRESCOTT LIVING: Joe, my experience is most people do not understand school budgeting. Explain school budgeting, so that people will understand the divisions. JOE HOWARD: Yeah, and I’ll go pretty elementary with it, because otherwise it gets complex really fast. I would break it into three categories. We have hundreds of different accounts. We have to code them a certain way based on law, but we have a maintenance and operation account. That’s our biggest account, and that’s to pay our staff and cover daily operation. We cannot use a penny of that to fix buildings. Then, we have a capital account, which has been cut almost completely by the state. We only receive about 10 percent of that whole formula, but those capital dollars can be used on buildings and building repair, but cannot be used on staff. And, you know, 80 percent of our budget is staff, so that’s where the biggest struggle is. Then we have grants that come from all over, and we’re grateful for all those, but we also get lots of community grants – lots and lots! You’ll hear me say over and over, the support of our community is

what makes us or breaks us, and it’s making us, for sure. It’s part of the law that we also hire our own auditors to be the intermediary in that, and so it’s a very complex system, and the county is a part of it too, so all of our paychecks go through the county. But the budget process is very driven by law, and it changes every year after the Legislature. I’ve got a key financial officer in Brian Moore. He’s brand new, but we implemented something this year called proactive budgeting, and we just put a process in place where we focus on three areas, because we’ve learned that if you don’t keep the balance in these three areas, you’re in trouble. The first area to balance is staff and teacher salaries. In these times of teacher shortages, you need to be competitive with salaries. We have amazing teachers and staff, and we want to show our appreciation for them. I think our staff knows that we do everything that we can to pay them adequately on this tight budget. The other things to balance are class size, and that takes money. I mean you have to have the right ratio of teachers to kids. And then the third is programs. So, that’s our greatest strength. When you pool lots of people’s money together – and that’s our forefathers’ idea for public school – you can do lots and lots of things. You’ll see a piece of paper over there on the board, and there are probably 50 things on there. [Howard points to a bulletin board]. That’s for next year’s budget. I’ve had people come to me and say, “We have got to have these things,” and probably only three things on that list will make it. The most important thing that we can do for kids is put a great teacher in the classroom. PRESCOTT LIVING: And you lead me to that next question. How do you identify and retain teachers? JOE HOWARD: I’ll just get this out of the way – one has to be money. You cannot be at the bottom of the barrel on how much you pay. You’re just simply not going to be able to compete if you do that. So we’ve done a lot to change that. We have a supportive board. We put a new salary schedule together. We could not do this without the community of Prescott, who passed an override to give our teachers a 5.1 percent THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


HISTORY HIGHLIGHTS: EDUCATION IN PRESCOTT

raise two years ago. We gave them a 2 percent raise this year before the governor’s 1.06 percent raise because we said, “We don’t know if the state’s going to do anything; we have to do something.” Our teachers know. I think they saw us roll up our sleeves in that bond and override also. They know that administration and the school board and the community are doing everything that they can to support our staff. I think that’s huge in retaining teachers. Now, let’s put our money aside. I think we all know that you need to be happy going to work. You need to create an atmosphere and a culture where people know they’re making a difference for kids and they enjoy who they work for, know that their superiors, their principals and those folks care about them and care about their families. We’ve tried to create that culture. We realize that you’re a human being and you’ve got a beautiful family, and we want you to go take care of those needs, and we’ll support you in those needs, but then that we’ve got a lot of work to do. So we’ve implemented an anchor instructional model. It’s called, “classroom instruction that works,” and all of our teachers do it, and we train them and we’re constantly training with that. We have less of a recruiting/retaining program than FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

probably any other district I know right now in Arizona. PRESCOTT LIVING: OK, how is your district different from others in Arizona? What are you doing that’s different and successful? JOE HOWARD: Well, one, we live in Prescott. I believe we’ve got a community that really supports what we’re doing. And, we’re this beautiful small town, and I think that hits every aspect of Prescott. Certainly our district, that’s been here for 149 years, is definitely a reflection of the community and what’s great about the community. So, I mean, it starts with that. You’ve just got this quaint feeling about being in Prescott and being part of the school district. The culture that we’re trying to portray is our motto, “Every Child Every Day.” And so I think the most important thing that happened in Prescott Unified School District is that our teachers look at every child and realize that they’re different and they come to us with different needs and challenges, you know – wherever they’re at socioeconomically or wherever they come from. And that’s the beauty of public school. We’ve got lots of different beliefs and different types of people. PRESCOTT LIVING: Diversity? JOE HOWARD: The diversity makes it spe-

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• Education begins in Prescott in 1864 – the same year the town was formed. • The first recorded teaching was done by Catherine Lieb out of her home. • The first school was established in 1865 and was taught by Fannie Cave Stevens. The school was private and charged a fee, but no students were turned away. • Prescott Unified School District is the first School District established in the State of Arizona. • The first public school in Northern Arizona was a hand-hewn log building located on South Granite and Carleton streets. • It was built in 1864 and was in use until 1876. • A replica of the schoolhouse is located on the Sharlot Hall Museum grounds. • In 1876 after the fire that destroyed the first schoolhouse, a new larger school was built on the corner of Alarcon and East Gurley streets. • It was in operation until 1903 when Washington School was built. (Washington School will be the home of the district office later this year.) Source: “Education in Prescott” from Sharlot Hall Museum

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PRESCOTT ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT by John Heiney, Community Outreach Manager, City of Prescott

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he City of Prescott has added another tool to support its vibrant downtown. City Council recently unanimously approved the creation of an entertainment district in a defined area, about one-half square-mile centered by the downtown. The entertainment district designation will give the city more flexibility to approve entertainment-based businesses within the district, creating a more business-friendly environment, and encouraging new business concepts. Specifically, the new entertainment district will give the City of Prescott the flexibility to recommend approval of certain establishments – governed by Arizona liquor licensing laws – located within 300 feet of a church or school, on a case-by-case basis. The district (see map), is about one-half square-mile, and encompasses the downtown. The area is bounded roughly by Sonora Drive and Granite Creek to the north to Aubrey Street on the south, Sixth and Alarcon streets to the east , then Summit Avenue and McCormick Street to the west. State statute defines an entertainment district as, “a specific contiguous area that is designated an entertainment district by resolution adopted by the governing body of a city or town, that consists of no more than one square-mile, that is not less than oneeighth of a mile in width and that contains a significant number of entertainment, artistic and cultural venues, including music halls, concert facilities, theaters, ….. museums, studios, galleries, restaurants, bars and other related facilities.” Downtown Prescott features a wide variety of these types of venues, including the Whiskey Row, Elk’s Theatre, Sharlot Hall Museum, the Prescott Center for the Arts, and ’Tis Gallery by way of example.

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Kendall Jaspers, Director of the Prescott Downtown Partnership, said the entertainment district is well-placed. “I think it’s the right place to be — in the heart of Prescott near the iconic Courthouse Plaza, which is recognized across the country as being unique among American cities,” Jaspers said. “This aligns well with the council’s strategic goal to create an arts and entertainment district in the downtown,” said City Manager Michael Lamar. “The entertainment district designation can lead to enhanced marketing, master-planning initiatives and increased

opportunities to support the development of downtown Prescott as a destination for visitors and residents alike.” THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


City of Prescott PRELIMINARY DRAFT ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT City Of Prescott Downtown Entertainment District

5TH

Exhibit A

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VALLEJO

1ST

CAMPBELL

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Courthouse Plaza

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HILL

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FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

GRANITE

GRANITE

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E BR AU

SENATOR

TO TLE MIS

MARINA

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LEROUX

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100

200

300 Feet

8/8/17

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CITY

SPEAK

LOOK WHAT WE STARTED by Harry B. Oberg, Mayor of Prescott

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pon taking office in Nov. 2015, I wrote a State of the City article to inform our citizens of the pressing issues facing Prescott. Now, it’s time to provide an update. During my time as mayor, Prescott City Council and staff have made significant strides. Let me summarize:

Economic Development This is a sampling of some of the significant efforts we have started during the previous two years. During my tenure, I have striven to look at the “big picture” issues facing our citizens.

Early in my term we undertook a top-to-bottom review of our economic development team, and realized we needed a major change of focus. Since then, we’ve developed a plan to attract technology companies to Prescott to take advantage of the talent our graduates from Embry-Riddle University, Prescott College and Yavapai Community College offer. Two technology sectors in high demand are computer coding and cyber security operations. We have worked with education partners to add curriculum. A cyber security operations center will be established in association with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University before the close of 2017, pending funding. Implementation of a regional innovation center/business incubator is underway to draw a multitude of new businesses to Prescott. Early this fall, two business development conferences are scheduled in Prescott with over 150 technology company CEOs to familiarize them with our city and centers of learning.

Prescott Airport Commercial air service has been greatly improved with service to Los Angles and Denver. Two infrastructure improvements being evaluated are a new passenger terminal, and increasing the length and strength of the main runway. This will accommodate the new fleet of U.S. Forest Service planes used to support slurry missions to fight wildfires. As utilization of our airport services has improved, new businesses continue to locate in or near the airport industrial park.

Sober Living Homes

istered. This allows for better oversight to ensure the health, safety and welfare of clients in the homes and fosters improved relations between recovery homes and residential neighbors.

Public Safety Personnel Retirement System As mayor, I provided testimony before the state Legislature, which led to legislation to establish a new retirement system for the future. But it will not eliminate the growth of pension debt for the next 20-30 years. Faced with a growing $78.5M unfunded liability, Prescott residents understand this pension debt is unsustainable and a burden on the taxpayer. The City Council initiated a two-pronged approach to address this ever-growing debt: 1) pursuing further state legislative action, and 2) proposing a local sales tax increase. I’ve convened three mayors’ summit meetings to bring pressure on the state for permanent reform. I sent a letter to the governor with the signatures of 18 other Arizona mayors requesting his assistance. In addition, a PSPRS ad hoc committee has been formed at the legislature to propose permanent reforms.

Improving City Services Efficiency measures implemented in city departments since the beginning of my term of office resulted in personnel reductions, which now save the city $575,000 annually. We continue to evaluate all city departments for service and efficiency improvements, and we have implemented citywide customer service training for all employees. This is a sampling of some of the significant efforts we have started during the previous two years. During my tenure, I have striven to look at the “big picture” issues facing our citizens. I am pleased with the progress we have made during my term in office. Along with my fellow citizens, I look forward to the future and the continued advancement of these initiatives in Prescott.

Substantial improvement has been made in reducing the number of residential recovery homes. Approximately two years ago, there were over 170 listed with the City of Prescott. With the Council’s establishment of an ordinance to raise the standard of care in recovery homes, only 42 homes are currently reg-

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THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION •• FALL 2017


BUILDING A BALANCED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN by Charlie Tardibuono , Business and Technology Developer and Jim Robb, Economic Development Technology Consultant, City of Prescott Economic Development

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arefully planning for economic growth can yield much needed revenue while protecting our identity and our future. Soon, a specific approach to bolstering the economy in the greater Prescott area (GPA) will be proposed to key civic leaders. This plan, “The GPA Economic Development Plan for Technology,” revolves around building a technology center where advanced software products – based on research and development of local colleges and universities – will be established. Small startup companies will take residence in the center and build companion products, establishing a hub of technical development and creating high-end jobs for area citizens. In short, a sector of the area’s economy will be established based on expanding the current technology industry. This business model, while sound in business reasoning and economic principles, is borne out of a need to create jobs in this sector of the economy, but also out of a love of the greater Prescott area. Balanced economic growth can be achieved in the area and is driven by a serious commitment to area residents. Growth does not mean the demise of the charm of the greater Prescott area communities. Instead, it means that carefully planned growth will preserve and enhance the amazing qualities that draw so many to the area. Growth – tempered by a desire to see healthy progress – is at the heart of the “GPA Economic Development Plan for Technology.”

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Six primary factors frame the approach of the plan: 1. Build upon GPA city planning strategies, resources and city strengths Among the greatest assets in developing the economic plan for technology was the information written into the various city plans. The strategic goals and identification of resources (including limitations of resources) was carefully considered in the writing of the technology development plan. 2. Optimize development from within the GPA While the GPA city plans propose strategy for drawing businesses to the area, the “GPA Economic Development Plan for Technology” departs from this approach. It is believed that a better, quicker method of stirring economic growth begins with assets found locally. One such set of assets is local colleges and universities – human resources as well as intellectual property. As the plan matures, local suppliers and businesses will be identified to contribute optimally to the implementation of the plan. 3. Retain local youth as lifelong contributors to the GPA heritage and economy It has become clear that area residents are aging and young people are leaving, for the most part. Regardless of the reasons for this exodus, a goal of the technology development plan is to keep local students in the area by

Dr. Ayers Chancellor, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University with Jim Robb, Economic Development Technology Consultant, City of Prescott Economic Development

aiding them in their career planning. From high school to college and then into the tech industry, this human resource is a powerful asset that will contribute to healthy economic growth. 4. Preserve our culture and heritage While the scope of the technology development plan does not specifically deal with the cultural arts nor the direct preservation of the heritage of our communities, the plan in no way will impinge on the character of what makes the area what it is. Instead, developing youth to join the local economy will bring with it not only increased revenue, but these contributing residents will have a deep appreciation of the history and qualities of the area. 5. Feed the local economy Implementation of the technology industry from many existing companies or those that are spawned by the industry will have the benefit of opti-

mizing the revenue generated by locally based businesses. 6. It’s about the residents In the end, the foundation framed within the “GPA Economic Development Plan for Technology” is designed to benefit all residents in the local communities. From the youth preparing to enter the workforce, to those currently in the workforce, to retirees – all will benefit from the positive impact of this plan. These six points set the foundation for the proposed solution of the “GPA Economic Development Plan for Technology.” To see a successful implementation of an economic plan and to realize the optimal results, a broad spectrum of factors must be considered. To be clear, the strategies and the business planning to establish a more balanced economy is extremely important. However, defining the plan based on a love for the legacy and residents of the greater Prescott area is crucial. THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


THE PRESCOTT PIONEER PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LL EY • CHINO VA LL EY • DE W EY-H UM BOLDT

CONTINUED…

Primary elections results: Both propositions win handily; run-off election needed for Mayor, City Council

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oth propositions on the primary ballot of Aug. 29 passed handily. However, no candidates for city offices won outright, which necessitates a run-off election on Tuesday, Nov. 7. The first proposition, 442, had voters approving an extension of the Home Rule option by a substantial margin — 10,289 yes votes, or 66.27 percent; to 5,238 no votes, or 33.73 percent. That approval extended for four years the right of the City of Prescott to control its own budget rather than have it established by the state. The second proposition, one which attracted the most attention, was Prop 443. It gives the City of Prescott authority to raise the municipal sales tax by 0.75 percent (three-fourths of a cent) for up to 10 years in order to pay down the current unfunded Public Safety Personnel Retirement System (PSPRS) liability, estimated currently to be about $78 million. Voters approved Prop 443 by a vote of 8,719 yes votes, or 53.67 percent; to 7,528 no votes, or 48.33 percent. Prescott native Ken Bennett, who served in the 1980s on the Prescott City Council and later as mayor, and then was elected to four two-year terms as an Arizona State Senator, and later, elected as Secretary of State in 2010, commented after the election about the passing of Prop 443, “The citizens of Prescott made a wise decision.

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

They prevented what could have become a monumental debt from becoming even bigger. The majority exercised wise judgment.”

No candidates won outright Because no candidate, either for mayor or for city council, received 50 percent plus one vote of the ballots cast, the Nov. 7 general election will have Greg

Mengarelli opposing Jean Wilcox for mayor. Mengarelli received 6,628 votes (41.79 percent), while Wilcox garnered 4,695 votes (29.60 percent). A third candidate, Mary Beth Hrin, was eliminated, for she had only 4,503 votes (28.39 percent). All six city council candidates whose names were on the primary ballot will run against each other again. They are (with the votes they received in the primary election in parenthe-

ses) Steve Blair ( 6,622), Connie Cantelme (5,677), Phil Goode (6,984), Gregory Lazzell (5,200) Alexa Scholl (6,869) and Joe Viccica (5,352). Of those six council candidates, only the three who obtain the most votes will be elected in November. Unofficial elections results as of Aug. 29 showed that 16,432 ballots were cast of the potential 29,156 registered voters eligible to vote in the city election. PRE S COT T LI V ING

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LEADERSHIP EVERY DAY

PHOTO BY MICHAEL WILSON

by Sheri Heiney, President & CEO, Prescott Chamber of Commerce The seeds of greatness exist in any of us who strive to lead, even in the most modest undertakings.

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Y

our growth as a leader starts right now, wherever you are at this very moment. You don’t have to be president of a billion-dollar company to be a leader. You can begin with your present relationships – your family and friends, your community associations, your school or your place of work. Developing your leadership skills can prepare you for larger challenges in the future. For most of us, leadership is a dayto-day matter of how we strive to do our best, as well as how we get others to do their very best. Leadership involves our responsibilities at work, in the community, at church or in our families. Great leaders are often all around us. Very often, it is people closest to us who are doing great deeds with little means. The seeds of greatness exist in any of us who strive to lead, even in the most modest undertakings.

It’s quite possible that, until now, you haven’t really considered yourself a leader of any kind. Whether or not that’s so, you may be surprised to learn just how many ways you are a leader, especially to those closest to you. You could be a leader to a group, or maybe only to one or two people. It could be in your work, in a special interest you have or perhaps the quality of a relationship you have with someone, such as your children or loved ones. There are people around you looking up to you, believing in you as a role model and as a leader. At this very moment, you have the power to help shape the lives of others, especially if you choose to lead by example. Never forget this: At least once every day, try to ask yourself whether your life is setting a good example for others to follow. This is part of the contribution you

can make to change the lives of others for the better. The ability we have to make our world better starts with how we live our life and the example we set for others. Think about how your vision of the future may be pointing the way for others. Think about people for whom you might be a role model and in what ways you are setting examples for them. To expand your abilities as a leader, become the kind of person others want to follow. Finally, remember that leaders prepare others to assume their roles; they want their vision to be sustained. For more information about the Prescott Chamber of Commerce, please visit prescott.org or call us at 928-445-2000 or 1-800-266-7534, or stop by the Visitor Information Center located at 117 W. Goodwin St., Prescott, AZ 86303.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


PRESCOTT HERITAGE TRAIL & HISTORY HUNT by John Heiney, City of Prescott

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f you’re ready to learn about the rich history of Prescott, search for hidden clues and soak in the beauty of Arizona’s 1864 territorial capital, then the Heritage Trail & History Hunt is for you! Launching in the fall of 2017, the City of Prescott in partnership with the Prescott Chamber of Commerce, have teamed up to bring locals and visitors an exciting new way to explore Prescott. By stopping in at the Official Visitor Center downtown, pick up the maps and begin the journey. This self-guided experience takes explorers through a real-life

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

historical walking tour of downtown Prescott, linking up with the expansive hiking and trail system through the city. Kids will be able to hunt for treasures through the History Hunt with over 15 small icons to be discovered around Courthouse Plaza. With map in hand from the Official Visitor Center, they can follow the clues, find the treasure and return the completed map for a one-of-a kind button and be entered to win a $500 scholarship to use for future educational expenses. The City of Prescott and the Chamber of Commerce expect

residents and visitors to unearth their favorite gems and begin exploring new locations, find exciting new trails and discover treasures just waiting to be found.

The Prescott Heritage Trail & History Hunt will be launched in the fall of 2017. Stay tuned for information and visit trailandhunt. com for more details.

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POISED FOR THE FUTURE by Harvey Skoog, Mayor, Prescott Valley

A Having a successful event center in the middle of our community is important. It brings positive economics and entertainment, and provides a large venue for local events.

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s Prescott Valley approaches its 40th anniversary since incorporation in 1978, the town is looking forward to some exciting developments. The town celebrated a huge achievement when the Prescott Valley Event Center was built and opened in 2006. Expectations were high and the economy was roaring. National artists and championship-caliber hockey brought throngs of visitors to the center in the first two years. However, when the recession hit and discretionary entertainment dollars became scarce, the center struggled to attract new artists and visitors. Now, that economic challenge has largely lifted, and the center is about to emerge from a reorganizational bankruptcy with a vastly improved operating position. Through all the struggles with this facility, the town worked hard with the new owner/ operator of the building to make sure its doors never closed. With the town taking ownership of the center, it will be stronger than ever. A new anchor tenant, the Northern Arizona Suns, recently signed a long-term lease to play in the building, and will bring thousands of fans to see NBA-level players. Having a successful event center in the middle of our community is important. It brings positive economics and entertainment, and provides a large venue for local events. Equally important, it is a jobbuilder and revenue generator for local restaurants, hotels and other shopping venues that people enjoy. The success of the event center has been enhanced by the hiring of Spectra, a management company operating more than 140 medium-sized centers

across the country. Prescott Valley is also making tremendous progress on rejuvenating our roads and streets. In the midst of a five-year “catch up” maintenance program, many streets have already been upgraded and work is underway on several others. One exciting project in progress is Sunset Lane in Prescott Valley. Plans call for widening this busy roadway, putting in turn lanes and adding pedestrian-friendly sidewalks. Already finalized is the long-awaited Glassford Hill/ Long Look intersection expansion and the Lake Valley Road widening adjacent to Liberty Traditional School. As growth continues, the town is planning ahead from a facility standpoint to keep up with that expansion. The Prescott Valley Police Department will be constructing a two-story, 11,000 square-foot addition to meet the needs of the community. Growth has also affected the local Yavapai College. Student enrollment is increasing rapidly in Prescott Valley. To accommodate the additional students, the college is adding a large, two-story facility that will include more classrooms, especially in allied health education, as health service needs continue to grow. Another benefit is that local youth will have Joint Technological Education District (JTED) courses on this campus. Thanks to the citizens of this great community, Prescott Valley is doing well. Our budget for the fiscal year is in good order with a strong reserve and decreased bond debt. We’re operating in the black. The community remains one of the safest in the state. With the ongoing support of our residents, we’ll continue to strive for excellence.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


CREATING CONNECTIONS

Events help guests connect, relax and indulge by Holli Maurer, Vice President of Operations/ General Manager, Residence Inn by Marriott

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t Residence Inn by Marriott, our brand is all about helping guests thrive on the road. We are mainly an extended stay hotel, and we target guests who are staying five nights or longer. It is extremely important that we make every guest have a unique experience in Prescott. And we accomplish this with many brand initiatives, including our Residence Inn Mix (formerly known as our evening social hour). We offer three main events: It’s On, Off the Grill and a night to Mix It Up. All three events have the same goal of providing an ideal setting for mingling with coworkers, guests and our Residence Inn team. The guests bring the

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

conversation, and we add some tasty food and beverage options to make their night perfect! Our It’s On event helps guests start the week off right. We have light snacks on a rotating menu, including a crudité island, a variety of chips and dips and always some sweet and salty options. Each night, we always offer bottled water, an Italian soda station and a variety of wines and premier beers. We want guests to get “fired up” on the Off the Grill night. Our team is outside each Tuesday night grilling and letting guests do the chilling – with plenty of cold beverages. We rotate our menu on this night, always offering a vegetarian option in addition to

grilled chicken breasts, hamburgers, hot dogs, or sausages. Wednesdays at the Residence Inn we Mix It Up. We have been fortunate enough to bring a taste of the local cuisine to the hotel by partnering with local caterer, Scott DeJoseph. A few times a month, DeJoseph brings food from his restaurant to our guests for a pop-in tasting. On alternating Wednesdays, we offer a sweet finale to the day with either a waffle sundae bar or a dessert bar offering. By delivering special events three nights a week, we simply offer interesting experiences that encourage guests to connect with each other, the local area and the hotel team.

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CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County connects donors and groups with local nonprofits

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elping other people improve the quality of their lives is a noble endeavor, but for Carol Chamberlain it’s an inspired mission—and her life’s work. As Regional Director for the Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County, Chamberlain manages the local affiliate office of the statewide Arizona Community Foundation. She matches groups and

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individuals who want to make a positive difference in their communities with local organizations that demonstrate compelling needs. Established in 1993 as the first and largest of six regional affiliates of the Arizona Community Foundation, ACF of Yavapai County reaches out to prospective donors in our community and provides them with a simple way to meet complex community needs.

“We believe strongly in sustainable solutions,” Chamberlain said. “Connecting the needs of a community to people who have a passion for giving is what we do best.” Offering administrative support to more than 100 charitable funds allows ACF of Yavapai County to achieve its mission to “lead, serve and collaborate to mobilize enduring philanthropy for a better Arizona.” The funds support multiple

programs focused on education, community improvement and development, health care, arts and culture, the environment and more. To honor individuals, groups and organizations that come together to fulfill community needs, the foundation also hosts an annual Joy of Giving Philanthropic Awards Luncheon. “Organizations choose to work w ith ACF of Yav apai THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


PHOTOS BY MARCHETTI PHOTOS

Economy • Local Business

Carol Chamberlain Regional Director, ACF of Yavapai County Donors can contribute in any amount to any of ACF of Yavapai County’s established funds, which support community grantmaking across a range of focus areas, such as the arts, education, scientific research or animal welfare. County because they have the pleasure of giving without worrying about all the administrative tasks,” Chamberlain explained. “Philanthropy is more fun for them that way.” With assistance from Lisa Sahady, ACF of Yavapai County’s Philanthropic Coordinator, Chamberlain encourages donors to raise the philanthropy bar. Donors can contribute in any amount to any of ACF of Yavapai County’s established funds, which support community grantmaking across a range of focus areas, such as the arts, education, scientific FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

research or animal welfare. “It takes only $25,000 to start your own fund with ACF of Yavapai County,” Chamberlain pointed out. “We make it easy for people to achieve their philanthropic goals, and we offer an endowment option to continue the gift past their lifetimes.” Donors can establish a donor-advised fund and remain involved in recommending grant recipients on an ongoing basis, a scholarship fund to help students pursuing higher education, or a specific field of interest fund to provide support to broad areas of personal interest. Since 1993, ACF of Yavapai Count y has awarded more than $13 million in competitive grants and scholarships countywide. For more information, contact Carol Chamberlain with the Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai Count y at CChamberlain@ azfoundation.org, call 928-5837816 or visit azfoundation.org/ Yavapai. PRE S COT T LI V ING

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JOY OF GIVING PHILANTHROPIC AWARDS

PHOTOS BY MARCHETTI PHOTOS

The Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County honors community members and local nonprofits by Carol M. Chamberlain, Regional Director, ACF of Yavapai County

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he Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County’s annual Joy of Giving Philanthropic Awards Luncheon celebrates the people and nonprofit organizations who work to make our community great. The 2017 Joy of Giving awards luncheon honored the contributions of late local philanthropist Bill Fain (1938-2016). Many say that 2017 Philanthropist of the Year honoree Bill Fain was the embodiment of Prescott Valley. Upon his generous donation of land, Prescott Valley built the Civic Center area, Bradshaw Mountain High School and the Yavapai Regional Medical Center East Campus. Fain’s generosity was not exclusive to Prescott Valley. The Prescott Airport is built on land he donated. His door was open to all, and he handled deals the “old fashioned” way, with a handshake.

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Fain has passed his philanthropic spirit to his children, ensuring that the Fain family will continue to be a part of this community for many years to come. These qualities and more led ACF of Yavapai County and its Board of Advisors to select Fain as the 2017 Philanthropist of the Year. The Kiwanis Club of Prescott was also recognized with the Community Leadership Award for its annual auctions that have provided more than $2 million in funding for community projects and college scholarships as well as its crowning jewel – Kayla’s Hands Playground, which was built in honor of Kayla Mueller whose life was cut short by ISIS. This year’s grant recipients were celebrated during the luncheon, and attendees participated in a group giving activity. Five nonprofit organizations shared stories about projects that serve our community’s

residents, and guests had the chance to turn their support into additional funding from ACF of Yavapai County. Our appreciation goes out to this year’s returning sponsors – APS and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona. Thank you to those who attended and supported the 2017 Joy of Giving. We hope it left you energized, inspired and full of affection for our home in Yavapai County.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


NEW “PRESCOTT CULTURE” EXHIBIT EXPLORES LOCAL PRE-HISTORY AT SHARLOT HALL MUSEUM by Fred Veil, Executive Director, Sharlot Hall Museum

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tep back in time to a period from 300 AD to 1300 AD here in the Central Highlands of Arizona to a way of life predating the Anglo-European influence on native cultures, and discover the “Prescott Culture.” From the Hohokam influence to the mystery of the Hilltop Sites and from a reproduction pithouse to the presentation of Coalescence of cultures, the new exhibit at Sharlot Hall Museum will surprise and amaze you. From the artifacts of an ancient culture to the elaborate and intricate exchange network of the varied peoples of ancient Arizona and from the influence of the Hohokam to the traditions of the “ancient ones” of the Yavapai,

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

this permanent addition to the museum will enthrall you with its presentation, interactive atmosphere and immersive technology. The four-phase exhibit draws you through the pottery and artifacts of the time and down into the ancient living structure (a representative pithouse) featuring the classic urn of the native culture. Along the way, interactive exhibit drawers showcase the luxuries and intricacies of desert life in the Central Highlands of the time. At the far end, share a beguiling moment with a native trader with baubles and handhewn regalia ready for barter. Enter into the nearby rotunda with its panoramic setting to discover the legend and lore of

the Hilltop Sites. Exhibit panels and a multimedia presentation try to shed light on the people who inhabited the area from 1100 to 1250 AD and suddenly disappeared. The scattered remnants of their existence are exemplified in the sites themselves — the stone walls and structural remains of forts, or defensive retreats... or houses for habitation...or labrythine lookouts...or observation posts. Only they know the purpose for these masonry marvels — walls of stone, hand set and laboriously placed along the many hilltops, buttes and ridges throughout the Central Highlands — only to be abandoned. Their

legacy remains the evidence and innate curiosity of these sites. A short video produced by the museum tries to explain their impact and the possible uses for these varied sites. The exhibit completes the PreHistory wing of the Lawler Exhibit Center at Sharlot Hall Museum, and the artifacts, pottery sherds and hand-made beads and utility tools are available for inspection with admission. Daily admission to the Museum is $9 for adults and free for museum members and youth 13 and under. The museum is located at 415 West Gurley Street, two blocks west of the downtown Courthouse Plaza.

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INDEPENDENT WORKERS IN PRESCOTT Are you ready for a ‘real’ coworking space? by Melanie Banayat, Founder, WingSpace Coworking homes or in cafés, and they are discovering the downsides of working in those environments. Common challenges include isolation, distraction, low productivity and overworking. Many desire to work in an environment better suited for their needs – one that fosters creativity and productivity among peers and Meeting Room

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potential mentors. The notion has been called “assisted serendipity,” and a coworking space accomplishes just that. Members can drop in to use a desk, as needed, or reserve one, as well as reserve team areas or conference rooms on an ongoing basis. Recognizing the growing need for a coworking space locally, entrepreneur Melanie Banayat is in the process of securing funding to open the first true coworking space, aptly dubbed WingSpace, to serve the greater Quad-Cities area. “The concept is about embracing the core values of the coworking industry – community, collaboration, openness, accessibility and sustainability,” said Banayat. “WingSpace will be developed for those who desire the benefits that come with working in a shared space among other like-minded people.” She added, “We want WingSpace to be user-friendly and welcomStorage ing to those who want to use the space, the shared amenities and Mop work in a collaborative Room environment.” Sign up to follow and support the WingSpace project at wingspace. Restroom biz.

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THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


ROTARY DELIVERS RESULTS Leading change in our community and world by A.J. Sheridan, President, Sunup Rotary Club

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nvolvement in Rotary means involvement with leadership in local, national and international community service. Paul P. Harris, a Chicago attorney, formed the first Rotary Club of Chicago in February 1905. It was one of the first service organizations aimed at creating opportunities for professionals with diverse backgrounds to exchange ideas and form lifelong friendships. Paul Harris noted, “Whatever Rotary means to us, to the world it will be known by the results it achieves.” Within 16 months, Rotary spread to six continents. Today, Rotary makes a difference all around the globe. We work together digitally and personally to solve some of our world’s most challenging problems. We have fought polio since 1979 and have

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

eradicated it from all but two countries. We develop wells in areas of Africa, where water is most needed, resulting in the development of healthier communities along with schools to help children advance. Locally, we provided funding to restore the Yarnell water system after the fire damage in 2013. As well, we conduct road cleanups, maintain the veterans’ memorial at the courthouse and carry out community service projects with groups such as Coalition for Compassion and Justice. The Sunup Rotary Club is one of five Rotary clubs representing this area. We consist of dedicated people who share a passion for community service, friendship and good times. We support programs that promote youth involvement, such as the Rotary International Youth Exchange, Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) weekend, high school Interact clubs, and college Rotaract clubs, college scholarships and much more. We work to develop leadership abilities and a broader perspective on the world and in the community among our area youth. Anyone interested in joining us to help make a difference in the world can visit our website at http://www. prescottsunuprotary.org/

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TEAMLOGIC IT

Serving even more businesses with technology consulting and IT support services by Rob Fallows

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n 2005, small-business owners either worked on their PCs, networks or servers themselves or signed up to expensive and restrictive contracts with computer-knowledgeable individuals who would come out every few months and blow dust out of machines. It was a very immature industry, and those computer service providers were generally so overloaded that they’d be impossible to reach or would often disappear. TeamLogic IT was formed by a savvy franchise-holding company as an opportunity to solve many of the gaps and challenges experienced by small-business owners and their staff. The company tested and adopted tools used by corporations to manage systems. They created a professional services infrastructure that included several customer information and experience tools. The many owners of the

franchised offices are very close and regularly work together to help solve problems nationwide. The company provides all of the benefits of a large organization, while retaining client intimacy, as each owner is there to provide direct and accountable support. The TeamLogic IT company culture is formed on the belief that happy clients and happy employees make happy shareholders. Rob Fallows, who was raised in Flagstaff, and Chris Cioffi, who grew up in Phoenix, left high-level American Express roles to purchase and independently operate their TeamLogicIT office at the very northern end of metro Phoenix. Over a 10year period, the business grew to 20 staff members who support over 130 small businesses and manage 3,000 computers in virtually every business sector. The world of technology support did not stop growing and chang-

ing. Technology is a constantly morphing environment. Even though PCs, networks and servers are still critical to small-business operations, many small-business owners are faced with difficult decisions about cloud computing, security, mobility (cellphones and tablets) and voice communications, let alone all of the regulations such as HIPAA, PCI and Sarbanes. It has become very difficult to be a small-business owner who is an expert at being a doctor, lawyer, financial professional, builder or any other profession and still be able to be informed and expert enough to assure the business technology needs are well-positioned. Chris, Rob and the staff at TeamLogic IT recognize that challenge, and work in partnership to help business owners find the advantages in the changes in technology and implement solutions in a safe and produc-

YOUR IT SPECIALIST

Rob Fallows

Chris Cioffi

PROACTIVE IT • PREVENTATIVE IT • RESPONSIVE IT

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tive manner. They are constantly growing staff and leader expertise through industry certifications and membership to independent testing companies, such as CompTIA, and by attending classes. Furthermore, they work closely and partner with many IT vendors to identify and turn product weakness into strengths. TeamLogic IT was running so well for Rob and Chris, and with clients already in the area, they decided it was time to invest in deepening support for the businesses and people in the greater communities of Central and Northern Arizona. They already had several clients in the Prescott and Flagstaff areas and recognized the need. The territories were purchased from the franchisor, offices were obtained and staff was hired. They are very excited to be of service and a part of the overall community’s well-being.

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TeamLogicIT of Prescott

115 E. Goodwin St., Suite B Prescott, AZ 86303 928-910-8900 RFallows@TeamLogicIT.com www.TeamLogicIT.com/PrescottAZ

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


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Business Spotlight

COSMETICS WITHOUT SYNTHETICS

Local entrepreneur and mom helps customers stay healthy and beautiful

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arj Melchiors, founder of Cosm e t i c s W it h o ut Synthetics, started her business 20 years ago out of a need to share chemical-free makeup and skincare products

with others. Suffering from allergies and chemical sensitivity since childhood, Melchiors had always sought out personal care and cosmetic products with minimal ingredients. After a 13year professional career as an

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interior designer, she started her natural cosmetics company as a mail-order business so she could stay home with her two young daughters. Melchiors heavily researched every product line she sold to make sure the ingredients were truly toxin-free. In the late 1990s, online shopping had not yet gained popularity, so she had to advertise in magazines. Two years later, she decided to build the website allnaturalcosmetics. com in order to reach more people. At that time, she was one of very few companies in the U.S. selling natural cosmetics online. The customer base continued to grow just as quickly as Melchiors’ daughters, and eventually she had to move the business out of her home and hire a staff. Due to many requests from customers wanting even fewer ingredients in their makeup than what was in the brands she carried, Melchiors developed the award-winning Earth’s Beauty® line of loose powdered arrowroot makeup. This led to the development of additional inhouse brands. “We are proud of all of the compa n ies we repres ent,” Melchiors said. “From Arizona-based companies, such as DeVita and Organic Excellence, to Rocky Mountain’s Wild Sage and Malaysia’s Paul Penders, to name a few.”

Today, the website shows over 400 products, of which most can be purchased as a sample size first. Because natural cosmetics grew to be so in-demand among customers, Melchiors opened her first retail store in Prescott Valley, several years ago, along with spa services at the location. The most popular items sold at the boutique include lipstick, moisturizers and a new fast-selling product, which is a water spray that hydrates and heals the skin. The boutique also highlights gift items that are made by local artists. Due to the longevity of Melchiors’ presence in the natural cosmetics world, she is often asked to give presentations to small groups. She will be traveling to the East Coast later this year to display her products at a medical symposium addressing the topic of cancer. With so much time and experience behind her, Melchiors’ vision has not changed. She is determined to educate the public about the dangers of putting chemicals onto one’s skin, and committed to providing her customers with the best cosmetics without synthetics. All Natural Cosmetics Boutique & Spa is located at 8504 E. State Route 69 in Prescott Valley. Phone is 928772-0119.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


HASSAYAMPA INN Supporting local ranchers through new culinary offering by Penny Allphin, CHME, VP Sales & Marketing

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he historic Hassayampa Inn, located in beautiful downtown Prescott, Arizona, will celebrate its 90th year in business in November, and is proud to announce the implementation of our “support local” purchasing initiative. As of Aug. 10, the Peacock Dining Room, a staple dining establishment of the Prescott downtown historic district, has transitioned to serving Arizona-raised “Five-Star Beef.” These steaks are known throughout top culinary establishments for high quality that promises to deliver exquisite marbling, superb tenderness and genuine mouthwatering flavor that are cut from grass-fed open-range cattle finished in Arizona. “With continued attention to raising the

level of products and service at the historic Hassayampa Inn, we are excited to transition to local “Five-Star Beef” that is processed here in Arizona. This will not only support local businesses and ranchers first, but continue to help reduce our carbon footprint, staying true to our core values at the Aris Companies of being environmentally friendly,” said Aris Hospitality Management’s President and CEO Michael Kouvelas. The Peacock Dining Room, located in the historic Hassayampa Inn, underwent a com-

plete renovation in February 2014, creating a modern and chic art deco ambience of yesteryear that complements the building’s timeless charm. Executive Chef Jason Perkins implemented an exquisite menu, keeping the favorites of yesteryear and including today’s favorite tastes that all food enthusiasts can enjoy. While dining at the historic Peacock Dining Room, you will not only receive an exceptional dining experience, you will be supporting local communities throughout Arizona. Thank you and bon appétit!

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Special Section:

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hey come from many different backgrounds and industries, but the women featured in this year’s Women in Business section have one thing in common – they are all making a lasting impact on our community, our state and even our world. From growing the food we eat to growing our entire local economy, and from running their small mom and pop shops to running our cities and colleges, these women are shining examples of what leadership means. You probably already know many of their names, but we’re proud to show you even more about what makes them special!

UNLESS NOTED SEPARATELY, PHOTOGRAPHY FOR THE MAJORITY OF THE WOMEN IN BUSINESS HEAD SHOTS WAS PROVIDED BY CHRISTOPHER MARCHETII, MARCHETTIPHOTO.COM

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LEADING LADIES

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oday’s workforce looks nothing like the workforce of the past. Since WWII, women’s participation in the U.S. labor force has climbed from 32.7 percent to 56.8 percent in 2016. Women make up nearly half of today’s workforce – and in many industries ladies are leading the way! From human resource managers to education administrators and even speech pathologists and physical therapists, women are holding key roles in today’s business

world, and their work is making a lasting impact. In fact, women are 8 percent more likely to have earned a bachelor’s degree by age 29 than men, and in 40 percent of households with children under 18, mothers are the primary or sole earners. Couple that with the nearly 10 million businesses American women own and the $1.4 trillion in receipts these businesses account for, and that’s what we call bringing home the bacon!

Women in Management Occupations Human resources managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74% Social and community service managers . . . . . . . . . . . 71% Education administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65% Food service managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46% Marketing and sales managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45% Chief executives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27% Computer and information systems managers . . . . .26% Construction managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7%

Did you know? • There are 74.6 million women in the civilian labor force. • Almost 47 percent of U.S. workers are women. • More than 39 percent of women work in occupations where women make up at least three-quarters of the workforce. • Female veterans tend to continue their service in the labor force: About 3 out of 10 serve their country as government workers. • The proportion of women with college degrees in the labor force has almost quadrupled since 1970. More than 40 percent of women in the labor force had college degrees in 2016, compared with 11 percent in 1970. • The range of occupations women workers hold has also expanded, with women making notable gains in professional and managerial occupations. • In 2016, more than one in three lawyers was a woman compared to fewer than 1 in 10 in 1974. Still, despite these gains, women remain underrepresented in STEM occupations, and the number of women computer workers has actually decreased since 1990. Fortunately, our education, business and government sectors have been partnering throughout Arizona and the nation to bring STEM to girls and young women starting in elementary school – and the numbers have already begun to shift. Source: U.S. Department of Labor 2017

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Special Section: Women in Business

ELAINE EARLE Chief Financial Officer ROX Group Chief Executive Officer & Publisher ROX Media Group

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PHOTO BY JODI LYNN & CO.

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laine Earle is an accomplished professional with 20 years of experience working in public accounting, IT consulting, management, public relations and publishing on behalf of major corporations and also as a principal of her own enterprises. Earle graduated from the University of Arizona with a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting in 1997 and passed the Certified Public Accountant examination immediately thereafter. Starting her career at KPMG, a “Big 4” accounting firm, she served as an expat for three years in three foreign countries (England, Switzerland and Australia). Following Earle’s successful seven-year tenure at KPMG, where she reached senior management level, she left in 2003 at age 28 to become Controller of a publicly-held insurance carrier in California. There, she oversaw all Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) public and investor reporting for the firm, and managed a staff of about a dozen senior accountants. Earle also handled accounting and reporting for mergers & acquisitions, initial public offerings and successfully implemented a national Sarbanes-Oxley compliance program for the public companies that she worked for. Her 20 years’ work as a Certified Public Accountant prepared her for her current role as Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of ROX Group, a business group that she owns with her husband. It includes companies with operations in the real estate, insurance, travel and media industries. In addition, Earle currently serves as Chief Executive Offi-

cer (CEO) of ROX Media Group and Publisher of seventeen titles in four of its consumer publication lines, including lifestyle, real estate, shopper and visitor magazines as well as “sponsored” custom print publications. She also serves as Publisher of several destination marketing titles, including official visitor guides, tourism maps and other custom tourism/visitor media products. In the Prescott area, Earle publishes four magazine titles including TravelHost Arizona, Prescott LIVING Magazine, Quad-City Smart Shopper and the Visitors Guide Greater Prescott Area for the City of Prescott. The hallmark of her success

in publishing has been to bring a “one firm” solution to clients through developing a highly-skilled, diverse and dynamic team to achieve her clients’ established objectives. Earle has created and executed custom action plans for clients, including text, mobile, digital and social media marketing and printed publications, including leading advertising sales and distribution. In fact, one of Earle’s recent shop local projects for a major suburb of Phoenix won an economic development award. Personally, Earle has a passion for traveling, and has been to over 30 foreign countries with some exotic adventures,

including visits to several African countries, Indonesia, Japan and Eastern Russia. Many more travels are planned for the future, and now frequently include her 10-year-old twin sons, who recently accompanied her on a home/school exchange to Germany in fall 2017. Upcoming planned travels include a thirdtime trip to Africa to visit one of Earle’s best friends from her expat years, Croatia and hopefully Southeast Asia. Earle and her husband, Rock, are deeply committed to their family, and enjoy spending quality downtime together in addition to their dedication to operating and growing their various companies.

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

BEA LUECK

KATIE MAYER

General Manager & Managing Editor, ROX Media Group

Editor & Project Manager ROX Media Group

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ea Lueck has been the general manager and managing editor of ROX Media Group since its founding. Her team and her clients like to call her “the chief doer of stuff,” and it’s easy to see why. From before a project even starts, Lueck works with clients to ensure their visions are brought to life. In publications, she guides the process from concept to print to distribution and beyond. Lueck has over 22 years of experience in multiple advertising media, including print, direct mail, television and web. She was partner and general manager of KCAB, a low-power TV station that operated for 11 years in the greater

I Casa Grande market. Lueck has been married to her husband, Rick, for over 34 years, and they have two grown children and five grandchildren and another on the way. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family and renovating her home – an endeavor she will never finish because there is always another exciting project! She is a lifelong advocate for animals and currently has four rescued dogs and three birds, including a pet starling named Dickens.

f a project involves communication – written, verbal, digital or client communication – chances are Katie Mayer is a part of it at ROX Media Group. As a graduate of the ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Mayer started her career as an award-winning beat reporter for the East Valley Tribune newspaper, then located in Mesa, Arizona. Next, she moved into public affairs/relations where she held numerous positions in the government, nonprofit and higher education sectors. Today, she oversees publishing projects and writes and edits copy for a variety of ROX Media Group publications. She has appeared

JULIE TURETZKY

SUSAN COHEN

Public Relations & Marketing Manager, ROX Media Group

Sr. Account Executive ROX Media Group

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ulie Turetzky is the public relations and marketing manager for ROX Media Group, where she works to promote and provide support to the company and its statewide publications including Prescott LIVING Magazine, Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine, TravelHost Arizona and area Visitor Guides. Turetzky is a marketing professional with 20 years of experience working in client and agency settings. She has created and managed marketing strategies — designed to meet client objectives and stay within an established budget — across many industries. She has experience in public relations,

FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

on local television shows many times and twice nationally, and is a regular guest lecturer to journalism students at ASU. She is married to fellow Sun Devil, Jared, and together they have one son and three rescued Chihuahuas. In her free time, she enjoys DIY home renovation projects, true crime shows, playing table tennis and reading as many magazines as she can get her hands on. She is a loyal supporter of various animal and child welfare groups.

S advertising, print collateral, outdoor, radio and television, as well as branding, packaging and tradeshows. Turetzky joined ROX Media Group after spending five years in the publishing industry as marketing manager with House Beautiful special interest publications, where she ensured advertiser programs were delivered as contracted. She is an excellent communicator and able to keep projects aligned with their predetermined strategy.

usan Cohen recently joined ROX Media Group and Coldwell Banker ROX Realty. Her background is in medical marketing and sales, and she brings over 30 years of experience. After moving to Prescott from Phoenix in 2006, Cohen worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce as the marketing and membership director, served on the board for the Prescott Jazz Summit, graduated from Prescott Area Leadership Best Class XXIV and owned and published a local magazine. Most recently, she was in new home sales, commuting to Wickenburg.

She is happy to be back in the Quad-City area full-time and representing Prescott LIVING Magazine, Quad-City Smart Shopper, TravelHost Arizona and the Visitor Guide – Greater Prescott Area. She enjoys hiking, the Prescott Bluegrass Festival and the Phippen Museum, and she is an active member of Rotary.

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Special Section: Women in Business

BARBARA CLARK STEVENSON Co-owner, American Financial Security, LLC and American Financial Investments, LLC

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verything Barbara is comes from her parents, her grandmas, her swim coach - all the talented people who took an interest in her and helped along the way, and Ross Perot. Srong Midwest values rooted in family, hard work, education and church as well as good public schools and years of both competitive swimming and golf taught Barbara Clark Stevenson that she needed to work for what she wanted – that effort does not guarantee results, and it’s results that count. Right out of college, with training in secondary education, performing arts, Renaissance Lit and Speech Pathology, she became a Realtor®, then a broker, and then co-authored the first accredited education for Realtors® in her state. At 25, she moved to Colorado, and was hired into a more than 14-year career with EDS of continuous learning. She worked hard from the “center of the values circle,” where results were measured and rewarded. Clark Stevenson also served in the commercial insurance industry (earning a Fellow of the Life Management Institute certification, or FLMI) and worked in worldwide manufacturing, where she was responsible for corporate communications for the General Motors account. Clark Stevenson is a graduate of MIT’s yearlong executive leadership program, The Leadership Lab. In 1994, she was wooed away by Oracle to help transform the company culture from sales-driven to one focused on service and relationships. By this time, she knew startups were where she excelled. On her first day, Clark Stevenson was asked to take a different, “temporary” assignment to lead the com-

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pany’s fledgling management consulting practice. Over the next three years, she worked in 13 different countries building small consulting hubs. Clark Stevenson retired from corporate life and constant travel in 1999 and took two years to step back, remodel her dream home, play competitive golf and build a circle of friends locally. She got the horses she always wanted and spent time with the aging dog – Sir Alex – whom she adored. Upon deciding that Prescott was where she wanted to be, she brought her horses to her little ranch, got a new puppy, Ranger, and remodeled again – out in this beautiful nature. She loved the quiet and found she truly needed it to recharge.

But, she also found she needed to get her brain working again. Clark Stevenson looked for a way to apply her knowledge, skills and experience at a more personal and individual level, so she returned to something she had done before for herself, and became certified to complete taxes, both personal and later corporate returns. Over the following 10 years, she built a loyal clientele within a local franchise of H & R Block. She was selected to represent franchise needs at the corporate executive level and served on their prestigious President’s Field Tax Advisory Council for several years. Today, Clark Stevenson is co-owner, with her husband, of two firms in Prescott specializing

in retirement planning, investments and strategic tax preparation. They published their book, Pillars of Retirement Income, host a weekly radio show, “Financially Tuned with Ron and Barbara,” now on KQNA, contribute a monthly educational article in the Quad City News and have hosted over 50 seminars to help educate people about different aspects of retirement, investments and tax impact. Clark Stevenson is proud of the dedicated and talented professionals on her team, and what they accomplish every day. “You see, at our companies we serve with our knowledge, skills, integrity and ethics,” she said. “At AFS it’s all about the relationship — and results.”

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Special Section: Women in Business

SHANTI RADE

FIONA REID Grower/Co-owner Painted Lady Vineyard

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Owner Whipstone Farms

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ade came into farming by chance through a high school internship. After traveling the country and working on several different farms, she moved to Prescott to pursue a degree in Agroecology from Prescott College. After graduating, she managed the Prescott Farmers Market where she met her farming partner and now husband Cory Rade. Together they own and operate a 20acre farm in Paulden, growing over 100 different varieties of vegetables and flowers without the use of chemicals. Rade manages many different facets of the farm from marketing and communications, to green-

house production and field operations, as well as helping to oversee the crew of farm workers. While she loves growing just about everything, her main passion is with flowers. The farm has expanded in recent years into selling wholesale to florists and wedding design using all farm grown flowers.

aised in Zambia, Reid made her way to Prescott 20 years ago and graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Prescott College in environmental studies. For 11 years she was the education director at the Highlands Center for Natural History, particularly loving the summer days spent with young kids outside in the forest. Since retiring from HCNH Reid has dedicated her days to nurturing an acre of wine

vines throughout the growing year, from pruning to harvest and beyond, and taking care of the several acres of ranch she shares with Jodi Padgett.

REPUBLICAN WOMEN OF PRESCOTT Celebrating 75 Years in Prescott The Largest Republican Women’s Club in the Nation!

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he Republican Women of Prescott (RWOP) is the largest Federated Women’s Club in the nation with over 700 members. We are excited to be celebrating our 75th anniversary in Prescott dating back to 1942! This year, President Linda Nichols, the Executive Committee and Board of Directors set goals to focus on our membership, recognize our many volunteers, and reach out to our community. Each month, we enjoy a luncheon along with an engaging guest speaker and highlight a local charity selected by our Caring for America Committee. Our May luncheon program honored law enforcement. RWOP honors our veterans in November with a full military program and donates to

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Honor Flight each year. RWOP has made these two events an annual tribute. Throughout the month, we offer an evening of networking, invite new members to coffee, and host a forum that allows local leaders to discuss important issues. Our largest event is our scholarship fundraiser for regional students. For the past three years we have held a featured speaker event that has included Dinesh D’Souza in 2015 and Judge Jeanine Pirro in 2016. This year, we hosted Lt. Col. Allen West. Each successful fundraising event has enabled us to offer our annual scholarship program. This year we gave $15,000 to ten deserving college-bound students in 2017! The RWOP Executive Committee consists of the president,

(L-R) Standing - Pat Lorenzen, Carie Hughes, Jan Smith; Seated - Darlene Packard, Linda Nichols, Sherrie Hanna; Inset- Nancy Barrett, Marla Bassler, Elsie Tyree

five vice presidents, the treasurer, secretary and a parliamentarian. Our board of directors consists of our past president, chaplain and historian, ten standing committee chairs, and seven special committee chairs. We have an online presence with our monthly newsletter as well as

on Facebook. If you are looking to join an active and engaging organization visit us at RWOP. info. We welcome new members, as it is our membership that makes RWOP great! S COT T LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • PRE PRESCOT LIVING

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Special Section: Women in Business

VALERIE STRINGER ANNE B. WENZEL Realtor, Realty One Group Mountain Desert

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ello Prescott! I love my hometown, and it really is my hometown! I have had the privilege of being a part of this community both personally and professionally. I was born and raised in Prescott and am a third generation Prescottonian! I have been a REALTOR for almost 20 years and enjoy being a part of this amazing town. My knowledge of the real estate market along with my familiarity of Prescott can serve you in all of your real estate needs. So, whether you are thinking of buying, selling or investing, let me assist you as the REALTOR for all the seasons of your life. Please contact me; I am here for you!

Certified Public Accountant Tiensvold Shaffer Wenzel CPAS PLLC

T 928-713-4800 Val@ValerieStringer.com

he Prescott community has an amazing abundance of talented volunteers, dedicated leaders and active citizens. Wenzel feels so fortunate to have the opportunity to live and work in this community. Born and raised in a small town in Northern Maine, Wenzel moved to San Diego where she managed the financial reporting and accounting function for a variety of companies. As a CPA for almost 20 years, she has partnered with her clients to assist them with their accounting and tax needs. Since moving to Prescott four years ago, Wenzel has served on several

nonprofit boards and been a member of several community and business groups. 141 S. McCormick Street Suite 104 Prescott, AZ 86303 928-445-5777 anne@tswcpas.com

ROXANE NIELSEN Co-owner Prescott Brewing Company

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oxane Nielsen is co-owner of Prescott Brewing Company with her husband, John. She and her husband moved to Prescott in 1993 and put all of their resources toward opening the “brewpub.” Nielsen has a business accounting background as well as a two-year degree in bilingual/bicultural studies. She then worked for Migrant Head Start in California as a family advocate for Hispanic farm workers. She was involved with business planning for Prescott Brewing Company and was instrumental in the development of their written business plan. Born in Long Beach, California, she attended a business college for two years, studying accounting and other business-related topics. Nielsen and her husband opened Prescott Brewing Company on March 15, 1994. She set up the books for the restaurant and did much of the office work. Before the doors opened, Nielsen spent about a year volunteering in the front office of the Prescott

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Chamber of Commerce – a great way to learn about a new community! As their opening of the restaurant neared, Nielsen had to give up her time at the chamber, but has remained active in the community. She sat on the board of directors at the chamber and subsequently on the board of trustees for the Sharlot Hall Museum. She helped found the Prescott Downtown Partnership and was recently invited to serve on the newly formed Prescott Tourism Advisory Committee. She has also served on the city’s general plan committee. Nielsen is involved in many facets of Prescott Brewing Company, which now has about 75 employees to run its operation downtown and its microbrewery production facility out near the airport. Nielsen and her husband opened the microbrewery production facility in 2011. Today, she is now willing and able to go in late and leave early!

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

JULIANA GOSWICK WENDY BRIDGES President & CEO, Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters

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oswick’s dedication to Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters (YBBBS) began simply: as a donor at the annual gala. Fast-forward nearly 10 years and she is now leading and living the YBBBS Mission as President & CEO, guiding efforts to support vulnerable children with professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better. In her leadership role, Goswick remains grateful for the opportunity to introduce innovative ways to connect the YBBBS Mission to our generous community. The new Women’s Initiative celebrates the power of women who unite to produce positive change in our community. Her five-year Family Match with Little Brother Bruce (that

Economic Development Coordinator, City of Prescott

A includes son Jake, an ERAU student, and daughter Julia, a student at Tri-City Prep) is a testament to her deep belief in the YBBBS Mission.

servant leadership philosophy combined with a strong desire to serve the community led Wendy Bridges to becoming an economic development practitioner for the City of Prescott. Bridges has a degree in management from Yavapai College, completed the economic development program at University of Arizona, earned her candidacy for CEcD, and is completing a degree in public management from Northern Arizona University. Professional roles include Arizona Association for Economic Development board of directors, Northern Arizona Council

of Governments Economic Development Council and a recent appointment to the Yavapai Workforce Development Board. Bridges lives in Prescott and enjoys hiking Prescott’s trails.

KIM VILLALPANDO Executive Director Phippen Museum

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illalpando is the executive director of the Phippen Museum, located in the majestic Granite Dells of historic Prescott, Arizona. Named after inspirational local artist, George Phippen, the museum opened its doors in 1984 and is dedicated to the presentation and preservation of the art, history and heritage of the American West. Villalpando started her career with the Phippen in 2003 as the museum’s bookkeeper. She was promoted to director in 2005 and continues to be enthusiastically dedicated to helping the public learn more about the incredible art of the American West and the unique ranching heritage and history of Arizona’s Central Highlands. Villalpando grew up north of Chicago in Lake Forest, Illinois and received a bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in 1982, majoring in lodging, restaurant and tourism administration. There, she met the love of her life, Tony Villalpando, her husband of 33 years. Together they have two adult

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children, Justin and Kristin. Villalpando loves Prescott for the beautiful climate and the quality of life. She stays involved with the community as a member of the Prescott Corral of Westerners, the Prescott Tourism Advisory Board, all the local Chambers of Commerce, and has served twice as president of the Rotary Club of Prescott. When she’s not working, Villalpando loves to travel and considers herself quite the foodie. A favorite pursuit is finding and experiencing new dining venues, with a particular interest in those offering regional and cultural fares. Villalpando believes that the Phippen Museum plays a valuable role as a cultural leader in the community and encourages locals who have not visited to stop by and explore the awesome experiences it offers. She feels that the Phippen has a very bright future ahead, including plans for a stunning outdoor pavilion, expansion of its collection room, numerous landscaping improvements and a sculpture garden.

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Special Section: Women in Business

PARSHALLA WOOD Independent Financial Advisor, Wedbush Securities

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ood spent her childhood in Phoenix, but has called the Prescott area home for more than four decades. She earned her B.S. and M.S. degrees in business administration from the University of Phoenix. Her financial services career began 48 years ago in the bookkeeping department of Valley National Bank, where she was promoted to Assistant Branch Manager in 1991. Wood has worked at Banc One, Wells Fargo, and Calton & Associates, gaining experience in investment banking, annuities, and mutual funds. In 2003, Wood launched her own company, Granite Mountain Financial Services*, as an Independent Financial Services Advisor, and in 2011 began her affiliation with Wedbush Securities. Throughout her career, she has been dedicated to building a deep understanding of her clients’ needs and goals, and applying her industry expertise to help provide the best investment management and financial planning services possible. Wood advises clients on a wide range of investment products, including CDs, tax-free

municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mutual funds, stocks, and fixed and variable annuities, as well as life insurance and long-term insurance. Wood is also committed to supporting her community and local service organizations. She has actively participated on the Good Samaritan Society Board, and has held positions within: • Prescott Chamber of Commerce Government Affairs Committee • Advisory Board of Prescott College • Central Arizona Partnership • Sunup Rotary Club, 2008-2009 President • Big Brothers Big Sisters of America *Securities and advisory services offered through Wedbush Securities Inc. Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC. ABOUT WEDBUSH SECURITIES Since being found in 1955, Wedbush has been a leader in the financial industry providing clients with a wide range of services; including institutional sales, correspondent

clearing services, equity research, corporate and municipal finance, equity market making, fixed income trading, prime brokerage, and wealth management. Headquartered in Los Angeles, with nearly 100 registered offices, the firm focuses on dedicated service, client financial safety, continuity, and advanced technology. Wedbush Securities is the largest subsidiary of holding company WEDBUSH, Inc., which also includes affiliated firms.

ANGIE SUMNER Broker, President Sumner Commercial Real Estate

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hen I decided to change careers from a business owner in the reprographics field and as an architectural designer of 22 years, I wanted something that was going to challenge me. Imagining a new career in commercial real estate in 2008, at the bottom of the worst recession in U.S. history, sounded a little crazy, but I did it on purpose. I knew it would take time to learn a whole new set of skills. In 2016, I purchased the brokerage that I was working for and opened Sumner Commercial Real Estate, Inc. In just over a year, I have expanded to a second location, added two new brokers and implemented a new state-of-the-art property management software to better serve our property management clients. To continue the challenge, I am in the process of obtaining the highest level of designation for a commercial real estate broker and I am running for the newly created com-

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mercial director position at the Prescott Area Association of Realtors. I am the currently the vice president of the Prescott Area Commercial Group (PACG), and I am learning the importance of melding the local commercial and residential interests to best benefit our fast-growing community. I can say that the learning process of commercial real estate has been an enjoyable quest, but the most rewarding part of my job is assisting my clients in selling, buying or leasing their commercial property and helping them to achieve their business and financial dreams!

C O M M E R C I A L R E A L E S TAT E , I N C . sales

leasing

property management

8098 E. Valley Rd., Prescott Valley, AZ 928-775-4227

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

PEGGY BALLIE

SHARI GRAHAM

Co-owner PuroClean Disaster Response

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Owner, The Purple Cat Good Used Book Shop

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tick your nose in a good book at The Purple Cat. Shari Graham is a textbook “hoot.” Colorful and bursting with energy, Graham is the proprietor of The Purple Cat Good Used Book Shop. Assisting her on a book hunt, I called out titles from the next aisle. I was

answered by, “Got four of those already,” while she simultaneously passed out bookmarks and charmed strangers. When asked why she named it The Purple Cat, Graham said, “It just makes me happy.” Book lovers will be happy, too. Impeccably-organized and free of that musty book smell, The Purple Cat is sure to be “Your New Favorite Book Shop.” 3180 Willow Creek Rd., across from Jack in the Box. 928-776-0116 www.ThePurpleCatAZ.com

love my business because it allows me to help other women protect their most valuable physical possession – their home. When disasters like floods, mold or fire ravage a home or commercial building, we promptly and compassionately mitigate the damage and restore the structure. I know that my home is more than just a structure; it is where I grow and homeschool my children and where I make lasting memories. I share it and my business, PuroClean Disaster Response, with my Navy veteran husband, Doug. We are also sharing our vision with our children, who are starting to work the business, as well.

ROSA L. MORENO-HILBURN “A Home That Shows Well…Will Sell Well”

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ounder/Owner of Virgo Organize Interiors since 2006, Rosa L. Moreno-Hilburn, is a certified Interior Redesign Industry Specialist (IRIS) and professional businesswoman with a background in the medical field, starting as a medical and surgical assistant then moving into hospital administration, consulting to health-care professionals and working in credit and collections management. She has also worked in loan modifications as a case coordinator/negotiator in short sales foreclosure avoidance and has been a nature photographer, a former owner of a fine art gallery and a Spanish translator/interpreter for attorneys, insurance companies and physicians. Moreno-Hilburn now specializes in real estate staging and interior redesign as a home makeover specialist, providing services in art work and decorative accessories placement, color consultation, interior furnishings, shopping, move-ins, moveouts, working with seniors, holiday decorating, garage and patio makeovers, residential and commercial interiors and exteriors, as well as event planning and coordination.

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Moreno-Hilburn successfully completed the Professional Interior Arrangement Designer Training Program –The Art of Arrangement, I.R.I.S (Interior Redesign Industry Specialist) and graduated in July 2006. “I love improving the look of a home so that a prospective buyer says, ‘This is it!’” Moreno-Hilburn said. “I can do a home makeover in one day!” As an active member of the Prescott Chamber of Commerce, Moreno-Hilburn is an active participant in the community. She is available as a guest speaker for seminars or workshops for local groups. Moreno-Hilburn offers youth mentoring services for high school and college students. This is a free service she provides to the community to help youth with goal-setting, knowing how to dress properly, self-esteem improvement, resume-writing and interview skills. Moreno-Hilburn enjoys spending time with friends and family, including grandchildren Houdini and Oshi, who live in San Diego, and she also enjoys golfing, traveling, writing, biking, photography, wine and dine, cooking,

music, dancing, singing and sewing. And, she will always welcome a good joke! Moreno-Hilburn lives in Stone Ridge in Prescott Valley with husband Leland Moreno-Hilburn who is a Realtor with FireSky Real Estate. Prescott Valley, AZ (Stone Ridge) Office 928-460-5809 or Mobile (520)-576-8007 - Hablo Espaňol www.virgoorganizeinteriors.com Rosa@virgoorganizeinteriors.com S COT T LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • PRE PRESCOT LIVING

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Special Section: Women in Business

MEANING MATTERS MOST IN OUR WORK by Billie Orr, EdD, Prescott City Councilwoman

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ecently I attended the Global Leadership Summit, and one theme that resonated with me was finding meaning in our work. Presenter Laszlo Bock, formerly of Google, suggested, “Figure out why you are doing what you are doing, and write it down. It’s like a booster shot at work!” Meaning matters most in our work, and it is up to leaders to help their teams discover meaning in what they do every day. One of the greatest joys I experienced in my various careers was leading teams focused on serving others who depended on our expertise, product or excellent service. Motivated by Bock’s presentation, I reflected retrospectively on “meaning” in my former and current work. As a teacher, I realize there was no greater meaning in my work than helping children learn to read and discover the joy of learning. As vice president at Continental Bank, my meaning was keeping our bank ranked highest

in customer service and growing in the Valley. As the principal of Kiva School in Scottsdale, my job was to create an environment where our team of teachers, staff and parents facilitated a safe, loving environment where all students were able to excel and reach their potential. Based on kindness, integrity, volunteerism and academics, Kiva became one of the most sought after schools in the Valley. Today I am blessed to be serving on the Prescott City Council, and honestly, I thank God that He has led me to this servant leadership. The work we do on council may seem thankless to some, but I find it rewarding and meaningful. Why do you do what you do? Write it down and share it with your team. Yes, meaning matters most in our work!

TRACEY HORN Founder & President , Helken & Horn Advertising Agency, Inc.

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orn launched Helken & Horn Advertising Agency, Inc. in Prescott, Arizona in 1995 with co-founder Robin Helken. In 1997, in an amicable parting, she retained the already successful agency’s name. Helken & Horn has created over 1,000 campaigns for local businesses. Horn grew up around the ad world in New York City where her father was in the business for more than 25 years. She graduated from the University of Arizona in 1994 with a degree in fine arts and media. She started as an intern and was later hired at C.J. Heileman & Associates of Tucson. Instead of returning to the “Big Apple”, she explored Arizona, falling in love with Prescott, where she worked for a small agency until opening Helken & Horn. She has gained invaluable experience as a client service director, in copywriting, graphic design, video scripting and film production. She is an expert in crafting sound advertising budgets, and determining highly effective media placement strategies.

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Accounts are serviced professionally and seamlessly. The agency handles all media contacts and negotiations, determining the most efficient use of advertising dollars. Horn coordinates a talented team of creative professionals in developing and executing smart campaigns that project her client’s desired image, thereby producing real results. Horn and her team free clients to do what they do best: Running their businesses. “I’m dedicated to helping Helken & Horn’s clients succeed in the most logical, cost-effective and creative manner possible,” says Horn. “It’s a win-win situation. Given the dynamic growth we’ve experienced over the past 22 years, we’ve proven our unique approach not only serves our clients — it’s also the key to our ongoing success.” Helken & Horn has won numerous awards including Telly Awards, Silver Microphones, Best Ad Agency in the Quad Cities three years in row, and Horn was awarded Volunteer of the Year by the Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County in 2015.

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

CINDY GRESSER

VICKIE JOHNSTON Co-creator Ultra Water Bar Health Store

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Executive Director The Smoki Museum

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indy Gresser is the executive director of The Smoki Museum, and has been since April 2009. She was introduced to the museum in 2002 by her husband, who among other things, told her she could “make a difference” at the museum. Those few words sparked her commitment to bringing the organization, with its rich history, into the present and the future. Gresser is proud to say that the museum now has indigenous people serving on its board of trustees and acting as advisers. They are also active members and volunteers at The Smoki Museum. Gresser is passionate about

the arts, and believes that arts can enrich every part of life and improve the lives of those less fortunate as well as those with unique abilities. She has worked with the Prescott Area Arts and Humanities Council for many years, and currently serves as the Art in Public Places Committee chair for the City of Prescott.

ickie Johnston is a researcher, educator, co-creator and inspiration for the UltraWater Bar Health Storetm, along with Jay Hare, CEO of AlkaVivatm, a Nevada-based company. Johnston has been on the forefront of “green living” since the beginning. She is opening the very first UltraWater Bar Health Storetm in the nation right here in Prescott Valley, Arizona, with additional locations coming soon. The company offers clean, chemical-free, toxin-free, healthy water and the ability to buy a system that literally lets you “Take back your tap.”tm. Stop by 8164 Hwy 69 Prescott Valley and sign up for a free class and free clean, healthy alkaline water.

MARGO CHRISTENSEN Vice President of Marketing & Public Relations Ponderosa Hotel Management Services, LLC

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hristensen is vice president of marketing for Ponderosa Hotel Management Services, LLC overseeing marketing, advertising, public relations, corporate sponsorships and social media. She began her career with PHMS in 1997 as director of sales in Flagstaff. Christensen became general manager of the Comfort Inn Flagstaff, then went on to become regional director of sales for the Flagstaff and Santa Fe properties. In 2001, she became vice president of marketing for all properties, which currently includes the Comfort Inn and Sleep Inn in Flagstaff and the Residence Inn, SpringHill Suites and Quality Inn in Prescott. Christiensen serves on the Executive Board of Directors for the Arizona Lodging and Tourism Association – the leading legislative advocate for the tourism and lodging industry in Arizona. She is an executive board member and 2018 chairman of the board for the Prescott Chamber of Com-

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merce and is one of the founding members of the City of Prescott Tourism Advisory Committee. Previous to her lodging career, she spent seven years working for America West Airlines, studied Hotel Restaurant Management at Northern Arizona University and received her Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing from the University of Phoenix. When not working, she enjoys traveling, hiking, canoeing and regularly practices hot yoga at a local studio. She enjoys tending to a large raised bed garden of herbs and vegetables, a small fruit tree orchard and has a passion for cooking, preserving and collecting cookbooks.

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Special Section: Women in Business

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE WOMEN IN BUSINESS LEADERSHIP EVENT

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ore than 40 women leaders in business, nonprofits, government and education gathered at the Jersey Lilly Saloon on the evening of Aug. 15 for a celebration of accomplishments, networking and fun. The event kicked off our special “Women in Business” section of this issue, while also bringing together some of our community’s most important leaders. Each woman received a professional head shot, refreshments and a glass sculpture in recognition of their contributions to our community.

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THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

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Special Section: Women in Business

DR. PENELOPE WILLS President, Yavapai College

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obody starts out saying, ‘I want to be a college president,’” Dr. Penelope Wills said with a chuckle. “I would worry about those people.” But in the seventh year of her presidency at Yavapai College, she wears the role quite well. Part academic, part administrator, part education advocate, she still enjoys meeting new students on campus and learning about their coursework and their plans. Wills says her achievements – in a field once hostile to women leaders – were never driven by ambition. “I was really driven by a desire to answer this question: How do I make this life better than I found it?” At first, she thought the answer was in the stars. “Originally, I wanted to be an astronaut,” she said. When her eyesight kept her earthbound, she turned her attention toward helping others. “My parents were poor – everybody was

poor – but my dad and mother always gave back,” Wills said. “You didn’t do it for recognition. You did it because you cared about people.” Back then, women had three career path choices: “become a nurse, a nun or a teacher,” Wills recalled. “I faint at the sight of blood, and I liked boys. So I went into elementary education.” In academia, she found her way to give back. “I love it,” she said. “You’re shaping lives. You challenge students and become partners in their learning.” She ascended through the ranks – vice president for Student Development at Georgia Highlands College, then president at Northeast Iowa Community College – by keeping an open mind, finding common ground and working together. “I’ve had women mentors and male mentors,” she said. “You can learn from everybody in your life. I still learn from students every day. You have to be assertive and you have to be strategic. But you also have to be

willing to work together.” Above all, she said, you need passion for your work. “We always have to remember who we are here for,” Wills said. “We are here for the students.”

DONNA WERKING Founder, Digital Marketing Strategist and Social Media Expert, Northern AZ Social

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erking has lived in Prescott, Arizona for more than 22 years. She has two children, ages 5 and 16, and has celebrated 18 successful years with her husband. She holds 13 years of advertising and digital marketing experience. “I have been fortunate to work with more than 100 businesses in the Prescott area, during my career,” Werking shared. “My advertising journey began as the Director of Corporate Sales for a professional hockey club in Prescott Valley, Arizona.” She managed more than 90 corporate accounts including Nackard-Pepsi, Canyon Distributing (Coors) and Toyota’s advertising firm, Saatchi & Saatchi. “I learned most about the advertising industry during my three years with The Club,” she said.

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She was contracted by a local Prescott advertising firm for five years before launching her company, Northern AZ Social, in 2015. She states, “I noticed the demand for digital marketing became prevalent in the Prescott area during my time at the agency.” She began her digital journey serving small businesses by providing unique, custom strategies including social media marketing, digital media buying, website design, email marketing, pay-per-click advertising and website marketing through Northern AZ Social. “What separates my company from other digital marketers is our attention to detail and

the custom digital programs we offer,” Werking notes. “We provide results and we are often able to decrease a client’s advertising budget. We also stay local to our region because we understand the pulse of our community.” She added, “Marketing in a small town is different than a big city.” She has donated charitable time to committees serving area nonprofits like the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Arizona, the Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County and the New Year’s Eve Boot Drop Event, of which she remains a committee member and co-founded in 2009.

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

ALEXES (LEXE) NIEKAMP

MARYANNE KELLY

Owner and Instructor Lessons by Lexe: Dance Studio

Owner I Organize 4 You, LLC

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lexes “Lexe” Niekamp, 21, is the owner and instructor at Lessons by Lexe: Dance Studio, located at Prescott Gateway Mall. The studio has been open for over a year, and offers all styles of dance to all ages. Niekamp also choreographs and produces local plays. She will graduate from NAU in December with a bachelor’s degree in human behavior. Niekamp is a positive role model for children and adults in the community, to which she places an emphasis on giving back. She also loves to act, so you may have seen her on the stage. “Wild and untamed by nature,” is a motto that she lives by.

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aryanne Kelly formally opened I Organize 4 You, LLC in 2013, although she has been an organizer her entire life. She and her three staff members offer a full range of services in addition to organizing, including downsizing, packing, unpacking, staging, estate sales and organizing maintenance. Not just limited to homes and businesses, Kelly also helps individuals to organize their thoughts, lives, plans and goals in her work as a life coach. She is an active volunteer in Prescott, a licensed counselor in other states and a member of the Granite Mountain Psychological Society. Her background

includes working as a hospice counselor and chaplain, conducting neuropsychological assessments and having a private practice for many years. Kelly’s passion and goal is to help others lead an uncluttered life, leading to a more peaceful and serene mind and environment. Learn more at IOrganize4You.com.

JODI GILRAY-SZOSTAK Doctor of Physical Therapy Jodi Gilray PT PLLC

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n high school, I wanted to be a physical therapist because I saw that they wore comfortable clothes to work. I didn’t know what that profession really did. Then, still in high school, my sister was diagnosed with leukemia. When she was hospitalized while undergoing a bone marrow transplant, she had physical therapy and talked about the fun she had. However, I still didn’t have a good understanding of what a physical therapist does. I went to the University of Arizona to get my Bachelor of Science degree in physiology, and found that I loved the human body and the intricate way it worked. I then attended Northern Arizona University, where I earned my clinical doctorate in physical therapy. I received experience in cardiovascular, neurological, orthopedic and pediatric physical therapy. I started my own business in 2013, and then took post-professional certification courses in developmental kinesiology and neurodevelopmental treatment

FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

so that I could effectively treat infants and children, from minor impairments to significant disabilities. In the middle of all that, I became widowed. Feeling defeated, I moved to Prescott with my young children in hopes of learning how to live my new life. It was then that I truly learned about my profession and what really mattered in life. Physical therapy in pediatrics is a profession where you get sweat on, cried on and drooled on. You spend your days crawling, lifting and bending over. You realize these kids have a life harder than they deserve, so you keep going – working on that first step. You give the gift of independence in exchange for a smile. I am now happily remarried and have my own family, but I treat my patients as if they were my own children. I have been changed for the better by this profession. And I get to do it all while wearing comfortable clothes.

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Special Section: Women in Business

MAGGIE GREENWOOD Executive Director Alta Vista Senior Living

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ith over 30 years of marketing, community relations and operations experience, Greenwood found her true passion working with the senior community when she opened Alta Vista Senior Living back in 2011. Greenwood, her husband Bob, and their now grown children, relocated to Prescott more than 16 years ago from Phoenix, and fell in love with all Prescott offers. Greenwood always tells people, “Prescott is a place where you can truly make a difference; you just have to jump in”. Since opening in July of 2011, Alta Vista Senior Living community has been awarded several community and business awards. The highest is the 2016 Best Retirement Community in Yavapai County, which is voted on by the business community, as well as the residents of Yavapai County. Using her public relations and community relations experience, Greenwood has

become a big part of Prescott, getting involved and making a difference in the community. She has served on more than seven community boards, including Salvation Army, Yavapai Silent Witness and City of Prescott Acker Trust. Greenwood was the recipient of the Arizona Governor’s Award for Community Service in 2007 for her work in Yavapai County. She also received the national ICSC marketing award for community programs in 2006. Greenwood and her husband have been married for over 32 years and raised their two children here in Prescott. They are now the very proud grandparents of a beautiful little girl, and are looking forward to many more grandbabies! Her passion, when not working with her residents, is spending time with rescue dogs. Currently, she and her husband have three dogs, and she is hoping to sneak a few more in when Bob is not looking!

The Women of Alta Vista

SHANNON VIALPANDO Director of Community Relations Alta Vista Senior Living

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hannon Vialpando joined the Alta Vista Senior Living family in March 2013 as director of community relations. She has over 20 years working in advertising and marketing, and seven years ago decided to find her real passion, with the experience she had. That passion was, and is, senior living! Working in the senior industry has allowed her to be a big part of the Prescott community! Vialpando sits on the board of directors for Prescott Meals on Wheels, does committee work for the American Diabetes Association, and makes herself available as a resource to the community wherever she can! Hosting events and giving back to those in need are at the top of her priority list! Through Vialpando’s work on these committees, several fundraisers have been developed and have become key signature events, such as the annual Meals on Wheels Queen of Hearts Tea. Held every

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March at Alta Vista Senior Living Community, the event sells out in a few days and raises over $5000 a year. Vialpando and Alta Vista Senior Living also support the American Diabetes Association. They participate with teams in the annual walk, provide the Alta Vista shuttle to make sure walkers get to the starting line on time, and have been the hosts of a volunteer dinner! For over 23 years, Vialpando has lived in Prescott where she raised her two daughters as a single mother, teaching them that integrity and work ethic go hand-in-hand. Her girls are her pride and joy! Adding to that, she is the proud grandmother of a beautiful young lady whom she loves dearly! Alta Vista Senior Living is different. It is a family of residents and staff, and is also family owned! Vialpando believes that her passion and career have crossed paths, and that Alta Vista is home! You don’t find that too often in life, but she has!

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

JODI PADGETT Senior Partner, Taylor & Padgett Wealth & Legacy Strategies

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odi has been in the wealth management business in Prescott for over three decades, and is senior partner of Taylor & Padgett Wealth & Legacy Strategies. She is a Certified Financial Planner (1988) and has her MS in financial planning (2006). Padgett often refers to herself as a “philanthropist in progress,” taking the firm’s motto — striving to partner with people who want to make wise decisions about money, and who endeavor to leave a legacy — to heart. Padgett believes that making real connections with her clients allows her to guide them toward maintaining and building their wealth and encouraging them to leave a legacy to their family and community. She, herself, is very involved with the local community. In 2010 she was awarded the Philanthropist Leadership Award of Yavapai County. She participates as an advisory board member of the Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County, has been on the investment committee of the Arizona Community Foundation for 13 years, is a

board member of the Highlands Center for Natural History, and a founding member of the Skull Valley Wine Growers Association. Padgett is also a breast cancer survivor and with her team, the Scooter Hooters, has participated in the 3-day, 60-mile walk for breast cancer for the last 10 years and plans to do so until a cure is found. She feels blessed to live in the small, peaceful rural community of Skull Valley, partnering with Fiona Reid, in the Painted Lady Vineyard, and is very happy to now have her son, Jake, as part of Taylor & Padgett. Her hobbies include work (she hasn’t figured out that work is not a hobby), the world of wine-grape growing, running, is a bookworm and member of a small book club.

KIM MCELROY Owner Broken Horn D Ranch

PrescottLivingMag.com Follow us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ PrescottLivingMagazine FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

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im McElroy is an entrepreneur cattle rancher who provides health-conscious locals with wholesome, delicious beef. McElroy believes in raising cattle naturally and humanely to create a high-value food product by blending progressive research with time-honored ranching traditions. She and husband Dave Pawel own and operate the Broken Horn D Ranch in Prescott. McElroy is a Beef Quality Assurance Certified Producer and a member of the Arizona Cattle Growers Association. Previously, she was an award-winning horse trainer and coach in a multitude of equestrian disciplines. McElroy

graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. degree in equestrian studies and biology from Lake Erie College in Ohio.

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Special Section: Women in Business

CAROL CHAMBERLAIN Regional Director, ACF of Yavapai County

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arol Chamberlain serves as regional director for the Arizona Community Foundation and oversees the ACF of Yavapai County. Chamberlain brings more than 25 years of experience in nonprofit management, having served as president and CEO of the Greater Southwest Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation. She was also a major gifts officer with the National Arthritis Foundation. She earned her undergraduate degree from Texas Woman’s University and holds a master’s degree in nursing from Rush University in Chicago. Chamberlain was an emergency room nurse and

LAURA SCRIVNER

KAREN FANN

General Manager Capital Canyon Club

Arizona State Senator, District 1 Arizona Senate

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aura Scrivner is the general manager of Capital Canyon Club and is an award-winning 20-year veteran with Troon Golf. She has extensive private club experience, and has managed upscale golf clubs across the U.S. from Colorado to Delaware. In Scrivner’s previous roles with Troon, she has managed daily fee, resort and high-end private clubs. Prior to Capital Canyon Club, she oversaw three golf clubs located in Delaware with a combined 81 holes of golf and more than 350 associates. Scrivner’s love for golf began at a young age, and so did her experience in the hospitality industry. Her first job in golf was working on a golf course maintenance crew during her college years in Durango, Colorado.

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later became a Family Nurse Practitioner during the early part of her career. She and her husband, Ken Mabarak, are developing Lakeview Plaza in north Prescott.

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This launched her development in the golf and resort industry and eventually landed her a position with the leading golf course management company in the world – Troon Golf. Scrivner and her husband Cline relocated to Prescott in early 2015 to take on the Capital Canyon Club project. “The opportunity to reopen a club and course that had been shut down for three years is an opportunity that not many in the industry every have a shot at, and I wasn’t going to pass that up,” Scrivner said. “I’ve opened new facilities, run established clubs and gone through several renovations, but never a revival.” Laura and Cline now call Prescott home and are enjoying being back out West.

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ann served three terms in the Arizona House of Representatives and is currently serving a freshman term in the Arizona Senate. During these past seven years, she has introduced and successfully passed over 75 bills, earning over 20 legislative awards. Committee assignments include: chairman, House Insurance; chairman, House Transportation; vice chair, Senate Finance; vice chair, Senate Transportation; and member of the Agriculture Water and Land Committee. Her previous political experience includes: vice mayor of Prescott City Council and three-term mayor of the Town of Chino Valley. Fann has been the owner and president of Arizona High-

way Safety Specialists, Inc. for 33 years, the largest guardrail company in Arizona, and is a local radio talk show host. Previously, she was the co-owner of Fann-M Ranch; worked at Braniff Airlines; and was a legal assistant in the Superior Court. Fann moved to Prescott at the age of 4. She and her husband Jim McKown live in Prescott. THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

TERRI ANTONE

VICKIE SHERIDAN

Owner Antone Optical

Custom Picture Framer & Owner The Framers Market & Gallery

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erri Antone is an Arizona Licensed dispensing optician and certified by the American Board of Opticianry, who grew up as a farm girl in south-central Minnesota. She moved to Arizona in the early 70s where she met her husband Randy, to whom she’s been married for 39 years. They have two grown children together, and are the proud grandparents to a rambunctious 1.5 year old! Antone Optical, opened in January 2005, is the culmination of a lifetime of optical experience and an outstanding business partnership with Dr. Renita Frost, optometrist. They share a philosophy of treating all their patients like members of the family!

ife is not about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.” I love this quote, because it reminds me of the power we all have over our own lives. When faced with the inevitable changes of life, I have chosen to embrace opportunities to adapt, grow and reinvent myself. That is how I became a custom picture framer and owner of The Framers Market & Gallery. Fresh out of college, I started teaching high school English. I lasted for five years before admitting this was not the life I wanted. I returned to school and eventually earned a Master of Fine Art in visual art. I learned the basics of picture framing out of the necessity of framing my own paintings

for exhibits. I am an education junkie. I love to take classes and workshops and constantly look for new ideas and techniques to improve my skills. I hope that thirst for knowledge never ends.

KRISTA CARMAN Partner, Carman Law Firm

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arman is a partner with the Carman Law Firm in downtown Prescott. She graduated from Northern Arizona University in 1998 with a B.S. in Elementary and Special Education. She taught special education and left the field to study law. She graduated from ASU with a J.D. in 2002 and was admitted to the Arizona State Bar in January 2003. Carman moved to Prescott in 2004. She has been practicing plaintiff’s civil litigation since 2003. A large portion of her practice is devoted to serious injury and wrongful death matters. She has successfully litigated civil rights violations resulting in a wrongful death as well. She is an executive board member of the Arizona Trial Lawyers Association and a member of the Northern Chapter of the Arizona Women Lawyers Association. She also participates in the State Bar Fee Arbitration Committee and is a former member of the Supreme Court Commission on Appellate Court Appointments and the Committee on

FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

Civil Justice Reform. Carman has been retained numerous times to represent victims of crime including the families of homicide victims, assault victims, dog attack victims and drive-by shootings. Carman and her husband and law partner, André, currently represent Prescott Unified School District for some of its legal needs, realizing her long-term goal of practicing school law. She is the President of the Prescott Unified School District Education Foundation, which feeds her passion for helping her community. She is also a board member of the Community Pregnancy Center in Prescott. Carman loves to sing on the worship team of her church and volunteers in the nursery. She was born in New Brunswick, Canada but was raised in Mesa, Arizona. She is married with four biological children and two foster children. She enjoys traveling with her family, being active outdoors and in the gym, playing games and reading.

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Special Section: Women in Business

• Grace Sparkes was born Jan. 21, 1893 in in Lead, South Dakota. She came with her family to Prescott in 1907. • Sparkes graduated from St. Joseph’s Academy in 1910 and later from Lamson Business College in Phoenix. • Sparkes served as secretary of the Prescott, (later renamed the Yavapai) Chamber of Commerce, from 1911 until 1945. • She helped organize and was secretary and arena director of Prescott Frontier Days for 30 years. She was known throughout the West as “the girl who bosses 200 bronco busters,” and she helped establish the “Prescott Rules” of rodeo, many of which are still used by professional rodeos today. • Sparkes is also credited with coining Prescott’s slogan, “Cowboy Capital of the World.” • Seeing the need for a first-class hotel downtown, she spearheaded funding and construction of the Hassayampa Hotel. It opened in November 1927, and is on the National Register of Historic Sites today. • In 1921, Sparkes helped organize the Smoki (pronounced “smoke-eye”) People of Prescott, which promoted Indian lore for over 70 years. She inducted President Coolidge an honorary member of the organization. • As chairwoman of the Yavapai Civil Works Administration in 1933-1934, Sparkes was instrumental in securing the New Deal funding necessary to construct many buildings and improvements that are still with us today. These include the Lindley Field and Park, Smoki Museum and no less than four road-bridges in Prescott. • She also secured approval for the establishment of the Veterans Hospital at old Fort Whipple and the restoration of the Old Governor’s Mansion in Prescott. • In 1935, Sparkes and Sharlot Hall, with Yavapai leaders Sam and Viola Jimulla,

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For more interesting stories, go to www.VisitWesternHeritageCenter.org

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHARLOT HALL MUSEUM

by Drew Desmond, writing for Prescott Western Heritage Foundation

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Prescott Wes t

SPECIAL WOMEN IN BUSINESS HISTORICAL FEATURE: A look back at the life and legacy of Grace Marion Sparkes, 1893-1963

eritage F nH ou r e

Grace with President Calvin Coolidge (left)

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secured 75 acres of land to create the Prescott Yavapai Indian Reservation. Sparkes also secured money for the Yavapai Indians to build their own houses on the new reservation. Sparkes also played a crucial role in preserving other historic sites in Arizona, including the Coronado National Memorial and the Tuzigoot Indian Ruins. She also campaigned successfully to add more land to the Montezuma Castle National Monument. Sparkes served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for the Arizona exhibit at the Chicago World’s Fair and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association. Sparkes spearheaded the effort to bring us Interstate 10 – a faster way to California and an economic boom for the state. Upon her retirement in 1945, she moved

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to Cochise County to oversee her own mining claims. She also enjoyed hiking, horseback riding and reading. The Old Armory building in Prescott is now named The Grace M. Sparkes Activity Center in her honor, and so is the bridge on Williamson Valley Road that crosses over Mint Wash. Sparkes passed away at age 70 on Oct. 22, 1963 and was buried in the family plot at Mountain View Cemetery in Prescott. Because of her effective interest in public welfare and her estimable personal qualities, she had an extensive number of acquaintances and was highly esteemed by all who knew her. She was inducted into the Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame in 1985.

Sources: Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame and Sharlot Hall Rose Garden Biography.

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business PAID POLITCAL ADVERTISEMENT

JANA BRIDGES

ALEXA SCHOLL 2017 Candidate, Prescott City Council

Window Coverings Expert Blind Brothers Arizona

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ana Bridges started in the window covering business in 1990 at her parents’ family business in California. In 1995, Arizona became home, and Bridges assisted in full design-work for a furniture company and design studio in Phoenix. She then expanded into her own design studio until she moved to Prescott in 2009. Here, she returned to doing window coverings and fabric designs. “I truly have a passion for window design,” Bridges said. “I enjoy helping people with that special added touch that makes their home uniquely theirs.” Bridges was recently hired with Blind Brothers Arizona in

Prescott as a design and sales consultant. The company will be opening a new showroom on 230 N. McCormick St. in late fall. Bridges will also help with custom drapes and bedding in an array of fabrics. Bridges can be reached at 928-776-1845 or by visiting blindbrothersaz.com.

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lexa Scholl is a Prescott native and 2017 candidate for Prescott City Council. Scholl graduated with distinction from Prescott High School in 2015, and she currently commutes to Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University, where she is a Tillman Scholar studying political science and Spanish.

After graduation, she plans to attend law school and raise a family in Prescott. She decided to run for council because of her love for Prescott, a desire to preserve the unique qualities of her hometown and to provide a fresh perspective to city council. Her website is www. alexaforprescott.com. Paid for by the Candidate

ELLEN CARPENTER Chief Operating Officer, Dorn Homes President, North Central Chapter of the Arizona Society of CPAs

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llen Carpenter is a notable presence in the homebuilding industry – not simply because she is a woman working in the upper echelons of leadership in an industry otherwise dominated by men, but also because of the path that brought her there. Carpenter joined Dorn Homes in 2004, after spending years as a CPA working closely with small builders, nonprofit organizations and religious entities. Had you asked her, at the time, she would not have imagined that she would eventually end up in this role leading a homebuilding company. Carpenter attributes her growth over the years, and – ultimately – her success, to two factors above all else: attitude and skill set. In a predominantly male industry like homebuilding, Carpenter has found that the single most important tool in earning the endorsement of her peers and other industry leaders is confidence. This means having confidence in the skills that she has spent years developing combined with projecting

FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

that confidence when working with others. This process starts from within. “Be confident in yourself so that you can project that confidence,” Carpenter said. By having confidence and an understanding of her skills, Carpenter found that she was able to identify company needs that aligned with her talents. This is uniquely valuable in a smaller organization, which demands flexibility of leadership while the organization is growing. While acknowledging that there are outside challenges for women, she argues that the only limit to success is the limit you place on yourself. When asked for advice for women in the workforce, Carpenter said, “Find your passion; develop your skills and then run with it.”

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Special Section: Women in Business

SHERI L. HEINEY, ASBC President & CEO, Prescott Chamber Of Commerce

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einey’s primary responsibilities include providing leadership, training, and action to help businesses prosper, increase employment opportunities, and encourage economic development and tourism for the benefit of the Prescott area. She has oversight of 800+ membership, and the official Visitor’s Information Center attracting over 30,000 visitors annually. Conducting over 30 events per year including the Courthouse Lighting Event, Annual Christmas Parade, host of Talk of the Town Radio Show on KQNA the 2nd & 4th Wednesday of the Month, and in September launching the Prescott Chamber Business Beat TV Show! Heiney is married to John Heiney, with four grown

SUSAN ROBERTS Jersey Lilly Saloon

R children, one grand daughter and a very spoiled Shih Tzu, Bella. John works for the City of Prescott as their community outreach manager. She attended Muskegon Business College & Davenport University and is an Accredited Small Business Consultant (ASBC). Heiney holds a real estate & insurance license and is a master gardener.

oberts worked in the IT Industry for 11 years before moving to Prescott, Arizona. She purchased a vacant building to start cottage rentals, now known as Apple Creek Cottages. Roberts built and grew this business for 13 years. While running Apple Creek Cottages, she became a REALTOR® working with investors. Roberts began investing in single family, multifamily and commercial properties while in the IT industry and enjoyed remodeling and renting out the properties once complete. With the success of Apple Creek Cottages and other investments, her son stepped in to take over Apple Creek Cottages. Roberts pur-

chased the Jersey Lilly Saloon and implemented several successful changes such as draft beer, utilizing storage room for clients, installing a POS system, and soon to come - heaters on the balcony. Included in the purchase was the penthouse apartment, now available as the Whiskey Row Penthouse vacation rental, which is popular with tourists booking it on Expedia’s 180 websites. She believes the reason for success is her enjoyment of people and love of seeing them happy.

SANDY MOSS Host and Producer AZTV7’s Sandy and Friends

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oss is the host and producer of AZTV7’s Sandy and Friends show that airs live weekdays at 9:30 a.m., and broadcasts statewide from Prescott, Arizona. She is also the movie reviewer and entertainment reporter for Arizona Hometown Radio Group in Prescott. Acting has long been an interest for Moss. She has had leading roles in such theatre productions as Ordinary People; Mousetrap, Sam’s Shepherd’s Fool for Love, Shadow Box, and others. In 2012, Moss authored a true adventure book, The Terrible Loyalty, a natural extension of her long-time newspaper journalist background. She is also a freelance writer. Her hobbies include gardening, house renovations and reading. Moss has a passion for animals, green initiatives and living with kindness and responsibility on our fragile planet.

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THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

BELLA VITA HEALTHCARE Kim Gould Doctrate of Nurse Practitioner & Stephanie Purinton Certified Nurse Midwife Helping women of all ages recognize their potential for good health

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ur providers are passionate about the health of you and your family. This passion, combined with the latest medical knowledge, allows us to provide the best care possible. We look forward to building a lifelong relationship with you and your family! Every family needs a home. Our primary care nurse practitioner and certified nurse midwife women’s health nurse practitioner strive to provide a medical home for our patients. As a certified nurse midwife, I offer gentle gynecological care for women of all ages. I specialize in women’s health and natural childbirth, but also support women in all of the pain relief options available to them, including epidurals. We offer in office 3D/4D ultrasound. I provide labor support and attend births at Verde Valley Medical Center. I give one-on-one specialized care in a safe and secure environment, where you are an active partner in your care. I strive to provide compassionate and comprehensive

care to all women! This is YOUR birth make it all YOU want it to be! Family health nurse practitioners (NPs) bring a comprehensive perspective to health care. They are prepared to provide a full range of health services across the lifespan. What sets NPs apart from other health care providers is their unique emphasis on the health and well-being of the whole person. NPs guide patients in making smarter health and lifestyle choices. My goal as an NP is to help women of all ages recognize their potential for good health. We look forward to serving you and becoming a part of your family.

JANE ANNE SHIMIZU Director of Marketing, Gunsite Academy, Inc.

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himizu joined the Gunsite staff as the Marketing Director in 1999. Her primary duties are advertising, social media relations, maintenance of the websites and Staff Photographer. She is active in the Prescott Chamber of Commerce and Prescott Sunup Rotary (Past President). She has been involved in the shooting sports and the firearms industry for over 20 years. Shimizu often carried a gun as a young mother living in an isolated Arizona forest near Flagstaff. However, her formal training began at Gunsite Academy where she took her 250 Pistol Course in 1995. Her future husband promised to take her to Hawaii if she took a class at Gunsite, and after her 250 class she was more interested in continuing her firearms education than sitting on a beach. Shimizu can operate almost all the small arms offered in Gunsite classes. She’s taken all levels of pistol classes as well as shotgun, general rifle and carbine. Jane Anne has

FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

also been a nationally ranked competitive shooter, involved in putting on local IDPA pistol matches and attending the national IDPA Championships. Stay tuned for “The Well-Armed Woman of Gunsite Chapter” coming October 14. Shimizu is a certified NRA Instructor and an early proponent of the growing movement among women who have armed themselves responsibly. A favorite aphorism is, “The modern lady arranges herself so that she is never surprised” These words define the ethic of the armed and prepared woman. Shimizu is the wife of local businessman Bob Shimizu, mother of two daughters and grandmother of four. She lives in Prescott, AZ and commutes daily to the Gunsite Campus. She can be reached at jashimizu@ gunsite.com.

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Special Section: Women in Business

VICTORIA “TORI” WARD

YVONNE NAPOLITANO

Travel Coordinator, ROX Travel

Executive Director, Adult Care Services

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ard has transformed her duel love of travel and storytelling into a career as both a travel writer and travel coordinator. Ward crafts travel for others, from packaged tours to customized, independent travel to all points on the globe, utilizing skills she developed working as a director both in the private and public sector. She graduated from Troy State University with a master’s degree in political science and, after navigating her way through public and private sector office politics, found a career that allows her to impact lives in a positive way. Asking questions, learning travelers’ priorities and exploring ways

Y to convert wishes into realities, she crafts travel “memories.” Ward is a travel coordinator for Rox Travel and a feature writer for both Prescott LIVING Magazine and the Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine. She is currently in the editing process for her second book, “Confessions of a Safari Addict.”

vonne Napolitano has worked for Adult Care Services, The Susan J. Rheem Adult Day Center and The Margaret T. Morris Assisted Living Center for people with Alzheimer’s disease and dementias since 1999. She became Executive Director in 2010. Napolitano has degrees in therapeutic recreation and health administration and a nonprofit management certificate. She is an Arizona licensed assisted-living manager, and nationally certified therapeutic recreation specialist. In addition to enjoying life in Prescott with her family and friends, Napolitano volunteers for the Alzheimer’s Associa-

tion, Arizona Assisted Living Federation of America, Days for Girls International and Sacred Heart Catholic Church.

THE WOMEN LEADERS OF PRESCOTT COLLEGE

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rescott College has been empowering future leaders to make a difference in local and global communities for over 50 years. Inspiring the next generation of leaders requires a great leadership team comprised of many individuals. At Prescott College, you’ll find that many of the institution’s faculty, staff, and administrators are women. Whether supporting students’ academic success inside and outside of the classroom, cultivating scholarship and research funds to support student and faculty learning, or developing strategic marketing and recruitment strategies to identify the next generation of students, there are many people helping to advance the Prescott College mission to “educate students of diverse ages and backgrounds to understand, thrive in, and enhance our world community and environment.” The mission of Prescott College attracts a talented leadership team from around the country who now call Prescott, Arizona home. Having just celebrated its 50th anniversary last year, Prescott College is poised for growth with a dedicated team

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of experienced leaders. The institution was recently recognized as a College of Distinction and as one of the 50 Most Innovative Small Colleges in the nation. Pictured here: (front row) Suzanne Morse, Director of the Library; Shayna Beasley, Director of Marketing; Mary Frances Causey, Associate Dean, Institutional Research and Compliance;

Dr. Stephanie Krusemark, Chief Enrollment Management and Marketing Officer (back row) Ashley Hust, Director for Advancement Communications and Major Gifts; Jerri Brown, Chief Student Success and Institutional Effectiveness Officer; Erin Lotz, Associate Dean of Instruction; Andrea Jaeckel, Chief Financial Officer; Kristine Preziosi, Associate Dean of Student Affairs.

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

LISA WATTERS -LAIN General Manager and Owner Watters Garden Center

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s a local girl, Lisa Watters-Lain would ride her horse to the YMCA swimming pool, when it was still outdoors. “Growing up in Prescott was a real treat – rare by today’s standards,” Watters-Lain said. After school, she and her three sisters worked in the family garden center. There, she learned what real customer service was. “Back in those days, you knew everyone,” she said. “We would meet customers at school, church, the grocery store and at the YMCA pool. It was a small town back then, and word spread fast – good or bad.” She added, “It has been decades, but I still feel the pressure to deliver more than customers expect; it’s within the company’s DNA to make sure the community talks positively about Watters Garden Center and our family.” After graduating from Prescott High School, Watters-Lain achieved her degree in special education from Arizona State University and her master’s degree from Northern Arizona University, but her love of gardening and fond memories of working in the family business never left. Watters-Lain married her college sweetheart, after graduating from ASU. Together, they raised four children and the next generation to own the family garden center. “Our kids developed a strong work ethic working here,” she said. “It’s a joy working with family.” She added, “Just last week, we had four generations of family here in the garden center – not all working, but family collaborating in the garden center.” As Prescott has grown, so Watters Garden Center has been able to grow. “My father, Harold Watters, never dreamed we would use all the land when he built the garden center in 1982,” Watters-Lain said. She and her husband, Ken, now wish they had a few more acres to expand, too. Watters Garden Center has been voted the best garden center in Arizona many times and has made the top honor of “Most Revolutionary Garden Center” in the country by peers. FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

“It’s a lot of work, and you can never be happy in retail,” Watters-Lain said. “There is always something that can be improved or makes you better. It’s work and fun all at the same time.” Competing head-to-head with giant in-thebox stores is challenging, but this is where Watters-Lain shines. The mountains of Arizona have different garden needs from anywhere else in the country, and this is where Watters Garden Center makes a difference in the community. “Small business is responsive and able to grow plants unique for the area,” she said. “Watters not only has the right plants at the right time, but we also help locals with design and education, so their plants don’t only survive, but thrive, in the garden.” Prescott Woman Magazine features her garden advice each publication. Watters-Lain and her staff hold free garden classes at 9:30 a.m. every Saturday, and she co-hosts “The

Mountain Gardener” radio show, which airs throughout Arizona. “Watters’ success comes down to hand-holding our customers, helping them choose the right plant and then surrounding them with local garden advice that ensures success.” Watters-Lain said. As a second-generation owner, Watters-Lain hopes one of their children will one day carry the legacy. “Running a small business is ideal for families,” she said. “It has allowed me to be an individual, boss and mother, with the flexibility to thrive in each, which is not always easy, but I never get bored.” Watters-Lain’s weekly garden advice can be found at LearnToGarden.org; her weekly podcast can be found at TheMountainGardener. podbean.com and is published in Prescott Woman Magazine. She can be found most days managing her team at Watters Garden Center in Prescott, Arizona. S COT T LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • PRE PRESCOT LIVING

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Special Section: Women in Business

DEBORAH BLOUNT

SHEILA POLK County Attorney, Yavapai County

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Grammar School Principal Trinity Christian School

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eborah Blount is the grammar school principal (K-6) for Trinity Christian School. After having 14 years in the classroom, Blount found she had a passion to mentor and lead teachers, and a desire to become a “teacher of teachers,” as well as oversee the administration operating the day-to-day activities of the grammar school. Her degree is in elementary education. With the growth of Trinity Christian, there was a need for a grammar (elementary) school principal. Given her teaching background experience and her experience as a CFO at NAX of North America, this was a perfect fit

for both Blount and for Trinity Christian School. Deborah has served as grammar principal for two years and is delighted to be serving in this position.

heila Polk is a native Arizonan who received her bachelor’s and law degrees from ASU. After clerking for Arizona Supreme Court Justice Jack Hays, Polk served in the Arizona Attorney General’s Office for 11 years before moving to Yavapai County in 1994. There, she joined the Yavapai County Attorney’s Office, where she specialized in the prosecution of felony crimes. In November 2000, Polk became the first woman to be elected Yavapai County Attorney, and is currently serving her fifth term. She is a member of the Governor’s Arizona Human Trafficking Council. As well, she has served on the Governor’s Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kit Task Force. Polk also chairs the

Arizona Prosecuting Attorneys’ Advisory Council, and serves as vice-chair of the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission. Polk is co-chair and founding member of MATFORCE, the Yavapai County substance abuse coalition. Polk is the driving stimulus behind the law enforcement course, “What You Do Matters: Lessons from the Holocaust.”

DEBBIE MARANVILLE Co-Owner The Natural Healing Garden and Goods from the Garden™

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aranville is co-owner of The Natural Healing Garden and leads her catering services, Goods from the Garden - Healthy Fusion. Maranville and her husband, Richard, have owned their family business for seven years in Prescott, Arizona. Daughter Stephanie and grandson, Ty, are also important members of the team. Maranville and her passionate staff prepare delicious, healthy meals using locally grown herbs and produce. She describes herself as a “Culinary Specialist” and has been in the food & beverage industry for over 35 years. She loves to prepare foods made with love. Whether it’s a wedding, anniversary party, holiday party, family gathering or any social event, Maranville loves to create and share healthy fusion. Maranville is a Certified Herbalist and recently graduated from Herbal Wisdom Institute in Prescott Valley. “I loved learning

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about the power of herbs and plants and how they kick up a recipe, as well as all the amazing properties to support our immune system.” She enjoys teaching classes on culinary herbs, Plant to Plate. Goods from the Garden will be participating at the Prescott Winter Farmers Market. Maranville loves supporting local farmers and utilizes their products in her recipes. Goods from the Garden will implement Market Fresh Prepared Meals and a Soup Program. A recent client stated: “Dearest Debbie, Thank you again and again for such a wonderful meal. Everything was prepared and displayed with such love. I could taste it in every bite. You made things flow so smoothly from start to finish. I will always appreciate not only the amazing food, but the intangible gift that your and your ladies brought to my daughter’s wedding - Blessings.” SD Maranville supports many community

events. She is a Prescott Chamber of Commerce Ambassador, a member of the Acker Night Music Festival Committee and the Events Manager at the Plaza View Ballroom.

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATION EDITION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Women in Business

DEBORA BLACK Chief of Police City of Prescott

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s a girl growing up in Lombard, Illinois, I never could have imagined that someday I would be the police chief in “everybody’s hometown,” Prescott. My interest in police work did not become apparent until I began college as a sociology major and took elective courses in criminal justice. Then, I was hooked, and immediately switched majors. With an associate degree in hand, I applied to over a dozen agencies in the Chicago area and quickly discovered I was not a candidate they were interested in hiring. My family had relocated to Phoenix, so I headed West, and received a much warmer reception with the Phoenix Police Department. I was hired, completed basic academy training and began my career as a Phoenix police officer. As a rookie working nights and weekends, I had the opportunity to continue my education at Arizona State University, ultimately earning a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice and a Master of Public Administration. In 1991, I had my beautiful daughter, Mallory. I continued to work full- time, accepted challenging assignments and competed for promotion, ultimately rising to the rank of assistant police chief. When I left the Phoenix Police Department in 2006, I intended to leave law enforcement forever. I was a stay-at-home mom to my teen daughter and started my own consulting company, Black Ink, LLC. My plans took a turn when I was recruited for an assistant chief position with the Glendale Police Department. This proved to be instrumental to my career. When the police chief returned to his hometown of Louisville in 2012, I was appointed interim police chief. At that time, Glendale Police Department faced many challenges, including budget shortfalls, personnel management issues, increased violent crime as well as hosting high profile sporting events and entertainment at the University of Phoenix Stadium. This was a period of tremendous growth for me as a leader, ultimately leading to my appointment as police chief in 2013. My husband and I chose Prescott as the community where we would retire. We bought a home in 2012 and spent as much

FALL 2017 • THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION

time here as my schedule allowed. When the former police chief announced he would be leaving the Prescott Police Department in 2016, I was immediately interested. It was important that I understood the needs of the community and the department to ensure my experience and leadership style would be a good fit. The rest, as they say, is history. I was appointed Prescott Police Chief in July 2016. I became the first woman in history to hold the position. My first year living and working in this wonderful community has been amazing. I believe everything I’ve experienced in my life and career has been in preparation for this

time and place. Leading and serving alongside the men and women of the Prescott Police Department has been the greatest honor of my career. We are committed to the safety of everyone who lives, works or visits Prescott. We perform our work with integrity, compassion and respect for all. Public support for police officers is demonstrated by members of the community on a continuous basis. Every day, in all that we do, we strive to earn and maintain your trust and confidence to keep Prescott safe and enjoyable as “everybody’s hometown.”

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Exciting events and striking scenery in the greater Prescott area!

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-AND-

ABOUT

If you would like to contribute images of area events, people, pets and scenery, please post on our Facebook page or email to: editor@roxco.com

APRIL LYNN JOHNSON

WINNING PHOTO - GOODWIN FIRE - OUESLATI

BETTE BOREN - SAWWHET OWL

BOBBI JANE TUCKER - FAMILY PORTRAIT IN PAULDEN

ELAINE EARLE

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ROBIN SCHWARTZ - LOVE IS IN THE AIR

BRENDA BAARDSEN

JIM SHANEYFELT

SHEREE ROBINSON MOSS - LYNX LAKE THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


THERESA DITSON

DARRYL WEISSER - PRONGHORN

DANIELLE ADAMS

OUESLATI - GOODWIN FIRE KATHY SAUNDERS - COURTHOUSE GAZEBO

MICHAEL MCDERMOTT - RODEO PARADE

COLETTE BIELE - CLOUDS

OUESLATI - REUNION

Prescott LIVING Magazine

Grand Prize Winning Photo Summer 2017 Photo Contest ROSA L. MORENO-HILBURN-WINDMILL HOUSE CHINO VALLEY

JENN WINTERS-ASHCRAFT

DAN HAMMEL - CALM BEFORE THE STORM FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

BUDDY THE DOG

CANDACE SHERIDAN

DARYL WEISSER PRE S COT T LI V ING

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A JOURNEY FROM PAIN-FILLED TO PAIN-FREE by Sandra Cheney

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n spring 2015, I received the shock of my life - a diagnosis of rectal cancer. Everything after that day was a whirlwind. Treatment consisted of eight weeks of radiation and two weeks of chemotherapy. During that time, there were numerous side effects, such as loss of hair, head rash and mouth sores, but the most devastating was the internal pain from the radiation burn. I was declared cancer-free on Sept. 11, 2015, but that was not the end of the pain. For more than a year, I continued to struggle for a solution. It seemed the only thing available was a variety of powerful prescription drugs, ranging from fentanyl to morphine to oxycodone. None of these touched my pain, but instead left me in a constant stupor and eventually led to addiction. As a result, any change in prescription or dosage elevated the pain, caused withdrawals and led to emergency room visits. With the assistance of my doctor, I weaned off of all the drugs. It took 10 months, but on Dec. 31, 2016, I took my final dose of pain medication. With my body still healing from the radiation, the pain was excruciating, as was the anguish my body endured as it freed itself from the final remnants of the drug. The stress and depression were overwhelming. I searched for something that would calm me physically, mentally, emotionally and bring me back to a full, functioning life. I prayed to God and all the angels in the universe to open a door and lead me to the light of healing. That light came in February 2017 in the form of two earthly angels, who were friends of mine - Megan and Vickey. They invited me to an open house called “Heart Healthy Yoga” with Amy McVickers, my next angel. I was guided to take a series of six classes that were restorative with focus on the heart as the center of love and positive energy. I realized that my healing had begun and felt so uplifted.

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I applied for the second series of Amy’s classes, which included “chair yoga,” and during that class she introduced me to my MELT angel, Kathy. MELT is a self-treatment system that reduces chronic pain and helps one stay healthy, youthful and active for a lifetime. Kathy is the owner of the Co-Op Studio where I was taking classes with Amy. I started taking yoga and MELT classes, and they proved to be the most significant gift in my healing process. I had been having gripping back pain and intermittent, extreme leg pain since I had stopped the pain medication months earlier. After the MELT Treatments with Kathy, I went to an art fair and the back and leg pain took over my body, forcing me to go home and rest. That night I had lots of pain and got very little sleep. This was nothing new. It had happened before and I finally gave up and took some aspirin and fell asleep. But, in the morning when I woke up, there was something new - I had no pain in my back or legs. I continued to be pain free, and took more yoga and MELT classes. I have eliminated my back and leg pain and can feel my body healing internally, alleviating the pain from the radiation. There are other results that are happening every day: better balance, stronger and more flexible knees and a powerful grip. It has now been six months since I started yoga and two months of doing MELT. I am so filled with gratitude that my journey has taken me on a path laden with so many valuable gifts - happiness beyond my wildest expectations. Thank you to Amy McVickers for her gentleness, her positive attitude, her heartfelt manner of teaching and her loving spirit. Thank you to Kathy DeFreitas for her guidance, her inspiration, her sparkling smile and her phenomenal ability to always know what a student needs at just the right time. I am a MELTer for life and will advocate MELT to everyone I meet.

Kathy DeFreitas The Yoga Room Class Highlights “Our Small Personalized Classes”

Chair Yoga with Amy — Chair yoga provides a safe manner for strengthening and supporting the body, while improving balance and stamina. Perfect for any age, those not comfortable getting down onto the floor, or with physical needs requiring use of a chair. Amy McVickers, RYT500 call 602-670-1866 Gentle Myofascial Yoga classes with Kathy — This offers a blend of gentle yoga stretches and movement using the MELT Method to hydrate dry connective tissue. Kathy DeFreitas, ERYT500 call 928-420-9437 Yin / Restorative with Lori — Soothing morning classes with longer (3-5 min) holds in postures to stretch and open the tissues of the body and cultivate the flow of fluid energy. Lori Durr, RYT500, LMT call 928-515-4595 Life Coaching — Pam’s coaching focuses on the mental and emotional transition into retirement. Pam Garland, MS,IC, call 520-247-3565

Workshops at The Yoga Room Prescott: Yoga for a Healthy Heart Series — Yoga for a Healthy Heart is designed for individuals who have challenges with their cardiovascular system, a history of cancer or other illnesses. Contact Amy McVickers 602-670-1866 email Avmcvickers@gmail.com Healing our Hearts — A gentle workshop designed to overcome stress caused by grief and heartache. Boost your immune system while quieting the mind, using restorative postures with sound and crystal healing bowls. Contact Kathy DeFreitas 928-420-9437 email TheGroveYogaRoom@gmail. com or facebook.com/Yoga.Room.Prescott The Yoga Room Prescott at the Grove 119 Grove Avenue a CO-OP Yoga Studio THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


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HELPING HEARTS

by Dr. Vijay Swarup and Dr. Akash Makkar

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eart arrhythmias and irregular heartbeats affect millions of Americans, and these can lead to many health risks including heart failure, stroke and sudden death. “The medical field of heart rhythm specialists is the most rapidly-growing field because of the new technologies, which allow effective and often curative treatments of heart arrhythmias,” said Vijay Swarup, M.D., FHRS, founding partner at Arizona Heart Rhythm Center. Unlike clogs and blockages often associated with heart problems, electrical impulses are what the doctors at Arizona Heart Rhythm Center (AZHRC) specialize in fixing and fine-tuning. These electric impulses can affect heart rhythms, often causing low blood pressure and can lead to a stroke or even cardiac arrest and sudden death. “Think of your heart as a house. If there is a clog, you call the plumber. If there is a problem with the electrical, you call an electrician; and we are the electricians of the heart.” said Akash Makkar, M.D., FHRS, partner at Arizona Hearth Rhythm Center. AZHRC is based in Phoenix with its primary location at 1848 E. Thomas Road, Suite 100. AZHRC also serves patients at other locations throughout the greater Phoenix area with clinics in Peoria, Goodyear and Gilbert. AZHRC recently opened an office in Prescottm and is seeing patients at 3108 Clearwater Drive in the Crossings. Several of the arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation, cause blood to stagnate in small chambers of the heart forming blood clots, which force many patients to stay on blood thinners to avoid strokes. “The connection between strokes and

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heart arrhythmia is well-established.” Dr. Makkar said. “Using blood thinners often leads to problems with internal bleeding, which can sometimes be life-threatening.” Dr. Swarup and his team at AZHRC were the pioneers in development and testing of a heart plug, which was recently approved by the FDA for preventing strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. This plug seals off the appendage to the heart where most stroke-causing blood clots come from. This plug is called the WATCHMAN device and is now manufactured by Boston Scientific Inc.,a large biomedical company. AZHRC has the largest experience in successfully implanting this device in the U.S. AZHRC provides a vast array of services and surgeries to meet the heart rhythm needs of patients, including: • Evaluation of heart and heart rhythms with various heart monitors. • Tilt Table testing • Ultrasound evaluation of the heart • Stress testing • Electrophysiology study • Cardiac ablation for all arrhythmias • Pacemaker implants with 24/7 remote monitoring • Defibrillator implants with 24/7 remote monitoring • WATCHMAN device implant • Pulmonary artery pressure sensor implants for heart failure (CardioMEMS) • Newer heart failure device treatments, including research protocols For more information, Arizona Heart Rhythm Center has a comprehensive website at www. azheartrhythm.com THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


THE IMPORTANCE OF WORKING WITH A FIDUCIARY by Ronald Stevenson and Barbara Clark Stevenson

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Schedule a complimentary financial consultation Registeredtoday Investment A 3112your Clearwater D and receive copy! READ OUR BOOK! Schedule a complimentary

Suite B, Presco

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ou may have heard track. When you do business about the U.S. Dewith our team, you will know financial consultation today www.AmericanFinancialSe partment of Labor’s exactly what you are paying for Investment Advisory Services offered through American Financial Investments LLC, a and receive your copy! in the state of Arizona. Insurance products and tax services are offered through A long-anticipated or investing in because of our American Financial Investments LLC and American Financial Security LLC are affi liated Registered Investment Advisor fiduciary rule that passed in the total transparency and disclosure Check our website for more details. spring. The new regulations that regarding our compensation and accompany the rule are expectinvestment methods. ed to not only significantly alter In the current economic landhow people plan for retirement, scape, it is more important than The Crossings, off Willow Creek Rd. but also protect individuals from ever that you choose to work biased retirement advice. with a financial professional who Schedule a complimentary But what exactly is a fiduciary? puts your best interests first. A fiduciary is an individual financial consultation today www.AmericanFinancialSecurity.net About the Authors: Ronald F. or firm that is committed to Investment Advisory Services offered through American Financial Investments LLC, a Registered Investment Ad-visor and receive your copy! in the state of Arizona. Insurance products and tax services are offered through American Financial Security LLC. Stevenson, Investment Advisor putting their client’s interests American Financial Investments LLC and American Financial Security LLC are affi liated companies. Representative, & our Barbara first. Advisors will be required by Check websiteClark for more details. Stevenson own American Financial law to adhere to this standard • Investment and Port Investments, LLC, A Registered and offer complete transparency, Investment Advisory Firm. They even when it comes to clear and • Income & Hybrid An specialize in professional investupfront fees. • Life Insurance Strat ment and portfolio management, Before this ruling, recommenretirement income planning, social dations made by advisors only • Personal and Busine Registered Investment Advisor security maximization, tax free had to be “suitable,” meaning income design, annuities, personal that advisors could sell products Watch our Video & corporate tax preparation and riddled with high fees in order “Color of planning. For more information, call to earn a higher commission, Money” 928-771-8368, 3112 Clearwater even if a lower-priced option was The Crossings, off Willow Creek Rd. Dr., Suite B, Prescott, AZ 86305 or equally as applicable. Schedule a complimentary visit our website: American.Financial Although the new DOL rule financial consultation today is a step toward protecting the www.AmericanFinancialSecurity.net Serving the average investor, there will still Investment Advisory Services offered through American Financial Investments LLC, a Registered Investment Ad-visor and receive your copy! Prescott area in the state of Arizona. Insurance products and tax services are offered through American Financial Security LLC. be Wall Street brokerage firms American Financial Investments LLC and American Financial Security LLC are affi liated companies. since 2003 website for more details. that canCheck sellourproprietary products, which means the potential • Investment and Portfolio Management for bias remains. Working with a • Income & Hybrid Annuities fiduciary is as important as it has ever been. • Life Insurance Strategies At American Financial Invest• Personal and Business Tax Preparation ments, LLC, we are dedicated to Registered Investment Advisor providing you with personalized financial solutions, and making Watch our Video sure that your needs and goals Investment advisory services offered “Color of are placed first. Ruling or not, with through American Financial InvestMoney” we have always been devoted to ments, LLC a Registered Investment Ron & he Crossings, off Willow Creek Rd. Advisor in the State of Arizona. Insurserving our clients with the best Barbara ance products and Tax services are advice we can offer. Sundays at 9 am offered through American Financial We strive to provide you with Security, LLC. American Financial the solutions that we believe Investments, LLC and American w.AmericanFinancialSecurity.net Serving the sory Services offered throughwith American your Financial Investments a Registeredand Investment Ad-visor Financial Security, LLC are affiliated align uniqueLLC,goals, Prescott area rizona. Insurance products and tax services are offered through American Financial Security LLC. companies. ial Investments LLCwork and American Financial Security are affi liatedsure companies. with you toLLCmake your since 2003 financial planning is on the right

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3112 Clearwater Drive Suite B, Prescott

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112 Clearwater Drive Suite B, Prescott

928-771-8368

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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HIGH QUALITY CARE

Thumb Butte Medical Center & Urgent Care fills urgent need in Tri-City area Our mission is to provide excellent, accessible medical care. Our patients are treated with the utmost respect, dignity and honesty in a healing environment.

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ig-city health care services with down home caring for neighbors is what has made Thumb Butte Medical Center & Urgent Care an important place in caring for residents in the Northland. The centers in both Prescott and Prescott Valley employ over 20 medical professionals, six full-time and four part-time doctors. They specialize in family medicine, internal medicine, cardiology, rheumatology, allergy, podiatry, chiropractic care and orthopedic surgery. Medical Director of Thumb Butte Medical Center & Urgent Care Dr. Hojat Askari said, “Our mission is to provide excellent, accessible medical care. Our patients are treated with the utmost respect, dignity and honesty in a healing environment. Each of the doctors ensures that all patients are treated like their own family.” “Dr. A,” as he is affectionately called by his patients, said, “The 12,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art medical center was the dream of my father who wanted medical clinics to serve people in need. And now, I’m living it every day.” The 4,000-square-foot urgent care center under construction will specialize in the treatment of minor emergencies, illnesses and injuries, all with minimal wait times. Equipped with an in-house laboratory, the center can treat a broad range of ailments from broken bones to sinus infections. Coming soon is a pharmacy and X-ray facility. Walk-ins are always welcome, and unlike emergency rooms and other primary care clinics, there is little-to-no wait time. The center accepts most insurance plans, and low

PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • YOU!

rates put affordable health care well within reach, even for uninsured patients. If you can’t get an appointment with your own doctor, come see one of the Thumb Butte physicians. The facilities are open every day, including all holidays, because you never know when you’ll need care. Thumb Butte Medical Centers also provide cosmetic procedures, such as Botox, and offers nutritional supplements and vitamins to pick up and stay healthy. Or, enjoy the convenience of auto-shipping these items to your home, so you’ll never run out. For more information, visit thumbbuttemedicalcenter.com

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


SOMEONE IN THEIR CORNER by Allison Hurtado, CASA Community Outreach Specialist

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story in the news of a young child pulled from an allegedly abusive situation struck a chord with Prescott resident Capri Barney several years ago. That’s because, at the time, she was preparing to become an advocate for a child in the foster care system through a volunteer program called CASA, which stands for Court Appointed Special Advocate. The program recruits and trains everyday community members to get to know a child and the circumstances that have brought him or her into the foster care system. Information gathered goes back to the judge, who will eventually decide the child’s fate — whether they return home or are adopted. It’s a role Barney considered for nearly 10 years before she decided the time was right, and was appointed to the case of that young child. “It has been such a great experience being in this child’s life,” she said. “We’ve seen therapists come and go, foster parents come and go, parents come and go, extended family members come and go — yet I’ve been there the entire time. It’s been a very rewarding experience to not only spend time with the child, but also advocate for him on a court

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level to try to find what’s best for him.” There are more than 60 CASA volunteers in Yavapai County, supported by a staff of program coordinators who are there to help answer questions that come up and ensure the safety of volunteers. “Anybody who has the time, they would have the support,” said Don Biele, a CASA advocate in Yavapai County for more than two years. “Starting out, I didn’t have a clue what I was doing, but the staff guided me through it. Every time I have a question, they have an answer.” Biele said he decided to become a CASA volunteer after retiring. He thought it would be similar to other mentoring programs around the state, but has found it’s more than that. Not only do CASA volunteers spend time with the children twice a month — doing things like going to the park, the movies or the mall — but they also have the ability to review all the documents in the case and reach out to the child’s doctor, teacher, therapist, case manager or foster placement for more information. This focus is what has made the program so successful. Children with a CASA volunteer on their cases have been found to spend

less time in foster care and even perform better in school. “Through my entire career, it was real easy to throw donations at causes, but not always time,” Biele said. “With this program, what CASA needs is not money; they need the time of individuals who get to know the kids and are able to advocate for them. There’s no other way to do it.” Volunteers for the program must be 21 years of age or older and pass a thorough background check. Advocates go through 30 hours of training before being appointed to a case. There is a great need for more advocates in Yavapai County, where there are more than 400 kids in the foster care system. “The best part is just knowing that I’m doing something to help a child who couldn’t do it for himself,” Barney said. “I can see there are so many children with so much potential, but they need someone who is willing to devote some time to them to help them reach their potential. Every child deserves someone in their corner.” For more information on the program visit CASAofYavapaiCounty.org or call 928-771-3165.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


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PRESSCOT COTT T LI V ING YOU! • PRE

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ENJOYING THE BEST GRAINS FOR DIABETES

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f you have diabetes, should you stop eating bread, rice and pasta? While everyone with diabetes and pre-diabetes benefits from eliminating processed grains – like white rice, cold cereals, white bread and certain snack foods – from their diets, some individuals benefit from avoiding whole grain products as well. When you enjoy whole grains, you benefit from the bran, endosperm and germ, which include the fiber and nutrients that the grain stores. When you eat processed grains, you only consume the starchy center of the grain, missing out on fiber, oils and magnesium, which help you maintain good blood

sugar control. Whole grains offer a slower conversion of starch to sugar, and they lower blood sugar and insulin levels after meals. Barley is an excellent example of the many healthy grain varieties readily available today. It contains more fiber and nutrients than white and brown rice. Barley also has a low glycemic index and won’t raise blood sugar levels as much as brown rice after meals. Try our delicious Mediterranean Barley Salad recipe here. Quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat are pseudo-grains that don’t seem to raise blood sugar levels as much as true grains. Quinoa makes a delicious pilaf or hot cereal

and can be used in salads and soups. Cream of buckwheat cereal is an excellent option for breakfast. Avoiding or reducing grains at meals can lead to improvements in health for some individuals. However, it is important to follow a healthy diet that is sustainable in the long run. Remember to check out our cooking videos and download our recipes at yrmchealthconnect.org. You can also follow us on Facebook at YRMC’s Your Healthy Kitchen. Your Healthy Kitchen is one of the many ways that Yavapai Regional Medical Center offers health education and support to the people of Yavapai County.

MEDITERRANEAN BARLEY SALAD

Makes about 6 cups INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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1 cup hulled barley 3 cups water 1- 1½ pound eggplant, cut into ½ inch slabs ¾ pound zucchini, cut into ½ inch slabs ½ pint cherry tomatoes, cut in halves or quarters 1 pint white button mushrooms, wiped clean with a damp towel ⅓ cup sliced Kalamata olives, rinsed 1-2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice Zest of one lemon 1 tablespoon maple syrup (optional) 1-2 big pinches of ground coriander Salt and pepper to taste ¼ - ½ cup chopped fresh mint ¼ - ½ cup chopped fresh basil

PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • YOU!

DIRECTIONS

1. Place barley and water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and cover the pot. 2. Simmer about 40 minutes, until barley is tender. Meanwhile, heat a grill to medium hot. 3. Brush one side of the eggplant with 1-2 tablespoons olive oil and place the oiled side of the eggplant on the grill. Place zucchini and mushrooms on the grill. Cook until veggies have nice grilling marks on them. Turn veggies over and cook until tender. 4. When cool enough to handle, cut veggies into bite-sized pieces and place in a bowl. 5. Make dressing by combining 3 tablespoons olive oil, lemon juice and zest, maple syrup (if using), coriander, salt and pepper. Set aside. 6. When barley is cooked, let cool slightly then add to vegetables in the bowl, along with the olives and dressing. Toss with the fresh herbs and serve at room temperature on a bed of salad greens.

PER 1 CUP SERVING:

280 CAL, 14 G FAT (1.5 G SAT FAT), 260 MG SOD, 34 G CAR, 9 G FIB Article and recipe provided by Yavapai Regional Medical Center, YRMC HealthConnect, Your Healthy Kitchen at www.yrmchealthconnect.org.

Enjoy these related articles, with video tutorials and downloadable recipes: Add Variety to Your Meals with Whole and Ancient Grains https://yrmchealthconnect.org/addvariety-to-your-meals-with-whole-andancient-grains-your-healthy-kitchen/

More Ways to Enjoy Whole Grains https://yrmchealthconnect.org/more-waysto-enjoy-whole-grains-your-healthy-kitchen/

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


THE PRESCOTT PIONEER PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LL EY • CHINO VA LL EY • DE W EY-H UM BOLDT

CONTINUED…

Prescott Fire Department: So much more than just a fire department by Dennis B. Light, City of Prescott Fire Chief

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stablished in March 1885, the City of Prescott Fire Department is known as the oldest within the State of Arizona. Steeped in tradition, the members and community work hard to respect the heritage such an honor holds. That said, little-to-nothing – aside from the name – really has remained the same as it was back then. A side f rom adv ances i n equipment, many, if not all, the nation’s fire services remained pretty much the same well into the 1950s. Prescott’s Fire Department was no different. However, with the 1950s, and in the aftermath of World War II, came the urbanization of communities. More and more folks migrated out of the country and into the city. All of a sudden “company towns” were a distant memory, and with their departure the ability to muster an “all-volunteer fire service” became a distant memory. Those facts, combined with insurance company changes to

Aircraft Rescue Firefighter training on mock up of aircraft

underwriting practices, resulted in a primarily “all-career service” being born. Today’s fire service is much different from the one established some 132 years ago, here

Technical Rescue Training evolution on Watson Lake

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

in Prescott. Most certainly we still identify with our brand of being a fire department, but the proportion of effort spent combating fires has been on the decline for many years. As such, we have morphed into what is often referred to as an “all-hazards/all-risks” model. A fire department is typically mandated by its city or district to respond to all emergencies. That includes not only fires, but trail and technical rescues, hazardous materials emergencies, and frequently, emergency medical service (EMS) calls, as well. As a result, the City of Prescott Fire Department has made adjustments to its brand to accommodate changes in our community.

With the popular television series “Emergency,” which showcased paramedics Johnny Gage, played by Randolph Mantooth, and Roy DeSoto, played by Kevin Tighe, a new market niche for Prescott Fire Department came into view. Each week, as these actors brought characters to life inside people’s homes, the community shared in a greater desire to offer prehospital emergency medical services and care. Today, Prescott Fire provides advanced life support, first-responder response by a combination of paramedic and emergency medical technicians.

continued on page 138... PRE S COT T LI V ING

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Special Section:

EMBRY-RIDDLE, STEM AND YOU by Keaton S. Ziem, Digital Strategy & Business Intelligence, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

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mbry-Riddle Aeronautical University has been an integral part of the Prescott community since its establishment in 1978, nearly 40 years ago. Ever since, Prescott and Embry-Riddle have become home to tomorrow’s leaders in aviation and formed a reputation for excellence in the skies. Yet, since its beginning, Embry-Riddle has refused to rest upon its laurels, challenging itself and its curriculum to forge new standards of excellence in industries reaching beyond aviation. In 2012, the university revealed its vision for a new, state-of-the-art Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) based learning center that would not only revolutionize Embry-Riddle, but its Prescott home and the surrounding

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Quad-City area as well. Incoming students of the 2017 fall semester will be the first to see, experience and utilize Embry-Riddle’s newest state-of-the-art campus facility: The STEM Education Center. “Our university is now truly a STEM university. While we will never leave our deep aviation and engineering roots, we have expanded our offerings to include degrees in the sciences and technology,” said Dr. Frank Ayers, Chancellor of Embry-Riddle’s Prescott campus. “We are so pleased to have raised funds from our friends in the local community, and across the aerospace industries that we support, to aid in the construction.” The STEM Education Center will provide students and educators with the tools neces-

sary to impart curriculum to a new generation of blossoming scientific minds. With the final touches to the building’s interior taking place, students and campus leadership are eagerly anticipating the center’s grand opening, which will officially establish the facility as the only one of its kind in Northern Arizona. The two-story building covers 52,000 square feet of space and contains over 20 industry-grade laboratories, replete with innovative technological equipment unique to each STEM program the university offers. Besides engineering programs, the STEM Center’s facilities support degrees in astronomy, forensic biology, space physics, wildlife science and the new bachelor’s degree in simulations science, gaming and animation.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges guidebook, an annual ranking of nearly 1,800 accredited fouryear schools in the United States, has ranked Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Prescott Campus’ Aerospace/Aeronautical/ Astronomical Engineering Program No. 1 in the nation in its 2018 edition.

The $22 million center also includes the community-friendly Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium—the only Arizona planetarium north of Phoenix—capable of seating 125 students and visitors for captivating explorations into the furthest reaches of the universe in full 360-degree high definition. “The Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium will delight students and residents alike with a variety of presentations,” Ayers said. “It is much more than a planetarium, containing multimedia learning software that can display full-dome planetarium features that explore the planets and look into the complexity of the human body or modern spacecraft design. We will be learning about all of its capabilities this year and it will soon be open to the public.” continued on page 100... PRE S COT T LI V ING

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Special Section: Education

DISTRICT VERSUS CHARTER SCHOOLS What are the differences? by Tim Carter, Yavapai County School Superintendent

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s the Yavapai County school superintendent and a member of the Arizona State Board of Education, I receive many questions from the public, and one of the most common is, “What are the differences between school districts and charter schools?” School districts and charter schools are both public schools. This is a common public misunderstanding. Both entities are designated as “Local Education Agencies” (LEAs) and fall under the jurisdiction of the State of Arizona (Governor, Legislature, Courts, Arizona State Board of Education and the Arizona Department of Education). Charter schools additionally are under the jurisdiction of their sponsor, in most cases, the Arizona State Board of Charter Schools. Both types of schools are tax-supported. Charters receive funding directly from the state general fund. Districts receive their funding from a combination of general-fund dollars and local property taxes, referred to as “equalization” and using the assessed value of the property within the district as a factor. District schools date back to at least the establishment of statehood, but many were in operation prior to that time. There are several different types of school districts in Arizona, but collectively they serve students from Kindergarten through 12th grade in a rather comprehensive manner, including a variety of academic options, extracurricular activities – such as athletics and fine arts – transportation, food service and the like. An act of the Arizona Legislature in 1994 established charter schools. The first charters opened in 1995. Simply put, a charter is

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a “contract for student achievement” that identifies the specific mission of the school, such as fine arts, technology-based, college prep, dropout recovery/prevention or uses a specific educational theme, such as Montessori or experiential learning. School districts are overseen by an elected governing board. State statute presumes that governing boards will have three members, but also allows boards to be expanded to five members by an affirmative vote of the district electors in a special election. As a result, most governing boards in Arizona actually have five members. The powers and duties of the governing boards are also outlined in statute, which lists those powers that boards “shall” exercise (ARS 15- 341) and those they “may” exercise (ARS 150-342) at their discretion. Charter school governance is established by the charter documents, under the jurisdiction of their sponsor, and is vested in the charter holder. Normally charter school boards are established for advisory purposes, and their powers vary from one charter to another. These board members are not elected by voters, and may be selected by

the charter holder or “self-perpetuating” by the local charter board itself. School districts have specific boundaries established by law, and modifications to those boundaries generally require an act of the Legislature, the County Board of Supervisors or a vote of the district electors. Each district is a separate and distinct political subdivision. Arizona law does allow “open enrollment,” so parents are free to take their child to a different school district other than the one in which they reside, if the school has “capacity.” Charters do not have specific boundaries, yet the open enrollment statute still applies. According to the latest data from AZReportCards.org, Arizona currently has 216 school districts operating 1,924 schools, serving 1,112,146 students or 87 percent of Arizona’s school-aged youth . There are 425 charter holders operating 533 schools, with 157,438 students or 13 percent of the student population. Yavapai County has 26 districts and 24 charter schools. A directory of Yavapai County schools is available at YCESA.com, using the “schools” tab.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Education

STUDENTS ON AIR by Drew Diener

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bout 9:40 a.m. on a Thursday morning in early September, a handful of Prescott High School students began to trickle into the Badger Media Studio, home of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Arizona’s Multimedia Studios program, a partnership between the BGCCAZ and the Prescott Unified School District. The students were preparing to produce and livestream the morning announcements. Multimedia Studios program director Josh Orlando and PHS media arts teacher Robyn Bryce buzzed around the two-room studio giving directions and testing equipment as the students took their places behind cameras, in front of computer screens and at the news desk. Everett Sims, III, a PHS junior, delivered the announcements for the first time. Sitting at the news desk minutes before the announcements went live, Sims – smartly clad in a lime green

button-down shirt and a navy blue sports coat – rehearsed his lines and tried to maintain his cool as he prepared to make his on-camera debut. Meanwhile, his veteran co-host, Mason Pennington, also a PHS junior, slipped into a gray sports coat and tried to commit to memory a student’s name he would announce during the broadcast. Behind the cameras, a trio of students prepared to film the newscast and cue the hosts, while in the adjacent room, a team of students manned computers and listened to Bryce’s last-minute instructions. And then, all of a sudden, it was show time. Sims and Pennington appeared on television

screens in classrooms throughout campus and spent the next few minutes delivering the day’s school news. The show went off without a hitch. It was a professional-quality production delivered by a team of high school students who are gaining life-changing vocational and interpersonal skills that will help them thrive in their future endeavors. “This is a like a real studio,” Bryce said. “It’s a real-world experience for these kids. This is challenging work for these kids, and when we do things that are challenging, we become better people.” Established in May 2017, the Multimedia Studios program is

one of a number of programming efforts by the BGCCAZ to extend its reach beyond its Prescott and Prescott Valley clubhouses. In September, the BGCCAZ opened an after-school program at Glassford Hill Middle School in Prescott Valley, and in October it will open a teen center in Chino Valley. For more information on how you can help the BGCCAZ impact the lives of our community’s youth, visit the BGCCAZ online at bgccaz.org or call 928-776-8686. Drew Diener is a local attorney and a member of the Board of Directors of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Arizona.

For every $1 invested in a Boys & Girls Club, the community sees a return of nearly $10 (Study: the University of Michigan)

Receive dollar-for-dollar credit on your Arizona state taxes by donating to the Boys & Girls Club

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Juvenile crime and victimization increases during the hours of 3-7pm. With your support, we can make sure that every child and teen has a safe place to go after school.

(928) 776-8686 www.bgccaz.org S COT T LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • PRE PRESCOT VING

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Special Section: Education

EDUCATION P News from around town

News Bites

rescott is a hub of world-class education. From preschool to trade school and all the way through postsecondary school, the learning opportunities in our community are boundless. But what many people don’t know is that our local schools do so much more than solely provide amazing educations. They are among the pillars of our community – giving back, preparing the work force of the future, partnering with private enterprise, collaborating with government, contributing to technological growth and even enriching culture

YAVAPAI COUNTY EDUCATION SERVICE AGENCY

Seeking school district governing board members

through providing endless arts and entertainment shows and events. With so much happening in Prescott’s schools and higher education institutions, we couldn’t fit all of it into our pages! So, in addition to some larger features and profiles, you’ll find a roundup of local news bites from various educational institutions throughout the Quad-City region. Here, you’ll learn about a great place to enjoy a delicious meal, meet students who are truly making a difference and explore special programs that take education far beyond just the classroom! Enjoy!

com or call Yavapai County School Superintendent Tim Carter at 928-925-6560.

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ave you ever thought about a challenging and yet highly rewarding service opportunity where you can “give back” to the community ? If so, serving on a school district governing board may be exactly what you are looking for. Yavapai County has 26 school districts, and no matter where you live, your residence is within a school district. Qualifications include being a citizen of the United States of America, being at least 18 years of age, possessing your civil rights, being a registered voter and having continually resided within the school district for at least one year immediately preceding taking office. As well, the candidate and his or her spouse cannot be employed by the district or work under a third-party employment contract with the district. In general, governing board members are elected to two- or four-year terms. The next election will be held in November 2018. The process of becoming a candidate will begin about April 1. When vacancies occur during a term, an appointment is made by the county school superintendent. For more information, visit the Arizona School Boards Association website at azsba.org; visit the Yavapai County Education Service Agency website at YCESA.

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TRI-CITY COLLEGE PREP HIGH SCHOOL

Tri-City Prep students place in top half at international competition

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epresenting Arizona, a team from Prescott’s Tri-City College Prep High School recently competed at this year’s North America Envirothon Competition and placed 20th out of 54 states and provinces. Arizona won this competition in 1997 and 1998, but had not scored higher than 35th place since then. Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in North America and hosted this year’s North America Envirothon Competition. This is En-

virothon’s 20th anniversary, and was attended by teams from nine provinces in Canada and 50 U.S. states. The Arizona team had won the state title in the spring. Arizona’s team members, Amanda Bertsch, Kaleb Lyonnais, Brianna D’Angelo, Ethan Kraft and Kimberly Zamora Delgado, along with their teacher, Carolyn Muchna, participated in a weeklong adventure of learning and testing. Judges for the competition were environmental lawyers and other experts in environmental fields. In preparation for the competition, each team member chose an area of specialty and took the lead at different eco stations, where the students were tested on such topics as aquatics, soil ecosystems, forestry, wildlife ecosystems and micro and macro invertebrate identification. For the final stage of the competition, the students were presented with an environmental problem to solve, taking into account protection of the environment, community needs, sustainability and budget. They presented their solutions to a panel of judges; speaking skills and ability to respond to judges’ questions came into play. While Bob Wilson, a USDA soil scientist, and other key Prescott community members helped the team prepare, most of the team’s training was in desert and high desert ecosystems. The estuary ecosystem where the competition took place was very different, with lots of water and salt water ecosystems. All the teams received some

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Education

training the first two days of the week before the competition to help prepare them for the estuarine environment.

For the final stage of the competition, the students were presented with an environmental problem to solve, taking into account protection of the environment, community needs, sustainability and budget. They presented their solutions to a panel of judges, where speaking skills and ability to respond to judges’ questions came into play. While Bob Wilson, a USDA soil scientist, and other key Prescott community members helped the team prepare, most of the team’s training was in desert and high desert ecosystems. The estuary ecosystem where the competition took place was very different, with lots of water and salt water ecosystems. All the teams received some training the first two days of the week before the competition to help prepare them for the estuarine environment.

in an intimate club-style setting. This year’s Cabaret includes folk/bluegrass songstress Dana Louise & the Glorious Birds on Nov. 17. As the holidays near, YCPAC will celebrate with a fresh take on an honored classic and a cool new way to deck the halls. In The Hot Sardines’ Holiday Stomp, (Dec. 5), the brassy jazz combo leads you on a refreshing riff through a holiday songbook you only thought you knew. Then, in “White Christmas, The Musical” (Dec. 14 – 17) YC Performing Arts delivers a vivid live-telling of the story sprung from Irving Berlin’s classic holiday tune. Tickets for Yavapai College Performing Arts Center’s 2017-18 season are now on sale. For reservations, or more information, please contact the YCPAC box office, 1100 E. Sheldon St., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, or call 928-776-2000 (or 877928-4253 toll free) or visit ycpac.com.

cally sourced, and each meal is made to order – like a restaurant. Based on national surveys, SpoonUniversity.com has ranked Crossroads Café in the top three for “dining hall food” in Arizona. The Café operates year-round and is always open to the public, typically from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. most of the year. prescott.edu for more information.

NAU PRESCOTT VALLEY

NAU Prescott Valley student and alumni profiles

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s a small community campus of Northern Arizona University, the campus in Prescott Valley has been able to attract a diverse traditional and nontraditional student body. Not only do students come directly from the county’s high schools and charter schools, but some students come from as far away as Nebraska to pursue one of the four degree programs offered at the Prescott Valley campus. Meet some of our featured students on page 94 of this issue of Prescott LIVING Magazine.

PRESCOTT COLLEGE YAVAPAI COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

YCPAC offers world-class performances

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n October, the Yavapai College Performing Arts Center (YCPAC) offers two astounding musicians at the top of their game. Grammy award-winning jazz trumpeter Chris Botti, America’s biggest-selling instrumental artist, brings his innovative sound back to Prescott on Oct. 12. Then Scotty McCreery—American Idol winner and country music’s rising star—raises the roof with his vibrant voice and heartfelt songwriting on Oct. 26. In addition to its mainstage season, YCPAC will also bring back its critically acclaimed Cabaret series, featuring unique performers

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Crossroads Café hosts weekly tradition

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ommunity lunch is a proud tradition at Prescott College. Our community joins together each Wednesday for free soup and bread provided by the Crossroads Cafe. It’s a chance to connect over a warm meal and share information about what’s happening at the school. Just like the Crossroads Café itself, community lunch is open to the public and typically runs from noon to 1:30 p.m. during the fall and spring semesters. Crossroads is not like a cafeteria at a big college, where you grab a tray and have a bunch of different setups. It’s a small café and seats maybe 75 people, where most of the food is made from scratch and sustainably/lo-

PRESCOTT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

School to incorporate program helping youth learn and grow

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rescott Mile High Middle School will be supporting Capturing Kids Hearts for its learning community in the upcoming school year. The program – a creation of the Flippen Group, a leadership consulting group based in College Station, Texas – pushes several

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Special Section: Education

EDUCATION

News Bites

simple, but purposeful directives. Teachers are expected to be outside their doors during class switches and to give handshakes, fist pumps and/or audible greetings as students enter class. A few times a week as class begins, teachers ask students to volunteer “something good” that is happening in their lives – a step instructors say has prompted students to open up beyond what they could ever have expected. Mile High Middle School leaders and staff dedicated a considerable amount of time researching institutions that have been successful in improving attendance, decreasing discipline referrals, remaining focused on academics and providing a positive culture focused on children. It was discovered that many are Capturing Kids Hearts schools that unify their efforts to provide a safe environment where all have the opportunity to learn and grow. Mile High is excited to provide Capturing Kids Hearts, as it has always been dedicated to supporting the district mission of “Every Kid, Every Day,” but having a unified process – made possible through the extremely generous financial support provided by the James Family Foundation and Kiwanis Club of Prescott – will assure that children have the chance to flourish in a community grounded in love and respect for all.

Continued

approximately 5,800 students pre-K through high school and is the largest school district in Yavapai County. With 700 employees, including 290 teachers, HUSD is the largest employer in the Prescott Valley/Dewey-Humboldt area. Today, we have many things to celebrate: • Our partnership with Arizona State University extending from preschool to the Barrett’s Summer Scholars Program, • Being featured on George Lucas’ Documentary, “Schools That Work,” • Winning the Golden Bell Award, • Being recognized by U.S. News and World Report and Newsweek as a top school. We are committed to providing a comprehensive, world-class education for all students. This includes high standards for academics, expansive opportunities for co-curricular activities and individualized programs that offer a variety of unique experiences for our students.

TRINITY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

Trinity Christian is flourishing

HUMBOLDT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Who is the Humboldt Unified School District?

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n 1906, the Humboldt School District opened with 43 children in a one-room schoolhouse near the Iron King Mine in Humboldt. Fast forward to today, the Humboldt Unified School District serves

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e are flourishing! Trinity Christian School is thrilled to share our vision for the bright future of the young people in the Quad City area. As we march into our 15th year with 290 students and 101 student alumni, we are blessed to announce our future plans for even greater growth. The new campus will provide a much-needed permanent home for Trinity Christian to continue its vital Christ-centered classical mission to raise up young leaders who are strong in their faith

and ready to lead with sharp minds, a heart for serving others, and to be good citizens of our community. This fall, on the north end of Prescott, Trinity is acquiring 17 acres of land for our future school site that will hold 600 students in pre-K through 12th grade. Our new facility will have a preschool, amazing athletic and fine arts facilities, 21st century science and technology labs, as well as spacious classrooms designed to seamlessly integrate technology and classical instruction. In addition we will offer a parent training and counseling center. The architectural plans are already underway, and the first phase of construction is set to begin in 2018. Trinity Christian School is not affiliated with a particular church; it is an independent, classical Christian school, which partners with parents and community members. Follow our progress and stay in touch on our Facebook page trinitychristianaz.com.

ARIZONA AGRIBUSINESS AND EQUINE CENTER

Great experiences attending Arizona Agribusiness and Equine Center

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y name is Abby Berry and I graduated from Arizona Agribusiness and Equine Center this past year. I am very grateful to have gone to AAEC as they offered me many wonderful opportunities. In my four years of attendance, I have taken veterinary science classes and college classes with Yavapai College. I have amassed 52 college credits since I started attending AAEC, including Calculus I, Chemistry 151 and 152 and Spanish 101 and 102. I was also given the chance to embark on a veterinary science

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Education

Mirroring the traditions of Caravans started in 1967, this past spring, Orme students embarke epic adventure covering all corners of the Southwest. From New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, all th the California coast they spent a week learning and exploring.

Caravan 2017 echoed the purpose of Caravan which late school Founder, Charlie Orme, expla “Challenges, both physically and emotionally strengthen the spirit of people. I believe we com these challenges caravanning through the Southwest, than in most of our experiences.”

trip to South Africa for two weeks. I was able to work with veterinarians and the African wildlife for the best learning experience of my life. The most important thing that makes AAEC a wonderful school is the staff. They are warm, welcoming and very helpful people. Their guidance and their willingness to cater to each student is what makes the school so great.

CHINO VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

Chino Valley USD Centennial

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y name is Taylor Duran, and this year Mr. Patrick Wellert, the principal of AAEC Prescott Valley, has won the prestigious Administrator of the Year award. We are all very proud to have him here at AAEC. This award was received at the state Career Technical Education (CTE) conference in Tucson in July. Only one out of 80 administrators who are exceptional supporters of agriculture education in our state are eligible to receive this award. Mr. Wellert was an undeniable choice for this award. He has helped many students in agricultural education, assisted with many FFA activities, scholarship applications and college courses. Mr. Wellert was an agriculture teacher for 11 years at Chino Valley High School and eventually became a principal here at AAEC for the last five years. Since becoming principal, enrollment has doubled in size!

he Chino Valley Unified School District was first established on July 1, 1918 as The Farms School District teaching grades kindergarten through 8th grade. The name was changed to Chino Valley School District in 1946. Ninth grade was added in 1974, and grades 10 – 12 were approved to be added in 1985. The class of 2017 was the 25th graduating class of Chino Valley High School. The early address for Chino Valley Schools was “Highway 89 across from the Log Cabin Store.” The Log Cabin Store building still exists, right across Highway 89 from Chino Valley High School and the CVUSD District Offices. Chino Valley High School is on the site of the early Chino Valley School. At other sites throughout Chino Valley, Del Rio Elementary School opened in 1980 followed by Heritage Middle School in 1993 and finally Territorial Early Childhood Center (formerly Territorial Elementary School) in 1999.

By the Numbers

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ORME

Orme students explored the Southwest

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irroring the traditions of Caravans started in 1967, this past spring, Orme students embarked on an epic adventure covering all corners of the Southwest. From New Mexico to Utah and Arizona, all the way to the California coast, they spent a week learning and exploring. Caravan 2017 echoed the purpose of Caravan, which late school founder, Charlie Orme, explained: “Challenges, both physically and emotionally, strengthen the spirit of people. I believe we come closer to these challenges caravanning through the Southwest, than in most of our experiences.”

In the Quad-City area, including Mayer, there are 5 school districts and 17 charter schools.

≈497 TEACHERS

≈13,500 STUDENTS

Source: Yavapai County Education Service Agency

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Special Section: Education

NAU PRESCOTT VALLEY Student and alumni profiles

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s a small community campus of Northern Arizona University, the campus in Prescott Valley has been able to attract a diverse traditional and nontraditional student body. Not only do students come directly from the county’s high schools and charter schools, but some students come from as far away as Nebraska to pursue one of the four degree programs offered at the Prescott Valley campus. As an example, Josh Bowen moved from the Midwest in late 2016 to be closer to family. In January 2017, Josh began taking classes while running his consulting business. He is interested in helping people in the Quad Cities learn more about technology and helping businesses integrate technology into their operations. Bowen has been impressed with the amount of attention and advice he has received from faculty during his first semester on campus. “Not only do they take the open-door policy serious, but they are amazing people who truly want to help,” Bowen said

Isaac Delamater

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by Richard Heath, Executive Director, NAU Prescott Valley Campus

of the faculty. Bowen is working with Dr. James Subach to research and present a poster on a possible application of machine learning to the area of insider threats in cybersecurity. Upon completion of his bachelor’s degree in Entrepreneurship, Bowen plans to help make the Quad Cities a technology hub by attracting telecommuters and satellite offices of large technology companies to the area, as well as assisting local entrepreneurs in succeeding. Of the 200 graduates of this campus since 2013, many have gone on to or are working toward some very rewarding careers. A 2013 graduate of Bradshaw Mountain High School, Isaac Delamater chose to attend the college because of the credits he had earned as a duel-enrollment student at Yavapai College. While attending the Prescott Valley campus majoring in Service Management and Leadership, Delamater took advantage of the opportunities that the program and lead faculty member Scott Lewis was able to create for him. He studied abroad in Costa Rica for a summer, learning the Spanish language while embracing the culture. Disneyland hosted his internship as part of the Disney College program in fall 2015. Delamater is currently finishing his manager-in-training program as an assistant front desk manager at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge (the largest resort in Arizona). While he is still in the discovery process regarding what he would like to do in the future, Delamater recommends the NAU Prescott

Josh Bowen Valley campus to anyone wanting to attend college locally. “It was a hands-on, fast paced, fun and challenging curriculum that opened my eyes and forced me to think differently,” he said. As an alumnus of the inaugural graduating class in May 2013, Lyndsie Aquilina is coming full circle by becoming an instructor in the program in which she received her degree – Applied Human Behavior. Aquilina decided to attend the NAU Prescott Valley campus because it was an economical choice for obtaining a degree. She was able to live at home, work, and save money. The education and support she received from the professors and advisors at the campus prepared her to earn a master’s degree from King’s College in London. Currently, Aquilina is working as a client site coordinator with Cerner at Yavapai Medical Center with a goal of eventually working with veterans suffering from PTSD and other anxiety

Lyndsie Aquilina disorders. Lead faculty for Applied Human Behavior, Kristen Alaniz, speaks highly of Aquilina. “Lyndsie is an excellent young woman,” she said. “Lyndsie used her education at NAU as a springboard for seeking out adventure and deepening her education in her chosen field of study. She is the best example I know of what education can do to assist a young person to develop confidence and continue to grow as a whole person.”

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Education

ESSAY CONTEST WINNER

“SHOES” by Alysia Kuknyo

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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hoes take us places. A few of mine have travelled to far off countries, but every pair of shoes I have ever owned has been worn in Prescott, Arizona, and they have many stories to tell. My dusty boots can tell you all about the forest trails I have hiked or the crazy bull riders at the World’s Oldest Rodeo. A few pairs of tennis shoes could tell you what pace I kept in the Whiskey Row Marathon or how many times I took them off to dip my feet into the water of Goldwater Lake. However, the many high heels I have owned throughout the years could tell you both similar and entirely different stories. A pair of red heels have a white gash up the heel from the time I wore them on a spontaneous bouldering adventure at

Watson Lake, and the black heels are worn smooth from nights on the dance floor at Matt’s Saloon. Several pairs of loafers were specifically reserved for school and work, and although they had their fair share of adventures around Prescott, they could talk more about the diverse community of people, where strangers become neighbors, within minutes, in times of joy and hardship. In a way, you could say that Prescott is a town that wears many different kinds of shoes, just like me – that there is something here for everyone to make it their hometown. Whether you are a local or a visitor, Prescott has a unique life adventure waiting to be discovered. As a born-andraised “Preskitonian,” I can readily tap my heels together and say, “There is no place like home.”

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Special Section: Education

YAVAPAI COLLEGE PROVIDES GROWTH AND ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

by Tim Diesch, Marketing Specialist, Yavapai College

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iving in the Prescott area has distinct advantages. Gorgeous weather, a tremendous variety of outdoor activities and stunning natural beauty are arguably the most obvious benefits. There is a lesser-known resource available to residents, however, to spark their curiosity, provide outlets for creativity and whet the appetite for knowledge. Yavapai College’s Lifelong Learning division provides opportunities for enrichment and development through noncredit courses, and they are available to everyone from kids to seniors through a variety of programs. The College for Kids program takes place every summer—one session each in June and July—and is designed for children ages 5-17. Courses and activities focus on the areas of science and technology, nature, creative arts, drama, filmmaking and writing, cooking, languages and more. Registration is required, so check with Yavapai College in the spring to see about enrolling your kids. Prescott area residents are invited to enjoy lifestyle and leisure classes through Yavapai College’s Community Education program, featuring hands-on learning and special interest topics. Community professionals experienced in their chosen fields teach these noncredit courses. Subjects are wide-ranging and include areas such as history and cultures, arts and crafts, philosophy and spirituality, finance and retirement, and health and wellness. If anyone reading this article has a background in an area that would interest others, or if you have an interesting hobby or pastime that you would like to share, then consider serving as a Yavapai College Community Education instructor. If interested, visit www.yc.edu/commed to submit a proposal and resume. See the area “So You Want to Teach” for application deadlines, instructions and a link to the proposal. For additional information, call 928-717-7755. The Yavapai College EDventures program is a great way for

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The Yavapai College EDventures program is a great way for residents to travel, engage in fun and healthy group activities, and make new and lasting friends

residents to travel, engage in fun and healthy group activities, and make new and lasting friends. Accompanied by experienced guides who interpret the natural and cultural history of the region, the EDventures program provides a path to learning more about local and regional natural history. Upcoming EDventure outings include an overnight trip to Canyon de Chelly with Navajo guides; multiple day trips to the bottom of the Grand Canyon; a daylong trek along the “Mother Road” of Route 66, from Ash Fork to Oatman and a day in historic Jerome that concludes with a ride on the Verde Canyon Railway. Next year, EDventures presents its international travel offering to a land of extremes: Iceland. Journey with world-renowned geologist, author and international expedition leader, Wayne Ranney, for an in-depth exploration of Iceland’s natural wonders from Aug. 1-14, 2018. View the stunning sights, steep yourself in the unique culture, observe the natural wildlife and even take a crash course in the Icelandic language. Please join us for an information presentation on Saturday, Oct. 28 at the Yavapai College Prescott campus—please RSVP by calling 928-717-7755. Yavapai College Lifelong Learning also features the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), a means by which residents may explore, discover, develop, engage, and socialize with others. Within the OLLI framework, talents, experience and skills are shared in a relaxed environment to explore new interests, discover and develop latent abilities, engage in intellectual and cultural pursuits and contribute to a rapidly changing multicultural and multigenerational society. There are no tests or grades in the OLLI program, and it offers a variety of events throughout the year providing opportunities for socializing. OLLI is a membership organization. Register by phone at 928-717-7634 or online at www.yc.edu/olliregister. THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Education

• • • • •

Why attend YC? Tuition cost is 78% below the Arizona four-year university average Average class size of 17 students 24% of full-time faculty have their PhD’s, nearly twice the national average Transfer to a four-year university with little or no debt Financial aid, academic advising, tutoring services, and other student resources

Chino Valley | Clarkdale | Prescott | Prescott Valley | Sedona | Online

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YC 013-18

Visit yc.edu today to learn more.

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Special Section: Education

GIVING STUDENTS HOPE by Krista Carman, President, PUSD Education Foundation The mission of the PUSD Education Foundation is to collaborate with PUSD to provide excellence in education, to promote innovation in teaching and to partner with the community to enhance the quality of education for all students.

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ducation is everyone’s business. In 2013, a group of professionals and parents decided to try to make a dent in a big problem – the neglected and underfunded public school system in Prescott. Of course, all Arizona public schools suffered from years of budget cuts at the state level, but this particular group loved Prescott and had a passion to give back to our community. The vision was to make our Prescott schools a shining example of what a public school can be, in turn attracting and retaining great teachers, educating wonderful children and increasing the quality of life for all Prescott residents. Prescott schools are unique in that they are exceptionally high achieving, despite the pitiful funding. However, what could these schools and teachers do if they had the opportunity to fund their dreams for their campuses and students? The PUSD Education Foundation intended to find out. The PUSD Education Foundation officially launched in 2015. Since that time, The Foundation has donated over $43,000 to better our public schools. The Foundation receives private, business and grant donations to support its work. The mission of the PUSD Education Foundation is to collaborate with PUSD to provide excellence in education, to promote innovation in teaching and to partner with the community to enhance the quality of education for all students. The Foundation has been able to award innovative teaching grants to worthy educators during each semester of its existence. The grants have provided much-needed technology, robotics labs, specialized math curriculum, high school-level fine arts curriculum and much more. The Foundation also awards grants to

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campuses for beautification projects, as many of the PUSD buildings are historic and in need of some improvements – and these are no longer funded by the state. Most recently, PUSD has adopted a new philosophy of culture – Kids At Hope. Kids At Hope is a cultural shift in the schools, which provides every adult (staff and volunteer) with the tools and resources to communicate to students the belief that every child has hope and can succeed – no exceptions. Kids At Hope is a twist on the frequently used phrase, “kids at risk.” Children cannot control their risk factors (divorce, low income, single-parent homes, learning disabilities, etc.) but the hope can be controlled by loving adults in the lives of our children. The PUSD Education Foundation

is proudly supporting and partnering with PUSD and the Margaret T Morris Foundation to bring Kids At Hope to our schools. This new culture launched with the start of the 2017-18 school year. Antwone Fisher, a notable poet, author, screenwriter (known for his 2002 film autobiography, “Antwone Fisher”) and Kids At Hope board member, spoke at the PUSD convocation, and shared his at-risk story. He described how the risk was turned around by just a few caring adults who chose to give him hope. The PUSD Education Foundation is thrilled to be a small part of a big community change. If you would like to volunteer, donate or be a part of something amazing, please contact us through our webpage pusdeducationfoundation.com

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Talk, C nnect, Read! How? When?

Talk, C nnect, Read! How? When? n your child starts a conversation, give him or her your full attention...eye contac Ÿ When your child starts a conversation, give him or her your full attention...eye contact is a erful connector. powerful connector. r answering child’s question, ask hera question. a question. Ÿ After your answering your child’s question, askhim him or or her Ÿ Pause after speaking...to give your child a chance to continue the conversation. se after speaking...to give your child a chance to continue the conversation. Ÿ Build vocabulary by introducing a new word and offering its definition, or use it in a way that d vocabulary introducing a new word and offering its definition, or use it in a w is easyby to understand. Don’t turn on the radio...or a video...talk! Talk about the scenery, the neighborhood, or what asy to Ÿunderstand. something looks like. t turn ŸonRead the aloud radio...or a video...talk! Talk about the scenery, the neighborhood, o to your child...even older children benefit from being read to. ethingŸ looks When like. reading aloud, stop and talk about the story. Look at the pictures, ask questions about the child...even story, ask how the story children makes yourbenefit child feel from or whatbeing he or she likesto. most about d aloud to your older read the story. n reading aloud, stopof and talk about the story. Look at the thecolor, pictures, question Ÿ Take advantage daily activities...while in the kitchen, discuss texture, ask and taste ut the story, how childwhat feelfoods or what or sheand likes of theask foods; talk the aboutstory wheremakes the foodsyour come from, you likehe or dislike, who mos will clean up. story. Ÿ While grocery shopping, discuss what to buy, how many you need, and what you will make. e advantage of the daily in the kitchen, discuss the color, texture, an Discuss size,activities...while shape and weight of the packages. Ÿ When having awhere meal together, turn off come and put from, away allwhat foods you like or dislike, an e foods; talk about the foods clean up.electronics to encourage talking and connecting, which will lead to reading success. e grocery shopping, discuss what to buy, how many you need, and what you wil For information: Denise Murphy, Director of Early Literacy Denise.Murphy@yavapai.us uss the size, shape and weight of the packages. n having a meal together, turn off and put away all tronics to encourage talking and connecting, which Talking builds the reading brain! ead to reading success.

Talk, C nnect, Read!

formation: Denise Murphy, Director of Early Literacy

Denise.Murphy@yava

Talking with children helps them understand their language and builds their vocabulary, which builds their overall reading development Talk, C nnect, Read!

Talking builds the reading brain!


Special Section: Education

THE STEM CENTER AT A GLANCE As Arizona’s premier STEM University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University designed and constructed the STEM Education Center to bring science, technology, engineering and mathematics to life for its students and community. To help students achieve their greatest potential, the STEM Education Center required industry-grade laboratories, workshops and studios worthy of the brilliant scholars who would use them. A few of the most exciting new laboratories at Embry-Riddle include: • The Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium features a state-of-the-art dome theater and powerful digital projection system that allows for presentations of NASA’s library of shared content and 3-D universe exhibitions. Soon to be open to the public, the planetarium and theater will illuminate the universe to viewers with stunning clarity, and will be prominently featured through media and educational outlets within the local area and beyond. • The Cavendish Lab provides students with the ability to research and experiment with exotic propulsion systems, including the study of matter and antimatter interactions, which could ultimately be used to revolutionize deep space travel. • The LIGO Optics Lab allows students to investigate and identify the ‘physics reach’ of LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) detectors and their search for Gravitational Waves—a key indicator in the identification and study of black holes. • Drs. Charles and Elizabeth Duva Robotics Lab supports multiple courses, labs and studies in the ever-growing field of robotics engineering and programming. The lab features indoor and outdoor testing areas, and will enable the development of stationary, mobile and aerial robotic systems. • The Energy and Thermo-Fluids Lab is where students study how thermos-fluid phenomena work and how it affects engineering design. The energy labs provide experience with standard and green energy experiments. A connected portion of the lab will house an outside energy yard that allows students to experiment with energy harvesting devices. • The Raisbeck Engineering Design Studio supports mechanical engineering and multi-disciplinary design courses, creating a realistic team-based capstone design experience for all students in each stage of the design process, from conception and assembly to testing and operation. • The Space Grant Lab will support the students’ work on group projects, including our payloads from cube satellites and high-altitude scientific ballooning missions. The lab also includes a cleanroom for continued payload and instrument development. • The Keickhefer Foundation Forensic Lab empowers students with industry-grade forensic biology equipment. Studies in this lab include sampling and analysis of DNA evidence and blood types, polymerase chain reactions (PCR), genetic sequencing, microscopy techniques, biochemical analysis of body fluids and environmental contaminants, anatomy and physiology, as well as microbial identification. • Margaret Morris Foundation Wildlife Science Lab prepares wildlife professionals to study animals, their habitats and their ecosystems. This lab will be used for ecology, ornithology, mammalogy, and plant identification courses, which aid graduates in dealing with the management of wildlife issues in urban, rural and airport settings.

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...continued from page 87 The STEM Center’s completion comes at an exciting time for Embry-Riddle, highlighting a period of extraordinary growth in student enrollment, which has approached an all-time high of 2,600 students and prompting campus infrastructure investments in excess of $45 million. These investments have included a new residence hall on the southern edge of campus and an expanded, updated Eagle Athletic Complex—where the Men’s and Women’s Basketball, Women’s Volleyball and Wrestling teams compete in the CAL PAC conference. These facilities combined with the existing campus observatory complex—recently rated No. 8 in the nation among the top 35 Best College Observatories—ensure that Embry-Riddle will continue to thrive as an institution for scholarship and research for years to come. With the increase of student enrollment comes the potential for amplified community

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Education

involvement and economic growth to the Prescott area. Embry-Riddle draws its student body from all 50 states and dozens of foreign nations, resulting in an incredibly diverse campus that recognizes Prescott’s small- town appeal. It is here that students develop the academic foundations of their future professional careers while becoming active members of the community before graduation. These students’ arrival to Prescott generates a positive economic impact of $278 million annually, affecting the entire community in both direct and indirect spending. This influences Quad-City business owners in a myriad of ways, including a demand for off-campus student housing, local restaurants, grocery stores, service stations, hotels and other retail merchants. As Embry-Riddle continues to produce an increased demand for STEM-based industries in Prescott, the University’s growth could signal long-term economic development in the area for decades. The conception of ERAU’s STEM Center

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

has always carried with it the intention of serving a wider audience than just students and faculty. Between its impressive lab facilities and remarkable planetarium, the STEM Center will become an invaluable resource for local middle and high schools, as well as an epicenter for community engagement events year-round. This research-rich campus environment is capable of influencing local students and underrepresented groups in the community, who previously had little-tono access to STEM-based curriculum—such as young women and minorities—by exposing them to the possibilities of careers in high-paying professions that might have otherwise been unattainable. “As a native Prescottonian and ERAU employee of 19 years, the opportunity to further the connection between Embry-Riddle and Prescott is very exciting!” said Andy Fraher, Director of STEM Outreach. “To have Embry-Riddle’s world-class academic program here in Prescott is amazing—add to that the social, cultural, and athletic events, along

with events planned for the Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium for the public, this facility will undoubtedly deepen the bond between Embry-Riddle and Prescott.” In 2018, Embry-Riddle celebrates its 40th anniversary in Prescott, during which time both have collaborated in the development, cultivation, and enrichment of thousands of students who have, at one time or another, called Prescott their home. Just as Embry-Riddle has continued to challenge itself and utilize the newest technology and training techniques for the benefit of its students, so has it sought to strengthen the bond between its campus and the Prescott community. The deepening of this partnership is vital to the fulfillment of Embry-Riddle’s mission: to prepare the next generation of leaders with a value-driven, globally aware academic foundation, comprised of strong technical, human relations and conceptual skills needed for success in business and public administration—across the Prescott community, within state of Arizona and around the world.

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Special Section: Education

AAEC HIGH SCHOOL

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arn your high school diploma and college associate degree at the same time. In a unique partnership with Yavapai College, our students begin co-enrollment as soon as the 9th grade. Classes on our campus offer rigorous college preparatory curriculum, and enables qualified secondary students to earn college transferable credits towards their Associate Degree while completing work for their high school diploma. We offer small class sizes, along with a teaching staff that are masters in their field. The Arizona Agribusiness and Equine Center (AAEC)continues to offer outstanding instruction in the sciences for students interested in careers in biotechnology, veterinarian studies, equine science and agriculture related fields. Our Chemistry and Biology classes are ahead of the field and career oriented. AAEC teaches the Arizona State Standards in all core curricula, and is accredited by the North Central Association of Schools and Colleges. 7500 Civic Circle, Prescott Valley.

(928) 775-3200 www.aaechighschools.com

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THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


PRESCOTT

FARMERS

MARKET

by Kathleen Yetman

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ctober is National Farm to School Month – a time to celebrate connecting kids to local food. Farm to School programs may include one or more of three elements: procurement, education and school gardens. Procurement is the sourcing of foods from local farms to be served in school meals, snacks or cafeteria taste tests. Through education, students participate in lessons about cooking, agriculture and nutrition. School gardens engage students in growing their own food and learning science, math and other subjects in a hands-on, real-life setting. In the greater Prescott area, kids and families benefit from each of these elements. Humboldt Unified School District’s (HUSD) Child Nutrition program gives preference to local produce when procuring food for students, and provides nutrition education in the classroom. Many schools in HUSD and all in Prescott Uni-

fied School District have a school garden. For four years, Yavapai County Community Health Services, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and Prescott Farmers Market have collaborated to provide in-school nutrition and cooking classes, assistance in garden building, and after-school garden clubs. Each October, these three organizations coordinate schoolwide taste tests of a locally grown veggie in local cafeterias to introduce kids to fresh vegetables from nearby farms. Farm to School programs greatly impact the health of children and families in our communities. Kids are more likely to eat a vegetable when they are directly involved in planting the seed, watering and harvesting it. In addition to benefiting students and the schools they attend, Farm to School strengthens the local economy, increases the income of local farmers and inspires families to cook more vegetables at home.

Prescott Summer Farmers Market

Prescott Valley Farmers Market

Prescott Winter Farmers Market

Chino Valley Summer Farmers Market

May ‑ October Saturdays, 7:30 a.m. - noon Yavapai College Parking Lot B 1100 E. Sheldon St.

November - April Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. YRMC Pendleton Center 930 Division Street

Year-round Tuesdays, 3 - 6 p.m. Harkins Theatres Parking Lot Glassford Hill Road and Park Avenue

June - October Thursdays, 3 - 6 p.m. Olsen's Grain Parking Lot 344 State Highway 89

https://www.prescottfarmersmarket.org/ Yavapai County Community Health Services 1090 Commerce Drive, Prescott, AZ 86305 928-771-3122 http://www.yavapaihealth.com/health-ed FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

University of Arizona Cooperative Extension

840 Rodeo Drive, Prescott, AZ 86305 928-445-6590 https://www.facebook.com/FCHSYavapaiGila/ PRE S COT T LI V ING 103


Special Section: Education

GRANT HELPS DISCOVERY GARDENS PRESCHOOL GROW

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rescott Unified School District’s Discovery Gardens Preschool was recently awarded a $143,000 grant by the Arizona Department of Education. This grant will help the district’s Quality First accredited preschool grow by 30 additional 4-year-old students this coming school year. According to Discovery Gardens Director, Stacy Williams, the grant helps pay for staff and supplies to provide free preschool to qualifying students. “We are thrilled to have been awarded this funding and provide quality preschool for more students,” Williams said. Discovery Gardens is a tuition-based preschool for students age 2 years and 10 months to those preparing to enter kindergarten. In addition to the new grant providing more families with access to preschool, Discovery Gardens provides other scholarships through its accreditation by First Things First’s Quality First program and the generous donations of community members. “We have an incredible staff of certified teachers and paraprofessionals,” Williams said. “Our classrooms are inclusive and designed to meet the learning needs of every student we serve.” Williams, who holds a bachelor’s degree in special education and master’s in early childhood education, has been with Discovery Gardens for 12 years, serving as director since 2012. Her staff includes professionals trained to provide special education services as well as therapeutic and health professionals provided through PUSD. Sandy DeKemper, a longtime paraprofessional who now volunteers at Discovery Gardens, was very excited to hear about the new grant. DeKemper, who sends her grandchild to the preschool, called it, “the best in town.”

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“I wouldn’t send them anywhere else,” she said with a big a smile. DeKemper also encourages any interested parents to schedule a visit to Discovery Gardens. Paul Katan, PUSD’s Federal Programs Director and Grant Writer, worked with Williams to secure the funding. According to Katan, “this funding was previously unavailable in Yavapai County, and we are very lucky to have it.” He went on to explain how PUSD receiving this grant now makes scholarships available to Yavapai County residents who have begun working and learning about early childhood education. Katan said, “In addition to serving more 4-year-olds at Discovery Gardens, the

Preschool Development Grant has a scholarship program that pays tuition, books and fees for folks wanting to complete a bachelor’s or master’s degree in early childhood education.” He added, “The grant is great for Discovery Gardens and for aspiring early childhood educators throughout Yavapai County.” For more information or to schedule a visit to Discovery Gardens, call 928-442-1283 or visit prescottschools.com. For more information about the Preschool Development Grant (PDG), email paul.katan@prescottschools.com. And, for information about the PDG Scholarships for early childhood education, call 855818-6613 or email info@thearizonaregistry.org.

CAPTURING KIDS HEARTS

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rescott Mile High Middle School will be supporting Capturing Kids Hearts for its learning community in the upcoming school year. The program – a creation of the Flippen Group, a leadership consulting group based in College Station, Texas – pushes several simple but purposeful directives. Teachers are expected to be outside their doors during class switches and to give handshakes, fist pumps and/or audible greetings as students enter class. A few times a week as class begins, teachers ask students to volunteer “something good” that is happening in their lives. This is a step instructors say has prompted students to open up beyond what they could ever have expected. Mile High Middle School leaders and staff dedicated a considerable amount of

time researching institutions that have been successful in improving attendance, decreasing discipline referrals, remaining focused on academics and providing a positive culture focused on children. It was discovered that many are Capturing Kids Hearts schools that unify their efforts to provide a safe environment where all have the opportunity to learn and grow. Mile High is excited to provide Capturing Kids Hearts, as it has always been dedicated to supporting the district mission of “Every Kid, Every Day.” But having a unified process – made possible through the extremely generous financial support provided by the James Family Foundation and Kiwanis Club of Prescott – will ensure that children have the chance to flourish in a community grounded in love and respect for all.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


, d l i h C Every y a D y r e v E Highly Qualified & Dedicated Staff Technology Integrated Instruction Student Support Rich in Tradition Honors Programs STEAM Blended Learning Dual Enrollment AP Classes 21st Century After School Program Frequent Communication With Families FREE All Day Kindergarten State & National Award Winning Athletics, Music & Art Programs

Every Child, Every Day

prescottschools.com 928-445-5400

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Special Section: Education

TRINITY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Teaching classically and growing flourishing students for 15 years by Kyle Maestri, Headmaster of Trinity Christian School

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’m asked all the time, “What is meant by ‘teaching classically’ and ‘flourishing’ students?” Classical education’s sound and proven philosophy of education has been around for more than 2,000 years. Some of the greatest minds in history, including Francis Scott Key, G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien reflect their classi-

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cal development. Our founding fathers bear marks of classical training in literature, classical language (especially Latin), history and rhetoric. Classically and historically speaking, flourishing means to do what we were made to do, and in doing so, to reach one’s maximum potential. When reaching our full potential, we bring the greatest glory to God, our creator. As St. Irenaeus in the second century said, “The glory of God is man fully alive.” To flourish is just that – to be fully alive. This means being fully alive and flourishing and

having realized potential. It’s bringing maximum glory to God. That is what we all want for the children in our lives. So often today in the preparations for their future we forget to consider the most critical questions like, “What kind of person are they becoming?” “What do they love?” “Are they forming strong habits, like hard work, attention to detail, confident speech?” Pursuing these deeper things that shape a whole person – head, heart and hands – is what classical Christian education is all about. Doing this in the context of exploring our amazing God-given heritage is a real joy.

Children and even teenagers are capable of surprising us. They are not just absorbing timeless works or going through the motions to pass a test. Through learning about the great men and women who came before us and learning how to think for themselves, students are inspired to true greatness and are coming to ask the right questions of the world around them today. We are thrilled to be a part of the classical Christian education movement. We are equipping young people to flourish as leaders in their communities in a way that goes above and beyond college prep.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Special Section: Education

2020 VISION 2020

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RE-DEFINE RE-DESIGN RE-IMAGINE

m o c . d e fi i n u t d l o b hum

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FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Special Section: Education

7 THINGS YOU’LL NEED BEFORE FILLING OUT THE FAFSA FORM

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f you need financial aid for college, you must complete the free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form. The 2018–19 FAFSA form is available as of Oct. 1, 2017. You should fill it out as soon as possible at fafsa.gov. Here is what you’ll need to be prepared to fill it out: 1. Your FSA ID* An FSA ID is a username/ password to log in to certain U.S. Department of Education (ED) websites. Each student, and one parent of each dependent student, will need an FSA ID to complete the FAFSA process on fafsa.gov. We recommend creating your FSA ID early to avoid delays. For step-by-step instructions, a video is available on YouTube. IMPORTANT: Do NOT create an FSA ID on behalf of someone else. That means parents should not create FSA IDs for their children and vice versa. Doing so may result in issues signing and submitting the FAFSA form and could lead to financial aid delays. (Also, it’s against the rules to create an FSA ID for someone else.)

2. Your Social Security number* You can find the number on your Social Security card. If you don’t have access to it, ask your parent or legal guardian or get a new or replacement card from the Social Security Administration. If you are not a U.S. citizen, but meet Federal Student Aid’s basic eligibility requirements you’ll also need your

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Alien Registration number. 3. Your driver’s license number If you don’t have a driver’s license, then don’t worry about this step. 4. Your 2016 tax records* Changes made to the FAFSA process, beginning with the 2017– 18 FAFSA form, now require you to report income information from an earlier tax year. • On the 2018–19 FAFSA form, you (and your parents, as appropriate) will report your 2016 income information, rather than 2017 information. • Since you’ll already have filed your 2016 taxes by the time the FAFSA form launches, you’ll be able to import your tax information into the FAFSA form right away using the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT). • Not everyone is eligible to use the IRS DRT, and the IRS DRT does not input all the financial information required on the FAFSA form. Therefore, you should have your 2016 tax return and 2016 IRS W-2 available for reference. • You cannot use your 2017 tax information. If you have experienced a reduction in income since the 2016 tax year, you should complete the FAFSA form with the info for 2016, and then contact each of the schools to which you’re applying to explain and document the change in income. They have the ability to assess your situation and make adjustments to your

FAFSA form if warranted. 5. Records of your untaxed income* The FAFSA questions about untaxed income may or may not apply to you, but you’ll still need to report answers on the 201819 FAFSA form. 6. Records of your assets (money)* This includes savings and checking account balances, as well as the value of investments such as stocks, bonds and real estate (except the home in which your family lives). You should report the current amounts as of the date you sign the FAFSA form, rather than the 2016 tax year amounts. 7. List of the school(s) you are interested in attending • Even if there is only a slight chance you’ll apply, list the school on your FAFSA form.

• •

You can always remove schools later, but if you wait to add a school, you could miss out on first-come, firstserved financial aid. The schools you list will automatically receive your FAFSA results electronically. They will use your FAFSA information to determine the types and amounts of financial aid you may receive. If you add a school to your FAFSA form and later decide not to apply to that school, that’s OK! The school likely won’t offer you aid until you’ve been accepted anyway. You can list up to 10 schools on your FAFSA form at a time. TIP: To be considered for state aid, several states require you to list schools in a particular order. Visit studentaid.ed.gov to learn more.

Information supplied by the U.S. Department of Education

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


NOVEMBER (continued from page 19)

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Shop Local VETERAN OWNED Business Day - ALL DAY at Veteran-owned businesses

10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Stepping Stones - 6719 E. 2nd St., Prescott

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Meditation Circle - 1:00 PM2:00 PM - Prescott Valley Public Library - 7401 E. Civic Circle, 1st floor. “Ronny Cox in Concert” - Presented by: The Folk Sessions - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theatre & Performing Arts Center 117 Gurley St., Prescott. $25-$30.

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2017 Veterans Day Parade - 10:30 AM-1:00 PM Downtown Prescott - 120 S. Cortez St.

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“Born Country - The Best of Alabama - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theatre & Performing Arts Center - 117 Gurley St., Prescott. $22-$25.

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Holiday Boutique By Lonesome Valley Quilt Guild -

Valley of Lights - 6:00 PM-10:00 PM - 2215 5th St., Prescott Valley. A one mile drive through of holiday lights.

Prescott’s 22nd Annual Holiday Light Parade - 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Courthouse Square 120 S. Cortez St., Prescott. Bonfire, Entertainment & Fun after the parade at Mile High Middle School Field.

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Walk Through Bethlehem Live Theater - 1:30 PM-4:00 PM - American Lutheran Church 1085 Scott Dr., Prescott

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NAGS: Northern Arizona Genealogical Society - 1:00 PM-3:00 PM - Prescott Valley Public Library - 7401 E. Civic Circle, Genealogy Room.

GHOST TALK TOO

Oct. 20, 21, 27 and 28; shows at 6:00, 7:30 and 9:00 pm Ghost Talk Too brought to you by Prescott Center for the Arts and West Yavapai Guidance Clinic Foundation

GHOST FEAST

Oct. 11, at El Gato Azul, Reservations Required, 928-445-1070

DAY OF THE DEAD ART EXHIBIT

Oct. 2 – Nov. 2, PCA Gallery, 208 N. Marina, Prescott, 928-445-3286

HISTORIC CEMETERY WALK

Oct. 28, 10 to 2, Citizens Cemetery, 815 E. Sheldon St., Prescott, 928-713-8807

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS CELEBRATION

Oct. 29, Smoki Museum, 147 N. Arizona, Prescott, 928-445-1230

"Integrity, Knowledge and Experience" Business and Personal Services Please feel free to contact us today for a free consultation or to learn about the new services we offer business owners.

Tiensvold Shaffer Wenzel CPAS, PLLC 141 S. McCormick St., Ste 104, Prescott

(928) 445-5777 www.tswcpas.com

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Special Section:

SWEEPING VIEWS, PRISTINE TERRAIN AND CLEAN AIR by Ray Newton

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very morning when I drive to work, I’m stunned by the splendor of this valley. And I’ve been lucky enough to do it for

13 years.” That’s how Jim Jones, sales manager for Talking Rock, describes how his work week starts. Located 15 miles northwest of Prescott on Williamson Valley Road, Talking Rock is a private, master-planned residential golf community. In the summer, it was applauded by Where to Retire magazine as “… one of the top 50 master-planned communities in the United States.” “Some people tell me the countryside reminds them of that around Santa Fe, while others tell me it’s a lot like Bend, Oregon,” Jones said. “I agree, except we don’t have the snow and cold of those two communities.”

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Carefully sculpted into the pinon, juniper and chaparral-covered terrain, the development covers 3,600 acres of a former working cattle ranch. Its name is derived from original owners finding and preserving historic Native American artifacts on the property. Jointly owned by Symmetry Companies and Harvard Investments, 1,000 acres of the development are dedicated as “open space” — no man-made structures anywhere. Further, more than 30 miles of walking and hiking trails have been mapped, and more are under consideration. To date, more than 1,500 custom home sites have been planned, with about half of those already identified and in some stage of development. Only 13 years old, Talking Rock has about 280 homes already built. What’s more, 25 more are currently under

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


construction, and 17 are in design review. About 600 residents call Talking Rock “home,” Jones said. Of those, 60 percent are full time, while 40 percent are part time. All residents are members of the Talking Rock Club and have full access to all the diverse amenities. Among those are the clubhouse, the full service Ranch House Restaurant, Morgan’s Bar and Grill, Coop’s Coffee Shop, the Barn Fitness Center, a swimming pool and spa, tennis courts, basketball court, shuffle board and horseshoes, bocce ball, a children’s play area, a dog park, a community garden, a fishing deck and pond and biking trails. In August, 23 new home sites were defined, ranging in size from two-thirds of an acre to two acres. Called Cooper Hawk Ridge, the lots are really premium in the development because of their elevation and

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

the natural landscape, Jones said. “These are spectacular view lots — any direction. You can look south toward Granite Mountain and Prescott, or west toward Juniper Mesa Wilderness Area, or east toward Paulden and Perkinsville — nothing but pristine terrain, blue skies, cottonball clouds and clean air,” Jones said. Jones said the newly available lots start at $170,000. “We’re encouraging buyers to consider contemporary design elements that incorporate steel, glass and natural wood materials,” he added. Some will allow for RV garages, guest casitas and studios, too. They also give a different perspective of the championship golf course. Not quite a fourth of the acreage is a rolling link-style 18-hole golf course with wide

open spaces. Planned by renowned course designer Jay Moorish, each hole has five tee boxes. That provides a challenging, yet nonintimidating experience for those ranging from beginners to the most experienced golfers, Jones said. Golf carts are not a requirement, though they are available. When Moorish designed the course, he followed the rhythm of the land, so fairways are generally straight and fairly wide. Golf Digest recently ranked the course as one of the top 15 private courses in Arizona. A golf pro at the course commented not long ago, “This is the kind of course a 10-year-old kid could kick the ball around without trouble.” For additional information: 928-237-4047 or TalkingRockRanch.com

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Chino Valley 68 - Quail Ridge 69 - Appaloosa Meadows 70 - Brightstar 71 - Highlands Ranch

Prescott Valley 62 - Viewpoint 63 - Pronghorn Ranch 64 - Granville 65 - StoneRidge 66 - Mingus West 67 - Prescott Ridge 77 - Mingus Meadows 78 - Prescott Prarie 79 - Poquito Valley 80 - Antelope Meadows 83 - Legend Hills 85 - Lynx Lake Estates 86 - Castle Canyon Mesa

40 - Aspen Creek Meadows 41 - Hassayampa 42 - Historic District Area 43 - Brighton Hill Cottages 44 - Tenney Ranch 45 - Timberridge 46 - Copper Canyon Village 47 - The Mountain Club 48 - Forest Hylands 49 - Summit Pointe Estates 50 - The Foothills 51 - Haisley Homestead 52 - Hidden Valley Ranch 53 - The Dells Prescott 54 - The Ranch at Prescott 55 - Yavapai Hills 56 - Granite Park Ranch 57 - Lynx Mountain View Estates 58 - Victorian Estates 59 - North Arrow Ranch 60 - Granite Peak Ranch 61 - Sunrise Villas 82 - Equestrian Estates 84 - The Dells at Prescott

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Chino Valley

Special Section: Home & Garden

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THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


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BEFORE AFTER

BEFORE AFTER

How Home Staging Benefits You • Staged Homes look better than comparable homes for sale. • Staged Homes sell faster. • Staged Homes sell for more money in most markets. • Photos of Staged Homes look better in print and internet advertising. • Agents working with buyers recognize Staged Homes as properties ready to sell and are more likely to show your home.

• Buyers view Staged Homes as homes that are clean and well taken care of. • Building inspectors view Staged Homes as homes that have been well maintained. • Staged Homes often get better appraisal value.

“Staging used to be a luxury. Today it’s a necessity.”

A home that shows well….will sell well!

BEFORE AFTER

VIRGO ORGANIZE INTERIORS ™ Real Estate Staging Since 2006

Rosa L. Moreno-Hilburn I.R.I.S. • Interior Re-Design Industry Specialists Email: Rosa@virgoorganizeinteriors.com Cell: 520-576-8007 • Office: 928-460-5809 "Trusted for Service, Respected for Results"

Real Estate

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• With each client and every real estate transaction, I strive for the utmost in Professionalism. • I will make myself aware of your personal needs and wants and will tailor the buying or selling experience to just for you. • My commitment to every client is always to provide the finest service with their interest as my single most priority. 114 PRE S COT T LI V ING

Leland Moreno-Hilburn, REALTOR® morenohilburnrealestate@gmail.com (928) 830-5083 • liveinprescott.com

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


REVERSE MORTGAGES

When Reverse Is The Right Direction

Combating the misconceptions by Donna Linton, contributor

M

isconceptions in the reverse mortgage field have plagued our industry for more than 26 years. I have sat with skeptics, and overheard misinformed seniors talking negatively about our product. Even close relatives are confused. The problem is the result of several factors, including common misconceptions about a complicated financial product. Most Americans hold on to the false belief that the bank owns the borrower’s home. The reverse mortgage program has changed substantially from its inception. With new protections in place for non-borrowing spouses, expanded rules to police

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

industry participants and a financial assessment to ensure the loan’s suitability for a borrower’s circumstance, reverse mortgages are a better, stronger and safer product than ever before. It has become a unique financial planning tool that may help more seniors, with the power of the HECM (Home Equity Conversion Mortgage). Nobel Prize-winning economist and MIT finance professor Robert Merton has drawn attention to reverse mortgages. “Americans have wrongly steered clear of reverse mortgages,” Merton said during a wealth management conference. “This is going to become one of the key means of funding retirement in the future.”

Your Hometown Reverse Mortgage Specialist

~ GET THE FACTS! ~ Free, Confidential In-home Consultation

928-237-9599 NOW: Use the Reverse Mortgage to PURCHASE a home!

WILLIAM ‘BILL’ BINKEY Sr. Reverse Mortgage Consultant NMLS # 214866, AZ # 0916242

www.isAreverseMortgage4me.com

Frontier Financial of Arizona • 1191 Old Chisholm Trail, Unit B Dewey, AZ 86327 • AZ BK # 0910428 NMLS # 150085

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Special Section: Home & Garden

INVEST IN AMERICAN-MADE FLOORING by Dan Hussey

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hirty years ago, when I opened my first flooring store, most of the products we offered were manufactured in the USA. Now, many of the manufacturing jobs have moved to China and other foreign countries. This shift has had a big impact on the flooring you are offered in the typical flooring showroom. Americans are competitive shoppers, and many times the low bidder gets the project. This tendency to shop for the lowest price, has created a retail environment of offering products made in foreign countries, in order to present the lowest price. To some, this advent of mostly foreign-made flooring products is distressing. Some shoppers are cognizant that products made overseas cost jobs in the states. Flooring is usually a larger purchase, with and average ticket of $2,500. And when you buy an entire house full of new flooring, the total can exceed $15,000. It doesn’t take long with purchases of that size to take many jobs away from the country we all love and want to see prosper.

For those of us with a passion for the prosperity of America, how do we answer this flood of foreign-made products? Here are some suggestions to help turn the tide – to protect American jobs and our long-term prosperity: 1. Be aware and proactive. Ask for products MADE IN AMERICA. 2. Don’t make the lowest price your first objective. Cost is important, but not the most important aspect of a flooring purchase. 3. Encourage retailers that you shop with to offer more products made in America. 4. Buy American. Compare American-made with American-made, not American-made with foreign-made. 5. Encourage your friends and family to support manufacturers and retailers that support American-made products. 6. Recognize the advantages of American-made products. The availability is better, and there are shorter wait times. Here in our Totally Floored by Flooring America showroom, we have installed American-made flooring on the showroom floor. We encourage you to visit our showroom, and ask us to show you our competitive and gorgeous MADE IN OUR BEAUTIFUL USA products! P.S. One bright spot: Most carpet is made in America!

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THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION •• FALL 2017


The Norkus Group

The Key to your Real Estate Success Di Ann Norkus

Top Producer - Presidents Circle

928.710.0148 danorkus@hotmail.com

www.Home2PrescottAZ.com 231 N. Marina Street • Prescott, AZ 86301 Office: 928.777.8331 • Fax: 928.708.0022

Your new home offers timeless design, privacy and some of the best views in Prescott 1375 Natures Way, Prescott • 4 BR, 5 BA, 4,183 SF MLS # 1002139 • $749,500 The main floor features a spacious living room with picture windows, hardwood floors and hookups for a gas fireplace. The kitchen boasts granite counters, stainless steel appliances, eat in kitchen and large patio for dining with a view. Master bedroom has a marble fireplace, expansive master bathroom and spacious private master deck. Perfect for entertaining, the downstairs is an ideal family game area or in-law suite including a guest bed/bath, living room area, wet bar and game area. Come swim, play or soak in the one-of-a-kind custom built ‘’swim-spa’’ room.

Beautifully situated on over 2 acres, this Santa Fe property is architecturally pleasing and ready to be called ‘’home’’ 13775 N. Spotted Eagle, Prescott • 3 BR, 2, BA, 2,641 SF MLS # 999490 • $629,900 From the gated courtyard to the open floor plan with tongue and groove wood ceilings and stone fireplace, this home offers a spacious split 3 BR, 2 BA design with an office, and bonus studio or family room. Easy care tile flooring throughout, with an open kitchen that has all the right features and enhances great room style living. In addition to the attached 3 car garage, there is a 1,620 SF dream workshop, RV garage and storage garage. The outdoor space is like a nature preserve with deer, quail and all types of birds sharing the environment. Home is positioned to keep privacy at a maximum and road noise at a minimum.

Premier lot in one of the most prestigious, gated communities in the Prescott area, The Preserve 6960 W. Secret Springs Trl., Prescott • 5.7 Acres MLS # 998177 • $250,000

Ready to build your Dream Home? 1428 Commonwealth St., Prescott MLS # 1003383 • $119,900

Located in Prescott’s premier gated community High Valley Ranch

Located just 4 miles from the historic Downtown Courthouse

Great views with a neighborhood that shows real pride of ownership

1610 High Valley Ranch Rd., Prescott • 2+ Acres MLS # 1003342 • $115,900

1615 High Valley Ranch Rd., Prescott • 2+ Acres MLS # 1003345 • $115,900

4121 N Bitter Well Dr., Prescott Valley MLS # 991014 • $23,950


Special Section: Home & Garden

BEST FALL-COLORED TREES TO PLANT NOW by Lisa Watters-Lain, Arizona’s Garden Gal, Watters Garden Center

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ot all trees are created equal when it comes to autumn colors, but this is their season. Autumn is also the ideal planting window for trees and tall shrubs. Increased garden success is had when plants are showing their colors. The days are cool and the soil is warm, so plants start with a burst of new root growth. Most properties don’t have many trees. You can count on one hand the number of trees in the average landscape. Trees stand out in any landscape, like anchors that bring together the foundation of a good plan. Also, don’t forget that trees increase the value of your landscape more than spas and grills. Don’t waste money by cutting corners. Trees are where the landscape value is and this is no place to pinch pennies. Buy the best-looking tree you can find – bigger is better. Nice looking trees at the garden center turn into big, bold specimens as they mature. An ugly tree only stays ugly its entire life. Cut landscape dollars on shrubs, flowers and hedges so your budget can afford a few specimen-sized trees to enhance your outdoor ambiance. Here are the showoffs of fabulous fall foliage.

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Red Celebration Maple - A very fast-growing shade tree blazed in reds and oranges through autumn, it produces a tall, narrow tree with ascending branches more resistant to wind and storm damage. Widely used as a street tree, driveway lining or any place tight spaces demand a tree that will not spread past 20 feet. It offers the brightest of reds in fall. Flame Maple – This little maple is famous for blazing red foliage that ignites a landscape. It’s well-adapted to mountain clay soils, sun, wind and cold winters. Once rooted in your yard, it’s easy on irrigation and perfect for firewise landscape needs. Though sometimes mistaken for a Japanese maple, this mountain variety is the far hardier of the two trees. Whether grown as a short multi-trunk tree or a 10-foot shrub, it is on my list of preferred “water-wise” plants. Ornamental Pistachio – These are for gardens exposed to the wind and subjected to microbursts or other weather anomalies. This autumn showoff thrives not only in harsh environments, but even with neglect. The attractive umbrella shape turns a brilliant crimson; no other tree produces such a vibrant, broad range of of fall

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Trees are where the landscape value is and this is no place to pinch pennies.

reds and oranges. It can serve dozens of uses: as a shade tree, street tree, accent or first yard- specimen. This is the ideal choice for flanking driveways or grouped in pairs to meet overhead at street sides. Grow this colorful low-water need tree against a solid evergreen background to provide intense contrast to any landscape. Aristocrat Pear – This is the last tree to turn autumn red in December, but also celebrates the other three seasons of the year. Producing gigantic masses of white flowers in spring before the leaves appear, this tree then provides glowing green leaves through summer that are disease and bug- resistant. In winter, the tree has a clean outline. It is upright and pyramidal when young, and becomes broadly oval at maturity. It also resists wind damage. The autumn colors are often thought to be brighter than maple and rival the purple of Raywood ash. Regal Petticoat Maple – This newly developed tree is striking as a shade tree. Large maple leaves are glossy green with a dark velvet purple underside. In autumn the leaves are equally striking, with aspen gold on top and a bright magenta pink on the bottom and accents of red, orange and salmon throughout the tree.

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Thriving in our high pH soils, it also matures above 35 feet with age. Petticoat has proven itself even in commercial landscapes, and it is also very hardy against wind damage. Quaking Aspen - for the past four years the undisputed best-seller here at Watters Garden Center is Quaking Aspen, Populus tremuloides or trembling leaf poplar. Growing in the wild at the over 6,000-foot elevations, it does well as a cultivated specimen. Aspens have the classic pure white bark like a birch, but unlike a birch, handle our clay soils even better. True to their name, the dainty leaves shiver and

quake with the slightest breeze. For a natural look with aspens, plant them in clusters or buy a clump of aspens in the same container. They are social trees and like to hang out together in groupings. They are best planted before the Thanksgiving holiday. Until next issue, I’ll see you among the fancy fall foliage here at Watters Garden Center. Lisa Watters-Lain can be found throughout the week at Watters Garden Center, 1815 W. Iron Springs Road in Prescott, or through her website at WattersGardenCenter.com or FB.com/WattersGardenCenter.

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Special Section: Home & Garden

MULTI GEN HOUSING A new trend or the re-awakening of an old tradition?

Over the next several issues I will explore this trend. This issue looks at “what” and a little about “who.” Next, we will look at design issues and solutions. Lastly, we can look at the Arizona angle and what is happening across our country.

by Tom Reilly

W

hat is “multi gen housing?” In a nutshell, it is several generations of the same family living under one roof. I will wager many of us could think of reasons why this wouldn’t work, but according to the Pew Research Center, 57 million Americans, or 18.8 percent of our population, think it is a good idea. And with those numbers, this issue bears another look. At Renovations, we have completed several projects along the multi-gen scenario over the last few years, and are currently working on another project. This re-emerging or new trend is not just the more familiar "mother-in-law quarters,"

although it can be that. We are finding that young families are moving back in with parents for a variety of reasons. These range from the recent economic turndown to losing employment and increased student-loan debt as well as divorce. Also, we baby boomers are reaching 65 at the rate of 11,000 per day, and we like the idea of being close to our grandchildren and having the added benefit of being able to live in our own homes longer. In this part of Yavapai County, we are seeing several design approaches to meeting the sometimes conflicting needs of the different generations. As you might imagine, a millennial family, just starting out with small ROC #098410 ROC #222306

Your Complete Remodel Resource

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children, have a different daily cycle than we boomers, who might be coming from several years of being empty-nesters. I bet we all have some different schedules for meals, relaxation and family time. Couple this with each generation wanting some alone time, and you can see some creative solutions have been implemented. One of the challenges is the differing rules for the multiple jurisdictions in our area. These stem from primarily cooking facilities. The concern is developing duplexes in a single-family district – a real concern. There are some very creative ways to move forward. Each home and circumstance has peculiarities that generate unique solutions.

(928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

Your Dream Home is Right Under Your Feet!

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Audra Farnsworth (928) 710-7947 • homes@audrafarnsworth.com

1024 Willow Creek Rd., Ste. E Prescott, AZ 86301

www.audrafarnsworth.com

1330 Clear Creek, Prescott MLS # 989692 • $139,900

1586 Conifer Ridge Lane MLS # 1005811 • $1,295,000

6430 E Kilkenny Place, Prescott Valley MLS # 1006399 • $240,000

412 Bloomingdale, Prescott MLS # 1005172 • $434,500

1800 Windy Walk Lane, Prescott MLS # 979330 • $74,000

1160 W. Copper Canyon Drive MLS # 1000935 • $112,000

Beautiful .44 acre flag lot located at the end of a cul-de-sac in The Heritage. This lot offers just enough boulders and trees for character and beauty, but still very build-able! Greenbelt behind lot for extra privacy! There are just a few view lots left in this highly sought after subdivision. Well priced and waiting for your dream home!

Sought after Blooming Hills Estates area. 3 BR, 2 BA, 2,237 SF. Open floor plan. Built in cabinets in garage, security system, two zoned HVAC, and central vacuum. Central location is close to shopping, hospital, and downtown, but far enough for quiet living.

Surprises await with this elegant European-inspired estate in Prescott's most elite neighborhood, Hassayampa Village. 5 BR, 5 BA, 5,629 SF. Voted 'Best Home on Luxury Home Tour', ''like a storybook home''. Nestled in the tall pines, enjoy expansive golf course/mountain views, sunrises/ sets from the large deck. This incredible unique home is a MUST SEE!!! It will certainly leave a lasting impression.

SUPER MOTIVATED! Great views, great location! Beautiful, well treed .29 acre lot in desirable Kingswood Estates! All city utilities, clubhouse/athletic facility, located just minutes from downtown Prescott. This lot is perfect for a walk-out home!

Tina Seeley (928) 443-0096

www.nationalrealtyofprescott.com

Recent upgrades including new appliances, vinyl flooring, new paint throughout. Well maintained front and back yards with mature fruit trees. 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,223 SF. Privacy fence to enjoy cool evenings on the back patio. HOA fees cover use of clubhouse, pool, and tennis. Walk to community park.

Views, Views, Views, all the way to the San Francisco peaks! Easy build corner lot well treed, boulders, and lots of wildlife. Paved almost all the way to lot - 3 minutes on dirt road. The creek runs along the edge of this property. Electrical hook-up at corner of parcel. Spectacular spot to build your private dream home.

Visit www.AudraFarnsworth.com for additional photos and information


Special Section: Home & Garden

CONSTRUCTION IS

ALL SMILES …but we need to see more of them! by Sandy Griffis, Executive Director, Yavapai County Contractors Association

D

espite the rapidly recovering construction industry, many companies are still finding it difficult to grow and move local economic development up the chain due to lack of a workforce. As is the case in any business, people are an organization’s greatest resource. The quality of this most important resource – people – is what distinguishes one team or company from another. Having talented management in place to guide and direct operations is crucial,

Based on surveys conducted across 30,000 employees, the construction industry rose to the top of the list of happiest employees, even above industries such as consumer products, technology and finance. PRE S COT T LI VING V ING 122 PRESCOT

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and obviously, having an adequate number of skilled and unskilled workers to perform the work is also a necessity. Finding and recruiting a sufficient number of skilled, talented people – not only in the construction trades, but every other business – is becoming increasing difficult. There are several factors contributing to this problem. As in construction, this is typically viewed as being one of the least desirable industries in which to work. Surveys among the nation’s youth show construction at the bottom of the list of professions that they would enter. Construction, by nature, is dangerous, dirty and hard work. Other industries or professions offer preferred work environments that are cleaner, safer and generally more desirable, so consequently, there is a severe shortage of talented people willing to work in construction. The construction industry in North America has relied upon immigrant or foreign labor to varying degrees throughout the course of history. Thousands of Chinese laborers built the transcontinental railroads in the 19th century. European immigrants constructed the urban landscape in the 19th and 20th centuries. And a few years back, the labor void was filled largely by Hispanics. Hispanic labor from Mexico and other Latin American countries was filling the gap in the domestic workforce. These hard-working individuals were making a substantial contribution toward keeping the industry moving and pro-

ducing. And with the baby boomers retiring and with the millennials, who grew up in an electronics-filled, socially-networked world, what workforce do we have? Millennials working in construction – heck no! When a news story features the construction industry, it is often accompanied by images of serious men and women in hard hats and tool belts, surrounded by chaos, showcasing the gritty elements of the jobsite. But according to a new study, the best tool in a construction craft professional’s toolbox might just be their smile. TINYpulse, in its “Best Industry Ranking Report,” shows that construction professionals are the happiest employees in the workforce. Based on surveys conducted across 30,000 employees, the construction industry rose to the top of the list of happiest employees, even above industries such as consumer products, technology and finance. There’s no doubt that the commercial and industrial construction markets have bounced back from the recession. Average hourly wages have increased, and job creation in the construction industry over the past 12 months has been the fastest since 1999, however, there is not a workforce to support this job creation. There are strong opportunities for professional growth in the construction industry. There are promotion paths and unlimited opportunities for mentorship and training. As an industry, construction has displayed a commitment to workforce training and skill development that few others can match. Construction is one of the few industries where, with the right training, job experience and commitment, an employee can start his or her career in a craft training program and grow to be a company owner. We need commitment from our schools and our educators to provide industry-recognized training for in-demand careers, to ensure that the future of the construction industry will be all smiles. Where would America be without the construction industry? THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Buying? Selling? Relocating? YOUR real estate dreams are my life’s work.

“Whether buying or selling real estate, put me to work for you. With over 28 years of experience, I bring you caring and professional service. I am here to help you every step of the way.”

I am happily married to Col. Robert Shanks Jr, USAFR (Ret.), and I understand the relocation pressures families can face. My husband and I are members of Willow Hills Baptist Church. Gardening, hiking and photography are my favorite hobbies. I have a highly developed listening ability allowing me to gather the facts needed to effectively represent my clients and negotiate purchase contracts on their behalf. My integrity, honesty and professionalism have resulted in multiple real estate awards over the years. Please don’t hesitate to let me bring my superbly developed professional, caring service to you for all of your real estate needs. I am here for you because your real estate dreams are my life’s work!

• Over 28 years of residential experience in Arizona • Graduate, REALTOR® Institute Designation • Certified Military Residential Specialist • Member of U.S. Vets Advisory Council in Prescott • Prescott Chamber of Commerce Ambassador and member • Prescott Federal Credit Union Board of Directors

Cindi LaSalle-Shanks Realty One Group Mountain Desert 100 E. Sheldon Street Prescott, AZ 86301

928-533-1012

realtorcindi@aol.com www.realtorcindi.com Each office is independently owned and operated.


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benefits

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ToHomes name a few...increase in value, build equity and provide a nest egg for the future typically Homes typically increase in value, build equity and provide a nest egg for the future

Your monthly mortgage payment can be fixed Your monthly mortgage payment can be fixed

The interest and property tax portion of your mortgage payment is a tax deduction The interest and property tax portion of your mortgage payment is a tax deduction

You can paint the walls or renovate however you’d like You can paint the walls or renovate however you’d like You can bring home askingpermission permission You can bring homeaanew newbest bestfriend friend without without asking

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Realtor,ABR,CDPe,SFR,CNE,CCSS,RSPS Realtor,ABR,CDPe,SFR,CNE,CCSS,RSPS Bloom Tree Realty Bloom Tree Realty 928.308.0101 928.308.0101 prescottsbesthomes@gmail.com prescottsbesthomes@gmail.com www.PrescottBestHomes.com

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REPRESENTING BUYERS AND SELLERS IN THE PRESCOTT QUAD CITIES

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Donna Baade

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Realty One Group Mountain Desert 100 E. Sheldon St., Ste. 200 • Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 642-5338 • DonnabPrescott@gmail.com

To find the newest Prescott area property listings visit donnabprescott.com

Each office is independently owned and operated.


C U S T O M 1 / 2 T O 1 AC R E H O M E S I T E S T h e ro l l i n g h i l l s o f t h e P r e s c o t t N a t i o n a l Fo r e s t s u r ro u n d yo u .

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JERSEY LILLY SALOON Mistaken identity, but rich history by Ray Newton

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ittle did a British actress, who performed internationally during the Victorian on into the Edwardian era, know that her name would grace one of the most famous saloons in Arizona and the Southwest. What’s more, it is purely by accident, not design; and it’s only recently that the popular Whiskey Row watering hole known as the Jersey Lilly Saloon is called what it is. The new owners say they have no plans to change the name. “We like what we are, and we’ll continue that tradition, even though we’re making some changes,” said Susan Roberts, one of the three co-owners. “Our biggest change— expanding the floor space on the second floor so that customers have even more room to enjoy themselves.” She estimates they’ve spent more than $100,000 in renovations. Roberts said when she and her son, Josh Makrauer, and their partner, Andre DeFreitas, bought the saloon three months ago, they made the conscious decision to continue building on past success. That success has a long history—150 years, in fact. Located smack in the center of Whiskey Row, the second-floor saloon is the only bar with a balcony that looks out toward Courthouse Plaza. But it was among the many bars and brothels that served miners, ranchers and military during Frontier and Pioneer days, before the turn of the century. When it was rebuilt after the notorious Whiskey Row Fire of July 14, 1900, its appeal continued, even though it then had several different names.

Current name is fairly recent

A reality is the current name happened when local businessman Marlin Kuykendall bought what he called, “… an abandoned dump almost 30 years ago.” “I spent thousands in rebuilding the place,” Kuykendall said. “While doing that, we found dozens of dusty old posters and photographs, many of lovely women from the Victorian era.” Kuykendall said one picture was of an especially beautiful woman. A man offered him $300 cash for it, thinking it was of Emilie Charlotte LeBreton, born in 1853 in the British community of Jersey. She was later known by her stage name of Jersey Lilly Langtry. She became famous in the United States when Judge Roy Bean named his 128 PRE S COT T LI V ING

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Traveling • Dining • Entertainment

saloon in Langtry, Texas, after her. She had no connection with Prescott. “I had no idea who was in the picture, but I thought he must know something I didn’t. I turned him down, but I named the saloon The Jersey Lilly. The name stuck. But honestly, I don’t know if that picture was really her, “ Kuykendall said with a chuckle. Expansion continues—support for courthouse lighting is emphasized Roberts and her partners are more than satisfied with business these past few months.

“Of course, we’re in the middle of busy season right now. We’re getting a lot of tourists and new people as well as our regulars. But we’ve expanded, too—already added 600 square feet and a new back bar. And this past week, we punched a hole in the rear wall to expand some more,” she said. Roberts emphasized the Jersey Lilly would remain a leader in fundraising for the annual Christmas Courthouse Lighting and related events. “Last year, former owner Tommy Mere-

dith and his wife raised more than $32,000 through an auction. We want to meet or exceed that this year. It’s scheduled for Nov. 2,” Roberts said. “What most people don’t know is the Courthouse Lighting is not paid for by the city or the county. Instead, it’s private money that makes it possible for Prescott to sustain its image as ‘Arizona’s Christmas City.’” She added, “Be assured, we’re here as a permanent part of the new ‘Downtown Entertainment District.’”

The only balcony in Prescott that overlooks the beautiful Courthouse Plaza on Historic Whiskey Row.

Live music and dancing Available for private parties and special events

928-541-7854 • 116 S. Montezuma Prescott, AZ 86303. FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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5th Annual Hotshot 19 Memorial Workout of the Day Event In Memory Of • • • • •

Jesse Steed, 36 Wade Parker, 22 Joe Thurston, 32 William Warneke, 25 John Percin, 24

• • • • •

The commencement of the Honor Guard Ceremony, which honored the 19 Fallen Heroes through the presentation of each hero’s name banner. All 19 names were proudly displayed on the pull-up rig at the start of the Saturday noon heat.

Clayton Whitted, 28 Scott Norris, 28 Dustin Deford, 24 Sean Misner, 26 Garret Zuppiger, 27

• • • • •

Travis Carter, 31 Grant McKee, 21 Travis Turbyfill, 27 Andrew Ashcraft, 29 Kevin Woyjeck, 21

Anthony Rose, 23 • Eric Marsh, 43 • Christopher MacKenzie, 30 • Robert Caldwell, 23 •

RAISING THE BAR TO RAISE MONEY FOR FIREFIGHTER EDUCATION

C

ould you do it? This workout was designed to reflect and honor the sacrifice of the fallen 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots Crew.

The Workout: • 6 Rounds for Time (45 Minute Cap) • 30 Air Squats • 19 Power Cleans • 7 Strict Pull-Ups • 400 Meter Run

Arizona Wildfire and Incident Management Academy (AWIMA) where firefighters receive the best training possible to save lives, homes and natural resources while keeping themselves safe. AWIMA’s motto: “Everyone comes home safely.”

On August 26th, thousands of athletes, spectators, sponsors, volunteers and staff were at Captain CrossFit in Prescott for the 5th Annual Hotshots 19 Memorial Work Out Day. Over $16,000 was raised to benefit the

About Captain CrossFit: Our mission at Captain CrossFit is to provide every member with a highly effective, premium fitness, health and wellness experience – both within, and beyond, the walls of our facility. Captain CrossFit will provide the highest quality training, equipment and facilities to assure athletes maximize their time and effort with us – yielding maximum results. We will

Michelle Blevins, co-owner of Captain CrossFit, hangs the name banner of Christopher MacKenzie for display throughout the event.

Tennil Reed, Arizona Native and CrossFit Games Athlete (6th Place in the World, Female Open Division), supports the Hotshots 19 Memorial Fundraiser - taking time for plenty of fan photos and interviews.

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create a community that fosters personal and physical growth for our members, staff and community. Captain CrossFit 420 6th Street | Prescott, AZ 86301 www.CaptainCrossFit.com 928-778-9789

Stephanie Turbyfill, widow of Travis Turbyfill, completes a power clean. This is the 5th year Stephanie has participated in the event and the first year she served on the Fundraising Advisory Board.

Officer Jessica Hugus, a 5-year veteran of the Prescott, Arizona Police Department demonstrated pride for her agency and solidarity for her brothers and sisters in the Fire Service by completing the workout in full police uniform.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


PRESCOTT WESTERN HERITAGE FOUNDATION WHO WE ARE:

We are a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit corporation, made up of individuals and organizations interested in Prescott and Yavapai County’s unique and storied Western heritage.

OUR MISSION:

To preserve and promote the Prescott area’s Western heritage through education, events, art, music and projects that enhance its Western lifestyle, making Prescott and Yavapai County unique and desirable places to live and visit.

OUR VISION:

To develop a collaboration of local organizations, businesses and cities and towns within Yavapai County to accomplish a common goal: ‘to make Prescott and Yavapai County Arizona’s premier destinations to attend Western

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

and historical events, to visit museums, historical societies and historical locations, which celebrate our unique Western heritage and culture. This will be accomplished by creating a Western Heritage Center to promote all participating, nonprofit organizations in Yavapai County, which share our vision of educating residents and visitors of all ages about our history and Western heritage. The Foundation’s goal is to create and own a Western Heritage Center. The center will be in a desired destination in downtown Prescott. Here, area residents, visitors, students, historians and others interested in the area’s Western heritage can enjoy artifact and memorabilia displays, events, entertainment and presentations of our unique Western history. ‘Center’ visitors will find significant and interesting historical information as well as detailed information on Prescott’s renowned museums, the Prescott Frontier Days Rodeo® and other organizations throughout Yavapai County, that preserve and promote our Western heritage.

OUR ANNUAL BANQUET:

Each year, we invite those interested in our vision to join us in celebrating and honoring a member of our community, a local organization and selected students as recipients of the Foundation’s Annual “Heritage Keeper” Award and the Annual “Heritage Keeper” Scholarships. These awards recognize their contributions to our area’s Western legacy. This “Western evening” is filled with fellowship, friendship and entertainment.

SILENT AUCTION:

The banquet’s popular silent auction provides funding to support our mission. Your auction contributions enable the Foundation to provide the “Heritage Keeper” Awards and to build the funds necessary for our proposed Western Heritage Center.

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n o i t a r e n e G t x e N

STUDENT FILM COMPETITION SEEKS THE

OF CINEMATIC STORYTELLERS

PHOTOS BY BOB SHANKS

by Helen Stephenson, Yavapai College Film & Media Arts Director

W

hat do Steven Spielaudience? What is that story trying berg, Peter Jackson, to accomplish? Telling a powerful Wes Anderson and story through film requires craft and the Cohen brothers practice. Making films, hands-on, is have in common? the best way to learn the medium, They all started making films as understand the teamwork, and create teens. They were driven, passionate and stories that get better each time. That’s why the Prescott Film focused. They knew their path early on Festival and the Yavapai College Film and focused on meeting their goals. All & Media Arts Program have created those traits gave them what they needed to be successful filmmakers. the High School Student Film ComToday’s high school students are petition. The competition opens in practically born with an iPhone November to middle and high school in their hands. Easy access to film students across the state. Aspiring and media equipment can turn filmmakers will submit their work – almost anyone into an instant media one short film, 10 minutes or less – to producer. Add to that their own the competition through the Prescott “channel” (through YouTube and Film Festival website: prescottfilmfestival.com. other streaming The compeservices) and they The right equipment doesn’t tition entry fee are practically automatically make one a is $10. Winning “in the business” already, right? filmmaker. Making a good student films Not exactly. film means telling a story. will be screened The right equipas part of The ment doesn’t Prescott Film automatically make one a filmmaker. Festival, June 8 – 16, 2018. Their creMaking a good film means telling a ators will receive a Filmmaker Pass to story. What is the beginning, middle the festival – allowing them access to and end of that story? Who is its everything (except the wine tasting).

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The director of the first-place winner will receive a three-credit class in the Yavapai College Film & Media Arts Program, valued at $315. Film & Media Arts classes are taught at YC’s Verde Valley Campus in Clarkdale, as well as online. Production and animation classes are conducted in person. Screenwriting is offered online. Some FMA classes are also offered on the Prescott Campus. The Prescott Film Festival and YC’s Film & Media Arts faculty agree that getting students onto a college campus early can be a wonderful opportunity and an eye-opening experience. It encourages students to develop in a fun and supportive environment, while learning from other filmmakers and media professionals. Their films also get an audience, and they get the thrill of seeing and hearing audiences react to their work for the first time. Keep an eye on the Prescott Film Festival website (prescottfilmfestival. com) for more details on the High School Student Film Competition in the days and weeks to come. And if you’re a student filmmaker, gather your best ideas … and put them in front of a lens.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


“PRES-COTT” or “PRES-KITT” How do you really say the name, anyway? by Melissa Ruffner, Historian and Author

W Melissa Ruffner’s historical presentations, walking tours, step-on guide services and costume sales and rentals are by appointment only. Contact her at historymelissa @cableone.net or (928) 830-4930.

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

elcome to... Well, just how – and why – do we pronounce the name of our town? Here’s a little bit of the back story. In the early 1980s, I wrote the first complete history of Prescott, sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. It was a two-year labor of love, since I was born here in 19**, but that’s a story for another time. When my youngest daughter, Leila, was stationed with a Marine Corps Wing Site Support Element at Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts, I took the opportunity to deliver a copy of my Prescott: A Pictorial History to the William Hickling Prescott home at 54 Beacon Street in Boston. The then-president of the Colonial Dames of America shared with me that visitors from Arizona often asked how the Prescott descendants pronounce their name. She told me that William H. was the grandson of

Colonel William Prescott, a Revafter our William H. and which olutionary War hero, and during were named after other folks, the colonists’ overthrow of the including C.H. Prescott, a railroad British in Boston, they changed official. We have several Sister the pronunciation from “PresCities, so perhaps we should COTT” to “Pres-KITT” to show adopt Prescott in the southeast their allegiance with the newly corner of Washington State. declared “Americans.” Then, if a new resident or As background, when people visitor mispronounces the name took surnames, they often chose of our town, they can merely their vocation (Miller, Baker, explain that they are referring to Smith…) and who they were the our Sister City. Or, do they call it son of (AdamSON), or where they “PresCOTT?” I know...do you? lived. Prescott was the priests’ “COTTage” William in a village. DescenPrescott dants in England still pronounce their surname “PresCOTT,” and descendants of the new Americans still use “PresKITT.” A student of mine at Yavapai College submitted a term paper identifying about a dozen towns named Prescott and indicated which were named

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Fall

WE’RE FALLING FOR by Ashlee Mortimer, Mortimer Farms

I

t might be the mouthwatering pumpkin pecan pies, the perfect weather, the excitement that comes from getting lost in a corn maze or the beautiful fall colors. Maybe it’s tasting fresh—pressed apple cider, finding the most unique pumpkin in the patch, inhaling the crisp fall air, snuggling around the campfire or even those belly laughs that can be heard for miles and miles. Whatever it may be, we are addicted — addicted to fall! The only prescription? The only fix? Fall at Mortimer Farms — your fall destination. For years, my family and I have strived to create farm experiences that enable our guests to have a wholesome family time and make those memories that last a lifetime. I can say full—heartedly the best times I had as a child were the times spent on my dad’s lap riding a tractor, playing on the old tires with my siblings, watching baby chicks hop around, helping my mama in the garden and checking the cows on cold winter days — the list goes on and on. One thing I’ve noticed is my favorite memories are on the farm and the ranch. These are memories I wouldn’t change, ever. For so long, these memory—making moments were only shared with a few close friends and family. Most families are generations removed from the farm, removed from those fun times and memory—making moments, like getting

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There is something magical that comes with having fun on the farm. It must help us tap into our ancestors’ lives, what our country was founded on or even just how to have real, hearty family fun!

dirty, petting a goat, walking through a field of pumpkins or even eating a burger from the same place it was raised. My love of fall grew even more as #MortimerFest began! I love fall because, for a whole month, I am able to see my childhood recreated and see thousands of families making memories that will last more than a lifetime. There is something magical that comes with having fun on the farm. It must help us tap into our ancestors’ lives, what our country was founded on or even just how to have real, hearty family fun! During our years growing up on the farm, my siblings and I were great at turning anything and everything into a special and unordinary time! One of my favorite things we did was turn big piles of plain old dirt into the world’s best play area. We would slide down the big slopes, balance on the slick parts, bury cool stuff and try and find it. We would play here for hours. It wasn’t anything special — literally a pile of dirt — and yet we had so much fun! Another one of my favorites is the Field Roller. It is a race inspired by the farming tool called a field roller. This is a piece of equipment that is hooked onto a big tractor and dragged across the field to break up large dirt clods before planting.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Needless to say, growing up on a farm and now recreating all of those great times for families all over is a life I wouldn’t trade for any other. I am in love with fall on the farm — not the flashy, bright, colorful carnival rides found in the city. We are a farm, and oh, we know how to have a blast. Yahoo for redneck swing, buckin’ bulls, corn bath, pony hops, zip lines, tire swings, peddle carts, corn mazes, pumpkin pads, pony rides, barrel trains, farm animals and so much more! Plus, on top of all the rides and activities, we find it extremely important to add farm education. This is because so many little humans (and big ones, too!) don’t have the opportunity to set foot on a farm or a ranch, and those who do often don’t know much about the ins and outs of the agriculture industry. To feed the need, we offer farm tours and shows, such as dog shows, magic shows and my personal favorite — pig races. They are all a blast and they all teach our guests a few new facts about what we do every day on the farm. I promise, you will have a great time! Agriculture is the best thing that has ever happened to me. It is to thank for the best memories of my life, and I am excited to share those same great memory—making experiences with you and your family. We are happy and excited for those lasting memories to be made. We also are so excited to be able to share our story with you and your family. We have a passion for what we do and the industry we are a part of — farming, ranching and feeding you. It is what we do, and we love it. We invite you to learn about that passion and learn about what we do and why we do it. Enjoy your day; have a blast; pick an awesome pumpkin; eat mouthwatering farm food and enjoy the wonderfulness that comes with being on a farm. And don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and our blog — BeyondtheBarbwire. #Mortimerfarms #MortimerFest Happy fall, y’all!

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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The LIVING Interview (continued) Joe reading “The Polar Express” to Discovery Garden preschoolers

...continued from page 25 cial. You know, I’ll just throw some things out, like if you ever sit at a Prescott High School Badger football game and watch the sunset over Thumb Butte and everybody in town’s there, it’s that type of feeling. If we’re 149 years old and we’re still doing the same thing we were doing 100 years ago or 49 years ago, or even five years ago, then we’ve got a problem, because our world is changing so fast. Something special about PUSD is, even through all these cut years, what I’m most proud of is we maintained our integrity. We continued to have some of the best test scores in the state. And this wasn’t just us, but you know, every time we had a board meeting to talk about cuts, and we talked about cutting the arts, the place was full with people banging their fists saying, “Don’t touch the arts.” And now that was a tough thing, because we said, “Well, what do we touch?” I mean, we’ve got to cut money, and so we found creative ways to do it. But even in some of the hardest times, when we closed those two schools, you know we came out of that and we added to our fine arts. We pushed it down to fifth grade, so that kids could get started even earlier. And if you ever have a chance to go watch the Granite Mountain Band, the kids fill the gym. And I have to tell you, our families are incredible. I mean, maybe we’re a little bit spoiled. We have incredible children, who come from supportive parents, probably more than most communities. Now that said, I’ll tell you the biggest crisis that we’re seeing right now is social emotional needs. And, it’s not just Prescott. PRESCOTT LIVING: Bullying, suicide, all those? JOE HOWARD: Those types of things. We’re all trying to put our thumb on it. I’m just going to make some guesses here and some observations, but our world is moving so fast right now. I don’t think we have a great handle, as a society, on social media right now, and I think it’s creating some things that we don’t even know are happening. Because I don’t care what school you’re at or what classroom you’re in, we are having kids across the nation, across the state and right here in Prescott who

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come in with trauma. They’ve lost a parent or they come from a tough situation. So we’re training teachers in stuff that we’ve never trained them in. PRESCOTT LIVING: How are your graduation rates? How do they compare with the rest of the state? That’s always an issue in Arizona. JOE HOWARD: Yes. We’re as good as anyone. We’re at the top of the state with that. PRESCOTT LIVING: What about dropout? Arizona has a terrible dropout rate. JOE HOWARD: Right, and ours is much better than Arizona’s. But that said, you know, Ray, if we have one kid drop out, we feel like we failed. We’ve actually been working with Mayor Oberg a little bit. There’s a mayor’s roundtable that’s focusing on dropout. So, you know, we’ve shared with him to share with the rest of the state some of the things that we do to keep kids in school. PRESCOTT LIVING: Prescott is a fairly affluent community.Do you have many students here who are eligible for or qualify for state and federal aid? JOE HOWARD: We definitely do. I think districtwide, we’re around 39 percent, so that’s probably a surprising number to most people. But we definitely have kids

who have great needs, and we have kids who come to us with great risk. Our job is to give them hope. PRESCOTT LIVING: So, with all you have accomplished and all you hope to still achieve, if funding were not a concern, what would you do? JOE HOWARD: Oh my gosh. I don’t even get to think about that. PRESCOTT LIVING: [Laughs] JOE HOWARD: All right [laughs], I’m not ready for that one. No…it’s everything on that list on the wall that supports kids the way you need to support kids. I’m just going to go over this list for a minute and tell you the things that we would do. We would bolster our career center to where, you know how you walk into Prescott High School and you just feel that college and career is a focus? All these things are manpower issues, and we don’t have enough people to do all of these things that the kids need, but you know, we’ve got a minimum wage issue. $40,000 out of our budget – our directors are paid lower than anyone in the state, and that’s actually part of our focus this year for our budget, and we’re going to take care of that. Mental health is another one. I mean, I’d hire counselors who could be

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


The LIVING Interview (cont.) there ready to respond when a kid was in trauma. I’d add more fine arts. The more direct attention that you give a student, the better job we’re going to do at educating. What we want to do is personalize learning, and that’s where the world is heading and different kids have different needs, and different kids have different dreams, and so the more stuff that you can give to that, the more you’re going to help those kids get to those dreams. PRESCOTT LIVING: I’m going to share an observation with you. I listen to you, and everything you said was people/personnel-related. I didn’t hear a word in there about more buildings. That tells me a great deal about you. JOE HOWARD: Well, thanks for saying that. You know, it’s about people. That’s the way that you operate every day. I mean, there’s nothing better we can do for kids than put a good teacher in front of them. PRESCOTT LIVING: How would you characterize your administrative style? Are you autocratic? JOE HOWARD: No, not at all. I would say the opposite of that. I mean we’ve worked hard in the last probably five years to balance leadership. In fact, the professional development that we’ve given to our principals is called Balanced Leadership. It comes from a company called McREL, and it’s something that we worked with Yavapai County Education Service Agency School Superintendent Tim Carter to bring to the Prescott area, so our professional management money allowed us to bring these folks in to do that. It’s preaching exactly what we believe in. What I learned really early on is if you’re creating things from your own ideas over and over again, you’re probably in trouble [laughs]. My style has always been to ask the people in the trenches, “Is this going to work?” We get stuff pushed down to us all the time, but here’s our style and we’ll take that to our teachers ultimately. I mean it, it goes from me to the principals and we go, “How are we going to do this?” And then we brainstorm that, and then we take that model down to the teachers and say, “How are we going to do this?” The people who have to do the work have got to have a say in how that work should be done. I feel that we’ve really turned the corner in that

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

and we’ve seen some success with that, and here’s a great example with curriculum. You know, we haven’t had books for years. We haven’t had money for books for years. Most districts haven’t, and so you have to go online. You know, our teachers were doing a great job of figuring that out kind of by themselves, so we said, “OK, we’re going to use online curriculums.” PRESCOTT LIVING: What are the biggest challenges you have? JOE HOWARD: The obvious is that we’re working on a budget that’s not like the rest of the nation. I went to the national superintendents conference and listened to somebody talk. I heard the person talk about their budget and I was like, “OK, how big are they?” Maybe they’re a little bigger than we are. I looked him up and I did the math, and I find out their budget is two times what we have per the same ratio – double what we have. Then the funny thing is Superintendent of Humboldt Unified School District Dan Streeter was at that conference, too. We’d get together and kind of talk about where we’re gonna go and what we’re gonna learn, and when I checked in with him, he told me the same story in a different break-out, only those folks were from California and they were three times the budget that we are. You asked the question earlier, “What would you do if budget wasn’t an issue?” You know, I also feel like guys like Dan Streeter and I, if we wanted to, could go to California and say to their board, “Hey, I can do this for you for a third of the price and give you twice the product, you know.” We’re making it work here in Prescott. We’re making it work, but we can do better. Otherwise the challenges are, how do you stay with the 21st century? These kids coming to kindergarten this year for the first time, none of us know what their job is going to be. So how do you teach them the academic skills that they need? We know how to do that. How do you teach them the problem- solving skills to move and change with the times, and to be problem-solvers, and to be able to solve things that don’t even exist right now? You know, that’s, that’s one of the biggest challenges. This is a community issue and this is a national issue.

continued on page 144...

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THE PRESCOTT PIONEER PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LL EY • CHINO VA LL EY • DE W EY-H UM BOLDT

CONTINUED…

PRESCOTT FIRE DEPT...cont. from page 85 These resources, combined with those of Life Line Ambulance, or in some instances, Native Air Life Flight Helicopters, along with our automatic aid partners with Central Arizona Fire and Medical, work to provide the best chance of survival for those suffering from a medical or trauma event. This evolution of the fire department continued then, and it continues today. In addition to emergency medical service and fire response, the Prescott Fire Department in conjunction with our automatic aid partners, is capable of responding to technical rescues, hazardous materials, weapons of mass destruction, downed power lines, automobile crashes and a vast array of other types of emergencies. So, in effect, the Prescott Fire Department lives up to the theme song popular-

DEEP WELL RANCH...cont. from page 21 opment — up to as many as 10,000 new homes. Others have criticized proposals to have building elevations as high as 150 feet. That proposal since has been modified. Ot hers have quest ione d availability of water. Prescott Regional Prog rams Di rec-

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Whiskey Row Fire of 2012

ized by the 1984 movie “Ghostbusters” by being, “Who you gonna call?” This continuous evolution is not one that was put together

haphazardly, or without great attention to detail. What you see, through decades of refinement, is a service model delivered by highly educated

and credentialed professionals, which has given us a system that is both efficient and effective toward meeting our community’s needs.

tor Craig McConnell has been quoted as saying that currently, Deep Well Ranch has been vested with approximately 950-acre-feet of water. Barger has said growth and development are not planned for the immediate future. “People need to recognize that we are looking at a 35- to 50-year growth period. We’re

trying to anticipate what needs and interests will be in 20 to 30 years,” Barger said. “We want to be visionary in planning for the future.” In brief, the development will contain single-family, multi-family, industrial light, mixed use, business, regional and specially-planned community uses. What that means

is that residential, retail, commercial and public space will be given consideration. Barger also has emphasized that approximately 400 acres of open space, including a wildlife corridor, are included in the development proposal. Review of the development proposal will continue through the coming months. THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


! t n e m o m ll u d a Never

AFTER 25 SEASONS

S

ummer marked the beginning of the Prescott POPS Symphony’s 25th season playing for Prescott audiences, and they’ve already made it an exceptionally entertaining one. For those who are not aware of the distinction between a chamber orchestra and a symphony orchestra, let us envision a chamber orchestra. It is small – usually around 30 musicians; some consisting of all string instruments – and plays classical music. So, too, does a symphony orchestra, which is large – typically 50 to as many as 100 musicians. Ours has about 60 to 70. So, what is a POPS Symphony? It’s a symphony that lets its hair down and plays movie scores, show tunes and more, along with classical. It may play music from TV shows like “The Lone Ranger” or commercials like Google Chromebook’s. Oh wait, that’s the “William Tell Overture” written by Gioachino Rossini in 1829. Classical? Yes. Just as “Hoe-Down” by Aaron Copland is best known as the “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner” ad campaign song and George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody In Blue” is United Airlines’ famous advertising theme. Classical music is heard by millions every day. The Prescott POPS Symphony is composed of extremely

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

talented musicians who can play some of the most difficult music ever composed. On top of that, they’ve got game, and love nothing more than to liven up a performance with the musical genius of other genres. Under the baton of Music Director & Conductor Joseph Place, the Prescott POPS Symphony is showing our community it’s got the chops to do it all. “I’m trying to grow both the orchestra and the audience to realize that the POPS has depth and can be a serious (but not too serious) symphony orchestra as well as a Pops orchestra,” noted the Maestro. Dec. 10 is the POPS holiday concert, and as is befitting, it’s filled with favorites from “Sleigh Ride” and “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!” to the “Hallelujah” Chorus. We are also bringing back “A Holly and Jolly Sing-Along” by James M. Stephenson, which was a huge hit with the audience last year, said Place. The last concert is “Cartoon Tunes” on Feb. 18, 2018. It is unexpected and delightfully new and different. The POPS will be performing music from classic cartoons, a perfect example of how classical music has always been a part of our lives! Enter stage left: Warner Brothers’ Merrie Melodies, Looney Tunes’ Bugs

Bunny and other cohorts. Enter stage right: some of Disney’s most beloved movie musicals. Maestro Place is keeping much of the musical lineup in this concert close to his tuxedo vest, but the audience can expect a fun and

engaging ride. Performances are at the Yavapai College Performing Art Center, 1100 E. Sheldon St. in Prescott. Tickets are available at the Box Office, 928 -776-2000, or online at YCPAC.com.

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MUSEUM DEBUTS NEW EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

The mission of The Smoki Museum is to instill understanding and respect for the indigenous cultures of the Southwest. by Cindy Gresser, Executive Director, The Smoki Museum

Many of the books and subject matter available have not been authored by the Native people, but rather by scholars studying them.

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s most people here in Prescott know, the museum underwent a fundamental change in thought and philosophy over 10 years ago. We started telling our “sordid” history through the eyes of many people, and continue to this day telling our story – factually. The white men and women that founded our institution imitated Native dance and ceremony for nearly 70 years. Yes, that’s our past. However, today we work toward our mission through education. Our special exhibits, permanent exhibits, classes, lectures and outreach are all directly targeted toward educating the public about our nation’s indigenous people. And what we find is that most people, especially from ages 18 to 70, really received no valuable information about Native people, or they think that, “all the real Indians are dead.” Many museums present information

• FUN!

about our Native people solely in the past tense through strictly archaeological collections that do not always represent the current state of our Indian people. You mean there are Indian people in Prescott other than the Yavapai? What do they do? Who are they? We have a wonderful exhibit that just opened in the museum that answers those questions and more. So, what did you learn in school about our Native people? If you were like me, and I grew up in Central Massachusetts, you learned that there was a colony of people (from England) in Virginia, but they all died. And then there was Plymouth Rock. The Indians gave those people corn and turkey, and we all lived happily ever after. Then came high school, and there was this group called AIM and they did “bad things” and occupied Alacatraz. But why? Weren’t all the Indians

on their reservations receiving assistance from our federal government, and living happily ever after? Only as an adult did I come to realize that our Native people – the Indians of America, still had living, breathing active cultures. The fact that these people still practiced traditional ways, ceremonies and ran businesses was a foreign concept to me before the age of 18. Once I moved to Arizona, only then did I ever have the opportunity to learn more and actually visit Indian homelands. As the Executive Director of The Smoki Museum, I am fortunate that we get to see hundreds of schoolchildren, usually third and fourth graders, come through the museum. In the short time they are here, we attempt to educate them about our Native people – past and present – through our exhibits and handson activities. How much do they THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


retain? The answer is unknown, but the cards and letters we receive are really cute. What about the kids who can’t afford to come to the museum? Even in Yavapai County, many schools cannot afford the cost of buses to give children an authentic museum experience. How do we ensure that they, too, receive accurate and quality information about our Native people? According to local teachers, there is not a good teaching tool currently available to provide accurate, concise information about Arizona’s Native people. Many of the books and subject matter available have not been authored by the Native people, but rather by scholars studying them.

The Smoki Museum of American Indian Art & Culture was built in 1935 to resemble a Hopi Pueblo Structure, and holds a priceless collection of American Indian art and artifacts from across the Southwest. We also feature the largest collection of Kate Cory paintings on display in the United States.

Hours:

Monday thru Saturday, 10am to 4pm and Sunday,1pm to 4pm

Does that really provide information that Native people wish others to learn about them? In response, The Smoki Museum is pleased to announce the debut of our new educational program “22 Nations … TODAY®”. Starting first as an informational booklet specific to third and fourth graders, this program will expand to provide relevant information to young children as well as high school students and adults. Did you know that there are 22 separate Indian nations within the State of Arizona? Can you name more than three or four of them? We bet, not! Stay tuned for more information and to obtain your own copy of “22 Nations … TODAY®”

Admission:

Adults $7, Seniors over 55 $6, and Students with ID $5. Native People and Children under 12 are always FREE.

Upcoming events:

Day of the Dead, October 29th, 11am to 3pm Storytellers at the Smoki, December 27th, 11am to 3pm Free cookies and punch for everyone in our Pueblo Building with a warm fire!

Smoki Museum • 147 N. Arizona Ave., Prescott (928) 445-1230 • www.smokimuseum.org

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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PHOTO BY JERRY CHINN

STUNNING SAFARI

An abridged excerpt from the soon-to-be published book: “Confessions of a Safari Junkie” by Tori Ward, ROX Travel, Cruise and Resort Specialist

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can’t determine what woke me each morning when we were on safari. Was it the crew preparing breakfast on the open-fire grill? Maybe it was the hippos with their belching grunts, or the last Morse code message of lion roars, which signal the end of their night prowling. Whatever the sound, my body responded with a smile in the darkness before rising to enjoy another day’s adventure. We moved camp from the lush savannah around the Khwai River with healthy lions, who walked beside our Land Cruiser without so much as a yawn in our direction. Wild-dog puppies played tug-of-war with fresh meat. Elephants, who welcomed us to the site our first night, came to visit during the day – practically touching us with their trunks. In three days along the river, we saw a dozen species of wildlife. Our guide was wonderful and the wildlife prolific. We then moved to the Savuti – a stark contrast to Khwai – where animals compete for limited water and lion coalitions fight turf wars for territorial rights. On our way, we stopped for coffee and three male elephants eating from a tree joined us. We stood by the truck and the smallest of the three took a few running

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steps at a fake charge. Johnny, our guide, walked over toward a giant termite mound, and the largest elephant nonchalantly headed to the area. He decided to show junior how it was done, and kicked up more dirt and took bigger steps toward the unwanted guest. We were only back on the road a short time when Johnny made a detour toward an open plain. We were off-road and suddenly saw what his trained eyes had caught. Lying at the edge of the plain, a lioness scanned the distance for predators or lunch. We soon realized that there were three cubs lying in the shade of a tree, not far from mom. Later, we stopped for lunch and enjoyed a cold, but satisfying picnic prepared by the camp’s chef. She and the rest of the crew later waited for us with a hot supper and cold cocktails in our new digs. We had just poured tea when Johnny’s head popped up like a meerkat and he said, “Dump the tea; there’s a cheetah.” We jumped back in our seats as Johnny sped across the field. The cheetah was moving too fast to photograph, but slow enough to glance back in our direction. The following morning we were on the road before dawn, and were rewarded when Johnny spotted a leopard lying in tall grass at

the base of a tree. We returned to the Marabou Pan before adventures further afield, and were blessed with the site of brother lions enjoying a morning drink and grooming each other beside the water’s edge. We will be returning for another safari with Johnny next summer. Contact me if you would like to share this remarkable experience with us.

EXPERT TIPS:

• Pack disposable body wipes for a quick refresh any time during the day. • Solar battery chargers are supplied in camp for charging the vehicle’s cooler and camera batteries. Take a supply of batteries. • Take a scarf to wrap around your nose and mouth to avoid breathing dust as well as a hat with a snug chinstrap. • Ladies, a wrap around the head flashlight is helpful for putting “sunscreen” on your face in the early morning darkness. Victoria “Tori” Ward is a cruise and resort specialist with an interest in traveling and seeing the world since she first began to crawl. For more information on these trips and others, contact Tori at tori@roxtravel.com or 928-254-9968

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


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Tori Ward • 928-254-9968


The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 137 PRESCOTT LIVING: What are your biggest disappointments? JOE HOWARD: The hardest thing about this job is when we have a student tragedy. It just cuts your heart out, just takes your legs right out from under you. When I think about the hardest times in my job, I’m sitting in this office or I’m sitting over in that other office over there, and we get a phone call and we stand up and we go, “I gotta go.” And we go to that school and deal with staff that had been in car accidents on their way to work. We’ve dealt with a staff member who collapsed in the room and died at the hospital. But the student tragedies are the worst. You know, having been a part of this dis-

trict for so long, I either taught the student or was the principal or they’re friends with my kids. I think probably everyone in our community could answer that question the same way. PRESCOTT LIVING: Yes. OK, Dorothy, if you could click your heels and wave your wand, what change would you make in K-12? JOE HOWARD: Hmm…oh, this is fun. I get to think about things I don’t always think about. What would I change in K-12? PRESCOTT LIVING: Core curriculum? JOE HOWARD: Yeah, I would really allow us to personalize education a lot more to really focus on individual student needs. That means, if you’re brilliant, you could be in calculus if you’re in middle school, if you’re ready for it. And, of course, that’s not just academics, but there are also social needs for a kid to be able to handle stuff like that. But I’d love to put so much flexibility in that every kid could have exactly what he or she needs. We’re trying to do that now, and we’re having some success with that. We’ve really opened up our honors programs, and we’re trying to create pathways for kids to choose different routes with JTED (Joint Technical Education District) and CTE (Career and Technical Education). The opportunities that kids have nowadays, compared to when I was in high school, have expanded so much, as you know. PRESCOTT LIVING: What about those who would say to you, “Really all you need is a classroom, a desk and a chalkboard.” JOE HOWARD: (laughs). The first thing that comes to my mind is this whole, “Every Child Every Day” and “Kids at Hope” piece, which is that a kid has to have his or her needs met before he or she can even learn. So, you’ve got to have some love in there before anything begins to happen. And that may not be for every kid, but on a given day, it doesn’t matter what family a kid comes from. They need that from a teacher. They need the relationship before that happens. So, that’s the first thing I would say. The other piece, to me, is the world is not that simple – especially with the technology that we have coming down. LEFT: Joe receives Arizona School Administrators Distinguished Superintendent Award in June 2017. Photo with ASA President Dr. Heather Cruz.

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We have to do a lot more than that. And, especially within the problem-solving piece, we have all these systems to circle kids back and remediate. Well, first of all, to assess and find out if they did or didn’t get it, and then what do we do about it? We don’t just move on, you know, we’re obligated to circle back. PRESCOTT LIVING: I’m going to shift gears and ask you some sort of, I hope, fun things. Tell me about the pie in the face. [Editor’s note: See top-left photo on this page] JOE HOWARD: Oh [Laughs], I think Stephanie Hillig, the high school principal, had put that pie in my face. If you see in that picture, I have my Prescott High Middle School shirt on. Stephanie and I had a lot of fun with rivalry when she was the principal at Granite Mountain Middle School. So we set up a lot of stuff like that, and mostly did those in front of kids at assemblies. She had a little grizzly bear emblem that I stole, in front of the kids, like I ran through and just took off and it didn’t come back until three assemblies later. I had a little scooter that someone donated to us, and I couldn’t give it to a kid or anything for liability so I put on a bike helmet and rode it down the halls and just acted goofy and checked our kids. She came and stole that from me. And that was gone for a long time. PRESCOTT LIVING: What do you, Jenna and the boys do for fun? You say you go sailing? JOE HOWARD: Well, we’re all passionate about music. Now, Jenna and I are not musicians, but we’ve always had great music around, and so now that the boys are older and they have their passions, we love following them and watching them do that. We love to go backpacking. I would say fishing, but I find that I’m the only one fishing, and they all go do something else. They grew up mountain biking with us. PRESCOTT LIVING: Who has been a major influence on your life? If you had to point to somebody and say, “I’m more than I am, because of you,” who would it be? JOE HOWARD: Quite a few people, but definitely my dad. Since I was a little kid, he has been my hero. He’s just a good guy, and probably much more of a natural at all of this than I am. I just grew up and saw his passion and always wanted to be like that.

continued on page 152... THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


FOREST VILLAS HOTEL

Polishing the Gem

G

o back 20 years and picture a serene hillside just outside of the historic downtown square of Prescott. If you squint your eyes, you might envision a region in the Mediterranean or the Amalfi Coast of Italy – an ideal spot just waiting for a hotel to sit among the trees in front of spectacular hillside views. This was the inspiration and vision of the founders of Forest Villas Hotel. It was that magical and imagined. The construction and design were grand from the beginning, with tall windows, balconies on every room and parapets. The elegant hotel is full of charm, with rose gardens, fountains, crystal chandeliers and a lovely Italian tapestry. Being long-term thinkers, the owners wanted to bring together the beauty of the European countryside with the local feeling of place and the intention of replicating the theme in other charming destinations. Today, keeping the hotel in the family is important. The hotel is now operated by a new generation from the original owners and a new management team, who are working to lovingly polish the gem and keep the dream alive. Forest Villas is enjoying a facelift, with updated facilities, including a newly

renovated outdoor lounge area with comfy seating and fire pits, an updated resort-like pool space with a heated pool and outdoor soaking tub and splashes of gemstone colors in new furniture and art. Forest Villas is slowly being updated and reinvented without giving up any of its original character and elegance or its doses of Prescott charm. As a matter of fact, it is turning up the charm with a service culture that is, in and of itself, inspired. The fragrant scent of freshly baked cookies will greet you upon arrival. Guests can expect to dine in the café or al fresco with a view and enjoy a hot breakfast and coffee counter in the morning. In the evenings a beer and wine menu is available, so sipping at sunset is the perfect way to end the day. All of these smells and sights are sure to make everyone feel at home. Before long, events such as Sangria socials and wine tastings will be available to the public in the spacious lobby. With additional meeting space along with the outdoor courtyard and arbor and other areas, the team soon plans to offer venues for small weddings and meetings with expansive vistas and unwavering hospitality. The hotel is conveniently located at the

A Taste

Reservations 800.223.3449

edge of Prescott – just minutes from historic downtown, yet close to Prescott Valley. Lynx Lake is three minutes away and offers loads of recreational opportunities on a beautiful, alpine trout lake. Hike, fish, boat or have a picnic – what a way to spend a day. “Go somewhere” on vacation with Forest Villas - it’s a getaway within a getaway! Book now to experience the warm, friendly hospitality, and let the team exceed your expectations of service and friendliness. For more information, please visit forestvillas.com, or call 800-223-3449. Stop by for a tour. Forest Villas is located at 3645 Lee Circle, Prescott.

of Italy in Prescott, Arizona

Information forestvillas.com

Location 3645 Lee Circle

Follow us on FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PRESSCOT COTT T LI V ING FUN! • PRE

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PRESCOTT CIRCLE TRAIL

by Kelly Tolbert, Recreation Coordinator – City of Prescott

D

ating back to the early 1990s, the Prescott Circle Trail was purely a vision of the Yavapai Trails Association members and president, Jan Alfano. Eventually, cooperation between land managers and nonprofit agencies led to Prescott National Forest officials devising an action plan and successfully completing construction of what equaled about half of the original Prescott Circle Trail. After the City of Prescott purchased Watson and Willow lakes from the Chino Valley Irrigation District in 1998, development of recreation opportunities led to those portions of the Circle Trail becoming incorporated into the existing Prescott National Forest portions. Embry – Riddle Aeronautical University was also a collaborator, allowing access across its campus for the northern portions of the trail. The finished product is a 54.45-mile combination of nonmotorized paths that cross jurisdictions of the City of Prescott, Prescott National Forest, Arizona State Land Department, Bureau of Land Management, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Yavapai County. As with many local trails, construction was funded by grants and performed by volunteers from the City of Prescott, Prescott National Forest, AmeriCorps VISTA program, the Over the Hill Gang, Prescott Mountain Bike Alliance (PMBA) and many other individuals. Ongoing maintenance is performed mostly by the Over the Hill Gang, Community Service Work Programs and Prescott National Forest-led work days. Perhaps the crowning accomplishment was generous funding initiated by the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA), which allowed for a paid American Conservation Experience trail crew to complete the grueling construction along Badger Mountain. Although maintenance is ongoing, this

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was a final step to connecting the various trails that comprise the Prescott Circle Trail, allowing the trail to be completed in May of 2015. Prescott, nestled in the Central Highlands of Arizona, is at the top of its class in geographic and biologic diversity. From the Circle Trail, hikers, equestrians, runners, mountain bicyclists and other nonmotorized trail users can experience highlights of dense chaparral; grasslands, such as Willow Lake; amazing rock formations at Watson Lake; and tall ponderosa pines strewn throughout the Prescott National Forest, as well as riparian corridors. All of this is located within miles of a bustling downtown culture that features historic Whiskey Row. Roger Naylor, Arizona-based freelance travel writer, perhaps describes it best when he writes, “The Circle Trail provides almost instant access to wild country as it follows the high backbone of rising mountains. It connects to all major trail areas as it orbits the town. No matter where you are in Prescott, you’re only minutes from a trail. What a rare gift that is – to be able to immerse yourself in fragrant woodlands, at a moment’s notice; to be able to stroll the shorelines of sun-kissed lakes or clamber over craggy granite formations, whenever you feel the urge.” Planning a hike on the Circle Trail is relatively easy, and can be completed in a multitude of ways. Broken into segments, roughing it in a campsite or lodging in one of the many B&Bs or hotels along the way, there is surely something for everyone. Featuring 5,500 feet of total elevation gain, the Circle Trail is not to be approached lightly. Fortunately, comprehensive guides, as well as gear, are available for a small fee at local biking and hiking retailers. More information can also be found at prescotttrails.com, yavapai-trails.org, and visit-prescott.com. THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Prescott Circle Trail

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FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Members of Citizens On Patrol with Sgt. Jeff Hemphill and Chief Debora Black

PRESCOTT POLICE FOUNDATION Supporting our community in many ways by Charmagne O'Day

A PORTRAIT PARK BY J.

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n 2011, when Sharon and Michael Broggie relocated to Prescott from Southern California, they became the first married couple to volunteer for the Prescott Police Department's Citizens On Patrol unit. At that time, the department did not have a nonprofit foundation that could help support its mission of community service. The Broggies took on the responsibility to establish a foundation. After two years, and with the support of the chief of Prescott Police, the foundation was incorporated. Among the many programs the foundation supports is the K-9 Unit, along with special events and equipment related to the unit's mission. It also provides financial support for the Prescott Police Explorer Post, which provides young people the opportunity to learn skills that may lead to a career in law enforcement. Another program is Citizens On Patrol. This all-volunteer unit provides thousands of hours yearly, performing duties such as traffic control at accident scenes, special events staffing, enforcement of handicap parking and patrol of homes when the owner is on vacation. Patrolling homes is a free service open to city residents for up to 30 days each year, and it includes walk-around surveillance. Owners can contact the Prescott Police Department at 928-778-1444, request a property watch and provide information. The department suggests residents contact police a few weeks before their planned date of departure. Another initiative of the foundation is providing annual support for the Role Model Scholarship Program at Prescott High School. These scholarships award students who act as role models for middle school students. The program helps youth in their transition to high school, and the participants coach students on avoidance of drugs and alcohol and other negative behavior.

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A new program, introduced by Chief of Police Debora Black, is the Citizen Police Academy, which had its initial session in May. Members of the community were introduced to various policing operations within the department. Plans are to offer this program on a regular basis, so residents may understand the many duties and challenges of being a police professional. Announcement of future sessions will be published in the Daily Courier newspaper. To support its many activities, the foundation annually holds fundraising initiatives and events. This year, the foundation approached the owners of Mortimer Farms, a locally owned nursery and farming enterprise. Owner Charlotte Mortimer agreed to provide $2,000 worth of assorted meats including turkey, chicken, pork and beef. The foundation purchased a small freezer to store the meat. The prize will be awarded to the holder of the winning raffle ticket. Tickets are $10 each, three for $25 or 10 tickets for $75, which provides a 25 percent discount. Tickets are available at Mortimer Farms Nursery, 3166 Willow Lake Road, at Mortimer Farms in Dewey, and in the lobby of the Prescott Police Department at 222 S. Marina St. Foundation CEO Michael Broggie said there are only 1,000 tickets available, and the drawing will be held before Thanksgiving, since a turkey is one of the prizes. Purchase of tickets is tax-deductable as a donation to the foundation. Members of the Foundation board of directors include Dan Barkwill, Jim McInerny, Carol Nelson and Sharon Broggie. The board is seeking volunteer candidates, who may wish to become involved in the organization. Additional information is available at 928-778-1850. Contact: Michael Broggie 805-509-1280 • michaelbroggie@outlook.com

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


© 2013 PPF

Annual Fundraising Raffle Win a New 7.2 CU FT Freezer Chest Filled with Assorted Meats

Meat Provided by

Including Beef, Pork, Turkey and Chicken Total Retail Value $2,150.00

One ticket $10 Three tickets $25 Ten tickets $75 Drawing to be held prior to Thanksgiving, 2017

PURCHASE TICKETS AT:

Prescott Police Department lobby 222 South Marina Street 8 am - 5 pm Monday to Friday or call 928-778-1850 Make check payable to Prescott Police Foundation

Winner to be notified by phone/mail. Applicable taxes are the sole responsibility of the winner. Choice of meat is the option of Mortimer Farms. The Prescott Police Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit community benefit organization. FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

www.prescottpolicefoundation.org

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10 Questions

WITH SANDY MOSS Animal rescue and preservation causes are always the ones closest to my heart. They are the defenseless creatures of the world, and we are so often the reason for their pain.

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1. Where did you grow up? St. George, Utah. It’s the “Heart of Dixie,” in southern Utah. 2. What made you decide to get into journalism? I always loved the English language and writing. I was an avid reader, but I happened into journalism by accident and fate. I was a newspaper journalist for a dozen years and have continued in radio broadcast for 14 years now, and have now been doing TV for almost four years. 3. Why did you make the leap from print to television? I like to say it was destiny. I love newspapers, but at 2 a.m. one morning at Harkins Theatres, while watching nine movies for charity with other community members, Sanford Cohen (of Arizona Hometown Radio Group) approached me about doing a job in radio. After consideration, I accepted. A decade later, Rich Howe (General Manager of AZTV7)

• FUN!

dreams were stronger than her body, and she was acting in a stage production on her way to other accomplishments.

called and asked if I’d like to apply for the retiring Morning Scramble host’s position. I said, “yes,” and the rest is history. 4. In your day-to-day work as a journalist, what story or interview has made the biggest impact on you? There are so many, but Steven Nasser’s story of being taken to a work camp in WWII at the age of 13 is one. His 16-year-old brother did not survive, nor did most of his family, yet Mr. Nasser’s attitude is one of joy and gratitude. He takes his story to school children around the nation at the age of 85. Another one was about a dog who was lost in the wilderness around Crown King. Almost three weeks later, the little thing turned up on its own doorstep 15 miles away, thin and ragged, but happy to be home. Then there was one about a young girl with “breakable bone” disease (also called brittle bone disease). At only 12, she had dozens of bones that had broken. She was in a wheelchair, but her

5. What’s your most embarrassing moment, either on-air or off? I know it would be juicy, but seriously, I can’t remember! A person in public learns to laugh off those kinds of things, usually on-air, before promptly forgetting them. After a while, not much is actually embarrassing. I did have a man who almost passed out during a radio interview, because he was so nervous and I had to run for a glass of water in the middle of our live, on-air chat, to try and revive him, all the while motioning him to continue talking without a host! The worst interview was possibly with a house painter-turned-artist who was so terrified, I suppose, that his conversation consisted of “yes,” or “no,” and such abbreviated responses, that I was left to carry the 20-minute conversation virtually solo. Then there was the show, recently, when a guest was attacked by a six-inch baby lynx with claws that seemed to be the size of a lion’s! 6. You and your husband Mick Shepard are known for much philanthropy and support of charities in the community. What causes are near and dear to your heart? Animal rescue and preservation causes are always the ones closest to my heart. They are the defenseless creatures of the world, and we are so often the

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Host of AZTV7’s “Sandy and Friends” reason for their pain. Children come next, and I always like to promote events and causes that keep them safe or help their lives to be successful and happy. Mick’s career was as a captain with the Salvation Army, so we also champion their work with people. 7. When you aren’t interviewing our local movers and shakers, what are you doing for fun? Reading books is one of my greatest and constant pleasures; gardening and enjoying nature is a big one; walking and being with my dog and three cats is important, too. I’m restoring a 1926 Model T Ford. I scuba dive, skydive, and water ski, on occasion. I’ve traveled to Africa, England, France, Hawaii, Canada and cruised the Caribbean and Mediterranean and elsewhere.

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

The list is long of things I want to do, but haven’t launched into yet, such as yoga, Pickleball and even more travel to exotic and interesting places around the world. 8. Why do you love living in Prescott? It has a long history that its residents cherish, a plethora of old buildings still in use, and a smalltown appearance and feel, though that is sadly an illusion now. I love the culture, and the giving hearts and intelligence of our neighbors, as well. 9. What is something most people would be surprised to know about you? I used to be terrified of having to speak in public or of being on stage, though I did both frequently! I’m also an introvert, so I thoroughly enjoy being with and learning

about people, however being alone is something I crave and relish. 10. What items are still on your bucket list to accomplish and do? Live near the ocean and write books, raise bees and chickens, learn to sail, hike in the Pacific Northwest, travel New England in the fall and visit New Orleans and Galveston…for starters.

Watch “Sandy and Friends” weekday mornings live at 8:30 a.m., and don’t miss Prescott LIVING Magazine’s own Elaine Earle’s guest appearances on the show, November 27 at 8:30 a.m. Visit www.aztv.com for more information.

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 144 Certainly there have been educators, all throughout my life, who have believed in me, supported me and taught me. Kevin Kapp and Chris Reynolds were guys who believed in my leadership and gave me a chance. Harold Tenney is one of them. [Editor’s note: Tenney was a longtime Prescott administrator] Harold sat me down, like in my second year of teaching, and said, “What are you going to do for your master’s degree?” And I said, “Well, I’m going to get an English master’s, because I’m going to be a writer.” He said, “No, you’re not.” [Laughs] I go, “What do you mean? You can’t tell me.” He said, “You’re going to be an administrator.” And I go, “Why do you say that?” And he goes, “You got it. You already got it.” I think I’d been teaching three years and he pulled me into his office and said, “What do you think about applying for the assistant principal that’s out there?” And I go, “I’m not ready for that.” And he said, “Yes you are” And I said, “Harold, I just started taking classes.” And so, you know I didn’t apply, and they hired someone else. As soon as I walked out of his office, I’m like, “Why would I say that?” But, you know what happened? As soon as he said that to me, I began to see myself as an administrator. PRESCOTT LIVING: How old were you? JOE HOWARD: 27 or 28 and then I started seeing myself as an administrator. Well, here’s a fun thing, too. After I left the crab boat in Alaska and became a teacher, the skipper of the boat called me and said, “You wanna take a trip down the Inside Passage in the boat?” And I’m like, “Yeah, how much, what projects are we gonna be doing?” And he said, “None. This is just for friends and family.” It was a 138-foot boat, but we could go anywhere we wanted. It wasn’t like a cruise ship. So Jenna and I went to Ketchikan to jump on that boat, and in the airport I grabbed a newspaper. I was making like 22-grand as a teacher and a coach and grabbed a newspaper and took a look at it and it said, “Part-time administrator, part-time teacher on Baranof Island – $90,000.” I’m making $22,000, or whatever, and I said to Jenna, “I’m going

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Joe and his dad Jim posing for the Prescott Public Library’s reading campaign

back and enrolling at Northern Arizona University, because if there are opportunities like this, I want to have a chance to take them.” What happened the next year is the assistant principal had left and Harold said, “Now you’re ready?” And I said, “Yes, sir. Let’s do it.” So, that was that. PRESCOTT LIVING: When they make a TV show about Joe Howard, who would you pick to play you? JOE HOWARD: [Laughs] Oh gosh. See, I don’t see very many movies, so you guys might have to help me with some. PRESCOTT LIVING: Brad Pitt? JOE HOWARD: He’s too handsome. PRESCOTT LIVING: Tom Cruise? JOE HOWARD: Ah, how about someone who’s dead? PRESCOTT LIVING: Yeah. [Laughs] JOE HOWARD: Robin Williams. PRESCOTT LIVING: Robin Williams? JOE HOWARD: Love Robin Williams. PRESCOTT LIVING: Why? JOE HOWARD: I think about him in “The Fisher King” and it’s just, he just has a way with people. You know, and we’re both stocky. [Laughs] PRESCOTT LIVING: Any final comments you’d like to share that you want the read-

ers to know about you, the schools and how you feel? JOE HOWARD: Well, I said this a lot throughout the interview, but I think what I wake up thinking most days is what a great community I live in. Public schools are nothing without a community that supports them. Without community partners – and we have so many community partners, so many generous groups and clubs and organizations in this town that support what we do – by no means are we doing this alone. PRESCOTT LIVING: And that tells me a lot about the community. JOE HOWARD: Yeah and those are our parents and community members who said, “Well, we’re going to take this into our hands…if the state’s not going to fund, we’re going to fund.” PRESCOTT LIVING: And they did it. JOE HOWARD: We’re going to do it. The PUSD Education Foundation raised $170,000 in its first two years. It’s now in its third year. They have given this back to our schools in many ways. This is one of the things I am most proud of being a part of. It is so refreshing to have a hard-working group of people who are in it to make a quick and direct difference for the kids of PUSD. 

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


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another one of our fashion consultants at Classy N Sassy. Kathy was looking for a comfortable, figure flattering Open mid-rise jean with extra room in the thigh area. This NYDJ (Not Your Daughter’s Jeans) ‘Marilyn’ 7 style did the trick. days/week Available in sizes 0 to 18. Made in the USA

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Corner of Goodwin & Granite • 928.776.7467 Corner of Goodwin & Granite • 928.776.7467 JEAN SULLIVAN is a local Prescott fun loving mom. During her first fitting at Classy N Sassy, she realized she was always wearing her jeans a size too large. She also learned how pocket positioning can be used to flatter and lift the rear. In this photo, Jean is wearing a mid rise ‘Avedon’ style by Citizen’s of Humanity. Available in Sizes 23-33 (Hair by Jennifer Tucker at Hair Station 105)

this Mention e 50% eiv ad to rec op with off any t rchase u denim p pires Offer Ex 7 11/30/1

BRI MCSHANE is a local Prescott Valley mom who has beautiful curves. She is showcasing one of our newest arrivals, which is the ‘Jeannie’ curvy style from True Religion. This style has a very stretchy fabric that eliminates the rear waist gap and the front creasing that Bri typically experiences with denim. We also selected a dark wash with lower fading which helps to slenderize all figures. Available in Sizes 27-34. (Hair by Jennifer Tucker at Hair Station 105)

ClassyNSassyClothing.com Steps away from Whiskey Row Corner of Goodwin & Granite 928.776.7467 Open 7 Days/Week

PHOTOS BY CHRIS MARCHETTI


Spotlight on Prescott’s Fashion Scene

#1

– Layer and Accessorize. Final touches are an inexpensive and fun way to add pizzazz to your daily outfit!

Wondering what to wear this season? Here are three great tips to make fall dressing fun

Add necklace Add long cardigan No accessories

#2

– Be prepared in style for Prescott’s beautiful fall weather - add removable outerwear that can be worn indoors or out

#3

– Love yourself, be happy and enjoy what you wear. Always remember, when you look great, you feel great!

Add hat

Denim jacket, scarf and hat

No outerwear

Fringe poncho/ cardigan

Fur vest

It so easy and fun to always be in style, when you dress Classy N Sassy in Everyone’s Home Town!

Model makeup was provided by Bella By Leah Fashions provided by Classy N Sassy Boutique


220 W. Goodwin St. • Prescott, AZ www.oldfirehouseplaza.com

Visit the plaza to experience a fine collection of charming boutiques and fabulous eateries housed within a beautifully restored historic firehouse. SHOPPING • Adventure Travel • Bella By Leah Makeup and Skin Care • Black Butterfly Artisan Chocolates • Classy N Sassy Boutique • Nanke Signature Group Showroom PROFESSIONAL OFFICE • CNN Mortgage

SALONS & WELLNESS • Amazing Foot Spa • Belle’s Skinsational Studio • Complexion Skin & Makeup Studio • Dr. Kate Sage, Naturopathic Doctor • Hair Station 105 Salon • Hot Spot Nail Spa • Intentions Yoga Studio & Apparel • Z Brow Bar

FOOD & BEVERAGE • Kensington’s Restaurant and Tea Room • Limonchello Pizzaria Napoletana • Prescott Lobster & Seafood Co

Retail • Restaurants • Salons • Wellness Center

A Taste of New England in Everybody's Home Town

• Lobstah Rolls • Lobstah Mac N Cheese

Two Taco Tuesday (2 chicken $6, 2 fish $8, 2 shrimp $10, 2 lobster $12)

• Salads • Street Tacos

Happy Hour Everyday 2-4 pm (1/2 off Beer & Wine with purchase of any one Entree per table) (Note... Specials cannot be combined with any other offers)

(928) 445-0783 220 W. Goodwin St. #2 • Prescott, AZ • PrescottLobster.com

• Crab Cakes • & More!

Peel N Eat Wednesday (1/2 Lb for only $6.99)


CHAPEL OF THE VALLEY

Embracing empty spaces by Dawn Wasowicz

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n the West, where nothing existed but rocks, trails and water, an entrepreneur saw a town; his father saw a park; and his mother saw a chapel. Bill Fain, a business and finance visionary, built Prescott Valley, a place to live. Norman Fain, an Arizona State Senator, built Fain Park, a place to linger. Johnnie Lee Fain, a pianist, a pioneer and matriarch of the Fain Family, had the vision to create a chapel, a place to truly be. Chapel of the Valley was built in 2002 and houses eight historical stained-glass windows. The windows have traveled on a journey all their own. They were created in Germany in 1906 – the same year Fain was born. The windows were placed in Mercy Hospital, Prescott’s first hospital. As Prescott grew and the need for a new hospital emerged, Henry Lovell Brooks took out a loan and purchased the windows, placing them in his home for safekeeping. Fain and Brooks became great friends, who shared their love of music. And over time, Fain’s dream of creating a chap-

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

el – a place to ponder, pray and find life’s purpose – was completed by Brooks’ gift of the stained-glass windows, which depicted religious moments in Christ’s life. The chapel we see today sits above Fain Park in Prescott Valley, and is a treasured jewel in our town. The chapel is run by Director Dawn Wasowicz, Bill and Nancy Fain’s daughter. Debbie Williams is the event coordinator, booking weddings, memorials and educational events. Darlene Packard and Mary Ann Sorrell round out the chapel team, keeping it open on Sun-

days from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. with docents who educate the public and keep our rich history alive. Economically, aesthetically and spiritually, Chapel of the Valley is the crown upon the park and the Town of Prescott Valley, whose residents so warmly embrace it. Together it unites three people, three visions, and one family with the community. Fain Signature Group: “Embracing the empty spaces and harmoniously knitting the fabric of our town into a place everyone can call home.”

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EDUCATION FIRST… WHEN USING FIREARMS by Jane Anne Shimizu, Director of Marketing and certified NRA instructor, Gunsite Academy

Youth classes educate young adults while instilling moral, safe and responsible gun handling.

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t. Col. John Dean “Jeff” Cooper, a U.S. Marine and firearms instructor, was educated at Stanford. He was a deep thinker and a prolific writer. After his separation from the military, Cooper became interested in one particular question: “How does one man prevail over another in armed combat?” Cooper spent the rest of his life examining this question, and was the first to collate what is known as the “modern technique” of the pistol, emphasizing two-handed shooting using the Weaver stance. First and foremost, of course, are rules of safety; they are the cornerstone of any gun class. Safety drives everything at Gunsite Academy, and the first hours of the basic pistol class are spent in the classroom instilling the following rules of safety: GUNSITE FIREARMS SAFETY RULES 1. ALL guns are ALWAYS loaded. 2. Never let the muzzle cover anything that you are not willing to destroy. 3. Keep your finger OFF the trigger until your sights are on the target. 4. Always be sure of your target and what’s behind it.

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• FUN!

Indoor and outdoor simulators bring reality to training with any firearm.

One of Cooper’s more notable quotes was: “Safety is something that happens between your ears, not something you hold in your hands.” Cooper later went on to found The American Pistol Institute in Paulden, which was later renamed Gunsite Academy. No matter what your weapon of choice – pistol, shotgun, carbine, sporting rifle, precision rifle, tracking or edged weapons – lessons taught in class are serious, lifesaving and life-altering. If you own a firearm and carry it for defense, you owe it to yourself to get quality training. If you need to use that tool to solve a life-threatening problem, you will

not rise to the occasion; you will default to your level of training. Students come from all walks of life and many ages. In any given class, you can find lawyers, housewives, doctors, engineers,

The gun industry is seeing a surge of women preparing to protect themselves with small arms at home and in their community.

plumbers and law enforcement personnel. It’s a surprising mix of people, no matter their profession. The common thread among students is cheerful self-reliance and the understanding that danger may arise at any time. They have the will to practice so they may prevail, should evil manifest itself. All students of firearms training go out into the world as safer, more aware and more responsible citizens. If you wish to learn more about Gunsite, you may visit www.gunsite. com. Better yet, contact Jane Anne Shimizu at jashimizu@gunsite.com to arrange a free tour of the facility. THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


Broken Horn D Ranch Locally-Grown, Grass Fed Criollo Beef

Specializing in therapeutic and nurturing massage, encompassing many proven and effective modalities and overall Awareness Therapy.

USDA Process verified Grass Fed, No Hormones, No antibiotics, No animal byproducts. Ever, for the life of the animal Individual cuts for sale • Whole or half sides available!

Valley Farmershands Market, at you the that thisPrescott “Available I must tell was absolutely, Tuesday’s in Oct., 3-6pm Prescott Farmers Market, down, THE best steak and hamburger Tuesday’s, Nov. - Apr.that TBD I’ve Saturday’s in Oct. 7:30am-Noon ever had!” @ Yavapai College– JC Bell, Scottsdale@ Harkins Theater parking lot

Fall... Time for new

Saturday’s, Nov. - April Available at the Prescott 10am-1pm next to YMCA Farmers Market, Saturdays, 10am-1pm @ YMCA. Chino Valley Farmers Market, Thursdays thru Oct, 3-6pm Prescott Valley, Tuesdays, @ Olsen’s Grain 2-5pm at Harkins Theater. eater. 3-6pm Closed for winter

beginnings

Reconnect with your body, learn to listen to its needs for your overall wellness.

It tastes good and it’s good for you! www.BHDRanch.com • 928-708-9385

119 Garden St. Prescott, AZ NaturalHealingGarden.com (928) 237-4116 LICENSED & BONDED

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

CHECK OUT OUR HEALTH-CENTERED FOOD & WELLNESS EVENTS

PIZZA

Specialty Pizza or Build Your Own Thin, Hand Tossed, or Pan Pizza Small-Medium-Large-Xtra Large Over 60 cheeses, meats, vegetables and custom toppings to choose from Gluten Free 10”, 12”, 14” Individual Slices

SALADS

SMALL-MEDIUM-LARGE Garden Greek Caesar Chopped Salad Spinach Spring Mix Wedge Antipasta

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PASTA

Alfredo Penne Spaghetti w/meatballs

WINGS

Regular / Boneless / Jumbo 8 flavors to choose from

SUBS

9 to choose from

CALZONES

Mini / Traditional / Jumbo Sizes include cheese and sauce and can add any pizza topping

ALSO AVAILABLE Kids Menu Dessert Local beer, wine & spirits

Dine-in • Carry-out Delivery • Catering 221 N Cortez St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-9455 twomamaspizza.com PRE S COT T LI V ING

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WATSON LAKE by Kelly Tolbert, Recreation Coordinator – City of Prescott

PHOTO BY BRYCE BECK

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atson Lake, Prescott’s crown jewel, is located just four easy miles from downtown Prescott. Nestled in the grand boulders, known as the Granite Dells, Watson Lake was originally formed in the early 1900s when the Chino Valley Irrigation District built a dam on Granite Creek. The City of Prescott purchased both Watson and Willow lakes in 1998, and continues to develop recreational opportunities for this vast park since its purchase. Features include – from the very obvious – photography, picnicking, boating and fishing, to the not-so-obvious, such as disc golf and rock climbing. In fact, these are only a few of the amenities the $3 parking fee will offer a visitor to Watson Lake. Other amenities include seasonal camping (for an additional fee, but includes shower access), well-maintained restrooms, toddler and child playground equipment, state-of-the-art horseshoe pits, bocce ball, two boat-launches, a courtesy dock and fantastic multipurpose nonmotorized trails. Kayak, canoe and stand-up paddleboards, as well as disc golf equipment, can all be rented Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays

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• FUN!

during the summer months. Watson Lake is a popular spot for special events, and is home to three signature annual events, starting in May with the Highland Games, the Antique Auto Show in August and the Prescott Pow Wow in September. The park experiences massive visitation during these events, which are considered full-park rentals, and camping is typically not available at these times. Several areas in the park are available by reservation and include a large ramada situated at the overlook, a small ramada next to the playground and 4.59 acres of grass centrally located within the park, all of which is perfect for any wedding, reunion or other special event. If you are a novice or experienced angler, Watson Lake has something for you. Rainbow trout, largemouth bass, sunfish, channel catfish, crayfish and crappie can all be found here. Arizona Game and Fish Department often stocks trout here, when conditions are favorable. Any regulations that they require are applied for fishing at Watson Lake. Boating is allowed at Watson Lake, and there are no restrictions regarding what size

boat or engine is launched here. However, it is regarded as a “no-wake lake,” as to allow for comfortable kayaking and canoeing. Positioned next to Prescott’s largest riparian area, Watson Woods, Watson Lake provides excellent birding opportunities along with interpretive signage. The water can be accessed at many points along the 4.79-mile system of trails, which loop around the lake. While there is no swimming allowed at any of the Prescott-area lakes, there is plenty to keep your attention while enjoying the beautiful outdoors. The Watson Lake Loop Trail is recommended for hiking and mountain biking (technical in certain areas) and offers 160 feet in elevation change. Foliage is sparse, and many areas are totally exposed, so it is not recommended in extreme conditions. For more information on the various activities at Watson Lake, please visit cityofprescott.net/services/parks/parks/. More information on renting equipment can be found at prescottoutdoors.com. To reserve a campsite, grassy area or ramada, please call 928-777-1122. Parking is free on Wednesdays.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • FALL 2017


NAZ SUNS USE PLATFORM TO HELP COMMUNITY, BOOST EDUCATION

PHOTOS BY MATT HINSHAW, NAZ SUNS

by Jake Withee, NAZ Suns

A

job in the spotlight carries a great deal of responsibility. The Northern Arizona Suns know this, and they hope to use their platform to better serve the community around them. The NAZ Suns remain active in community outreach programs to bring funds and attention to programs they think would benefit greatly from it, especially when it comes to education. Last season the Suns lent their support to a variety of causes, such as raising money to fight breast cancer, giving Christmas gifts to children and families in need at Shop with a Cop

FALL 2017 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

and supporting initiatives to rid the world of a disease in Walk MS. This was especially true in schools, where the Suns love to see kids excel in the classroom. “Having the opportunity to inspire and teach our youth about the value of education and a healthy living is important to us,” said NAZ Suns President Chris Presson. “It’s not just about basketball for us. We are humbled to know that we can be that positive role model in their lives and help them see that anything is possible through hard work and perseverance.” Northern Arizona Suns started the All-Star Student Achiever program, which encourages students to obtain perfect attendance and make the honor roll. Students who excelled in the program received two complimentary tickets to a NAZ Suns game. Everyone in the program was invited to a game in March, where NAZ honored one lucky school with a $500 donation. The Suns visited various schools as part of the program, including Liberty Traditional, Lake Valley Elementary and Granville Elementary. Players even went to classrooms to read books for the children as part of Read Across America. When schoolwork is completed, the Suns want kids to be active and exercise while having fun. To support this, the team hosted clinics at Bradshaw Mountain Middle School, Taylor Hicks Elementary School and Glassford Hill Middle School to teach students ways to have fun while playing basketball

the right way. The community can always improve, and the Suns plan to continue to do their part to help. If you are interested in partnering with the NAZ Suns through new community initiatives, contact Media Relations Coordinator Jake Withee at jwithee@nazsuns.com.

Having the opportunity to inspire and teach our youth about the value of education and a healthy living is important to us.

NAZ Suns invite youth to Kids Day Game in January Already owning one of the top family-friendly environments in the NBA G League, the Northern Arizona Suns are taking it a step further. They are hosting a Kids Day Game on Jan. 23 at 11 a.m. The team is inviting classes all around Yavapai County to the game, where students will enjoy high-level basketball along with great learning opportunities. The Suns hope to host 5,000 youth who will see what can happen by playing outside and staying active. With healthy habits, sportsmanship and a positive mindset toward exercise, anything is possible. Students will get a math, science and English interactive workbook at the game, along with free lunch. Those interested in this educational and fun opportunity, contact NAZ Suns director of operations Ashley Stovall at astovall@nazsuns.com

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PRESCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY EVENTS

GEOLOGY TALKS, 2nd Tuesdays at 6 p.m. • Oct. 10 - Grand Canyon National Park: Caves and Karst of the Grand Canyon • Nov. 14 - Geology of the McDowell Mountains near Scottsdale

ADULT EVENTS From Scottish swordplay to spy cameras, learn something new at Prescott Public Library! ARIZONA HUMANITIES LECTURES, 1st Thursdays at 5 p.m. • Oct. 5 - “A Man Would Be a Fool to Take a Chance on Me:” Violet M. Irving of Skull Valley, Arizona, Iconic Arizona Woman • Nov. 9 - The Bronze Buckaroo: The Life of Herb Jeffries ASTRONOMY TALKS, 3rd Thursdays at 6 p.m. • Oct. 19 - Eclipse Balloon Launch • Nov. 16 - From Corona to the Moon: The Secret CIA Spy Camera that Mapped the Moon and the Science it Offers Today.

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215 E GOODWIN STREET PRESCOTT, AZ 86303 928.777.1500 PRESCOTTLIBRARY.INFO

Events are presented with funding from the Friends of the Prescott Public Library. Additional funding provided by the Arizona Humanities Council for the Arizona Humanities Lectures.

JACOBITE REBELLION! 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28 Flagstaff Professor William Wilson and fellow 1745 Jacobite reenactors will explain and demonstrate Highland living and fighting styles of the 1700s. Experience 18th century Scotland through costume, swordplay and crofting.

YOUTH EVENTS •

TRICK-OR-TREAT FOR LITTLE ONES Tuesday, Oct. 31 Stories and songs followed by trick-or-treating around the library. Costumes are encouraged! Open to children, newborn to 5 years old.

FALL FESTIVAL Thursday, Nov. 2 Harvest a good time with your family at the Fall Festival! Enjoy games, refreshments and not-tooscary stories for the entire family.

THE THE EDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION •• FALL 2017


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Prescott LIVING Magazine  

Fall 2017

Prescott LIVING Magazine  

Fall 2017