Page 1

Thwarting Thieves . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Pillars of Wellness. . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Luxury Cruises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

THE HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

CELEBRATING MARICOPA! • Meet Mayor Price • Weight Loss Challenge

In Every Edition:

GOLDENCORRIDORLIVING.COM

$4.95 Complimentary • SPRING 2018

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA


1.04 Acre Horse Property

6898 West Palomino Way, Coolidge $391,900 4BR, 2BA 2,475 SF POOL | 1.04 ACRE HORSE PROPERTY • • • • • • • • •

Casa Grande/Coolidge custom beauty near Central Arizona College Open concept with 12’ ceilings, formal living/dining and great room Gourmet kitchen with EnergyStar appliances Gorgeous granite counters, maple cabinets and travertine tile Split master suite with separate garden tub and shower Fenced salt water chlorinated play pool Extended covered patio, Ramada and block fence 3 car side entry garage is over-height and extended 2 RV gates, full hook-up, 50 amp service and RV carport

GEORGIA F. SCHAEFFER ASSOCIATE BROKER, REALTOR , GRI, ABR, CDPE, SRES, SFR ®

520.560.3333 | georgias@coldwellbanker.com

DAWN M. ZIMBELMAN REALTOR , CDPE, ABR, SRES ®

520.431.2875 | dawnz@coldwellbanker.com 520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


TICKETS ONLY

50

$

TICKETS ONLY

2018

50

$

REGIONAL RICHES RAFFLE

Proceeds to benefit the Stanfield Free Clinic and the Breast Center at BCGMC

• $5,000 Cash Prize • Luxury Getaway at Seven Canyons in Sedona • Big Screen TV • Xbox to Xbox and PlayStation gaming centers • Apple Watch • iPad • Luxury sporting events • Weber Grill • 3 Night Stay in Puerto Penasco • Lenovo Laptop • Tickets to SeaWorld • And more with odds of a 1 in 4 chance to win!

PLUS: Enter to win a Trip for 4 to

Disneyland! Tickets $15 each

Includes 2-Night Stay for 4 in California near Disneyland 4 Tickets to Disneyland $200 Gas Card

Drawing to be held

6:00 pm Friday April 6, 2018 Memory Garden at J. Warren

1451 E. Florence Blvd. Casa Grande, Az Hors d’oeuvres provided Cash bar available Need not be present to win For ticket information call (520)381-6541


It’s time to Spring Clean Your Yard! Enjoy Your New Or Updated Outdoor Paradise.

Get your yard ready for Summer Entertaining! Landscape Cleanup New Installation Gravel & Pavers Sod and Synthetic Grass Hardscape Outdoor kitchen & BBQs Firepits & seating Ramadas Paver patio & driveway

Residential & Commercial

520-705-5250 ROC303493

Basic backyards start at $2500* *Includes sod, basic curbing, assorted trees/plants and drip system.

Built With Pride From The Ground Up

(520)836-6511

Custom Homes On Your Lot Or Ours ROC#175926

Coming Soon - Arroyo Verde Estates


PLANET FITNESS

Proudly serving Arizona City, Casa Grande, Coolidge, Eloy, Florence & Maricopa

is where you belong! 1325 East Florence Blvd. | Casa Grande, AZ | (520) 788-6200 In celebration of our new location in Maricopa!

20595 N. John Wayne Pkwy Suite 400 | Maricopa, AZ | (520) 666-2300

join in person or at planetfitness.com Must be 18 years old, or 13 with parent/guardian. Home club only. Billed monthly to a checking account. Commitment and state/local taxes may apply. Subject to a low one time startup fee. Subject to $39 annual fee. Planet Fitness locations are independently owned and operated. Š 2018, PFIP, LLC.


Some plumbing and electrical challenges can make a grown man feel like a child. When you find yourself needing help call the Pros at Brutinel Plumbing & Electrical.

CALL US TODAY! 520-836-5802

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Mention this LIVING ad and get $20 off first hour of service! (up to and including the 1st hour)

600 E. 1st St., Casa Grande, AZ 85122

ROC 067458 R-37R • ROC 068025 C-37 • ROC 067457 R-11 • ROC 074815 C-11

6

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


COMING MAY 2018

The TRAVEL & RECREATION Edition Don’t miss this opportunity to promote your business! Interview Bites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Finding Lost Pets . . . . . . . . . . . . .84

Stunning Safari . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94

Design Trends for 2018 . . . . . . . 36

Jim Suor’s Custom Creations . . 42

Stay, Play, Sail Away . . . . . . . . . 126

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

Craig McFarland, Mayor, City of Casa Grande

THE HOME & GARDEN EDITION Inside:

2018 Winter Visitor Guide

THE

BUSINESS & LEADERSHIP EDITION In Every Edition:

GOLDENCORRIDORLIVING.COM

SPECIAL REPORT

CASA GRANDE: A GROWING HORIZON

The Interview: In Every Edition:

$4.95 Complimentary • FALL 2017

Pat Johnson Talks Attesa

SEEDS OF HOPE:

DELIVERING MORE THAN HOPE

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA GOLDENCORRIDORLIVING.COM

$4.95 Complimentary • WINTER 2018

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA

GOLDENCORRIDORLIVING.COM For more information on how your business can be featured, please call 520-426-2074 or email info@roxco.com


Thwarting Thieves . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Pillars of Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Luxury Cruises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

THE HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

Spring 2018

The Medical, Health & Wellness Edition

Features:

CELEBRATING MARICOPA! • Meet Mayor Price • Weight Loss Challenge

In Every Edition:

GOLDENCORRIDORLIVING.COM

Contents

$4.95 Complimentary • SPRING 2018

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA

ABOUT THE COVER: Captivating Colors – Father Jonathan Shaw and daughter Addison Parde-Shaw flash rainbow smiles during the 4th Annual Copa Color Run held Feb. 24 at Copper Sky Regional Park in the City of Maricopa. The city-sponsored event featured a 1980s theme with music and attendee attire to match. This year’s event attracted 400 registrants as well as about 50 children under age 7. Photo taken by Addison’s mother Alyshea Shaw.

The LIVING Interview: Christian Price, Mayor, City of Maricopa

26

Maricopa Weight Loss Challenge Changes Lives

48

Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

60

Choosing Banner Casa Grande Medical Center

76

Economy & Local Business

Health, Wealth & Education

Travel, Dining & Entertainment

Tips for Workplace Health and Wellness. . . . . . . . . 30

Students Build Their Futures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Luxury Cruises to Pamper You. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

New Tax Law and Estate Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Being the Voice for a Child. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

“Our Town,” The Great American Classic. . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

Weekend College at CAC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Not All Thieves Are Stupid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Pinal County Fair Brings Fun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

G OLDENCORRIDORLIVING .COM


Letter from the Editor

A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

– IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE

W Bea Lueck

ith parts of the country recently experiencing back-to-back blizzards or cold and rainy weather, it is no wonder Arizona is a winter visitor destination! The weather has been wonderful, and I hope everyone is enjoying this perfect time of year – because the hot (H-O-T) weather will be here before we know it. Speaking of sunshine, our interview this edition features City of Maricopa Mayor Christian Price. I hope you enjoy reading the interview as much as I enjoyed speaking with him. He is one engaging conversationalist! Mayor Price speaks eloquently about the community that he is so enthusiastically proud to represent and call home. Also in this edition, is an article on the Maricopa Weight Loss Challenge. This second-year event has made a huge impact on the community. The first-year’s challenge was for city employees, but for this one,

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

residents of the community were invited to participate and win prizes for various categories. I had the pleasure of attending the awards luncheon, and I will say – everyone was a winner. Not only did they lose weight, but they learned new healthy lifestyle and diet choices and made many new friends along the way. This feature pairs nicely with the theme of this edition – Medical, Health & Wellness. As always, we offer our thanks to each of our editorial contributors, but we’d like to offer a special “thank you” to Banner Casa Grande Medical Center and Sun Life Family Health Center. Both organizations are key health care providers in our community as well as major employers in the region. Casa Grande and the surrounding communities are fortunate to have a variety of experienced medical professionals available at home – without the need to travel to the Valley for diagnosis

and treatment. Well, whether we like it or not, summer will be here very soon. The kids will be out of school, and many of us will head for cooler areas. So look for a special section on travel in our upcoming edition. According to the calendar, the next edition still falls under the “spring” season. But this is Arizona, and while summer doesn’t officially begin until June 21, to us in the great Southwest, when the temps are above 100, it is summer. We’d love to hear your travel plans. Drop us a line at editor@roxco.com or post on our Facebook page about your dream vacation destination. Until then – enjoy the beautiful spring weather!

–Bea

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G OLDENCORRIDORLIVING .COM PUBLISHER Elaine Earle, CPA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bea Lueck MANAGING EDITOR Katie Mayer CONTRIBUTING WRITER Donna McBride ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES Loriann Rhodes David Truby CREATIVE DIRECTOR/GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tim Clarke SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jake Pagano GRAPHIC DESIGNER Rebecca Bowen AD TRAFFIC MANAGER Jo Wobser PUBLIC RELATIONS & MARKETING MANAGER Julie Turetzky ADVERTISING INQUIRIES info@roxco.com COMMENTS & IDEAS editor@roxco.com CALENDAR INQUIRES calendar@roxco.com (520) 426-2074 442 W. Kortsen Rd, Ste 101 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

VOICES of the Community Meet some of our contributing Voices of the Community. These leaders come from public, private and nonprofit organizations. You’ll find their fresh ideas and timely stories in this edition. Angela Askey Executive Director, Public Relations and Marketing, Central Arizona College Angela is the Executive Director of Public Relations and Marketing for Central Arizona College. Prior to her arrival at CAC, Angela served as the Media Relations Coordinator at Mesa Community College and the Community Relations Coordinator at Idaho State University College of Technology.

Joel Belloc Mayor, City of Eloy Mayor Belloc was reelected for his second term as Mayor of the City of Eloy in November 2016. He has also served as a member of the Eloy City Council from 2002 - 2012 and as Vice Mayor from 2012- 2014. Prior to this, he served 12 years on the Santa Cruz Valley Union High School Governing Board. He graduated from Central Arizona College with an AAS degree in drafting/design, attended Pima College and the University of Arizona, where he enrolled in landscape architecture. He currently manages his family’s farming business, “Belloc Inc.” Mayor Belloc is a longtime resident of Eloy, and has been married to his wife Cecilia for over 40 years. Together they have three children, 10 grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Breanna Boland Executive Director, Casa Grande Alliance Breanna is the Executive Director of the Casa Grande Alliance. She started working for the organization in 2012 as a Prevention Specialist. Breanna studied Public Health at Northern Arizona University and is a Arizona Certified Prevention Specialist.

Evelyn Casuga Golden Corridor LIVING is published by Raxx Direct Marketing. Editorial content is provided by affiliates of Raxx Direct Marketing, community members and local organizations. © 2018. All rights reserved. No part of this publication, including but not limited to editorial content, illustrations, graphics and photographic images, may be republished, reproduced or reprinted without the prior express written consent of the publisher. The publishers of Golden Corridor LIVING assume no responsibility for errors or omissions of any advertisement beyond the actual cost of the advertisement. In no event shall the publishers be liable for any consequential damages in excess of the cost of the advertisement. Golden Corridor LIVING shall not be liable for inaccuracies, errors, omissions, or damages from the use of information contained herein. Submitted articles do not reflect the opinions of the owners or management of Golden Corridor LIVING Information contained within submitted articles had not been verified for accuracy and readers are responsible for CORRID LI V ING 10 GOLDEN forming their own opinions.OR Real estate information is as of 3-1-18 and is subject to current availability and pricing.

Economic/Community Development Advisor for Access Arizona Evelyn serves as Economic/Community Development Advisor for Access Arizona, the area’s regional economic development foundation. Evelyn works part time at CAC and consults with the Center for the Future of Arizona, and other nonprofit/ private entities. She volunteers with numerous organizations in economic and community development throughout Arizona.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Terri Durham

Helen Neuharth

Office Coordinator, Seeds of Hope Terri is a writer, idea-shaper, event-organizer, teambuilder, problem-solver, I.T. do-it-yourselfer with a make it happen mindset for Seeds of Hope. She uses her love of communication to integrate marketing strategies across multiple platforms including social media, website, mobile and print materials. And she loves cute shoes too.

President & CEO, Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce Helen was hired as the President/CEO of the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce in August 1991 and is a graduate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Institute for Organizational Management from Boulder, Colorado. Helen is an active member of the Arizona Chamber Executives.

Tiffanie Grady-Gillespie

Christian Price

Certified Physical Trainer, CPT, WickedFiTT Tiffanie is the owner of WickedFiTT, in Casa Grande, AZ. She is a well-known personal trainer, group fitness instructor, and all around fitness junkie. Tiffanie specializes in weight loss, strength and conditioning, and general fitness.

Corianna Lee Performing Arts Center Director, Coolidge Performing Arts Center Corianna “Cori” is a performing arts teacher at Coolidge High School and the Performing Arts Center Director for the Coolidge Performing Arts Center. At Coolidge High School, she directs the dance, drama and technical theater programs, and was named as an Arizona Teacher of the Year by the Arizona Thespian Society. Corianna has a bachelor’s in fine arts in dance and an master’s in special education. She is married with four children from kindergarten to high school and has been a resident of and employee in Pinal County for 17 years.

Mayor, City of Maricopa Mayor Price is serving in his third term as Mayor. Mayor Price is an entrepreneur and small business owner and is a partner of the Sierra West Group, a financial advisory firm. Raised in Tucson and a graduate of Northern Arizona University, he participates in numerous regional and national coalitions including serving as the Treasurer on the Executive Committee of the Arizona League of Cities and Towns.

Rina Rien Director, Casa Grande Main Street As Executive Director of Casa Grande Main Street since 2012, Rina fosters a collaborative approach toward building a vibrant downtown community. Rina enjoys partnering with highly creative people who share a passion for promoting Historic Downtown and preserving its rich history.

Donna McBride

Jon Thompson

Councilwoman, City of Casa Grande Donna is the Program Administrator/Public Information Officer and Supervisor for the CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) Unit for Pinal County Juvenile Court. She is actively involved as a Board Member for Casa Grande Alliance, Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, BlackBox Foundation, Mayor’s Reading Program, Pinal County Town Hall Vice-Chair, Parks and Block Watch Captain for the Casa Grande Police Department. She is a current member of the Casa Grande City Council.

Mayor, City of Coolidge Mayor Thompson graduated from NAU in 1979 with a Bachelor of Science degree. He was first elected to the Coolidge City Council in 2002 and served as Vice Mayor from 2006 to 2010. He gave up his council seat to run for Mayor and since being elected, has retired as Division Director for the Pinal County Adult Probation Department after 30 years.

Craig McFarland

Tori Ward

Mayor, City of Casa Grande Born and raised in California, Mayor McFarland has lived in Casa Grande since 2005. He is a graduate of California State University of Fresno, and retired from Golden Eagle Distributors in January 2015 as VP of Sales after a ten year run with the company, and 36 total years in beverage business sales management, marketing, and operations. McFarland began his first term as Mayor in December 2016.

Cruise and Resort Specialist, ROX Travel Victoria “Tori” is a cruise and resort specialist with a master’s degree in political science. She has completed more than 30 certification courses with the cruise and tour industry including the most advanced certification, Commodore, from Princess Cruise Lines. Tori is a member of the Cruise Lines International Association.

Gigi McWhirter Conceived in a plane behind the Airport Tavern and living proof that it takes a village to raise a kid proper. Married to the best man and we live in what I call the “Best Dog House in Casa Grande” shared with a bunch of dogs, two parakeets and a finch called “Rusty”. Lived in Alaska, drove on the Arctic Ocean, Walked on the Great Wall of China and drank Guinness in Ireland. But none of this compares to my profound love of animals and Flying Leap wines! SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

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Submit your events online at goldencorridorliving.com APRIL

1

EASTER MORNING COMMUNITY SUNRISE SERVICE - 6:30 AM-7:30 AM Copper Sky by the lake 44345 W. Bowlin Rd., Maricopa, AZ Please bring your own lawn chairs, blankets, and coffee.

3

CG KNITTERS & CROCHETERS - 6:30 PM-9:00 PM - A Latte Vino - 958 E. Rodeo Rd., Casa Grande. Meet, work on projects, ask & learn.

3

AFTERNOON PUPPET SHOWS - 4:00 PM - Vista Grande Public Library 1556 N. Arizola Road, Casa Grande. Furry monsters, fractured fairy tales, and an opportunity for kids to play with a variety of puppets.

4

FIELD OF SUNFLOWER BLOOMS - 6:00 PM - A Latte Vino - 958 E. Rodeo Rd., Casa Grande. Tickets available at www. paintnite.com.

5-8

COUNTRY THUNDER USA - 20585 Price Station Rd., Florence, AZ 85132 Premier Country Music Festival. Visit countrythunder. com for times and tickets.

5

KID’S ENCHANTED TEA PARTY - 10:00 AM-11:00 AM - Vista Grande Public Library 1556 N. Arizola Road, Casa Grande. Toddler Storytime for tea, cookies, and conversation. Fun for the whole family.

6-8

SPRING PLAY: OUR TOWN - 7:00 PM - CAC 8470 N. Overfield Rd.- Pence Center, Coolidge, AZ 85128 Free admission.

6

LA COCINA FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL - 5:30 PM-9:00 PM - 280 E. 3rd St., Casa Grande. Come and enjoy great Food and music every 1st and 3rd Friday of the month.

12

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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WEEKLY INDOOR MARKET 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

C St., Eloy AZ 85131 For families with children up to age 5, dental & sensory screenings, crafts, music, fun! Free event.

8

17

MARICOPA MUSIC FESTIVAL Copper Sky Recreation Complex 44345 M.L.K. Jr. Blvd., Maricopa, AZ 85138 2nd Annual Music & Beer Fest. General admission $20, VIP $50

11

WILD NIGHT FLOWER - 6:00 PM - A Latte Vino - 958 E. Rodeo Rd., Casa Grande. Tickets available at www.paintnite.com.

13

RAMEN HOOD-YOUTH THEATRE - BlackBox - 413 N. Florence St., Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Call 520-428-7050 for times.

13

WEEKLY INDOOR MARKET - 10:00 AM-4:00 PM Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

14

RAMEN HOOD-YOUTH THEATRE - BlackBox - 413 N. Florence St., Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Call 520-428-7050 for times.

14

2018 SPRING GOLF TOURNAMENT - 7:00 AM - United Way of Pinal County Robson Ranch-6844 S. Robson Blvd., Eloy, AZ 85131

14

5K POKER RUN 2018 - 8:30 AM-2:00 PM - Harrah’s Ak-Chin 15406 N Maricopa Rd., Maricopa, AZ 85139. 4th annual 5k Poker Run. Find tickets at www. active.com.

15

TEA LEAF READING CLASS - 2:00 PM-4:00 PM - Apothecraft-408 N. Florence St., Casa Grande. $20 cash, $25 debit/cc. Register by calling 520-518-1461 or visit ApotheCraft Shop

16

WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD SPECIAL EVENT - 10:00 AM-12:00 PM - 601 N.

KID’S MAKERSPACE ART CLASS - 4:00 PM - Casa Grande Public Library 449 N. Drylake St., Casa Grande. Art class for kids ages 7+. Registration required. Call 520-421-8652.

17

IT’S YOUR NITE - 5:00 PM - Robson Ranch Grill 5750 N. Robson Blvd., Eloy AZ 85131 No green thumb required! Ticket information at plantnite.com.

19

WIND ENSEMBLE CONCERT - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N. Overfield Rd.- Pence Center, Coolidge, AZ 85128 Free admission.

19

DAY OUT DOWNTOWN & HISTORIC WALKING TOUR - 9:30 AM - Meet on Main Street Patio Florence Street and 3rd Street. Groups are welcomed with prior notification. Call 520-836-8744

19

ANNUAL STUDENT ART SHOW - 5:00 PM-7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N. Overfield Rd.- Pence Center Lobby, Coolidge, AZ 85128 Free admission.

20

WEEKLY INDOOR MARKET 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

20

FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY MARICOPA - 5:00 PM-8:00 PM - 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave., Maricopa, AZ 85138. Good food, good company, good time. Kid friendly food festival.

21

PUBLIC SAFETY AWARENESS DAY - 9:00 AM-1:00 PM - 2525 N. Pinal Ave., Casa Grande, AZ 85122 Meet your local police officers, firefighters, volunteers & EMTs. Free event.

21

SHREDDING & E-CYCLE EVENT - 9:00 AM-12:00 PM - 958 E. Rodeo Rd., Ste. 16, Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Dispose your personal and confidential documents up to five boxes. Recycle old electronics. Free admission. Donations welcome.

25

4TH ANNUAL JOB EXPO 10:00 AM-1:00 PM - CAC San Tan Campus - 3736 E. Bella Vista Rd., San Tan Valley, AZ

26

THE ADDAMS FAMILYYOUTH THEATRE - BlackBox - 413 N. Florence St., Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Call 520-428-7050 for times.

26

CAC JAZZ SHOWCASESIGNAL PEAK BLUES - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N. Overfield Rd.Pence Ctr., Coolidge, AZ 85128 Free admission.

27

THE ADDAMS FAMILYYOUTH THEATRE - BlackBox - 413 N. Florence St., Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Call 520-428-7050 for times.

27

WEEKLY INDOOR MARKET - 10:00 AM-4:00 PM Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

27

MOVIE IN THE PARKDISNEY’S COCO - 6:00 PM-9:30 PM - Carr-McNatt-1115 N. Brown Ave., Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Blankets and/or low lawn chairs are encouraged. For information call 520-421-8677, Ext. 4561. Free and open to the public.

28

THE ADDAMS FAMILYYOUTH THEATRE - BlackBox - 413 N. Florence St., Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Call 520-428-7050 for times.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


BUSINESS INDEX Absolute Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Academy Mortgage - CG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Advanced Energy Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Banner / CGRMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 63, 76

April – May 2018

Brutinel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 C.A.V.I.T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Caliche Senior Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 89

APRIL (CONTINUED)

28

LULA ROE PALOOZA MARKET - 10:00 AM-6:00 PM - Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

28

P.O.W. W.O.W. - PRODUCE MARKET - 8:00 AM-11:00 AM - Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa

Grande, AZ 85122. $10 donation gets you up to 60 lbs of fresh produce. Bring your own basket.

29

CHORAL & HANDBELL CONCERT - 3:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N. Overfield Rd.- Pence Ctr., Coolidge, AZ 85128. Free admission.

Capital R Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Casa Grande Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Casa Grande Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Casa Grande Family Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 Central Arizona College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Coldwell Banker ROX Realty . . . . . . . 2, 23, 39, 67, 95 Coldwell Banker ROX - Property Management . . . 87 Color Me Crazy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Coolidge Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Cypress Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Desert Sun Heating, Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

MAY

1

GUITAR RECITAL - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N. Overfield Rd.- T116, Coolidge, AZ 85128. Free admission.

2

ROCKTACULAR ON PLAZA - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N. Overfield Rd., Coolidge, AZ 85128. Free admission

4

WEEKLY INDOOR MARKET 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

5

SUPER FUN INFLATABLE RUN - 8:00 AM-1:00 PM - 1115 N. Brown Ave., Casa Grande, AZ 85122. Kids ages 4-14 can test their SUPER powers at this obstacle course. Whole families encouraged to come out and enjoy games, vendors and entertainment.

Dick & Mitchell DDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

11

WEEKLY INDOOR MARKET - 10:00 AM-4:00 PM Limitless Events-1004 N. Promenade Pkwy., Ste. 119, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

12

MOTHER & SON GALA 5:00 PM-9:00 PM - 1004 N Promenade Pkwy Suite 119, Casa Grande, AZ 1st annual event, come dressed up in your best formal wear. Check in starts at 4:30pm. Tickets $40 for mothers & sons, $15 for additional children.

18

WHIMSICAL TULIP - 6:00 PM - A Latte Vino - 958 E. Rodeo Rd., Casa Grande. Tickets available at www.paintnite.com.

DM Family Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Elegance N Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Eva’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Fitzgibbons Law Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Grande Innovation Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Hospice of the Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Iron City Polaris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Jenkins Chiropractic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Jewell Glass & Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Mankel Mechanical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Mission Heights Preparatory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Norris RV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Ochoa’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Pinal County Fairgrounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Planet Fitness - Casa Grande . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Rich’s Auto Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 ROX Casa Grande Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Seeds of Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Star Towing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Sun Life Family Health Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Title Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 United Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Yang and Horsley Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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Tim Clarke Creative Director

Bea Lueck General Manager & Managing Editor

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Katie Mayer Editor & Project Manager

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Rebecca Bowen Graphic Designer

Loriann Rhodes Advertising Executive

Bea is the general manager and managing editor of ROX Media Group. She handles the various day-to-day activities necessary to take the publications from concept to print and distribution. She has over 22 years of experience in multiple advertising media, including print, direct mail, television and web.

Rebecca is a junior graphic designer with over five years of experience in the design and marketing industries. She has her associate’s degree in graphic design, and is currently pursuing her bachelor’s degree in communication. When she is not creating eye-catching visuals, she is enjoying hiking and other outdoor activities. Loriann brings more than 10 years of media experience to ROX Media Group. Her background includes selling trade publications as well as consumer membership publications. As Account Executive, she represents LIVING Magazine and Smart Shopper and supports other ROX Media Group projects as needed.

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

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PINAL COUNTY by Staff Reports

• A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA • A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOL

Casa Grande appoints new judge

C

Banner Casa Grande designated to provide pediatric care in emergency room

B

a n n e r C a s a Gr a n d e Medical Center’s emergenc y room was recently designated a “Pediatric Prepared Emergency Care Facility” by the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, also known as AzAAP. This voluntary designation means Banner Casa Grande’s Emergency Room is able to provide expert care and has the equipment necessary to stabilize and/or manage pediatric emergency cases that come to the hospital. Pediatric patients brought to the hospital are assessed for their illness or injury. If additional treatment is needed, those critically injured or ill patients will be transport-

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ed and admitted to a hospital that offers specialized inpatient pediatric care, like Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center in Glendale, or Diamond Children’s Medical Center in Tucson. “We’re excited to be able to offer this level of service in our community in a way that is tailored to the meet the medical needs of our pediatric patients,” said Jenni Stallman, nursing director of the emergency room at Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “Our physicians and medical staff are committed to providing the best care to all patients, including children who sometimes need more specialized

care depending on the severity of their illness.” According to the AzAAP web site, “Pediatric Prepared Emergency Care is a partnership between hospitals, physicians, nurses, emergency personnel and the Emergency Medical Services for Children program at the Arizona Department of Health Services.” “This designation helps us meet the growing demands of the community we serve,” said Rona Curphy, CEO of Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “When a child is seriously sick or hurt, parents want immediate care. We have the experts and the tools available to help provide that for them.”

asa Grande Mayor McFarland and City Council on March 19 held a swearing-in ceremony for newly-appointed city judge, Dyani Juarez. After careful review by a judicial selection committee, Juarez was selected as one of three candidates who was interviewed at a Special City Council meeting on Feb. 20, at which time she was appointed to serve as the city judge. Juarez possesses more than 20 years of experience working for the Arizona judiciary in various capacities, and has worked for the Casa Grande City Court since 2001. In her previous role, Juarez presided over thousands of cases reviewing civil traffic, domestic violence, DUI, shoplifting and assault offenses. She holds a variety of certifications recognizing her as a Fellow of the Institute for Court Management, Certified Court Executive, Certified Court Manager, Arizona Court Executive and an Arizona Court Manager. Juarez holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice administration and a master’s degree in business/public administration from the University of Phoenix. She most recently served as the Court Administrator for the Casa Grande City Court, a position that she held since 2004.

Read More News on Page 94...

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


PRESS

Visit GoldenCorridorLiving.com for Up-to-date Local News from Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine

LIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA • A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA •

Women’s march anniversary event was a success in Pinal County

O

n January 20, Casa Grande was host to the first-ever event of its kind. Women, men and even families from Maricopa, Pima and Pinal counties gathered together at Peart Park to spend an afternoon honoring women. This event marked the first anniversary of the worldwide Women’s March in 2017. The clouds and chilly air did not dampen the enthusiasm of the hundreds in attendance. Some wore pink hats; some carried signs and many others, excited about the day, converged around the amphitheater, waiting to hear the band and speakers. Over 20 civic organizations from around the area set up exhibits to promote their programs and reach the public. Exhibitors included the Pinal County Health Department, the Liberal Catholic Church, People Power, ERA Action, Planned Parenthood, Love Glasses and many more. Music played while

crowds gathered. A rousing welcome was given by Jevin Hodge, and then a color guard from the Eloy Veterans Center led the pledge of allegiance. Local singer Jacqueline Ibarra sang a stirring National Anthem. Speakers included Lisa Fitzgibbons (Casa Grande City Council), Constance Jackson (NAACP), Linda Lyon( Arizona School Board Association), Ralph Atchue, Hollace Lyon, Natali Bock, Nava Saraccino, Cindy Schaider, Serena Knierem and Blanca Varella, who represented congressman Tom O’Halleran. The emcee for the event was Sharon Girard, local activist, lead organizer and state senate candidate. The highlight of the event was the appearance of former congresswoman Gabby Giffords and her husband, Navy captain and astronaut, Mark Kelly. The crowd was especially appreciative and excited when

the couple arrived. Kelly spoke about the need to halt gun violence in this country, and Giffords spoke about strong women. Casa Grande is proud to have

shown the state that you do not need to go to Phoenix or Tucson to celebrate women. You can do it in your own backyard. We will celebrate again in 2019!

CGESD summer food service program going strong

F

or 27 years, Casa Grande Elementary School District (CGESD) has been ser ving free meals to children in the community during the summer months. The summer meals program has grown from a humble staff of 24 employees serving approximately 7,200 total meals from six sites in 1991 to an army of 41 staff members serving 42,781 total meals at 25 sites last summer.

The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) is a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Child Nutrition Program established to ensure that children, ages 18 and younger, continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session. Free meals meeting federal nutrition guidelines are provided to all children at approved SFSP sites. There are

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

no prerequisites, applications or registration required to qualify for the program – just be a child and show up at meal time! Parents are welcome to join the activities, and adult meals can be purchased at a value. The 2018 CGESD sponsored Summer Food Service Program begins on May 29 and will run through July 27. The program encourages good health through

nutrition and an active lifestyle, as well as providing an opportunity for interactive learning. We host a variety of activities, such as crafts and games, theme days and educational presentations from community and business members who help to keep the children engaged and ready to return to school with a focus on learning.

Continued on Page 54... GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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CITY

COMMUNITY HEALTH IS EVERYONE’S JOB!

SPEAK

by Craig H. McFarland, Mayor, City of Casa Grande

C This effort will not succeed unless it is a community solution, a community action plan and executed by the community.

ommunity Health is everyone’s business. One of my action plans last year was to help bring our community service organizations together. By working together we can make our resources go further and we can be more effective. Working with fellow Council Members Donna McBride, Lisa Fitzgibbons and the Emergency Assistance Ministry (EAM), we have been able to bring state, county and local service groups together. We have successfully built the City of Casa Grande’s Community Health Resources tab on the city’s new website: casagrandeaz.gov/community-health/. This website connects all of our local service organizations and organizes them by subject (like those listed below). • • • • • • • •

Physical health Mental health Homelessness Abuse Employment services Food Clothing Counseling and guidance

• • • • • • • •

Domestic violence Human trafficking Help paying bills Family services Dental health Housing Veterans services Spiritual health

We have also begun our work to address homelessness with the creation of the Mayor’s Homelessness Task Force. The task force has identified many different needs and issues as they relate to homelessness. Additionally, we have completed a review of all resources and are beginning to review and develop action plans to address the needs. This effort will not succeed unless it is a community zaction plan and executed by the community. Action plans are in process for affordable housing, a place to sleep and a place to clean up (I-HELP), feeding and clothing efforts, physical and mental health and education and work force development. Community health is everyone’s business; community health is everyone’s job! Make our mind set . . . everything is possible. Put passion first! We are connected. We are 100 percent accountable. Let’s have an attitude of gratitude, live to give and remember the time is now!

Visit City of Casa Grande’s Community Health Resources tab on the city’s new website: casagrandeaz.gov/ community-health/

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THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


HEALTHCARE IN CASA GRANDE

2016 ANNUAL REPORT

AL REPORT

YEAR AT-A-GLANCE BCGMC IS BELOW THE

BCGMC IS BELOW709 THE BABIES NATIONAL AVERAGES FOR ALL BORN REPORTABLE INFECTIONS  CENTRAL LINE ASSOCIATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS  C-DIFF

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We focus on making the patient experience excellent— every p e p e d g x n e e n encounter, every time. a o every encounter, time. rona.curphy@bannerhealth.com. ll r is n de M he fuevery encounter, every time. t not nmeeting here your expectations, please contact our are CEO, Rona Curphy at GranIf swe t WHY s d e s If we are not meeting your expectations, please contact our CEO, Ron a OSE BANNER CASA GRANDE MEDICAL CENTER? e l r a 7 d t i d 1 p 520-381-6519 or rona.curphy@bannerhealth.com. a s n o 520-381-6519 or rona.curphy@bannerhealth.com. o i h t a a nd mbers PROGRAM  ACCESS TO PERSONALIZED from WHY CHOOSE BANNER CASA GRANDE MEDICAL CENTER? WHY CHOOSE BANNER CASA GRANDE Fou MEDICAL Me CENTER?  178 BED 2  BANNER CORE CENTER FOR HEALTH RECORD “MY 64 C rd HOSPITAL a o B M PROGRAM  ACCESS TO PERSO  178 BED HOSPITAL BANNER” PROGRAM 178ORTHOPEDICS BED HOSPITAL  ACCESS TO PERSONALIZED BCG eesALL PRIVATE ROOMS  y o l 5  BANNER CORE CENTER FOR  ALL PRIVATE ROOMS HEALTH RECORD  COMPREHENSIVE REHAB  LOW INFECTION RATE p 9  BANNER CORE CENTER FOR ALL PRIVATE ROOMS RECORD “MY 3HEALTH Em C M  24-HOUR EMERGENCY ORTHOPEDICS BANNER”  URGENT CARE OPEN 365 SERVICES WITH PHYSICAL, G to  24-HOUR EMERGENCY 24-HOUR EMERGENCY ORTHOPEDICS BCBANNER” ers e t inueINFECTION t SERVICES  COMPREHENSIVE REHAB n LOW R n 8 DAYS OF THE YEAR OCCUPATIONAL AND SPEECH u 7 o t l c 5 o LOW INFECTION RATE SERVICES  COMPREHENSIVE REHAB V rgenCARE OP C , we  &URGENT u s M  STATE-OF-THE-ART SERVICESSERVICES WITH PHYSICAL,  ‘B’ LEAPFROG SAFETY SCORE THERAPIES (INPATIENT & e G c i C PHYSICAL, erv ergency ing, STATE-OF-THE-ART  URGENT CARE OPEN 365 SERVICES B WITH ians TECHNOLOGY DAYS OCCUPATIONAL SPEECH ew s AND magOF THE YEA FOR OUTPATIENT) i . n m sicEMS l e 9  BASE HOSPITAL e r y c a Y u h c P ien o o STATE-OF-THE-ART ices: t, &medi  ‘B’orLEAPFROG TECHNOLOGY OFexTHE OCCUPATIONAL AND SPEECH e.  ROBUST TELEHEALTH SA perYEAR  COMPREHENSIVE WOUND GMC PROVIDERS RPHDAYS s ion tTHERAPIES serv(INPATIENT U t i g d C hm ien l BC ember c n d t i a a a u c A i w p n m t d  BASE HOSPITAL F SERVICES OUTPATIENT) o I lSCORE ou ROBUST TELEHEALTH SAFETY THERAPIES  CARE FROM THE(INPATIENT HEART CARE WITH TWO N & de Me‘B’ LEAPFROG O d so e fol eds, TECHNOLOGY rd M n R . h a a 6 , t n 1 s o r a 0 e r O  WOMEN  PROVIDERS b B 2& INFANT HYPERBARIC OXYGEN di WOUND ffe FOR  n BASE HOSPITAL EMS SERVICES OUTPATIENT) e COMPREHENSIVE oSERVICES p stuTWO R CE anner Casa bGig yWITH acut CARE ear iA CERTIFIED eWITH ew LEVEL e , U l n  CARE FROM THE II e s THERAPY CHAMBERS r , r O e a e  f ROBUST u c WOMEN & INFANT SERVICES  COMPREHENSIVE WOUND B M d a nd NURSERY d car HYPERBARIC o th OXYGEN TELEHEALTH on o PROVIDERS es O a n c l i h l u R v a r o r F II e Se FROMwTHE HEART WITH A CERTIFIED LEVEL CARE WITH cility ugh grou  fINTERVENTIONAL CentTWO ant CARE n in CARDIAC CHAMBERS ur faSERVICES Thro inTHERAPY oke e n r o I p b o care o s nd t NURSERY HYPERBARIC h s We OXYGEN e t a l u d g c a e n e o t n a f h a e h l om ich is s ins a ue to care, c d the aWOMEN INTERVENTIONAL CARDIAC THERAPY W CHAMBERS n i m t h e n r  & INFANT SERV n w o t t we Unit 17. We c n patien uality a mate, it a h t i a q 20 cli nor July cellence highest ake A CERTIFIED LEVE t ho t o m WITH a e . r e x y g e h e’s on ing t ommunit rated able in peopl d i v e o r g it by pr to our c an Inte care, a erence NURSERY t Vis e ff i n c d o i d e t i e v s r se pat e ba s. well oved Out s m ces valu tion, as nt live  INTERVENTIONAL CARD a h 75 3 isits alth t embra oordina r patie , V e 7 H e 3 er tha re c erio Car Bann System ent re, ca h a sup a g c r l U ica ery wit 05 Deliv ces in clin ervices 5 its , s i 2 V s n 2 ncy adva cessible rge e c a m E as 3 GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING 19 SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

1800 E Florence Blvd, Casa Grande, AZ (520) 381-6300 www.bannerhealth.com $19,594,000

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16


COOLIDGE, ARIZONA RESIDENT FEEDBACK IS KEY TO CONTINUED CITY IMPROVEMENTS by Jon Thompson, Mayor, City of Coolidge

I The City Council and I are always looking for ways we can improve Coolidge and get a sense of what’s on the minds of our residents.

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GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

t has been my pleasure since 2014 to serve as Mayor for the City of Coolidge. I get excited to see the positive changes since I’ve held this position. More importantly, watching the community join together to make Coolidge a part of their lives is even more fulfilling. The organizations and individual members of our city are what make Coolidge a better place. Whether they are volunteering for a community clean-up or participating in one of our many events from Coolidge Days, Movie in the Park, recreational sports and many others, they are an important reminder of the people who support Coolidge’s success. The feedback from our citizen survey is another way our residents participate in identifying the needs of our community. The City Council and I are always looking for ways we can improve Coolidge and get a sense of what’s on the minds of our residents. Our response from last year’s survey was very helpful. We reached nearly every household in Coolidge and carefully tabulated the results with the efforts of city staff. This helped the Council identify specific areas our residents felt were important to them.

Two of the major items the Council and I set as priorities included our roadways and waste services. I’ve discussed in previous articles about the vast improvements made to our roads since last year’s survey. Our downtown area needed new roads and much of these streets have been newly constructed. The city has also repaved over five miles of additional roadway with a chip-seal process, helping to preserve and improve roads. Recycling was another center point to the needs of our residents. We began a once-per-week recycling pick-up for our residents in October. Residents have applauded the new service, and I, too, appreciate the work of our staff in coming up with ways to add services while reducing the overall costs to our residents. Our 2018 survey is slated to go out in April. We hope to hear back from even more residents this year, and I look forward to improving this community further. As Mayor, I enjoy speaking about our great city, and would invite you to Coolidge to explore the various shops, restaurants, community events and attractions including the Casa Grande Ruins National Monument. We hope to see you in Coolidge soon!

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Book His or Her Senior Portrait Session NOW! Call Tina at 520-450-1494

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SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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ELOY, ARIZONA NEW ELOY CITY HALL TO BECOME COMMUNITY ASSET Offers Ample Space for Employees and Residents Alike by Joel G. Belloc, Mayor, City of Eloy

We are committed to expanding economic opportunities and promoting private investment within Eloy.

T

he new City Hall sits on approximately four acres in downtown Eloy at the southeast corner of Phoenix Avenue and “C” Streets. It will house many of the administrative functions for the City of Eloy, as well as a new state-ofthe-art council chamber, community development and finance departments, dedicated indoor-outdoor community spaces and retail space totaling approximately 19,000 square feet. The primary objective of the building is to provide a facility that serves the community, reinvigorates the vitality of downtown and spurs economic growth. The new facility is designed to perform in Eloy’s climate by seamlessly blending shaded exterior gathering areas with indoor spaces via generous landscaped courtyards and a monumental day-lit interior lobby. From the lobby, the building creates a framed view of the Newman Mountains to the east. To showcase Eloy’s rich cultural history, the lobby has been de-

signed as a gallery to display art pieces throughout the year. This will not just be a place to pay utility bills; it will be the community “living room” in the heart of Eloy that will serve as a source of pride for all of its citizens. Working closely with Eloy’s City Manager, Public Works Director and Community Development Director, the project design firm (SmithGroupJJR), general contractor (CORE Construction), and project management firm (Abacus Project Management) placed a high priority on engaging the community and end-users by facilitating town hall meetings, interactive charrettes and by displaying floor plans and renderings at Eloy’s famous Fiestas Patrias event held at Main Street Park. These points of engagement allowed the community to provide valuable input regarding the design of their new City Hall.

View looking northeast of the new Eloy City Hall.

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THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Custom Home With Mountain Views

12694 West Sacaton Lane, Casa Grande

415,000

$

4BR 2.5BA 2,534 SF POOL 1.2 ACRES •

Custom home with incredible mountain views, sunrises and sunsets

10’ to 12’ ceilings, formal living/dining and great room

Gourmet kitchen with stainless KitchenAid appliances

Gorgeous granite counters and 20” porcelain tile floors

Split master suite with fireplace, separate exit and spa-like bath

Salt water chlorinated pool

Extended covered patio, Ramada and block fence

2 car side entry garage is over-height and extended

12’ RV and man gates of composite wood plus full hook-up

GEORGIA F. SCHAEFFER ASSOCIATE BROKER, REALTOR , GRI, ABR, CDPE, SRES, SFR ®

520.560.3333 | georgias@coldwellbanker.com

DAWN M. ZIMBELMAN REALTOR , CDPE, ABR, SRES ®

520.431.2875 | dawnz@coldwellbanker.com 520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


MARICOPA, ARIZONA MARICOPA CONTINUES TO GROW A Look at Upcoming Improvements, News and Events by Christian Price, Mayor, City of Maricopa

In an effort to bring affordable commercial space to Maricopa, the city is in the process of selecting a partner to design and develop the Estrella Gin Business Park, a 50acre, shovelready site that has been Certified Gold by the Arizona Commerce Authority.

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n October, the City of Maricopa will turn 15 years old. What a difference a decade-and-a-half makes! Since our incorporation, our population has increased nearly 3,000 percent and the growth isn’t slowing down anytime soon. In 2017, the city issued 810 single-family housing permits, close to a 25 percent increase from 2016. When you drive the SR 347 through the center of our city, you’ll notice impressive new developments that are making the City of Maricopa a desirable destination to live, work and play. In November 2017, the city celebrated the official groundbreaking of the State Route 347 Overpass Project, a transportation and public safety project in the making for more than 15 years. This overpass will link the southern and northern parts of the city, alleviate congestion for the more than 31,000 vehicles that pass through the intersection every day and dramatically increase the public’s safety and interaction with the more than 60-80 trains a day that travel the Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Construction is expected to take 18 – 20 months. The public can learn the latest construction and traffic delay information by visiting overpasstracker.com or by calling the City’s 24/7 hotline at 520-316-6910. In summer 2017, construction began on Edison Pointe, the 130,000 square-foot retail center located at the northeast corner of Edison Road and State Route 347. Future tenants include Ross Dress for Less, Goodwill, Burger King and Dunkin Donuts. Planet Fitness is set to celebrate its grand opening in March 2018. Construction is also set to begin on APEX Motor Club, a 280-acre private luxury motorsports facility located

near the intersection of State Route 238 and Ralston Road. Upon completion, it will be the only private motorsports club within the boundaries of the Phoenix Metropolitan Statistical Area and the sixth largest in the United States. The $25 million project will feature a 4.3-mile race-quality asphalt track, two 12,000 squarefoot buildings and for-lease garages that will accommodate up to 128 vehicles. Construction is expected to start in the coming months. In an effort to bring affordable commercial space to Maricopa, the city is in the process of selecting a partner to design and develop the Estrella Gin Business Park, a 50-acre, shovel-ready site that has been Certified Gold by the Arizona Commerce Authority. The Edison Road bypass was completed in 2017, allowing for better traffic circulation throughout the site and connecting State Routes 238 and 347, two of the primary access corridors for the city. The Estrella Gin site will be developed through a public-private partnership, and upon completion will be the first business park located within the city limits. Maricopa has also partnered with Urban Land Institute (ULI) as part of the Arizona Technical Assistance Program (AzTAP) to generate development strategies for the 140-acre City Center site, currently home to Maricopa City Hall and the Flagship Police Station. Maricopa’s City Center will serve as the governmental and public-use heart of the city. In late 2017, Maricopa was awarded $278,000 through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Regional Allocation program to fund a flood mitigation study for the Heritage District Redevelopment Area.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


As we continue to grow, we will strive to maintain the tight-knit community atmosphere that our residents and visitors rave about.

The Heritage District is an approximately 1.5 squaremile area, most of which lies within the 100-year floodplain. Flood control poses significant barriers to commercial development and residential improvements for low-to-moderate-income families residing in the redevelopment area. The purpose of the study is to identify incremental, achievable steps to remove the entire Heritage District from the floodplain as quickly as possible. To improve our customer service and efficiency Maricopa has implemented an entirely online and paperless permitting system called SmartGov. The city has been recognized throughout the country for this forward-thinking technology that is allowing for “all electronic plan reviews, online applications and payments.” This allows for significantly easier staff coordination and eliminates the need for developers and other applicants to drive to City Hall to drop off plans or write a check. SmartGov has reduced the average days

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

Maricopa Demographics: • • •

Est. Population – 50,174 Median Age – 32.8 Median Household Income - $66,860

to apply for and actually issue a permit from 63 days down to just 6! Excellent community events are another way to ensure you know your neighbor. This year, we are preparing for the 14th annual Salsa Festival at Copper Sky Regional Park on Saturday, March 24, from 2 - 8 p.m. An anticipated 10,000 festival guests will enjoy tasting a variety of salsas prepared by chefs from around the Valley, along with games for kids, activities in the Little Pepper Zone, food, spirits and entertainment. For more information go to maricopa-az.gov. The city is also gearing up for a year full of events including the Great American 4th, the Maricopa Mud Run, Copa Color Run and Merry Copa Holiday Festival, just to name a few. As we continue to grow, we will strive to maintain the tight-knit community atmosphere that our residents and visitors rave about. Our first 15 years as a city have been marked with explosive growth. We continue to work as a community to create development that will best serve our residents for generations to come and will offer diverse opportunities in culture, technology, education, business, entrepreneurship, transportation, entertainment and recreation for all ages. So come see us! You’ll be surprised at what you find.

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The LIVING Interview

Christian Price Mayor, City of Maricopa Interview by Bea Lueck

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s short sales and foreclosures plagued Maricopa, he stayed. When folks lost hope in their once-promising small city, he dreamed big. And when the city needed critical infrastructure, but lacked the sales tax revenue to fund it, he championed other efforts to bring it in. Outgoing, optimistic and passionate about his city, Mayor Christian Price is excited about all he has accomplished in his six years in office, but acknowledges there is still a long way to go. We sat down with the married father of four (who recently lost 35 pounds!) to talk about his commitment to his city, the importance of transportation and why he wishes civility would return to politics.

GC LIVING: Let’s start at the beginning – where did you grow up? MAYOR PRICE: I grew up in Tucson. My family moved there when I was one, so I’m about as close to a native Arizonan as you get without actually being born here. As a little boy, I loved to play sports. I was always a big proponent of being outdoors, and I was an Eagle Scout. GC LIVING: Any siblings? MAYOR PRICE: I’m the oldest of four. My father was a pharmaceutical rep for many years, and then he went back to school when I was in college and became a physician’s assistant. My mother was a speech pathologist in the Amphi School District and passed several years ago from cancer. GC LIVING: So, you went to University of Arizona? MAYOR PRICE: I love U of A, but in the end, I needed to get out of Dodge, and so I went to Northern Arizona University, in Flagstaff. GC LIVING: And you are an English Literature major? MAYOR PRICE: Yes, I am. [Laughs] It’s funny, truth be told I greatly disliked math and I was mildly interested in reading, writing and speaking publicly, and I was terrible at spelling. So I told her that I was going to be an English major in college. However, my mom was an expert in the subject

and she knew the English major requirements backwards and forwards, after all she had gotten straight “A’s” in the subject throughout her high school career. So as I announced my intent to major in it, she felt compelled to tell me this story about how when she had gone to college, and in her very first English class, she was so excited to get a superior grade. Yet upon completion of this first college English course, it turns out it was far harder than she thought, and she got a “D”. She was so shocked that it caused her to change her major and her career choice. Thus, I should probably think about doing the “same thing.” She went on to say that, “I simply don’t have what it takes to be an English major.” I said, “OK. It’s on.” So, I became an English lit major just to prove that I could do it. Now, I have found a love for writing. I love public speaking. I love reading and poetry, and my spelling has even gotten little bit better. GC LIVING: And then you minored in Spanish and ended up living in Northern Argentina? MAYOR PRICE: I served a mission for my church, and I was called to serve in Argentina. I learned Spanish on the fly. I loved the language. I loved the people. And when I got back to college, it just made sense to partner English literature with another language. GC LIVING: After NAU?

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

MAYOR PRICE: I went to law school. Part of reason why I became an English lit person is because the writing is such an important part, too, of being an attorney. I went to law school in Houston, and I thoroughly enjoyed my classes. And, interestingly enough, I went to a historically black law school. GC LIVING: Thurgood Marshall. MAYOR PRICE: That’s right. I loved being a part of that. I loved the cultural diversity. In the end, when my mom was sick with cancer, I had to make some decisions. And so, I decided to come back and help my family. GC LIVING: Now you’ve transitioned from a goal of becoming an attorney to becoming a financial advisor? MAYOR PRICE: Correct. I was looking for a job while trying to figure out what I was going to do with my life. I also ended up becoming a jeweler, so I was working at a jewelry store while I was studying to become a financial advisor. Having grown up in Tucson, they had the largest gem show in the world there each year. I had learned a lot about diamonds, gemstones and gold. So it was just a natural progression to make, and I still dabble in it today. GC LIVING: So when did you meet your wife, Cindy? MAYOR PRICE: She and I met at one of my best friend’s weddings. It was her cousin. She lived in Florida. And at the time, we were just at different stages in life. She was a little bit younger than me. She was a photographer. She was taking pictures of the wedding, and we ended up dancing once or twice. My best friend kept saying, “Oh, you’ve got to date her.” That day, I’m thinking, “Ah, she lives in Florida. I’m not dating her.” You know, I’m at NAU. She’s just entering the college realm. I’m not into that long-distance thing. Several years later, it

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The LIVING Interview (continued) turns out her family moved here. We found ourselves together here in the Phoenix metro area. And the rest is history. GC LIVING: So how did you end up founding Pantheon? MAYOR PRICE: I got my first job in financial advising, and I was taken on by a company based out of California that had a branch office here. And like most financial advisors who kind of start out in the industry, you learn two things. You either want to be with a bigger firm or you truly want to be “Independent”. So after about four years, the branch manager Brad Ullrich, who was then my boss, became my business partner and we started Pantheon Investments, Financial Services & Insurance. We really wanted to have the ability for us to service our clients in a way we felt was the most appropriate. You know, we weren’t there to push anything on them. I love being a business owner, and recently I merged my firm with another, to form Sierra Wealth Group, which can do even more to service clients in the financial services world. GC LIVING: Let’s fast forward to when you and your wife are looking for your first home. MAYOR PRICE: We were like most young couples trying to find what we can afford. It’s funny because at the time – this is 20032004, the lead up to the boom – houses were getting more and more expensive. And like most couples, you have to look to the outskirts, right? We looked in what is now known as San Tan, a few miles north of Florence. We looked in the revitalized area of downtown Phoenix, north of the South Mountain area and then a little place we’d never heard of that was just starting called Maricopa. And I’m telling you, we came to Maricopa and there was something about it. And to this day, I can’t explain it. It’s just a draw. It was a picture that hadn’t yet been painted. I felt like my family, as we grew there, would be a part of its creation or its history. We just took that bull by the horns and said, “We’re excited about this opportunity. Let’s see what we can paint on this blank slate and make it something great.” GC LIVING: So you became pretty active within the community right as you arrived? MAYOR PRICE: One of the things important to understand about me is that in my junior year in college, I had an internship in the state House of Representatives. Both of my

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professional philosophies have kind of come from my grandfathers. I have a grandfather, Clifford Marsh, who was a colonel in the U.S. Air Force and flew B-17s over Germany and B-29s over Korea, and then he ended up retiring in El Paso as an audiologist. Then my other grandfather, Dix W. Price, was an attorney, a very renowned attorney, to the extent he did a lot of pro bono work. He did a lot of things that he felt were for the common good. And you know, before the days that lobbying was considered a bad word, he did a lot of work on the lobbying here with the state legislature on behalf of education in Arizona, because he had served under three different presidents as the Secretary to the Board of Education at the U.S. level. He was very renowned as a statesman here, and I’ve always admired and wanted to emulate that. So for the entire ‘98 legislative session, my job was to summarize these massive bills and put them into one or two paragraphs and be able to present to the committee and tell them everything about what this bill was supposed to be. I was assigned to the human services committee and specifically the committee chair, Representative Freddy Hershberger, and I learned a lot from her. She was out of north Tucson, out of the Oro Valley area, and I was taught a ton about how the government process of ‘making sausage’ works. [Laughs] When I got to Maricopa, I got involved right away. I got involved in my HOA, as Maricopa is built on a kind of a backbone of HOAs. It’s also part of the reason was I dislike HOAs. [Laughs] Some people have said, “Well, wait a second, why would you become an HOA president if you dislike them?” And I said, “Well, it’s because I want to learn the ins and outs, and I want to teach people how to navigate them, and teach them what they can and can’t do with them.” And so when I decided that it was time to get involved more with the city, I attended all the city council meetings. There wasn’t a meeting or issue that I didn’t know about from sitting in the audience. One day I just kind of woke up and rolled over to my wife and said, “You’re not going to believe this, but I think I’m supposed to run for mayor.” [Laughs] GC LIVING: Why Mayor, versus City Councilman?

MAYOR PRICE: First off, I found out that my mayor would be leaving. But that really wasn’t the reason. The reason was, in my discussions, Maricopa had been terribly hit by the recession. Maricopa didn’t have a lot of business to fall back on. What we had was homes. Well, this was a housing crisis, so we were the poster child for foreclosures in the state of Arizona and in the Southwest. I remember talking to a gal and saying, “I would like you to come and be my campaign manager if I decide to do this.” And she said to me something that was so profound that I’ll never forget. She said, “Why do I want to help you be elected mayor to a place that everyone I know wants to leave?” And I thought, “How depressing is this?” You know? I mean, this is a brand new city out of the dust. This is a burgeoning city. This is a blank slate with opportunity written all over it. How can we say this? And for me I thought, “We have to change the tone. We have to change the narrative.” And so what I understood about city councils is that no one comes to town and says, “I want to meet with council member six.” What they say is, “I want to meet with the mayor.” You’re the face of the city. You’re the person who has to be out there. You have to network. You have to sell yourself. You have to sell the city and the story, and you have to get people to believe in something, in a future they can’t yet see, feel or touch. That’s hard to do, and I felt like it needed to start from the top. I love having conversations, I love learning from people. I love educating people on why we make decisions the way that we do, and that these decisions aren’t made in a vacuum. One of our city managers used to say, you know, “If you ever want to be revered or respected like a big city, you need to act like one.” And I thought, “That’s exactly right. We have to act like bigger cities act, not because we are a bigger city, but rather because someday we will be there.” The reality is if you can get people to buy in to the knowledge, the hope and the vision, that things will get brighter and this is just a cycle, then people’s attitudes and efforts change, you know? And it was a nasty cycle, and it was a detrimental cycle, but it’s just a cycle and our day would come again. We needed to be ready for that, and we needed to be part of that change.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


GC LIVING: Have things stabilized? MAYOR PRICE: Things have stabilized a lot. When you’re only 15 years old as a city, you really have to overlay hosts of challenges, like staff growth, newness and city immaturity and those types of things, when comparing it to a city that’s over 100 years old. Even though it might be relatively the same in size, those ways of acting and knowing what to do just have never been established – those policies, those procedures, those ways of doing things. When you’re created as a suburb and you’re the majority of your income comes from property taxes and not from sales taxes, which is what most cities try to rely on, right? When you’re 15 years old, and it was nothing but farmland and then eight of the 15 years was in one of the worst recessions since the Great Depression, things change dramatically, so you have to rely on the citizenry to both have the vision of where you’re going, as well as how are we going to pay for it. We are in the exact same position where Casa Grande was 100 years ago, where Chandler was 60-65 years ago and where Gilbert was 50 years ago. But now what we are being called to do is far more challenging because the rules have changed. Laws, policies and regulations have changed that have made things far more difficult. We are in a position where if we want to get things done, we have to pay for it ourselves. So, we pay more than the average city does for our amenities, like a new city police force, but we have incredible police force. We pay more than the average city for our fire force, but we have an amazing fire force. I think it’s really important to note that our premier gym, which I think is one of the best facilities in the state, if not certainly in the region, is Copper Sky Recreation Sports Complex. It has acres of parks, fishing lakes, dog parks, a multigenerational facility with an aquatic component and so much more. And yet that was voted on by a bond of secondary property tax on the residents, by themselves. They voted on that to approve it in 2008 – the start/height of the recession. But let me tell you, for us to be able to take people there, and tour them around and with our partnership with Ak-Chin, show them what Ak-Chin has created and what we are creating, such as a new City Hall and all of these new things, it creates a whole different

vision and a different outlook for people. It gives them hope and gives them an incredible quality of life. Remember, it wasn’t so long ago that when we wanted to tour economic development prospects around our city, they’d first come to our “City Hall,” which was 24 old ADOT trailers (leftover from the construction of the 101 freeway) linked together with a donkey living out front. [Laughs] So much for that prospect! GC LIVING: There was a recent voter approved legislation – Proposition 416/417 – where Maricopa stands win-win on the improvements. MAYOR PRICE: Absolutely. GC LIVING: State route 347, and Maricopa/Casa Grande highway or the East/West Corridor. MAYOR PRICE: Indeed. GC LIVING: How will that impact the residents and the future of bringing industry to Maricopa? MAYOR PRICE: Look, I am the biggest proponent of transportation and economic development. Those are my two favorite things to talk about, and they’re some of the most difficult things to do, because they’re abstract, right? We can talk transportation. Transportation can mean 30 years from now. Not that anybody wants to wait that long, but sometimes that’s what it takes. Let’s look at the 303, the 202 the 101 and the 60. All of those roads happened because somebody had the vision to say, “We need to keep this area dedicated for a freeway, because someday it’s going to be so grown out here that you’re going to need this as an arterial pathway to move goods and services and to move people.” And that’s really hard for a city council that’s, you know, 30 years ago, saying,

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

“Well, I got a developer that wants to buy this land right now, and put a strip mall in it.” And, I’m thinking “sales tax revenue, that’d be great.” It’s really hard to say “no” to that developer, and in turn say “yes” to the future, because the future can be so much greater if you can move those people. You can move those goods and services. So, when you look at Casa Grande, one of the things Casa Grande has going for it that the City of Maricopa does not, is it has the I8, and the I10 right there within its city limits. That is huge, so when we talk about transportation and talk about 347 and its potential increases, or improvements, we talked about the East/West Corridor, which is the Maricopa Casa Grande Highway, linking out two cities together. If you can improve something that is now an old two-lane, and you can make it a high-speed, 65-miles-an-hour, three-lane in each direction with entry and exit points off of that and create a secondary bypass that’s north of Casa Grande, but south of Gila River – that gives Maricopa another way to exit to the 10 – you are creating pathways for future growth and large-scale economic development. GC LIVING: Maricopa just had a groundbreaking of extreme significance, and that was the groundbreaking for the overpass on 347 that goes over the Union Pacific Railroad. MAYOR PRICE: Right. GC LIVING: The short-term pain will be the construction. What will be the long-term gain? MAYOR PRICE: Huge. One of the former mayors of Maricopa is a longtime resident, Kelly Anderson. He was appointed to the Arizo-

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desk and straighten out your legs. You can also use your feet to push your chair back and forth, but remember to fully stretch your legs. • Sitting straight in your chair, slightly away from your desk, extend your right arm straight up and lean to the left. Slightly stretch your right arm over your head and you will feel a slight pull in your waist region. Bring your right arm back to your side and do the same stretch with your left arm.

TIPS FOR WORKPLACE

HEALTH & WELLNESS

by Helen Neuharth, President/CEO, Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce

If you have a job that requires you to stand for many hours, you might try doing a few stretches without having to leave your work area. 30

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e all can fall into the workplace routine of sitting or standing in one position too long and even skipping lunch during the workday. I am fortunate that my work at the chamber allows me the opportunity to move around in the office and also outside of the office on a regular basis. However, there are many jobs that require a person to spend most, if not all of the workday, sitting or standing in a specific area. I have heard the phrase “sitting is the new smoking,” several times lately,

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meaning sitting for long periods of time is detrimental to your health. There are easy ways to counteract that issue. If you have a job that requires you to sit at your desk most of the day, here are a few stretches you can do without having to get up out of your chair. • Arm stretches: Hold on to your desk and push yourself the length of your arms. Hold for a couple of seconds, and pull yourself back to your desk using your arms. • Leg stretches: Sitting in your chair, push your chair away from your

The best way to stretch at the office is to take a break every half-hour to walk through the office for a couple of minutes before resuming working at your desk. If you often have lunch at your desk, try taking a stroll around the block once in a while, if you are able. You will probably return to work refreshed and energized. If you have a job that requires you to stand for many hours, you might try doing a few stretches without having to leave your work area. Be sure that you don’t lock your knees; keep some flexibility in both your knees. Bending your knees, one at a time, as far back as you can, will also provide some flexibility in your calves and hips. Be sure to hold on to something stable if you are standing on one leg at a time. There are a number of workplace health tips you can find on the internet, or you can ask your employer and/or the human-resources department at your place of work, as they may have some information to share. There are a number of health-care clinics and medical centers in our area where you can obtain additional information on workplace health tips. Of course, not just during flu season, but always, remember to wash your hands before and after meals, shaking hands with someone and handling merchandise or office items. Use common sense; it the best way to keep yourself and your family healthy.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

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WHAT’S UP DOWNTOWN by Rina Rien, Director, Casa Grande Main Street

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pring blooms with color and new arts and cultural experiences in your Historic Downtown. Here are a few recent additions and coming attractions to look forward to:

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Existing Parking Lot

HISTORIC CASA GRANDE PARK AN ELECTRIFYING EXPERIENCE

NEW ARTS DESTINATIONS OPEN DOWNTOWN Assuage Art & Photo Gallery is now open in The Casa Grande Plaza on 4th Street between Florence Boulevard and Historic Florence Street. Kapril, the gallery owner, has reached out to local artists to provide a diverse selection of visual arts including paintings, sculpture and photography. Hours vary, so please call 612-868-2230 to confirm before your visit. The BlackBox Foundation’s new home is The Woman’s Club, the historic stone building located on the corner of Florence Boulevard at Sacaton Street. Our arts and culture district is building, with BlackBox staging performing arts and The Casa Grande Art Museum and The Museum of Casa Grande forming a “triangle” of amazing experiences within steps of each other. Casa Grande’s Neon Sign Park is currently in planning stages for installation, which is projected for late 2018. Excitement is building for the park, serving both as a catalyst for building a downtown

SITE CONTEXT

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TAIL GATE BENCHES

DAY VIEW

nightlife and providing a unique pedestrian connection between shops and restaurants around Florence Street and the new arts and culture district. MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR THESE UPCOMING DOWNTOWN EVENTS: MARCH 10 AND 11: ART EXPLOSION IN PEART PARK, 9 A.M. – 5 P.M. SATURDAY, 9 AM. – 4 P.M. SUNDAY Beautiful Peart Park is the setting for this annual event, featuring fine arts from Arizona and beyond. There is live entertainment, food and fun for all at this free event. Visit cgmainstreet.org for details. MARCH 15 AND APRIL 19: DAY OUT DOWNTOWN LIVING HISTORY TOUR 9:30 A.M. AT MAIN STREET PATIO

Text CGMS to 57711. You’ll be prompted to authorize the texting service with a “yes” and receive a confirmation within seconds!

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Future Parking Lot

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Sign up for our text message service for weekly updates.

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INSPIRATION

LIGHTING

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NIGHT VIEW

Free living history tours resume third Thursdays through April. We meet on the Main Street Patio for refreshments and an orientation before heading out 10 a.m. (an approximately 1- hour walking tour). New characters have been added, including Angela Hammer, The Apache Kid and The Baron of Arizona. Afternoon tours of The Museum of Casa Grande and the Casa Grande Art Museum complete your experience. With prior notification, groups are welcomed. MARCH 30: CASA GRANDE ART MUSEUM: “CASA GRANDE STUDENT SHOW/ RECEPTION” Artist reception starts at 5 p.m. Visit casagrandeartmuseum.org for more information. APRIL 6: FIRST FRIDAY LA COCINA FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL, 5:30 P.M. Live music, family fun and a variety of food vendors are on hand starting at 5:30 p.m. at the corner of 3rd Street and Picacho Street downtown. Check out and “like” their facebook page at facebook.com/lacocinafoodtruckfestival for updates and more information.

SCHEMATIC- PRELIMINARY DESIGN 1

Main Entry

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Pedestrian Cross Walk

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Shoe Sign

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Accent Cactus Bed

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Motel Sign

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Historic License Plate Wall

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Exit/Entry

SUMMER SCHEDULES VARY, SO PLEASE CHECK OUR WEBSITE CALENDAR FOR UPDATES AT cgmainstreet.org Casa Grande Main Street is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization working on downtown revitalization and historic preservation. The Main Street program is designed to improve all aspects of the downtown experience. Strengthening public participation and making downtown a fun place to visit are as critical to Main Street’s future as drawing new business, rehabilitating structures and expanding parking options.

Historic Downtown… Experience the Difference

110 W. 2nd St., Casa Grande 520-836-8744 www.cgmainstreet.org

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


NEW TAX LAW PROVIDES INCREASED ESTATE-PLANNING OPPORTUNITIES The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed into law on Dec. 22, includes significant changes to the federal gift, estate and generationskipping transfer (GST) tax laws. by Ann F. Schrooten, Estate Planning Attorney, Fitzgibbons Law Offices

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ach U.S. citizen or resident is allowed a lifetime exclusion amount that may be used to shelter from gift and estate taxes transfers of cash or other assets during life or at death. Effective Jan. 1, 2018, the combined gift and estate tax exemption and the GST tax exemption amounts double from an inflation-adjusted $5 million to $10 million. For 2018, the exemption amounts are expected to increase to $11.2 million per individual or $22.4 million for a married couple. The increases are scheduled to be in effect through Dec/ 31, 2025, after which the amounts will revert to pre-2018 levels ($5.6 million per person, adjusted for inflation). Unrelated to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the gift tax annual exclusion has increased to $15,000 per donee (or $30,000 for a married couple). That change is also effective Jan. 1, 2018. The new tax law also permanently expands the benefits of Section 529 college savings plans, which allow tax-free accumulation of education savings. Under prior law, funds in these plans could be distributed income-tax-free for qualified

higher education expenses. The new law allows distributions to be made on the same basis to elementary or secondary schools as well, subject to a limit of $10,000 per plan-beneficiary per-year. The impact of the changes made to the estate, gift and GST taxes will depend on the circumstances of an individual or couple. For some, the changes will provide considerable planning opportunities to make gifts or other transfers to take advantage of the increased amounts while they are available. Although fewer individuals will have to worry about estate tax liability, the changes under the new tax law do not spell the end of estate planning as we know it. Non-tax issues that your estate plan should still take into account include management and distribution of assets upon death or incapacity, guardianship of minor children, family business succession and planning for a loved one with special needs. Ann Schrooten is an estate planning attorney at the Fitzgibbons Law Offices in Casa Grande. You may reach her at ann@fitzgibbonslaw.com or 520-426-3824.

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

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GET READY NOW FOR WEEKEND COLLEGE AT CAC by Angela Askey, Executive Director of Public Relations & Marketing, Central Arizona College Weekend College is based on a cohort model whereby students support each other as they progress as a group through the same classes.

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ow is the time to begin preparing for the new Central Arizona College Weekend College cohort that will begin in August 2018. Weekend College offers convenient class meeting times on Friday evening from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday morning from 8:30 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. at CAC’s Corporate Center (540 N. Camino Mercado, Casa Grande, Arizona 85122). Some prerequisite courses are needed prior to starting year one of the Weekend College cohort. Those interested should take Reading 100

(RDG100), English 100 (ENG100) and Math 118 (MAT118) this spring or summer to be prepared for the Fall 2018 semester. At the completion of the three-year Weekend College program, students will earn an Associate of Arts Degree. A complete listing of the courses required for completion during each year of the program are available at centralaz.edu/weekend. Weekend College is based on a cohort model whereby students support each other as they progress as a group through the same classes. They can enroll in Weekend College during the

fall, spring, and summer semesters. Weekend College programming is designed as a guided pathway that will lead directly into ASU’s organizational leadership bachelor degree program offered at the corporate center. The courses readily transfer to Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University and University of Arizona. Expand your world by attending Weekend College. For additional information, please email weekendcollege@centralaz.edu or call 520-494-6603 (Monday-Thursday) or 520-494-6605 (Friday & Saturday).

Weekend College Take hold of a radiant education that opens up a world of opportunity!

Things to know about Weekend College: • • • •

All classes readily transfer to UA, NAU, ASU, and most other universities (grades of C or better required). Based on a cohort model whereby students support each other. Can lead to ASU’s Organizational Leadership Bachelor’s degree offered at CAC’s Corporate Center. Includes personalized academic planning, financial aid, and career development.

Class Times: Fridays, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm | Saturdays, 8:30 am - 11:30 am Location: CAC Corporate Center, 540 North Camino Mercado, Casa Grande, AZ 85122

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HEALTHY COMMUNITIES, REVISITED

They Are Vital For Economic Development by Evelyn Casuga, 2nd VP, Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth and Sr. Advisor-Community Relations, Office of the President, Central Arizona College

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his article was printed in spring 2016, and seemed appropriate to revisit in the health and wellness issue again as it relates to communities and economic development. A healthy community doesn’t happen by accident nor is a healthy community guaranteed to stay that way forever. A healthy community requires the same kind of attention as keeping our bodies in good condition. As a starting point, David Darling and Gayla Randall at Kansas State capture “Dimensions of a Healthy Community” as follows: It’s a place where: • Residents hold a common vision of their collective future which challenges, motivates and unites them. • Leaders identify and resolve issues. • Organizations and institutions anticipate and adapt to an ever-changing environment. This may sound too ideal or out of reach, however, we can all recognize it when any of these elements are missing or somehow dysfunctional. We can name neighborhoods and communities – large and small, rural, urban and suburban – where neglect, disrepair and instability are the norm. We know what this looks like. There are rundown or abandoned buildings and we can feel unsafe. We know what healthy communities look and feel like, too – families playing in a wellgroomed park, robust commercial activity, volunteers at the ready and a stable political environment. Imagine a potential new business and industry exploring the best place to locate or expand. The notion of a “healthy community” may not be explicitly on the list of requirements or needs, but be assured that the elements are. Adapted from authors Mark Peterson and John Rohrer in their Total Development Paradigm model, the key layers include: • Leadership infrastructure – vision, knowledge of development process,

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• •

• •

technical knowledge sources and networking. Human infrastructure – values, work ethic, knowledge/skills, family structure and vision of the future. Support infrastructure – healthcare, religious institutions, financial sector, education and information systems, recreation and parks, law enforcement, retail sector and housing. Physical infrastructure – water, sewer, roads, industrial parks, utilities, technology and waste disposal. Economic base – manufacturing services, agriculture and mining.

Like Darling and Randall, Peterson and Rohrer recognize the need for vision, shared goals and identified action plans as well as for leaders and community members to actively participate in focusing energy and resources to achieve the greatest opportunity for success in building a healthy community. Let’s look at a few key components and ask ourselves where our community or our region stands. • Leadership – Without it, nothing happens in a community. Who are the

leaders, with or without titles? Is there room at the table for new leaders (e.g. younger, more diverse)? Governance – In all sectors – city, county, education, civic, social, religious and healthcare – do the various segments of a community have a voice or are there those who are left out or feel left out? Formal and informal organizations – How many do we have, and what is the quality of these civic, social and political entities? Are they growing, fading or reinventing? Planning processes – Once again, in all sectors, is it top-down or participatory? Is the public, when appropriate, truly engaged? Responsibility/accountability – Is there ownership and buy-in for community action?

Creating and maintaining a healthy community is an ongoing conscientious task, like taking care of our bodies. So how do we all participate to build a healthy community and increase the chances of staying that way? It’s easier than you think, and everyone can play a part.

The call to action from the “How to Build Community” poster published by Syracuse Cultural Workers, is to pick one or more of these steps below. For a number of these, healthy personal behaviors are also included as a bonus! Turn off your TV • Leave your house • Know your neighbors • Look up when you are walking • Greet people • Sit on your stoop • Plant flowers • Use your library • Play together • Buy from local merchants • Share what you have • Help a lost dog • Take children to the park • Garden together • Support neighborhood schools • Fix it, even if you didn’t break it • Have pot lucks • Honor elders • Pick up litter • Read stories aloud • Dance in the street • Talk to the mail carrier • Listen to the birds • Put up a swing • Help carry something heavy • Barter for your goods • Start a tradition • Ask a question • Hire young people for odd jobs • Organize a block party • Bake extra and share • Ask for help when you need it • Open your shades • Sing together • Share your skills • Take back the night • Turn up the music • Turn down the music • Listen before you react to anger • Mediate a conflict • Seek to understand • Learn from new and uncomfortable angles • Know that no one is silent though many are not heard; work to change this. THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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The LIVING Interview (continued)

...continued from page 29 na State Transportation Board, and without getting into too much detail, there are transportation organizations called Metropolitan Planning Organizations and they help deal with the federal monies, and they are how you plan all this stuff. Kelly and I sat down in 2012 and said, “One of the first things we need to do in this city is we need to time the lights all the way up and down our major artery that goes all the way through the city, the 347.” So I had ADOT do that, and ADOT did that in coordination with our Metropolitan Planning Organizations, and it’s sitting there ready to go. But, we can’t do it until the bridge is in place … you can coordinate all the lights before the tracks and after the tracks, but you can’t coordinate it through, which seems silly, because that’s the choke point, right? That’s what you need to fix, and so when the bridge happens, the first thing it will do is it will create a flow. It will take out stoplights. It will stop the public safety hazard. And it will stop dividing my city in half. There was a school bus that was hit on

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those tracks about a year-and-a-half ago. Fifteen minutes before that accident, it was full of children. That’s the kind of stuff that keeps me up at night. GC LIVING: I know you work many hours, but you still manage to find time to participate in community events. MAYOR PRICE: Absolutely. GC LIVING: Such as the mud run. MAYOR PRICE: I do, yes. GC LIVING: And, there’s a new one – the Maricopa Weight-Loss Challenge? MAYOR PRICE: One of city’s major costs every year is health care, right? But one of the things we know is that if we have an unhealthy employee – mentally, physically, emotionally and spiritually – if they are not healthy, then they’re going to the doctor a lot more. They’re raising the health-care cost for everybody else. Productivity is reduced, and you get less output, and that’s just a bad thing for the taxpayer. So, one of the things we decided to do is figure out how to reduce those costs? We thought this needs to be voluntary, so we created this program inside the city where we kind of created a test run, and we

said, “We want all of our city employees, because of the HSA accounts they have, we want to kind of give them a carrot, right? Whether it be an extra contribution to their HSA, it might be some other little perk along the way, and we started a program called The Whole30. The Whole30 is basically a diet that’s a hormonal reset. I lost 25 pounds on it and continue to this day on a Keto-based diet. I learned I could control my sugar addictions. I learned what affected my body specifically, because everybody’s body is different. I’ve seen my blood pressure come down; I was happier, more patient; I had more energy; my aches and pains went away and many, many more “non-scale victories.” I saw all these different things happen among our city employees, too. So, this year during my State of the City address I announced what we called the 2018 City of Maricopa Weight Loss Challenge, and it has been really fun. In the first two weeks, we had over 500 participants, all completely voluntary. Now, we have some little prizes and things in there that we’ve thrown in but that hasn’t been the motivator. Getting healthy with your friends and neighbors has been. It’s not just about how much weight you lose, but the story you tell. You have to submit a story as to what your journey’s been like. And there have been some amazing stories. We have a Facebook page where people post pictures of food, recipes, exercise routines and generally what they’re doing, also what the different fitness businesses are teaching. And it has become a tight-knit, united group of folks who are like “We’re in this together. I don’t feel like I’m trying to lose weight or get healthy by myself.” GC LIVING: So, you’re in office to 2020. What happens after that? MAYOR PRICE: I always tell people, “It’s whatever my wife says.” [Laughs] You know, for me, it’s really interesting, because while I try to look at everything, and I think, “Where am I best suited? Where am I best used? What will the voting public have me do, if they even want me?” It’s up to them. But I can say this, I’m a guy who likes to roll up my sleeves and do the work. I like to get stuff done, and that’s probably what I love most about local government, 365 days a year it’s about trying to get stuff done.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


The LIVING Interview (continued) GC LIVING: Let’s shift over and talk about family. MAYOR PRICE: I have four kids. I have an 11-year-old boy, 6-year-old girl, 5-year-old girl and a 3-year-old girl. And two of them have birthdays on holidays or pseudo-holidays. One is an April Fool’s baby, and believe me, she matches that very well, and the other is a Christmas day baby. GC LIVING: I have heard from reliable sources… MAYOR PRICE: Uh-oh. GC LIVING: That a significant portion of your salary as Mayor is given back to the community in various ways. MAYOR PRICE: One of the things people don’t understand is that I think everybody thinks that Mayors and Councils make a lot of money. Nothing could be further from the truth. For my first five years as mayor, I made $15,000 a year. I figured out once, at 60, 70 hours a week, I make about $1.48 an hour. And I’m thinking, “Great! Arizona just had a minimum wage increase, do I get one?” Nope, but that’s the way it works, unfortunately. And so, you’re right. If you ask my wife, a lot of it goes back in a variety of different ways. It goes back in time. It goes back in dollars given to projects for charitable organizations. I try and do what I can. I’ve got to put food on my table. If I’m working 70 hours a week, you know, making $15,000 a year and not working my financial planning business, you can do the math on that one. It’s pretty hard. We eat a lot of Top Ramen at my house. [Laughs] I do have the philosophy that a public servant should make a living wage, and certainly perhaps higher than what I make. But I also believe that, again, it’s public service. You should never be rich off public service, so I do my best to give back everything I possibly can. GC LIVING: What haven’t we covered that you’d like to convey? MAYOR PRICE: I think the only thing I would say is I would like to see civility come back to politics. OK? Republicans and Democrats will always fundamentally disagree on the fringes – 10 or 20 percent on each side. But it’s the 60 to 80 percent in the middle, I think, that if we really were focused on working together and working with one another, we’d get a lot more done, and I’d love to see those days come back. The Central Arizona Project, one of Ari-

zona’s primary water sources and the reason that Arizona is able to grow today, would never have happened in today’s political climate. It never would have happened, because Republicans and Democrats cannot work together. Now it’s a bit of an oversimplification, I know. There’s lots of things in which they do work together on, but there are so many more things that they don’t. One of the things I’ve always strived to do, when I came in as elected official in 2012, is there was some fracturing. Different council members with strong personalities, that’s who gets elected in politics, typically. They’re strong, type-A personalities and that’s great. The difference is, how do you treat them? And do you give them their chance and their say? Do you try and find a middle ground with them? Are you willing to compromise your position while still holding what you hold dear to yourself and to your constituency as well as your morals and your philosophies? Do you hold true to that while still simultaneously saying, “You know what? We can give a little bit more here.” After all don’t we do that in marriages? Don’t we do that in our relationships? I think about this all the time – would we act the way we act in politics in our own home? You know, sometimes, I look at it the way I act with my wife. Sometimes I give up more than I ever wanted to and sometimes I get my way. But most times it’s a compromise between the two of us. We find some sort of happy middle-ground we both get something, or we both give something up. That’s what I’d like to see more in our political system today. GC LIVING: Now, there’s one thing your constituents have a hate-hate relationship with – utility companies. MAYOR PRICE: I don’t think anybody likes paying their utility bill. Whenever you take 50,000 people and plop them down into a location that was nothing but farmland, how do you get all that infrastructure? And what does it cost? This is millions upon millions upon millions of dollars. So, it’s like buying a house. Most people can’t buy a house outright, so they mortgage it. Utility companies are no different. They do the same thing. They put in $50 million of infrastructure, and they’ve got to divide the bill across how many people that live there so that they can pay off this cap-

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

ital infrastructure cost and so that they can continue to provide water or electricity or whatever. Otherwise, they go bankrupt and the state comes in and takes it over, then it’s worse than it ever was before. So, in Maricopa, all of our utilities are privately held, so as elected officials, we have to know when to challenge and pressure them and when to work with them. However, one of the things that I think pressure does is it encourages the utilities to keep those costs under control as much as possible. Let’s take ED3 (Electrical District 3) for example, they have done some great things with investments that are paying off. At one point they tried to lock in a power/commodity price of ‘X’, when commodities were going through the roof. That seemed smart, after all Southwest Airlines had done the same thing and it saved their bacon after 9-11. But right after doing so, open market commodity prices took a nose dive and they went underneath the price they had paid and locked in. And that became problematic for our ratepayers, so for a period of about five years we were paying a higher that market rate price. Look, they were trying to hedge their bets and protect their ratepayer from increasing costs, and I’m not sure we can blame them for that. Most of us probably would have done the same thing. But yet, at the same time, they invested in a transmission line off the nuclear power plant, which is the cheapest power you can buy. That power line, once operational, will cover 80 percent of all the usage that ED3 utilizes. And so now we have seen our rates drop 15 percent over the last three-and-ahalf years. And we are lower than APS.

continued on page 58... OR LI V ING THE INTERV IE W • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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ALEXANDRA CARLINO

KASANDRA MARTIN

CHRISTA SULLIVAN

KELLY HARTIN

BETTY MARTINEZ GREG RODRIGUEZ

CRYSSI CAMPOS

CRYSTAL MCKENNA

APRIL TARANGO

ASPYN CAMPBELL

DANIELA SANCHEZ

JESS DANIELLE

JOHN STAPLETON

JOHANNA MONTIJO

KATE RESS

Out & About If you would like to contribute images of area events, people, pets and scenery, please post on our Facebook page or email to: editor@roxco.com

KRISTINA CALVERT

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THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Health • Wealth • Education

PATRICIA SAUCEDO

RYAN PORTER

MARINNA SANCHEZ

SONJA LEWIS

ROSEMARY RATLIFF

TASHA CARRISALEZ

MIRIAM LEYVA

MARY LOU INZUNZA

STACY CHICK ESPARZA

SAMANTHA HALLBERG

RICHARD TAPIA

MEGAN SANDERS

MELISSA TEMPLE

TERRY LYNN RAMSEY-HOOVER

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

TIFFANY PHILLIPS

YVONNE GARCIA GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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STUDENTS BUILD THEIR FUTURES AND ENRICH THE COMMUNITY by Mike Glover, Superintendent, CAVIT

Cosmetology students run a hair salon, and do everything from booking and making appointments to performing salon services, such as cuts, perms and colors.

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entral Arizona Valley Institute of Technology (CAVIT) provides career and technical training to students in grades 11-12 from 12 area high schools. The training is held on our central campus, located in Coolidge. CAVIT created student-run wellness clinics, as teachers were looking for an educational avenue for all students to apply their technical skills in an authentic workplace environment. After much hard work by both students and teachers alike, along with industry partner input, CAVIT opened up the following wellness clinics to community residents: veterinary, dental, massage, cosmetology and medical. Upon entering our campus, you can immediately sense there is a purpose to every person’s step. Picture walking into the massage clinic and observing teenage students giving various types of massages to community members. They are dressed professionally in scrubs, and the clinic looks, feels, smells and sounds like a day spa. Community members with leashed dogs and/or carrying cats in carriers enter the animal clinic, where a full array of services is offered by students. Cosmetology students run a hair salon, and do everything from booking and making appointments to performing salon services, such as cuts, perms and colors. The idea of getting a massage or taking a pet in for a service is often one of the first things cut out of an already tight personal budget. Receiving the same services for free or for a nominal fee and knowing

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

you are assisting in the education of a CAVIT student is definitely a positive incentive for the communities we serve. The goals of CAVIT’s student-run clinics are: 1. To provide community wellness activities to meet participants’ mental, physical and social needs. 2. To build a working relationship between CAVIT and our communities to enhance the wellbeing of area residents and their pets. 3. To provide students an avenue to apply their technical skills in a realworld setting to help prepare them for employment and/or continued postsecondary career education. Our teachers have created opportunities for students to be mentored alongside dentists, veterinarians and physician assistants, along with other industry professionals who assist in clinics. Our students are in control of their own destinies. They manage their actions (applying knowledge and skills) to master the expected outcome demanded by industry and community clients alike. This student-centered instructional approach is at a higher level, which motivates students to achieve goals above their expectations. It is this gainful pride that helps us achieve individual student success. Everything we do in our clinics is grounded upon inquiry-based instruction, rich with authentic learning experiences that replicate what is found in industry. Students design the look and feel of their clinic; they inventory and order the necessary materials; they use industry scheduling software to book appointments; and

they practice excellent communication skills in answering the clinic phones, taking messages, making appointments and conducting follow-up or appointment-reminder phone calls. Students must use customer service skills in greeting clients. They must take patient histories by using industryapproved patient notes and maintain client files. Of course, students perform the actual clinic skills as well: conducting animal examinations and cholesterol tests, doing mud wraps and much more. The addition of a real client serves to motivate our students, who already have high expectations for themselves, to an even higher degree of success in technical skills. The high quality of our clinics has helped CAVIT earn: the A+ School of Excellence, A+ Exemplary Program Award, Golden Bell Achievement Award and Arizona Outstanding Career and Technical Education Program of the Year Award three times (massage, medical and veterinary). At CAVIT, we believe every student deserves the opportunity and support to achieve his or her dreams. Our students are a fascinating montage of motivated individuals who accept responsibility for their own learning. Our students realize the opportunities of their chosen career fields as they put into practice relevant technical skills in real-life settings or scenarios. The focus is on the student. We invite you to contact CAVIT soon and book a clinic experience! Look us up at cavitschools.org, call us at 520-423-1944 or find us on Facebook.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


STUDENT-RUN WELLNESS CLINICS (sample services listed for each)

Services are by appointment only and provided by CAVIT students in training.

Animal Clinic with Program Veterinarian Bathing, Physical Exam, Vaccinations

Hair Clinic Color, Haircut, Perm, Updo

Dental Clinic with Program Dentist Fillings, Routine Cleaning, Tooth Extraction

Massage Clinic Chair, Deep Tissue, and Hot Stone Massage

Medical Clinic with Program Physician Assistant Physical Exam, Glucose and Cholesterol Checks

Central Arizona Valley Institute of Technology 1789 W. Coolidge Avenue in Coolidge www.cavitschools.org

(520) 423-1944


BEING THE VOICE FOR A CHILD by Donna McBride, Program Administrator/PIO and Supervisor for the CASA Unit, Pinal County Juvenile Court, Casa Grande City Councilwoman Volunteer advocates get to know the child and speak to everyone involved in the child’s life, including family members, teachers, doctors, lawyers, social workers and others.

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cross the nation, Americans celebrated Black History Month in February. And CASA of Pinal County recognizes the positive difference that our advocates of color have made to children in the foster care system. Sisters Bridgette Gibson and Deborah Hollman, of Coolidge, along with Casa Grande resident Rick Moody are three residents who may never be mentioned years from now in any history books, but they are making a tremendous difference in the lives of abused or neglected children in the foster care system. These children have already faced tough situations, and entering the foster care system can be traumatic. When a child is placed in a culturally different setting, it is even more challenging. They aren’t just removed from their homes but removed from their schools, community, place of worship, etc. The overall wellness of every child is important to CASA advocates. Bridgette and Deborah have volunteered with CASA together for nine years. Both have served as exceptional

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

resources in this area by sharing their life experiences and cultural knowledge. They have bridged the gap to help staff and volunteers learn better ways to provide quality care for children of color. Rick Moody has also been an asset by serving as a role model and ambassador to the CASA program. In Arizona, African American children are over represented in the state’s foster care system. Statewide, 5 percent of the child population is African American, but 15.4 percent of the children removed from their homes are African American. There is no evidence that African American children are abused or neglected at higher rates compared to children of other races and ethnicities. It is important that the CASA volunteer pool reflect the children who are underserved. Unfortunately, only 4 percent of the more than 1,000 volunteers in Arizona are African American. CASA volunteers are specifically trained to advocate for children in foster care. Volunteer advocates get to know the child and speak to everyone involved in the child’s life, including family members, teachers, doctors,

lawyers, social workers and others. The information they gather and their recommendations help the court overseeing the cases to make informed decisions. CASA volunteers commit to a child until the case is closed and the child is in a safe, permanent home. CASA advocates must be sensitive to cultural differences and help foster parents work through the issues the child is facing by being positive role models for children in care. We all like to think we’re color blind, but the reality is unless you’ve walked in the shoes of someone who has faced discrimination or not fitting in, you really don’t understand the challenges a child of color experiences when he or she has been uprooted and placed in a strange setting. And so, while we often celebrate the many faces of history like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. during Black History Month, let us not forget the names of CASA Advocates Bridgette Gibson, Deborah Hollman or Rick Moody. For these selfless, caring volunteers are making history of their own by creating a safe environment for children of color. They are for the child.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


55+ Active Adult Community · Single level Apartment Homes, 1 and 2 bedroom floorplans available · Beautiful clubhouse with library, fitness and game rooms · Activities and Special Events, providing a community atmosphere · Free shuttle, offering weekly grocery trips, monthly mall trips and local medical appointments · Heated pool and Spa · Covered Parking · Gas range, dishwasher, refrigerator, garbage disposal and Laundry hook-ups

• Serving Pre-Kindergarten (4 years old by Sept. 1st) through 8th Grade students from Casa Grande, Coolidge, Arizona City, Eloy and Maricopa

· On-site Beauty Salon · Water, sewer and trash included – Cable TV service available · Pet- friendly

• Scholarships are available to make tuition affordable • Fully accredited by NWEA and First Things First

• National test MAPS taken three times a year for students in Kindergarten - 8th Grade.

· Smoke Free · Centrally Located – close to shopping , dining and medical

St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School

Cypress Point Retirement Apartments 1771 E McMurray Blvd | Casa Grande| AZ 85122 520.836.6555 www.cypresspointliving.com ROX LIVING AD 013017 PRINTER FILE.pdf

• Catholic Religion taught daily. Children's Mass on Tuesdays.

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1:13:54 PM

Sister Carol Seidl, Principal • Diana Peck, Scholarship and Enrollment Manager 501 E. 2nd Street, Casa Grande, AZ 85122 • (520) 836-7247

Expand your child’s education! The Grande Innovation Academy is a state chartered, tuition free Kindergarten through 8th grade school. We foster a creative campus designed to develop individual thinkers, offering an academic culture that takes education beyond the textbook reading, writing, and arithmetic. We focus on the skills scholars will need throughout their lives. C

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Enroll today at: GrandeInnovationAcademy.com

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We are proud to announce the opening of the Little Innovators Preschool, offering a full-time and part-time program with 5, 4 and 3 day schedule options. For information on tuition, schedules and enrollment, visit LittleInnovatorsPreschool.com.

950 N. Peart Rd, Casa Grande, AZ 85122 • (520) 381-2360 SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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2018 MARICOPA WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE CHANGES LIVES

From left to right - Vannessa Belland, Councilwoman Nancy Smith, Mayor Christian Price, Matthew Reiter, Anthony DeCarlo, Sabra Hernandez, and Councilman Henry Wade

by Matthew Reiter, Fitness Coordinator, City of Maricopa Community Services

T

he 2018 City of Maricopa Weight Loss Challenge was a tremendous community success! We had more than 500 participants, and over half of them have experienced a huge amount of life-changing success and a substantial amount of weight loss. Contestants entered for free, and the requirement was to post a workout picture and meal picture once a week. At the end of 30 days, they qualified for four different tiers, and were awarded these prizes at the celebration and potluck party held Saturday, March 3. There were also five grand-prize winners that were awarded based on their story and non-scale victories.

We had a huge amount of success, and I feel it is amazing watching the effect of community members – who don’t even know each other – cheer each other on and inspire one another! It was the type of community event a personal trainer and a public health advocate would only dream of! The program utilized the Whole30 approach, which resulted in weight loss, increased muscle mass and improved health (read more about it on the next page). It was amazing watching all the support when people had tough days. It was moving and inspiring. I can’t begin to tell you the amount of non-scale victories we have

accomplished. I feel this entire city is going to be proud of what they have accomplished as a community. I look forward to watching this city join together and support each other as we move to a healthier and happy future! One of my favorite quotes sums up this challenge: “If you want to run fast, go alone, and if you want to run far, go together.” – Ancient African Proverb This was just the first step toward what the City of Maricopa is capable of when it comes to health and fitness. I look forward to even more!

Facebook testimonials from early final weigh-ins: “Went to weigh in this morning, 18 lbs lighter, wearing pants I could not wear for four years. Nice, let's rock Maricopa!” - Councilman Henry Wade “As the last week approaches, I have found out a few things about myself: I can resist temptation; I am stronger than I knew; and I am determined when I need to be.” – Claudia “Completed final weigh-in this morning. I had a drop of 7.2 pounds, which included a gain of 1.8 pounds in muscle. I dropped from 34.7percent body fat to 28.3 percent (6.4 percent) Yay! Today I did eat out with my hubby for cheat meal (a sub from Firehouse), but I’m fine with waiting another 30 days for my next cheat. I took a pic in this dress, because 40 days ago I had back fat sticking out, and when I walked, the skirt would creep up

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because it was so tight on my hips. I’m wearing it to an event in a few weeks, because I’m comfortable in it finally. I know I have more body fat to lose and more muscle to gain but this month has shown me what I thought I couldn’t do. Being 50 ain’t so bad after all. Woo hoo!” – Janice “Had my final weigh-in this morning. I’m very happy with my results. I was told at the beginning that it’s almost impossible to increase your muscle mass in 30 days. So me being me, I said, ‘challenge accepted.’ So therefore my approach to this challenge was not weight loss, but rather lowering my body fat percentage by increasing my muscle mass. I worked out twice a day five-six days a week and watched and counted everything thing I ate. So in total, I lost 5 pounds, 2 percent body fat and increased my muscle mass by 1/2 pound! I’m a very happy girl.” – Brandi

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Special Feature

Excerpts From Winning Contestant Essays “It's so sad that things had to get so bad, before waking up! I only hope and pray that this never happens to anyone else! It's not just about the weight; it's about the entire health of an individual. Weight loss and a good body are good by-products of a healthy state of mind and function. I was further inspired this weekend when one of my children stepped up to a huge challenge and overcame obstacles to achieve success!”

BEFORE

ANTHONY DECARLO - AFTER

Rachel Luna

TENA DUGAN

Tena Dugan

“Non-scale victories are the best part of my journey! The most exciting was to try on a pair of size 10 jeans and have them fit. The biggest and the best is how I feel. I can walk anywhere without being winded. I can finally run without stopping to walk. My skin is better. I crave veggies! This challenge has helped me to exercise more consistently and to come back to Copper Sky. I have more defined muscle tone (my kids are embarrassed because I like to flex). I have not been sick, and crave exercise now. I truly have a healthier relationship with food, and Whole30 helps me see how foods affect my body and how I feel. I have higher energy levels. I find myself drawn to the folks with likeminded health and fitness goals, and have a new community and friends. Finally, it is so nice to hear, ‘You look amazing!’ from so many people.”

WHY WE CHOSE THIS PROGRAM a. “Think of Whole30 like pushing the ‘reset’ button with your health, your habits, and your relationship with food. Our premise is simple: certain food groups could be having a negative impact on your body composition, health, and quality of life without you even realizing it.”

Anthony DeCarlo

BEFORE

What is WHOLE30?

“The first week of January I told myself that I needed to make a change, but was unsure how to start. I started cleaning up my Facebook feed to clear out that “clutter.” This allowed me to see on January 6th, a post that Matt had put up regarding this challenge. I started reading all about Whole30 and everything just clicked, and I realized that this is what I needed to do. The next day. I did my weigh-in and ordered two of the Whole30 books. Once they arrived, I started my journey that Wednesday. Everyone I talked to told me that I was crazy limiting my diet like that and cutting so much out. I just kept telling myself that I need to get to the end to see which foods are truly causing some of my health concerns. This challenge has helped

RACHEL LUNA - BEFORE

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

b. We wanted to offer a tool that empowers you to regain control over your relationship with food and educates you about how our food affects your body, emotions, and mental well-being. I personally have done many programs like this, but this one had the most comprehensive online support, associated reading materials and a large amount of success within the nutrition community with a wide variety of populations. We have had a huge amount of success with this program with Copper Sky members and City of Maricopa employees. For more information, visit whole30.com

me so much in going back to just the basic food groups and eliminating all the common problem food groups. I learned that I have an allergy to coconut. I have already learned a lot in the last week during my introduction phase. I know that both dairy and gluten are part of the problem. So thankful for this challenge!”

RACHEL LUNA - AFTER

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Special Feature (continued) Lorraine Comer

“My weight loss goal in the beginning, before the challenge, was to lose weight and get healthy, and during the challenge, it made me push more to go for a weight loss goal. When I started my weight loss goal I weighed 300 pounds, and when I went in on Feb. 7 2018 for my final weigh-in, I weighed 276.8. It has taught me how to manage my eating habits and to exercise as best as I could, for I do have some health issues, but those health issues are now under control and I can do more. I cut out all junk food and soda, and I drink water only. The challenge has impacted my life to show me that I can do anything if I put my mind to it. I believe by the end of this year to the end of next year I will accomplish my goal. Thank you, Maricopa.”

Idee Sodimu, J.D.

Rosemarie and Annastacia Patterson (mother and daughter) BEFORE

NIKKI RUGGLES - AFTER

“My weight loss goal, at the beginning of my journey, was to lose about 25 pounds. You could imagine my excitement when I heard about the weight loss challenge. I thought this will be great to get me started and have a group/ support to keep me honest. I knew the first challenge would be my diet. I even got the recipe for cabbage soup and loved it. I realized it really was mind over matter and I could achieve my goal if I stayed consistent.”

BEFORE

IDEE SODIMU - AFTER

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190 lbs. The weight loss challenge really got me back into my fitness mindset and helped me jump back into my workout routine and diet. My next goal is to have visible abs by summer.”

OR LI GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR LIV VING ING • SPECIAL FE ATURE

Jessica Stevenson

Nikki Ruggles

“When I signed up to be part of the weight loss challenge, I was sick and tired of being a failure. I've done dozens of dietary plans, and even had gastric bypass surgery. Here I was addicted to sugar, in chronic pain and so exhausted I could barely drag through a day of work. Ten minutes on a treadmill, maybe. Enter Whole30! Hmmm…tame my sugar dragon? Reduce chronic pain? Sleep better? On top of that, I don’t have to count calories. I’m sold. Who knew that just making a few changes on my plate could do all this! And anyone can be a success with this program! For the first time ever, I saw a program that would deal with emotional and psychological issues that were making me fail.”

Kyle Hilsinger

“Annastacia lost 5 pounds, and I lost almost 8 pounds. When we found out what we actually lost, we were both excited. We celebrated our loss as if we won a million dollars. This challenge has gotten us motivated again to work out. We have worked on our eating habits. We drink less diet soda, and we eat fewer processed foods. We have a long way to go, but we plan on continuing. Thank you for your support. I hope this challenge will help others to continue also.”

“A little over five years ago I got a diagnosis from a sports medicine doctor that changed my life. After a couple years of dealing with ruptured disks in my lower back, knee pain, back pain and foot pain, my doctor finally told me, "We've done what we can do, and not to sound harsh, but the real problem is you're fat.” That's when I finally accepted the fact that I needed to do something about my weight. I was about 250 pounds at my heaviest. Over the course of the next five years, my weight fluctuated between 150 lbs and

“My journey started on Jan. 1, 2018 with the mindset of this being my New Year’s resolution and the start of a better me. I had to continue to tell myself not to give up, because this was something that was needed as well as wanted. You never know how hard something is until you actually have to do it, and boy I tell you, giving up all the things that make me smile was the hardest step to take.

BEFORE

SABRA HERNANDEZ - AFTER

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


2018 Maricopa Weight Loss Challenge So, I said goodbye to all the yummy and filling starchy carbs, and I may even have dropped some tears for all the sweets and candies that I loved so much. This step was by far the hardest for me – to completely change the way I’m used to eating and to realize that it is only harming you, no matter how good it tastes.”

Janice Baltazar

“I’m a non-athletic 50-year-old woman with a pear-shaped body, who has never been into sports. The non-scale victories are the best part of this challenge. Here we go: • My clothes fit better. • I’m happy with my waist again. • I’ve developed a new relationship with food. • I’ve learned to appreciate cooking with non-processed foods. • I don’t think of food all the time anymore. • I met some fantastic people on the way, and I’m feeling more a part of the community. • I have more energy. • I’ve been saving a ton of money by not eating out or buying to-go food. • My outlook is much more positive.”

Bobbie Jo Asher

“My weight was out of control, and I was slowly killing myself. I was up to 450 pounds, completely miserable and feeling utterly hopeless. I knew if I didn’t do something soon I was going to die. I found a surgeon I felt comfortable with and decided to have gastric sleeve surgery. Unfortunately, before they could operate I needed to lose 70 pounds. On June 5, 2017, I cut all toxins out of my diet and committed to eating extremely clean and Ketogenic diet so I could lose the weight necessary to have my procedure. The more pounds I shed, the more I was able to move. I started going to the gym very regularly and with the help of InBody scans found that I was not only losing fat but I was gaining muscle. I have stayed the course and as the months have passed have lost more and more fat. I have never felt better. I was very excited to learn that Copper Sky was hosting a weight loss challenge. I know I’m not losing as generously as I was in the early stages of my journey, but it was definitely a good kick in the pants to keep on keeping on. I have shared my story and

BOBBIE JO ASHER BEFORE

AFTER

connected with many Copper Sky members and challenge participants along the way in hopes they’ll realize if I can do it, they can do it too. My husband and I have enjoyed working out together throughout the challenge and encourage each other every day to stay the course. I have lost a total of 125 pounds so far, have increased muscle mass in all areas and have dramatically reduced my body fat. I still have a long way to go, but I am loving the journey.” 

Sabra Hernandez

Joining the 30-day challenge was a huge step for me. I have always been ashamed for being overweight. I joined this challenge to encourage myself to realize that losing weight, dieting, living healthier and working out is not a bad thing. This whole time, my 7-year-old daughter has been watching me struggle and stress, but she should be watching me push and strive. I joined for her to see that changing your way of living is not a bad thing! This past 30 or so days has inspired me to share my stories with others and try and help them and support them like one of my close friends did for me. Mentally, I believe I am stronger. The words of encouragement have been so beyond helpful. The advice I have received will help me throughout the rest of my journey. I am doing this so I can live a long, healthy life, be an amazing mother of three and be the best example I can.”

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

PHOTO BY VICTOR MORENO

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Special Feature (continued)

RECIPES THAT FUELED THE WEIGHT LOSS Cabbage Soup

InstantPot Chicken Tortilla-Less Soup

INGREDIENTS • 2 tbsp butter or ghee • 2 tbsp olive oil • 1 cup onion, diced • 4 cloves garlic, minced • 1 1/2 lb ground beef • 1/2 lb ground pork • 6 cups beef stock • 3 tsp dried oregano • 2 tsp sea salt • 2 tsp smoked paprika • 2 tsp garlic powder • 2 tsp onion powder • 1 tsp black pepper • 1/2 tsp dried thyme • 2 14.5 oz cans diced tomatoes, drained • 6 oz can tomato paste • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped • 1 large head cabbage, halved and sliced • 3 cups riced cauliflower

INGREDIENTS Soup • 2 boneless skinless chicken breasts (about 1 1/2 pounds) • 2 cans RO*TEL, any variety • 1 14.5- ounce can Whole30-compliant chicken broth • 2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce • 2 teaspoons adobe sauce • 1 medium onion, chopped • 2 teaspoons garlic powder • 1 teaspoon onion powder • 1 teaspoon cumin • 2 teaspoons chili powder • 1 teaspoons dried oregano • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt • 2 zucchinis, chopped or cut into 1/2” half moons • 1 14- ounce can full-fat coconut milk or coconut cream, whisked until smooth Garnishes • fresh avocado slices • red onions, sliced thin • fresh cilantro, chopped • coconut cream • lime juice • shredded cheese, if not paleo or on Whole30 • tortilla strips, if not paleo or on Whole30

INSTRUCTIONS 1. In a large stock pot or dutch oven over medium heat, heat the butter and olive oil. Add the onion and garlic. Cook until the onion is translucent and garlic is fragrant. 2. Add the ground beef and ground pork to the pan. Cook until browned and drain any excess grease. Add the beef broth, oregano, sea salt, paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, black pepper, thyme, tomatoes, tomato paste, parsley, cabbage and riced cauliflower. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to low and simmer for 30 – 45 minutes. Serving Size – 1 Cup Calories – 265 | Fat – 15g | Protein – 19g | Total Carbs – 11.5g | Fiber – 4g Net Carbs – 6.5g SOURCE: PEACELOVEANDLOWCARB.COM

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Sprinkle boneless skinless chicken breasts with salt. Add the chicken breasts to the Instant Pot. Add the remaining ingredients from RO*TEL to medium onion, then add spices. Top with zucchini. 2. Secure the lid on the pot. Cook at high pressure for 20 minutes. Allow the pressure to naturally release for ten minutes, then use the manual release. Pull out the chicken breasts and add coconut milk. Switch Instant Pot to Sauté mode and stir to combine. Dice chicken, then return to soup. Serve hot, topped with garnishes of choice. Note: If you don’t have an InstantPot, you can use a slow cooker. Add all ingredients, except coconut milk, in order listed. Cook on low heat for 7 hours or on high heat for 4 hours. Remove chicken breasts and dice. Stir in coconut milk, then return chicken to slow cooker. SOURCE: 40APRONS.COM

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THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Arizona Gives Day Arizona Gives Day is a statewide 24-hour online-giving campaign to raise dollars and tell our nonprofit story to people across our state. Every dollar donated that day is counted toward incentives and prizes. In 2017, Seeds of Hope won an additional $10,000 for raising the second-most money in our category.

Celebratin g 25 Years

JOIN US FOR

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LARGEST ONLINE FUNDRAISING EVENT!

There are several ways you can participate in our biggest annual fundraiser. •

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First, you can give right from your phone, tablet or computer. You can even schedule your donation ahead of time! Second, you can ask others in your circle of influence to give. Third, you can advocate for us by telling others what we do. Finally, you can pray. We believe that with God all things are possible!

Mark your calendar for April 3, 2018. takes place in early April each year. The program is supported by our presenting sponsor FirstBank, along with a variety of other sponsor organizations.

Donations to Date: 2014 - $8,053 2015 - $27,953 + $10,000 prize 2016 - $54,133 + $8,000 prize 2017 - $45,130 + $10,000 prize About Arizona Gives: Arizona Gives and Arizona Gives Day is a collaboration between the Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits and Arizona Grantmakers Forum that began in 2013. This partnership has helped raise more Arizona than $10.1 million for An Arizona’s nonprofit sector. This statewide, 24-hour, online giving campaign

Arizona Gives helps people find, learn about and contribute to the causes they believe in, while enabling nonprofits to share their stories and engage the community through a unique online giving platform.

ately. Donors can also use advanced search filters to find nonprofits by the criteria they choose, such as location, focus area or even which organizations qualify for an AZ tax credit. Any qualified 501(c)(3) organization located in or providing services to Arizona can register to receive donations through AZGives.org. All nonprofit organizations are verified for eligibility before being allowed to participate on the website, ensuring that donors are giving to legitimate organizations.

Donors can create an account to pre-schedule donations, set-up recurring donations and make The statethe of year, or changes to their giving throughout For more information on donating, please Arizona offers they can check out as a guest and give immedivisit: www.seedsofhopeaz.com its taxpayers opportunity The state the of Arizona offers is as easy as 1..2..3! An Arizona TAX CREDIT is as easy as it’s taxpayers the unique to make contributions to The state of Arizona offers its taxpayers opportunity to make that 1...2...3 non-profit organizations An Arizona There has never been an easier way the opportunity to contributions to of non-profit reduce the amount taxmake contributions to TAX CREDIT 1. Donate online, by mail, organizations that reduce to help your organizations thatcommunity! reduce the owedthe to amount the state or increase 1. Donate online, by mail, or in person* non-profit or in is as easy asperson* 1..2..3! of tax owed to the amount of the taxpayer’s of or tax owed The state of amount Arizona its taxpayers theoffers state increase the to the state or increase thereceipt opportunity toamount make contributions to refund, dollar-for-dollar. amount of the taxpayer’s 2. Receive an email receipt the of the taxpayer’s refund, 2. Receive an email 1. Donate online, by mail, non-profit organizations that reduce the refund, dollar-for-dollar. If you file single you can or in person* dollar-for-dollar. amount of tax owed or you increase If to you file single canIf you file single you can donate upthe tostate $400 and up 3. Claim the2. dollar-for-dollar tax credit of on 3. Claim the receipt dollar-for the amount the taxpayer’s refund, Receive an email donate up to $400 and up up to $800 if you file donate up to $400 and to $800 if you file married. dollar tax credit on dollar-for-dollar. you file single you can your AZ income tax return toIf$800 if you file married. 3. Claim the dollar-for married. Find out more Find out more by visiting your AZ income donate tax up to $400 Find and up $800byifvisiting you file by visiting outtomore dollar tax credit on *donate by April 15, return married. Find out more by visiting your AZ2018 income tax www.azcredits.org or thethe www.azcredits.org or the Seeds of Hope www.azcredits.org or return www.azcredits.org or the Seeds of Hope Seeds of Hope website. Seeds of Hope website. *donate 2018 website. *donate by Aprilby 15, April 2018 15, website. Name Phone Card #

There has never been a There has never to help your comm been an easier There to has help never been an way your easier way to help your community!

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community!

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seedsofhopeaz.com Email_____________________________________________ Expiration date________ We value your privacy. All payment information is destroyed. City/Zip___________________________________________ Card number________________ 702 E. Cottonwood Ln • 520-836-6335 • Awww.seedsofhopeaz.com 501c3 qualifying charitable organization 702 E Cottonwood Lane ● 520.836.6335 Email_____________________________________________ a 501c3 qualifying charitable organization

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Casa Grande Elementary School District is

PINAL COUNTY PRESS A R I Z ONA C I T Y • C A S A GR A N DE • CO OL ID GE • E L OY • F L OR E NC E • M A R ICOPA

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The choice for families in Casa Grande

Did You Know? • Casa Grande Elementary has more A+ Schools and A+ Programs than any other school district in Pinal County • The District has a proven, rigorous instructional program built upon “Success for Every One” • More than 8 out of 10 families in Casa Grande choose the Casa Grande Elementary School District. • For more than 10 years in a row, 96% of families rate their child’s school an A or a B.

Visit Your Child’s School Today! ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT

WWW.CGESD.ORG

520.836.2111

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GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

Officials warn of animals with rabies

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hree wild animals recently tested positive for rabies in eastern Pinal and Pima counties, according to Animal Control officials. Ten domestic animals and one person have been exposed to rabies related to the recent rabid animals. Arizona is currently seeing rabies activity in multiple counties, including Pinal, Pima, Cochise and Maricopa. Rabies is caused by a virus that is almost 100 percent fatal once symptoms appear in all mammals, including humans, officials said. Exposure occurs when a rabid animal bites another mammal and exposes the wound to saliva. The virus causes infection in the brain and affects the behavior of the animal/human. Some signs can include nocturnal animals becoming active during the daytime, lack of fear of humans, increased

aggression and loss of appetite, among others. Animals lose the ability to swallow, but do not have foam in their mouths, as many people believe. Humans are able to receive vaccination after exposure to prevent symptoms and disease. Vaccination of domestic animals is the best way to protect your pets while also slowing the spread of the virus in the community. Arizona requires dogs to be vaccinated and licensed, which can be obtained through Animal Control. Contact Animal Control if your pet comes into contact with a wild animal, officials said. Wild animals can often be tested for rabies, and Animal Control may be able to trap the animal for testing. Do not touch or attempt to trap the wild animal yourself and do not destroy the bodies of any animals. Contact Animal Control

immediately. If the wild animal tests positive, officials said an exposed pet will be quarantined at home and given a booster rabies shot. However, if the pet is not vaccinated, it could develop rabies and will need to be euthanized or quarantined at Animal Control for six months to protect the animal’s family members. If the wild animal tests, negative, animal control can still provide education to pet owners to help them avoid future risks. Officials said that in 2017 in Arizona 20 humans were exposed to rabies, 54 domestic animals were exposed and 108 wild animals tested positive for the disease. Of these, 60 were bats, 24 were skunks, 17 were foxes and 7 were bobcats. For more information, call 520-509-3555 or email animalcare@pinalcountyaz.gov

CGESD...cont. from page 17

Each site will serve meals Monday through Friday, with the exception of holidays, at various serving times. For more information, call 520-876-3630. Answers to frequently asked questions along with site times,

locations, menus and event calendar will be posted in May on the Casa Grande Elementary School District’s food services webpage at cgesd.org.

There will be 25 serving sites offering breakfast and lunch throughout the Casa Grande area this summer, including bus routes in Paradise Palms and Chuichu.

Read More News on Page 94...

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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FOUR THEFTS THAT SHOW NOT ALL THIEVES ARE STUPID by Staff Reports

W

hile the majority of people live their lives honestly and don’t steal and cheat, unfortunately there are plenty of unscrupulous people in society who have no qualms about stealing from you. And while many people think that overall, thieves are stupid, many criminals are calculating and know when to strike. Often, these are crimes of opportunity. Below are some common ploys smart thieves have been employing recently.

car and have the GPS provide the directions to the victim’s home, which they then burglarize. The thieves know that the owner of the car is at the event and likely won’t be home for a few hours, so they can take their time and make off with the victim’s valuables. What to do: Instead of programming your home address into the GPS, instead program a nearby location, like your regular grocery store or gas station. Also, you should stash your GPS out of site, so it’s not such a tempting target.

1. The long-term parking trick Thieves regularly cruise the long-term parking lots of airports to not only steal things from the cars, but also to get ahold of car registrations in the glove compartment. They then drive to the owner’s home and rob them. The robbers will often stake out the home first for a day to make sure nobody is actually home, and then they strike. What to do: Don’t leave your registration and insurance cards in the car if you are leaving it in long-term parking. Also, you may want to consider leaving the garage door opener at home.

3. Stolen phone, drained bank account One of the worst things that can happen to people is to have their purse stolen. What do most people keep in their purses? Wallets, cell phone and keys to their home, along with a number of sundry other items. One woman whose handbag was stolen with those items in it had her husband’s phone number under “hubby” in her phone contacts. When she was able to call her husband from a pay phone, he told her that he’d received a text from her asking about their ATM card PIN number. They rushed to the bank and found out that the thief had withdrawn the maximum amount of cash for the day: $400. What to do: Use people’s names in your contacts lists and not designations like Mom, Dad or “Sweety.” Also, if you receive a text from a loved one asking for sensitive information, call him or her back instead of sending a text message.

2. The GPS home robbery Here’s another disturbing tactic. When people are parked at a long-term event – like a concert or fair – thieves look for vehicles with a GPS in plain sight. They break into the car and steal the GPS, plug it into their own

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GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

4. Stolen purse, burglarized home Sometimes people are careless about their purses when shopping. They leave them in the shopping cart while walking a short distance to grab something from a shelf. One woman had her purse stolen from a cart when she’d left it sitting there unattended. She reported it stolen to the store management, and when she got home, she got a call from store security saying they had her purse and wallet, although it had been emptied of its cash. But when she got to the store, she was told they hadn’t called her. Suspecting something was amiss, she hurried home only to find out that her home had been burglarized. The thieves had made the call knowing she’d leave to get her purse back. What to do: If you find yourself in a similar situation and get a call from a store, you should look up the store number and call them back. Better still, never leave your purse unattended while shopping.

For more information or to explore your insurance coverage options, call ROX Casa Grande Insurance at 520-836-7660 or 800-690-7660 or visit roxinsurance.com. Visit us at 442 W. Kortsen Road, Casa Grande, AZ 85122.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 41 The utility that is Global Water is a different story, right? They’re a for-profit company, and people don’t like that. But you have to look at what is the role of government again, so some cities have water companies that they run. There are pros and cons with both…but I’m going to tell you now – and I know that Dick Powell knows this very well as a council member in Casa Grande – but there is an old phrase in the West that says that, “Whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting.” Never is that more true than in Arizona. I just happened to have a two-hour conversation with a utility head talking about water scarcity here in Arizona and in Pinal County, and the day is coming where it is getting more and more difficult to grow and build. It is a commodity, folks. And every time we take agriculture out of the picture, which is not a good thing, because you have to be able to eat, right? But when you take out agriculture, they sell their water rights to somebody else and then they put in houses, and while those houses use overall less water than agriculture does, at the same time, we’re all pulling from the same aquifer. So the state has stepped in and said, “Wait, whoa, whoa, whoa! We have to be very careful about this.” Because otherwise what are all these homes going to be worth if one day, 50 years from now, you go to turn on the water spigot and nothing comes out? This whole state would be a ghost town. This problem affects and should concern, all of us. We can complain about bills, and we can hold our utilities accountable. But at the same time, we have to do a better job of understanding the complexities of the regulatory world in which these utilities also have to operate in for us to have the luxury of doing something as simple as turning on a spigot and having the water that we all expect to just come out of it. GC LIVING: So is there anything major announced from Maricopa or in the pipeline? MAYOR PRICE: Well, one of our biggest major announcements is APEX, which is a competitor with Attesa, and that one of the challenges to getting it out of the ground. But for us, APEX will be a game-changer. While it won’t be a thousands of direct jobs, we will have millionaires and billionaires now coming to the City of Maricopa – one

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of whom is very important in this area because his name is Mr. Jackson (of the famous Barrett-Jackson auction, which takes place every year in Scottsdale and draws thousands of people). GC LIVING: Do you have convention space out in Maricopa to have something similar? That would be a great addition. MAYOR PRICE: Yes it would. But you know, WestWorld in Scottdale wasn’t built because Barrett-Jackson wasn’t there. It was built because Barrett-Jackson was happening. GC LIVING: Yes, that’s right. And I assume you have other projects that are confidential in the pipeline? MAYOR PRICE: Yes, and you know, for us again…part of the low hanging development fruit is retail. That’s something we desperately need for the sales tax revenue that it can bring in. You see the more retail we have, the more we can lower or even eliminate the property tax. Maricopa suffers from at least $280 million in retail leakage. That is where people are buying things outside of the city, because in most cases, they are not offered in Maricopa. That means those tax dollars are going to other cities. As much as I want to support my neighboring cities in that fashion, I also want that money to stay local, to help pay for our needs, like police and fire. I do have to say that Ak-Chin has done a good job with the entertainment complex, which is an extension of Harrah’s, and their expanded resort and casino. They are doing more and more for the area. With APEX coming, folks can fly into Ak-Chin’s airport. They can come to Copper Sky; they can eat at our restaurants, play golf and so much more. So we have all these things working hand-inhand. So, that’s what we’re trying to build in Maricopa…a synergy among basically two different countries or two different nations. But we’re all in it together for the region. GC LIVING: What do you feel is your greatest accomplishment so far in office? MAYOR PRICE: I think people always point to things they can see, feel and touch. They point to Copper Sky, our city hall and newly built roads and retail establishments. But see, this is the problem. I think that politicians love to take credit for things they have seen go up during their time, but in great part you have to remember, you stand on other people’s shoulders to get there.

But, I think that my greatest accomplishment, aside from being able to see, feel and touch something, is to move something that is so complex and so difficult forward, something that so many people said would and could never be done, so for me, it’s the 347 overpass. It’s about getting people to understand that this transportation necessity is a safety hazard. In fact, it’s a top priority, and a hugely difficult process to make happen. And while expansion of the I-10, and expansion of the Port of Mariposa and the expansion of the I-17are all priorities too…how do I get my place in that line for those precious resources? If you start networking, and doing all the things that we promoted and talked about, well, I networked the board. I networked the staff. I networked all these people. I became friends with them, and guess what? They understood the value that we were presenting. We invited them to come to us and view for themselves that challenges. We also went to them. We took our stories to them, and it’s that sort of relationship-building that is key to making funding follow. However, it’s the reputation and the relationships we built across the county, across the state and even in Washington D.C. that are so critically important to our local issues here at home. In fact, I once had Senator Jeff Flake, after seeing me standing in his office for another meeting with him, tell me that he thought I was in Washington D.C. more than he was. In the end, all I can do during my tenure, during my time as a representative of the people of Maricopa, is to do the absolute best I can to elevate Maricopa’s status, reputation and position amongst our peer cities, our region and our state to ultimately improve our quality of life. 

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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Special Section:

5 PILLARS OF WELLNESS

S

ure, it’s important to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables every day. But it’s even more important to look at your life as a whole and what you can do to stay healthy. Here are five pillars of wellness and some tips on incorporating them into your life. These small changes can make a lasting impact on your health as you age. And you don’t need to do it all at once. Just one small change is a great start, and you can add more from there.

1. Financial

Financial health can play a role in poor physical health. By tackling your financial wellness, you are likely to reduce stress, have peace of mind and find better opportunities in your future. • Be honest about your situation. • Learn to create a budget. • Live within your budget and means. • Practice want versus need.

2. Emotional

When you take time to sort out how you feel and care for yourself, you are better able to navigate your emotional safety and health in the world. • Make time for self-care. • Learn to identify what you are feeling. • Practice saying “no” when you don’t feel like doing something.

3. Body

By working and living in an environment that is more soothing than stressful you are more likely to make better choices about nourishment and your physical health. • Reduce stress in your living and work environment. 60

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• Get routine medical checkups. • Nourish your body. • Be attentive your sleep needs.

4. Spiritual

In thinking about spirituality, you must think beyond faith and instead think positive about the journey ahead and your inner strength. • Be present and make mindful choices. • Learn that it is okay to be silent or still. • Connect with things that push you to grow and evolve. • Remember to breathe.

5. Social

By having a network of support you be more equipped to navigate through the highs and lows of life, knowing you have social support to draw from. • Develop a support circle around you. • Get out and meet new people and try new things. • Rekindle old friendships. Provided by Sun Life Family Health Center THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


READERS

Reveal

What are your favorite home remedies when you feel sick?

Answers received via Facebook. One contest winner was selected to receive Renaissance Fair tickets. To participate in our “Questions of the Week” for your chance to win prizes, visit us on Facebook at facebook.com/goldencorridorliving.

“Hot tea with lemon or a shot of tequila.” - JoAnne Garcia Villarreal “Chicken Soup, hot tea, lots of rest and Thieves Essential Oil to diffuse, kill germs and support your immune system.” - Deborah Owens (Contest Winner)

“Homemade chicken soup. Roast the whole bird; take off most of the meat, then boil in a big pot with carrots and celery. It will absolutely cure what ails you.” - Cindy Schaider “Spicy rice. It clears the sinuses right up!” - Maureen Schirmer

“Love and a warm, fuzzy dog to cuddle with.” - Kelly Wadkins

“Bed rest and lots of fluids.” - Kimberly Morris “Vicks and honey with lemon for cough.” - Olivia Yubeta Hammons SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

“Fresh, raw garlic!” - Jennifer Henderson

“Homemade chili and Orange Julius...mmmm.” - John Mihalic GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

MANAGING YOUR OWN HEALTH THIS YEAR by David Lozano, Earned Media Senior Manager, Banner Health

T

he 2017-2018 flu season was a tough one for many of us. Trying to stay healthy while avoiding major illness can be difficult, especially since many people today live a very active and busy life. Many of us work hard to manage our time, money and even our households. What we tend to forget is the importance of managing our overall health. How about that New Year’s resolution to lose weight or see a doctor? Many of us make those resolutions to improve our health. Some of us keep those resolutions and take steps to improve our health, while others decide that next year would be a better time to actually do it. what do you do? Managing your health is more than just taking a walk and drinking lots of water. While those steps are definitely good for you, seeing your doctor regularly will also help in the long run to better manage your health. If you don’t have one already, choosing the right primary care doctor is a great way to begin living a healthy lifestyle and taking control of your health. This is especially important for those

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who have some type of pre-existing medical condition or have suffered from a major medical issue in the past. Once you’ve chosen the right primary care doctor, the next step is making an appointment to see him or her. Once you go to the appointment, it’s important that you take the time to communicate and let your doctor know your complete medical history. Just like a mechanic should know the mechanical history of your car to fix any problems and avoid breaking down, your doctor should also know the complete medical history of your body. “As health care providers, our goal is to educate people and help empower them when it comes to managing their health,” said Rona Curphy, CEO of Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “For example, if a patient comes in for something related to diabetes, we want to teach him or her that there are ways to manage this disease once they leave the hospital.” As mentioned in the last edition of Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine, Banner Casa Grande was recently recognized by the Leapfrog Group for quality and

CORRID OR LI LIVING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION GOLDEN CORRIDOR

safety. That means patients receive exceptional care, and we use the latest technology and best practices to guide our health care experts, so they can save lives and help people manage their health. Some of the criteria measured by the Leapfrog Group that help people manage their health include doctor and nurse communication and good communication from a doctor or nurse about medications a patient may be taking. Curphy said, “When you think about it, the focus of health care has changed. Several years ago, we were more focused on treating the patient and their specific diseases, and then sending them home to recover. Today, we’ve become more focused on preventative care and finding ways to keep them out of the hospital, or at least preventing readmission for the same illness, so we can help them better manage their health care needs.” When one receives inpatient or outpatient care at Banner Casa Grande, the treatment likely won’t be the same as what he or she would have received five or 10 years ago. Our facility is using

new and improved advances in technology, along with enhanced best practices. This allows our caregivers to not only treat the illness, but also helps patients learn self-management so they can charge of their own health. “You’ve probably seen some of things that have changed here at the hospital. New technologies have been implemented at Banner Casa Grande, like a new and improved surgical robot – the daVinci Xi, and our LowDose Genius 3D Mammography for better breast health,” Curphy said. “We have a pharmacy that is open to both patients and the public if they need their medications or have questions about medications they are currently taking. These new technologies, and new services, coupled with physicians and nurses who have also improved the way they treat and communicate with their patients, have really helped us live up to our mission of making health care easier, so life can be better.” For more information about services offered at Banner Casa Grande Medical Center, please go to BannerHealth.com/casagrande.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Do you dream of getting a good night’s sleep? Approximately 22 million Americans suffer from a disorder known as sleep apnea. Fortunately, the sleep center at Banner Casa Grande diagnoses and treats Obstructive Sleep Apnea and other sleep disorders in children and adults. • • • • •

Are you tired and doze off during the day? Do you snore? Have you been told you stop breathing during sleep? Do you have high blood pressure? Is your neck size larger than 16 inches (for women) or 17 inches (for men)?

If so, it may be time to put your sleep problems to rest. We can examine your sleep issues at home or with an overnight sleep study at our center. Ask your doctor if a sleep study is right for you or your child.

Sleep Center Appointments: (520) 381-6423

BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

WHAT IS INTEGRATED BEHAVIORAL HEALTH? by Andrew Jones, Community Relations Coordinator, Sun Life Family Health Center

WHAT is Integrated Behavioral Health?

Davis Plunkett, LCSW

Remember: Your primary care provider remains in charge of your healthcare – the BHCs primary job is to help develop and implement the best integrated healthcare plan for you!

Integrated Behavioral Health is a program available to patients within Sun Life Family Health Center that provides services as part of overall good health care. The purpose of this service is to offer assistance when stress, worry or emotional concerns about physical or other life problems are interfering with someone’s daily life.

WHO is the Behavioral Health Consultant and WHAT kinds of problems can he or she help with? The BHC is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW), Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) or a Licensed Psychologist (LP) with specialty training who works as a member of the primary care team. This team approach allows us to consider physical, behavioral and emotional aspects of health. For example, BHCs can help develop plans for behavioral change programs, such as smoking cessation or other lifestyle modifications. BHCs can also help with emotional or behavioral problems, such as family or relationship difficulties, bereavement, excess stress, depression, anxiety or anger problems.

WHAT should I expect when I see the Behavioral Health Consultant? You can expect the BHC to ask you specific questions about your physical symptoms, the emotional concerns you are experiencing, your behaviors and how all of these

Tip of the Month: Learn to identify your own emotions for a healthier you! 64

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might be related. You can expect your appointments to be no longer than 30 minutes, in general, and for the BHC to provide brief solution-focused interventions. You can also expect to be seen in the exam room or in a comfortable office at Sun Life and the BHC will maintain a close working relationship with your primary care provider in offering the best overall care. Remember: Your primary care provider remains in charge of your healthcare – the BHCs primary job is to help develop and implement the best integrated healthcare plan for you!

HOW is this service different from mental health services? The services provided by the BHC serves as another part of your overall healthcare. Follow up sessions will be scheduled as necessary and dependent upon your specific situation. If you request, or if the BHC thinks you would benefit from specialty mental health services, the BHC will provide a referral. Documentation, assessments and recommendations will be written in your electronic health record. Sun Life Family Health Center welcomes you to learn more about our Integrated Behavioral Health Department and the services rendered. Sun Life offers continuous and comprehensive healthcare to individuals and the entire family. In addition to providing care when you are ill, we will also work with you to help achieve a healthy lifestyle and help prevent future illness. For more information, call our Sun Life Family Health Center location today at 520-836-3446. THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

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OR LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

EXERCISE AND STRESS by Tiffanie Grady-Gillespie, Certified Physical Trainer, CPT, WicketFiTT Exercise is also an effective anti-anxiety treatment. It relieves tension and stress, boosts physical and mental energy and enhances well-being through the release of endorphins.

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any of us find it hard enough to motivate ourselves to exercise when we are feeling our best. So, of course, when we feel depressed, anxious or really stressed out, it can be especially difficult. This leads to that whole feeling of being trapped in a catch-22 situation. You know exercise will make you feel better, but depression has robbed you of the energy and motivation you need to exercise, or your social anxiety means you can’t bear the thought of being seen at an exercise class or running through the park. So, what can you do? Everyone knows that regular exercise is good for the body. But exercise is also one of the most effective ways to improve your mental health. Regular exercise can have a positive impact on depression, anxiety, ADHD, PTSD and more. It also relieves stress, improves memory, helps you sleep better and boosts overall mood. And you don’t have to be a fitness fanatic to reap the benefits, because even modest amounts of exercise can make a difference. No matter your age or fitness level, you can learn to use exercise as a powerful tool to feel better. Exercise is a powerful depression-fighter for several reasons. Most importantly, it promotes all kinds of changes in the brain, including reduced inflammation and increasing feelings

CORRID OR LI LIVING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION GOLDEN CORRIDOR

of calm and well-being. It also releases endorphins, which are powerful chemicals in your brain that energize your spirits and make you feel good. Finally, exercise can also serve as a distraction, allowing you to find some quiet time to break out of the cycle of negative thoughts that feed depression. Exercise is also an effective anti-anxiety treatment. It relieves tension and stress, boosts physical and mental energy and enhances well-being through the release of endorphins. Anything that gets you moving can help. Let’s talk about stress for a moment. That has to be one of the biggest factors in all of our lives. Ever noticed how your body feels when you’re under stress? Your muscles may be tense, especially in your face, neck and shoulders, leaving you with back or neck pain or painful headaches. You may feel tightness in your chest, a pounding pulse and, of course, the dreaded sleepless nights. The worry and discomfort of all these physical symptoms can in turn lead to even more stress, creating a vicious cycle between your mind and body. Exercising is an effective way to break this cycle. As well as releasing those amazing endorphins in the brain, physical activity helps to relax the muscles and relieve tension in the body. Since the body and mind are so closely linked, when your body feels

better so, too, will your mind. A few more mental and emotional benefits of exercise: Higher self-esteem. When exercise becomes habit, it can elevate your sense of self-worth and make you feel strong and powerful. You’ll feel better about your overall appearance, and even meeting small exercise goals gives you a sense of achievement. Better sleep. Even short bursts of exercise in the morning or afternoon can help regulate your sleep patterns. If you prefer to exercise at night, relaxing exercises such as yoga or gentle stretching can help promote sleep. More energy. Increasing your heart rate several times a week will give you more get-up-and-go. Start off with a few minutes of exercise a day, and increase your workout as you feel more energized. In today’s nonstop, crazy world, where you’re constantly being texted, emailed, tweeted and constantly pulled in all directions, having the opportunity to take time out of your day to focus on you and your health is important. Recent research strongly suggests that improved mental health is an important and often-overlooked outcome of regular exercise. If you’ve been looking for a little extra motivation to get moving, know that exercise can help you feel better and improve your overall outlook on life.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

CHIROPRACTORS HELP THE BODY HEAL ITSELF by Dr. Sean Paul Jenkins, Owner, Jenkins Chiropractic

I

became a chiropractor because I honor the inborn potential of everyone to be truly healthy, because I desire to help the newborn, the aged and those without hope; because I choose to care for the patient with “dis – ease,” not disease; because I wish to assist, rather than intrude, and to free, rather than control; because I seek to correct the cause and know its effects; because I know doctors do not heal, but only the body can heal itself; because I want to make a difference; because every day I get to witness miracles and because I have

been called to give, love and serve from the abundance of my heart. That’s why I do what I do.“ Chiropractors are doctors specializing in disorders of the spine affecting the neurophysiology of the body. The joints in your body are part of this musculoskeletal system, and its optimal function is necessary for overall good health. Chiropractic focuses on disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the effects these disorders have on general health. Typical complaints include back or neck pain, pain in the joints of the arms or legs and headaches. Common

If you are serious about making a change Jenkins Chiropractic is offering you a free exam spot x-ray and review of your findings for FREE .* DO not call if you are not ready to make a change!

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CORRID OR LI LIVING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION GOLDEN CORRIDOR

causes of injury include falls and automobile accidents, improper lifting or repetitive stresses, such as sitting in an awkward position with poor posture. One of the most well-known procedures performed by chiropractors is spinal manipulation or chiropractic adjustment. By manually applying a controlled force into joints, particularly the spine, the chiropractor is able to restore or enhance joint function. This often reduces joint inflammation and pain. The procedure rarely causes pain and the doctor can adapt the procedure according to the patient’s current pain and needs. Prior to performing an adjustment, the chiropractor will start by taking a patient history and perform a physical examination to develop a working diagnosis. X-rays or other imaging, such as MRI or CT scan, may be used to confirm a diagnosis.

SITTING • Sit with your knees slightly lower than your hips, with your head up and back straight. Avoid slouching and maintain the natural curve in your low back. • Get up frequently to walk, adjust position or stretch. • When driving, take a break to walk around for a few minutes while you refuel. • When flying, avoid sitting in the same position for

extended periods of time. Use pillows or rolled blankets to maintain the s-curve to your spine. COMPUTER OR OFFICE • When texting don’t look down to see the screen, bring your arms up in front of your eyes. • When using a computer or mobile device, look down with your eyes, and if you wear glasses, make sure you also can scan the entire screen without moving your head. • Never hold the phone between your ear and shoulder. Use a headset to reduce shoulder strain. STANDING • When standing, keep one foot slightly in front of the other, with your knees slightly bent. This position helps to take the pressure off your low back. Shift your weight from side to side periodically. • When lifting, avoid twisting. If you must lift a heavy item, get someone to help you. SLEEPING • Place a pillow under your knees to relieve pressure on your spine. • When lying on your side, use a pillow between your knees may to maintain proper alignment of your spine and pelvis. • Never sleep in a position that causes a portion of your spine to hurt.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

BANNER CASA GRANDE RECEIVES DONATION Funding Will Help Support Breast Cancer and Stanfield Medical Clinic “Without the support of our local business partners we wouldn’t be able to achieve all that we do within the foundation. It’s amazing to see what our community can accomplish when we all work together.” 70

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anner Casa Grande Medical Center has had the fortune and privilege of receiving support from some local organizations and businesses during the past several years. Recently, Western State Bank Casa Grande donated a generous gift of $250 to The Casa Grande Community Hospital Foundation. This money will be used to help support Banner Casa Grande Medical Center’s Breast Center and the Stanfield Medical Clinic through their annual Regional Riches Raffle. “We are so honored to receive this wonderful donation,” said Rona Curphy, CEO of Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “Without the support of our local business partners we wouldn’t be able to achieve all that we do within the foundation. It’s amazing to see what our community can ac-

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complish when we all work together.” Terry Strain, executive vice president and bank manager of Western State Bank Casa Grande said, “We are pleased to be able to give back to our community in this way. As a member of the foundation board, I am passionate about the causes and commitment we support in order to better this wonderful area we live in.” The 6th Annual Regional Riches Raffle starts at 6 p.m., on Friday, Apr. 6 at J. Warren Memory Garden, 1451 E. Florence Boulevard in Casa Grande. Some prizes include: • $5,000 • Vacations • Electronics • Luxury tickets to sporting events • Gift cards, and so much more All prizes are valued at a minimum

of $75 each and tickets are $50. For every prize donated, only four tickets are sold. To buy a ticket, donate a prize or for additional information about the Casa Grande Community Hospital Foundation and the annual Regional Riches Raffle, call 520-381-6541. Banner Casa Grande Medical Center is a full-service, community hospital providing comprehensive quality care to the Casa Grande Valley as well as the surrounding communities of western Pinal County. The hospital offers a variety of medical specialties including: cardiology, gastroenterology, gynecology, neurology, oncology, pediatrics, psychiatry and urology. Banner Casa Grande is part of Banner Health, a nonprofit healthcare system with 28 acute-care hospitals in six states. For more information, visit BannerHealth.com/casagrande.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

LEADING-EDGE CARE MEANS FASTER RECOVERY FOR PATIENTS

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ounder Dr. Sean Flannagan established One Accord Physical Therapy (OAPT) in Casa Grande in 2004, and developed a unique approach to care that has allowed OAPT to expand to five communities in Arizona, with over 10 expert providers. OAPT only employs dual credentialed professionals, many whom teach their unique approach to patient care across the U.S. and Europe. “Because of the advanced skill sets of these professionals, A.T. Still University has partnered with OAPT with the goal of improving the standard of care within the physical therapy profession,” Dr. Flannagan said. “What this means to patients is

that they will receive the latest, leading-edge approaches to recovery and have access to experts across the state, even in a smaller community.” OAPT patients get better faster, spend less money and are better able to avoid surgery. At One Accord your questions are answered; your voice is heard

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

and we partner with you through the recovery process. We like to say, “You have drugs, surgery or us.” We help people get off pain medication, stay off the operating table and return to the activities they love to do. OAPT specializes in spine, headaches, referred pain, and return-to-work and sports programs. OAPT offers appointments as early as 6 a.m. and as late as 6 p.m. for working professionals. Patients are always managed by the same expert to provide for continuity of care and optimal recovery. OAPT has one of only a few Alter-G Anti-Gravity treadmills available in Arizona as well as four of only a dozen certified vestibular rehab specialists who provide expert

care for those with dizziness and post-concussion symptoms. OAPT is dedicated to a work environment that is family-conscious and promotes personal and professional development. OAPT’s mission says it all: “Driven to produce extraordinary results to positively impact the lives of everyone we serve.”

Dr. Sean Flannagan, PT, DPT, Cert. SMT, Cert. DN, Cert. VRS OneAccordPT.com 520-836-8621 DrSean@OneAccordPT.com

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

HOSPICE OF THE VALLEY HONORS MILITARY VETERANS, FIRST RESPONDERS by Beverly Medlyn, Communications Director, Hospice of the Valley

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ospice of the Valley celebrates the lives of military veterans and first responders through volunteer programs that match volunteers with those experiences with patients who have served on the front lines. “Honoring First Responders” trained its first group in January. The emergency, medical and law-enforcement officers will call upon hospice patients who served in the same capacity, linking kindred souls with like experiences. The program is patterned

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after Hospice of the Valley’s “Saluting Our Veterans” program, established in 2011 to honor military veteran patients. More than 2,100 veterans have participated. Currently 40 volunteers representing every branch of service visit with patients, who are referred by hospice care teams. “I enjoy so much being with these guys – they are my heroes. It’s a brotherhood of blood,” said Gale Winters, a retired Air Force veteran who volunteers for Salutes. Stacia Ortega, Director of

CORRID OR LI LIVING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION GOLDEN CORRIDOR

Hospice of the Valley launches “Honoring First Responders” with the first group of volunteers.

Volunteer Services, said first responders and military veterans share a commitment to putting others above self. They also share sometimes traumatic experiences of being in harm’s way – whether on the battlefield or an accident scene. “These issues can come to the surface at end-of-life, and it’s comforting to talk with someone who understands what you’ve been through,” Ortega said. Flags and pins that represent

the branch of service are given to the patients by the volunteers. “Let’s thank them on their final journey by touching their heart with our own,” said Salutes volunteer Rodney Dehmer. Hospice of the Valley also has volunteer opportunities for home care volunteers in the Golden Corridor/Casa Grande. For more information contact the volunteer department: 602-6366336 or view hov.org.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

THERE IS HELP FOR DRUG ADDICTION by Stephanie Collier, Project Coordinator (ACPP I), Casa Grande Alliance

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ailey lay in a hospital bed. She had a concussion, a few broken bones and multiple bruises after she passed out while driving and hit a parked car. Unable to get out of bed, she had time to reflect on her past and think about how she ended up here... Hailey started drinking her sophomore year in high school. She wanted so much to feel like she fit in somewhere, and she found easy acceptance in a small group of youth her age that used alcohol. By the 12th grade, Hailey had used marijuana, pills – pretty much anything she could get her hands on. She found herself feeling like she needed to pop a few pills just to get through her day. Once considered a bright student, her

mother noticed that Hailey’s grades were lower than usual. She confronted her, but accepted her daughter’s explanation that the classes were getting harder and balancing school and a social life was not easy. Hailey managed to graduate with grades that were barely passing. She knew she had to quit using drugs or she would never make it through college. One morning, she flushed all the pills she had down the toilet and swore she wouldn’t use anymore. That evening, Hailey was a mess. She was sweating and felt sick to her stomach. She had a pounding headache, and her thoughts were racing. The longer she waited, the worse she felt. She couldn’t take it anymore – she got in her car and drove to a friend’s house. Her friend gave her two pain pills she had taken from her dad’s prescription. After about an hour, Hailey was feeling somewhat normal again. She left her friend’s house to go get a coffee, as she was starting to feel sleepy. She awoke in the back of an ambulance, with no recollection of the accident.

What is drug addiction?

For a long time, people who were addicted to drugs were thought to be lacking willpower and good morals. As a result of scientific research, more is known about drug addiction today than ever before. Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences. It is considered a brain disease because drugs change the brain; they change its structure and how it works. These brain changes can be long-lasting and can lead to many harmful, often self-destructive, behaviors.1 According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 21.5 million people aged 12 or older had a substance use disorder in the past year.2 Addiction can happen to anyone, regardless of ethnic background, financial status, or any other indicator. However, research shows that people who start drinking before the age of 15 are six times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than those who begin drinking at or after age 21.3

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Signs of addiction include the following: • Neglecting other activities: Spending less time on activities that used to be important (exercising, pursuing hobbies, etc.) because of the use of alcohol or drugs and/or drop in attendance and/or performance at work or school.4 • Risk- taking: More likely to take serious risks (ex. stealing) in order to obtain one’s drug of choice.4 • Relationship issues: People suffering from addiction often act out against those closest to them, especially if someone confronts their substance problems.4 • Changing appearance: Noticeable changes in physical appearance that cause concern, or lack of hygiene.4 • Tolerance: Over time, a person’s body adapts to a substance to the point that they need more and more of it in order to have the same reaction.4 • Withdrawal: As the alcohol or drug wears off, the person may experience symptoms such as anxiety or jumpiness, shakiness or trembling, sweating, nausea and vomiting, insomnia, depression, irritability, fatigue or loss of appetite and headaches.4 • Continued use despite negative consequences: Even though it is causing problems (on the job, in relationships, legal issues), a person continues the substance use.4

Can addiction be treated successfully? Yes. Addiction is a treatable, chronic disease that can be managed successfully. Treatment approaches must be tailored to address each patient’s drug-use patterns and drug-related medical, psychiatric and social problems.1 For more information on substance abuse prevention or a listing of local substance abuse treatment programs, visit the Casa Grande Alliance website at casagrandealliance.org, or call 520-836-5022.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


You would do anything for your friends...

but when it comes to medicine, sharing isn’t caring! Your meds are just for you. Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment Referrals 1460 N. Pinal Avenue Casa Grande, Arizona 85122 520-836-5022 www.CasaGrandeAlliance.org Facebook: CGAlliance | Twitter: @CG_Alliance


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

CHOOSING

2016 ANNUAL REPORT

YEAR AT-A-GLAN

CHOOSING

We are honored to be your healthcare choice and provide you with a facility that you trust 1800 E. Florence Blvd., Casa Grande to ensure you the highest to quality, most healthcare choice and provide you with a facility Wereceive are honored be your advanced, and mostto compassionate Why are right choice? trust ensure care youpossible. receive thewe the highest quality, most advanced, a Our approach to caring for our patients and families involves leading-edge compassionate care possible. Why are we the right choice? Our approach medical technology provided by an expert, experienced team who treats every for our patients and families involves leading-edge medical technology person with professionalism, respect and compassion. Banner Casa Grande experienced treatinnovative every person professionalism, respect and Medical Center has a proventeam historywho of bringing care intowith our communities that addresses the full range of healthCenter needs of the we serve.history We provide superior care you Grande Medical haspeople a proven ofthe bringing innovative care i expect from a hospital, and no needof to travel outside of your ownpeople community. addresses thethere fullisrange health needs of the we serve. We provide

NNUAL REPORT

YEAR AT-A-GLANCE

SING

from a hospital and there is no need to travel outside of your own community

healthcare choice and provide you with a facility that you eive the highest quality, most advanced, and most le. Why are we the right choice? Our approach to caring ilies involves leading-edge medical technology provided by an expert, at every person with professionalism, respect and compassion. Banner Casa s a proven history of bringing innovative 578 care into our communities that 395 99 550 346 health needs of the people we serve. We provide superior care you expect BCGMC BCGMC BCGMC BCGMC BCGMC BCGMC no need to travel outside of your own Physicians community. BOARD MEMBERS PHYSICIANS VOLUNTEERS Volunteers Board Members

642 BCGMC Employee

FROM OUR CEO, RONA CURPHY

Banner Casa Grande Medical experience. In addition to our ne Center had a big year in 2016. We broke ground on our new offer the following serv $14,210,771 IN CHARITY Women and Infant Services care, acute beds, out CARE Unit which is slated to open in 578 395 642 17 621 17 wound care, sleep studi Through all of the July 2017. We continue to focus CGMC BCGMC BCGMC Foundation BCGMC FOUNDATION changes in our facility in patient care,Members EMPLOYEES BOARD MEMBERS ysicians Volunteers on excellence Employees Board by providing the highest quality and the healthcare 76 THE MEDICAL, HEALTH &climate, WELLNESS EDITION SPRING 2018 service to our community. it • remains a RONA CURPHY CORRID OR LI LIVING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION GOLDEN CORRIDOR


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

SALARIES, WAGES & BENEFITS $52,828,473

2017 Statistics Number of Patients Admitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,477 Emergency Visits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46,689 Urgent Care Visits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23,780 Total Surgeries Performed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,609 Total daVinci Procedures Performed and Total daVinci XI Procedures Performed. . . . . . 364 Total Outpatient Visits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,539 Medical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 Salaries, Wages and Benefits. . . . . . . . . . . $52,828,473

165,848 POPULATION IN OUR SERVICE AREAS

AVERAGE DAILY PATIENT COUNT 73

707 BABIES BORN

In 2017, Banner Casa Grande Medical Center had: 346 Volunteers Contribute 35,068 Hours of Service

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

Volunteer Hours in Dollars $846,542

Value to BCGMC Staff, Patients & Guests… PRICELESS!!!

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT

YEAR AT-A-GLANCE

Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

709

WHY CHOOSE BANNER CASA GRANDE MEDICAL CENTER? 78 BABIES BORN

We are proud to serve the communities in our service area, which includes Florence, Coolidge, Eloy, Casa Grande, Maricopa, Arizona City, Stanfield, Sacaton and all of Pinal County. We focus on making the patient experience excellent— every patient, every encounter, every time. If we are not meeting your expectations, please contact our CEO, Rona Curphy at 520-3816519 or rona. curphy@bannerhealth. com.

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• 141-BED HOSPITAL • ALL PRIVATE ROOMS • 24-HOUR EMERGENCY $19,594,000 IN CHARITY SERVICES CARE

AVERAGE DAILY PATIENT COUNT

BCGMC IS PROUD TO RECORD BELOW THE NATIONAL AVERAGE FOR ALL REPORTABLE INFECTIONS! CENTRAL LINE ASSOCIATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS

C-DIFF

SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS

MRSA

CATHETER ASSOCIATED URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

BCGMC IS PROUD TO REGISTER BELOW THE NATIONAL AVERAGE ALL REPORTABLE INFECTIONS! • FOR COMPREHENSIVE

• STATE-OF-THEWOUND CARE WITH TWO ART TECHNOLOGY We are proud to serve the communities in our service area which HYPERBARIC OXYGEN Coolidge, Eloy, Casa Grande, Maricopa, Arizona city, Stanfield, Sacat • ROBUST TELEHEALTH County. We focus on making the patient experience excellent— ev THERAPY CHAMBERS encounter, every time. SERVICES If we are not meeting your expectations, please contact our CEO • ACCESS TO PERSONALIZED 520-381-6519 or rona.curphy@bannerhealth.com. • WOMEN & INFANT SERVICES HEALTH RECORD “MY WHY CHOOSE BANNER CASA GRANDE MEDICAL CENTER? WITH A CERTIFIED LEVEL II BANNER” NURSERY PROGRAM  178 BED HOSPITAL  ACCESS TO  ALL PRIVATE ROOMS  • BANNER CORE CENTER RATE FOR HEALTH REC LOW INFECTION • INTERVENTIONAL CARDIAC  24-HOUR EMERGENCY ORTHOPEDICS BANNER” URGENT CARE OPEN 365 PROGRAM SERVICES  • COMPREHENSIVE REHAB  LOW INFECT  STATE-OF-THE-ART SERVICES WITH PHYSICAL, DAYS OF THE YEAR  URGENT CA • BANNER CORE CENTER FOR TECHNOLOGY DAYS OF TH OCCUPATIONAL AND SPEECH  ROBUST TELEHEALTH  ‘B’ LEAPFRO THERAPIES (INPATIENT & • ‘A’ LEAPFROG SAFETY SCORE ORTHOPEDICS

 BASE HOSP SERVICES OUTPATIENT) BASE HOSPITAL FOR EMS PROVIDERS • COMPREHENSIVE REHAB  WOMEN & INFANT SERVICES  • COMPREHENSIVE WOUND  CARE FROM WITH A CERTIFIED LEVEL II CARE WITH TWO PROVIDERS SERVICES WITH PHYSICAL, NURSERY OCCUPATIONAL AND SPEECH HYPERBARIC OXYGEN • CARE FROM THE HEART  INTERVENTIONAL CARDIAC THERAPY CHAMBERS THERAPIES (INPATIENT & OUTPATIENT)

CORRID OR LI LIVING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION GOLDEN CORRIDOR

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Community Resource Guide Banner Casa Grande Medical Center, part of the nonprofit Banner Health, is a regional medical center boasting the neighborhood convenience of a community hospital while leveraging the clinical expertise of one of the nation’s leading health systems. The state-of-the-art facility cares for patients through all phases of life, offering adult and pediatric Emergency and Trauma Care, Women’s Care, Maternity Services, Surgical Care, Orthopedics, Laboratory Services, Medical Imaging, Rehabilitation, and more. Located at 1800 E. Florence Boulevard in Casa Grande, the hospital serves Casa Grande, Coolidge, Eloy, Arizona City, Florence, Maricopa and other communities in Pinal County. It is integrated with the nationally recognized Banner Medical Group, bringing primary care, pediatric, orthopedic and surgical specialists to Pinal County. Banner Urgent Care in Casa Grande serves patients who need immediate medical attention, but whose conditions don’t require emergency medical care.

BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande


Community Resources Banner Casa Grande Medical Center Emergency & Trauma Care Banner Casa Grande operates a comprehensive Emergency Department, providing emergency medicine and trauma care to adult and pediatric patients. Our Emergency Department is pediatric-certified. Cardiology Services The cardiac catheterization lab provides lifesaving medical care, including stent placement and balloon angioplasty, to stop or prevent heart attacks. Surgical Care Banner Casa Grande’s hallmark surgical program features eight operating suites equipped with advanced medical technology and the latest in surgical robotics, including the da Vinci Xi® Surgical System, enabling surgeons to provide minimally invasive inpatient and outpatient surgery in the areas of: • Cardiology • Gastrointestinal/digestive health • General Surgery • Gynecology • Nephrology • Orthopedics • Podiatry • Urology Orthopedics Expert orthopedic care is delivered through the Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics at Banner Casa Grande, a collaboration between Banner Health and The CORE Institute. Gastroenterology Digestive health is essential to one’s overall health and well-being. Banner

BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande

Casa Grande offers a wide range of inpatient gastrointestinal health services to treat conditions such as: • Diverticulitis • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) • Inflammatory bowel disease • Irritable bowel syndrome • Gallbladder or liver disease Imaging Services Onsite inpatient and outpatient medical imaging services, including: • Bone Densitometry • Computed tomography (CT Scan) • Image-guided biopsies and procedures • Interventional radiology • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) • Positive Emission Tomography (PET/ CT Scan) • Ultrasound • X-ray • Digital and 3-D mammography for screening and diagnosis • Breast ultrasound & breast MRI • Stereotactic biopsy, ultrasoundguided biopsy and needle localization Patient Amenities Ensuring a true family and patientcentered healing environment, Banner Casa Grande features 141 private hospital rooms that include recliners for visiting family members, telephones and wireless internet access. The campus also offers an outdoor courtyard, gift shop, cafeteria and retail pharmacy to make the hospital experience more comfortable and convenient. Hospital meals are served via a room service dining program that enables patients to choose from menu selections based on their individual dietary requirements and preferences.


Special Section: Banner

Wound Care & Hyperbaric Services Each year, approximately 6.5 million Americans will suffer from chronic wounds caused by diabetes, circulatory problems or many other conditions. The Banner Casa Grande Medical Center Wound Center is a comprehensive outpatient center designed for the treatment of non-healing difficult wounds. Patients are managed by a qualified team of physicians and nurses certified in the care of acute and chronic wounds. A robust wound clinic treats chronic and slow-healing wounds using dressing changes, skin grafts, and advanced therapies such as: • Hyperbaric oxygen therapy to promote healing through increased oxygen intake • Negative-pressure wound therapy, commonly called a wound VAC, to promote healing by decreasing pressure on a wound. Conditions Treated • Diabetic and other problem wounds • Arterial insufficiency ulcer • Compromised grafts and flaps • Necrotizing soft tissue infections • Carbon monoxide poisoning • Crush injury and traumatic ischemia • Venous stasis ulcers • Gas gangrene • Chemical or thermal burns • Air or gas embolism • Radiation tissue damage

• • • • • •

Venomous spider bites Osteomyelitis (refractory) Compartment syndrome Post-radiation tissue injury Pressure ulcers Post-operative wounds

Don’t let a wound that won’t heal keep you from kicking up your heels. Sometimes, wounds don’t heal as quickly as they should. If not treated, these wounds can cause additional problems. At Banner Casa Grande Wound Center, we will create an individualized care plan, including the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy if needed, to speed up healing. We’ll help you feel confident to effectively care for these wounds in between visits and get you back in the swing of things.

Wound Care Appointments: (520) 381-6150 Mon - Fri 7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

The center is designed to provide highly individualized care, where the patient and family participate in the creation of the care plan and are given the necessary education to care for their wound between visits.

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Community Resources Urgent and Provider Care Urgent Care Whether it’s a sprained ankle, a cough or something in between, Banner Urgent Care provides the care you need when you need it. While no appointment is necessary, you can schedule an arrival time using an online reservation system to save your spot in line and minimize your time spent in the waiting room. Access the online check-in/reservation tool from your desktop computer, smartphone or tablet at BannerHealth.com/ UrgentCare. Banner Urgent Care, open daily from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., accepts most insurance plans. Affordable cashpay (no insurance) options are available and include X-ray and most laboratory services. Banner Urgent Care treats such illnesses and injuries as: • Abdominal pain • Allergies • Animal bites

BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Asthma Broken Bones Conjunctivitis (pink eye) Cough Cuts or lacerations requiring stitches Dehydration and heat exhaustion Diarrhea Ear infection Fever Flu, including flu shots and other vaccinations Headaches Minor burns Minor head injures Minor infections Nose bleeds Rash and skin irritations Respiratory infections Shortness of breath Simple fractures Sinus infections Sore throat Sprained joints Urinary tract infections (UTI) Vomiting Work injuries

(continued)

Banner Medical Group Banner Medical Group primary care physicians and advanced practice providers are based at Banner Health Centers and Clinics throughout Pinal County and Banner Health medical centers. Physicians at these locations provide a wide range of health services that span: • Family medicine • General Surgery • Internal Medicine • Orthopedics • Pediatrics • Primary care • Sports Medicine • Women’s care They also work closely with specialists to address specific health issues such as those related to: • Behavioral health • Cardiology • Gastroenterology • Nephrology • Pulmonology • Urology


Rehabilitation Services Banner Casa Grande’s evidence-based approach to rehabilitation helps patients achieve the best possible medical outcomes in the most efficient and effective manner. It is the only facility in Pinal County to offer three disciplines of adult and pediatric rehabilitation: physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech- language pathology.

We have over 250 years combined Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy Services. Physical Therapy • Orthopedics • Neurologic Conditions • BIG® Certified • Pediatric Orthopedic Vestibular Therapy • Dizziness, Balance Issues, Vertigo Speech Language Pathologists • Loud® Certified • Swallowing Disorders • Cognitive Rehab • Pediatric Speech and Language Therapy • Modified Barium Swallow Studies Occupational Therapy • Upper extremity Rehab • Pediatric orthopedic • Neurologic Conditions We treat patients of all ages Se Habla Español We accept most insurance plans

The right therapy, right here at home. Rehabilitation therapy is one of the key ways to get people back on the road to good health. Fortunately, you have convenient and effective physical, occupational and speech therapy right in your hometown. Upon referral from a physician, you’ll be evaluated by an experienced therapist and an individualized treatment plan will be customized to meet your specific needs so you can get back to enjoying life as quickly as possible.

Appointments: (520) 381-6326 • Physician referral is necessary.

Mike Skrowroneck, Director of Rehab Services says, “All of our patients receive personalized, hands-on training by experienced clinicians all while staying in Casa Grande. Our mission is to make health care easier so life can be better.”

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Sleep Lab The sleep lab blends state-of-the-art technology and equipment with an atmosphere that feels like a hotel to diagnose and provide treatment recommendations for virtually all sleep disorders. This comprehensive outpatient sleep facility is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and staffed by sleep medicine experts who are committed to helping patients rest easy. Banner Casa Grande Sleep Center works with the people of our community throughout the whole sleep experience. Testing is a part of what we do, but we also provide local customer support for those of you in the community on CPAP therapy.

Do you dream of getting a good night’s sleep? Approximately 22 million Americans suffer from a disorder known as sleep apnea. Fortunately, the sleep center at Banner Casa Grande diagnoses and treats Obstructive Sleep Apnea and other sleep disorders in children and adults. • Are you tired and doze off during the day? • Do you snore? • Have you been told you stop breathing during sleep? • Do you have high blood pressure? • Is your neck size larger than 16 inches (for women) or 17 inches (for men)? If so, it may be time to put your sleep problems to rest. We can examine your sleep issues at home or with an overnight sleep study at our center. Ask your doctor if a sleep study is right for you or your child.

Sleep Center Appointments: (520) 381-6423

“We are here to make your sleep better.”

– Dr. Rajeesh Punnakkattu, Medical Director Sleep Lab and Darrell Mason, Respiratory Supervisor.

BECAUSE

BECAUSE YOU DON’T YOU DON’T

SICK ON GET SICKGET ON SCHEDULE.

SCHEDULE. Open 9am - 9pm • 7 days a week 1676 E. McMurray Blvd, Casa Grande

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BECAUSE 8 a.m. to -99pm p.m.• 7 days a week Open 9am 1676 E. McMurray Blvd, Casa Grande

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Women & Infant Services

Women’s Center

Childbirth & Breastfeeding Classes 2018

Childbirth Class OB Childbirth Preparation Classes will give you the knowledge, tools and techniques to help you face your “labor day” with confidence. You will also tour Banner Casa Grande Women’s Center. Please dress comfortably. Snacks and water will be provided, but feel free to bring food. Bring “Parent’s to Be” booklet (received from your doctor) and two large pillows. CLASS DATES Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. February 24, 2018 April 7, 2018 May 19, 2018 June 30, 2018

August 11, 2018 September 15, 2018 October 27, 2018 December 8, 2018

Breastfeeding Class What is your motivation to breastfeed your baby?Location Come explore how breastfeeding can help you develop your own unique mothering OB/GYN Care Childbirth Class Banner Casa Grande style. You will learn how to: OB Childbirth will give you the knowledge, tools and Center • Help breastfeeding get off to a great start in Medical those vital first hours and Banner CasaPreparation Grande deliversClasses family- centered maternity days of your baby’sthe life.course, care fromto obstetrician/gynecologists otherday” with confidence. techniques help you face your and “labor During 1800 E. Florence Blvd • Ways to establish a full milk supply. health and newborn care experts. They create you women’s will learn: • Positioning and latching baby for feedings. 1st Floor individualized birthing plans that take into  What to expect during your hospital stay • How to work through some of the bumps of breastfeeding. account the childbirth wishes and labor and delivery Casa Grande, AZ  What is mothers-to-be happening inside body during labor and delivery • How to know your baby is getting enough milk. needs of and theiryour unborn babies. 85122 • Reading hunger cues.  Choices and options for yourself and your baby • How to continue to breastfeeding after returning to work or school. Newborn  Ways to be Care active during labor

Childbirth & Breastfeeding Classes 2018

     

Comfort techniques labor Newborns at Banner Casafor Grande are cared for in their mother’s roomand to help promote family bonding and Medication epidurals provide opportunities Cesarean births for breastfeeding support in our state-of-the-art womens center. Relaxation and breathing What to expect in your baby’s few days A four-bed Level II Special Care Nurseryfirst led by neonatologists and neonatal nurse practitioners Your body after childbirth

CLASS DATES Saturdays, 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. February 24, 2018 April 7, 2018 May 19, 2018 June 30, 2018

For more information, please call (520)381-6300 or August 11, 2018 visit us online at September 15, 2018 OctoberBannerhealth.com/ 27, 2018 December 8, 2018 casagrande

provides round-the-clock care for newborn babies who (Breastfeeding class taught in conjunction with Pinal County WIC) require more attention than can be provided in the You mother’s will alsoroom. tour Banner Casa Grande Women’s Center. Please dress comfortably. Register Today Snacks and water will be provided, but feel free to bring food. Bring “Parent’s to Registration is Be” booklet (received from your doctor) and two large pillows. for the pregnant woman (the support person is included). All patients must Location: register by calling 800-230-CARE (2273).

ClassBanner Dates Casa Grande Medical Center 1800 E. Florence Blvd 1st Floor Saturdays 8:30 Casa a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Grande, AZ 85122

Classes take place in the Discovery Room, which is located across the hospital cafeteria. Questions can be addressed by Ruth Ann at (520)381-6543. Please leave a brief message August 11, 2018 February 24, 2018 and she will return your call. For more information, please call (520) 381-6300 or visit September 15, 2018 Aprilus7,online 2018 at Bannerhealth.com/casagrande

May 19, 2018 June 30, 2018

October 27, 2018 December 8, 2018

BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande


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N Verbena Henness Rd.

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N Porter Rd. W Farrell Rd.

U

nw

oo

d

E McMurray Blvd.

Rd

.

Maricopa, AZ

H 287

Henness Rd.

N Arizola Rd.

Note: Map is not to Scale

N Peart Rd.

Florence Blvd.

Banner Health Serving Pinal County, including Casa Grande, Coolidge, Eloy, Florence, Arizona City and Maricopa H Banner Casa Grande Medical Center 1800 E. Florence Blvd. Casa Grande, AZ 85122

(520) 381-6300 U

Banner Urgent Care

Banner Children’s Specialists 1811 E. McMurray Blvd. Casa Grande, AZ 85122

Urology – (480) 412-7474 Cardiology – (480) 412-6336

1676 E. McMurray Blvd., Suite 1 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

Banner Health Clinic Casa Grande

Open daily from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

(520) 374-6530 Specialties Family Medicine, Primary Care & Orthopedics

(520) 316-0688

Banner Occupational Health Clinic 1676 E. McMurray Blvd., Suite 2 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

(520) 381-6783

Banner Health Coumadin Clinic

1811 E. McMurray Blvd. Casa Grande, AZ 85122

Banner Health Clinic 1828 E. Florence Blvd. Casa Grande, AZ 85122

(520) 381-6787

(520) 876-4006 Specialties General Surgery

Banner Children’s Banner Health Clinic

Banner Casa Grande Outpatient Services

(520) 374-6605

Rehabilitation – (520) 381-6326 Medical Imaging – (520) 381-6700 Breast Center – (520) 381-6745 Sleep Center – (520) 381-6423

1676 E. McMurray Blvd., Suite 3 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

1760 E. Florence Blvd., Suite 100 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

Specialties Pediatrics

Banner Wound Center at Banner Casa Grande Medical Center 1800 E. Florence Blvd. Casa Grande, AZ 85122

(520) 381-6150

BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande

1828 E. Florence Blvd. Casa Grande, AZ 85122

Banner Health Center Maricopa 17900 N. Porter Road Maricopa, AZ 85138

(520) 233-2500


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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

HOOCH AND YOUR POOCH by Gigi McWhirter

L

ife may be like a box of chocolates, but chocolate mixed with marijuana can be a toxic combination for your pet. Animal poison control centers have reported an increase of toxic reactions since marijuana has become legalized in more and more states. Whether pot is being used for medicinal or recreational purposes, it is THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) that gets humans high. Because house pets are (usually) smaller than their humans, it can take less THC for them to have a bad reaction. The more THC ingested by an animal, the higher the risk for a dangerous effect. In some cases, it may even result in death. Ingestion can come in several forms, including consuming goodies baked with pot, second-hand smoke, eating your secret stash, chewy hooch-infused candies and chocolates and marijuana based butters or oils. Besides the missing brownies or the chewed up ganja bag, signs that the cat, dog or other pet is having a bad reaction to marijuana can include: • Lethargy • Vomiting • Incontinence • Abnormal heart rate • Staggering or loss of balance • Low blood pressure • Coma • Death – if large amounts have been consumed If you notice any of the above symptoms, or if you suspect your animal is having a negative reaction, please contact a veterinarian or poison control immediately. Do not be afraid to advise the vet’s office that your pet has come into contact with marijuana or a marijuana-based product! It is essential for your pet’s care that you tell the doctor and the veterinary staff about your concerns. If possible, bring what you think your pet has gotten into with you – especially anything purchased from a legal source and those containing labels noting the ingredients and THC levels. Before giving pot in any form to any animal, talk to a veterinarian, even if you think your pet could benefit from cannabis for medicinal purposes. According to Dr. Douglas

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CORRID OR LI LIVING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION GOLDEN CORRIDOR

The more THC ingested by an animal, the higher the risk for a dangerous effect. In some cases, it may even result in death. Kramer, in an article for the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), “We need to investigate marijuana further to determine whether the case reports I’m hearing are true or whether there’s a placebo effect at work.” Remember, unless prescribed by a licensed

veterinarian, and not Dr. Google or the person at the dispensary counter, it is important that you keep the hooch from the pooch – and all the other animals, too! Happy tails to you!

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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LUXURY CRUISES INCLUDE MORE SPACE AND STAFF TO PAMPER YOU by Tori Ward, ROX Travel, Cruise and Resort Specialist • Photos by Jerry Chinn

M

y husband, who is the most romantic man I’ve ever met, surprised me a few years ago with a luxury cruise through Russia. Full disclosure: The trip was a bribe to get me to go on a tent safari in Africa. It worked, and we both learned something valuable about each trip. While we don’t mind roughing it if need be, we will spring for luxury when possible and not feel a pang of remorse. About half of the cruises I book are for clients looking to have an experience that will exceed the standard trip. Some want that experience to start before they walk out the door. It can include a luggage service that collects bags before leaving home with delivery upon return, or a limousine service can be arranged for home to airport and airport to ship transfers. It can also include a private charter jet to the embarkation port and then back home, although truthfully, I haven’t had any clients ask me to book a private jet yet. Call me if you want to be the first. What exactly separates a typical cruise experience from a luxury one? Of course, price is the main factor. So, what does the

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additional price buy in terms of real estate, amenities and convenience? Well remember that romantic husband I mentioned. He recently surprised me with a recommitment ceremony aboard the luxury ship, MS Paul Gauguin. She’s a small 332-passenger vessel that specializes in the waters of French Polynesia. Included in the price of the cruise was round-trip airfare from L.A., complimentary water-sports equipment use, over the top gourmet French meals and complimentary beverages, wine and sprits. Although the ceremony didn’t happen until half way through the cruise, the entire experience was special from the moment we arrived at the ship. There was never any waiting in line or looking for a waiter to fill a glass. Pampered luxury highlighted the entire trip, starting with tropical flowers and champagne awaiting us when we entered our suite. Although the Paul Gauguin only sails the South Pacific, there are many cruise lines classified as luxury brands. Similar to land accommodations, one of the biggest differences in a luxury cruise is space – and not just the size of the stateroom, but also the amount of

space allotted per guest throughout the ship. Guests rarely stand in line waiting to be seated in a restaurant. Guest suites are appointed with fine linens and distinctive furnishing. Most of the suites include balconies, and Avalon configures its guest rooms so beds are angled to face the windows. Some of the most luxurious ships are smaller and look more elegant than enormous ocean ships. But large ocean vessels can certainly be considered “luxury liners,” with Cunard’s Queen Mary 2 being one of the most distinctive. However, most of the luxury lines are smaller vessels with fewer passengers and few, if any, children on board. The dining experience on a luxury cruise is much more refined, with celebrity chefs often coordinating menus and gourmet choices. Specialty dining venues guests pay for on a standard cruise are often included on luxury ships. To complement the dining experience, the inclusion of beer, wine and spirits separate a traditional cruise, where beverage packages require a separate charge, from a luxury one. Some lines, such as Seabourn and Silversea, provide premium beverages while

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Traveling • Dining • Entertainment WI-FI

AIR FARE

BEVERAGES

INCLUSIVE TOURS

GRATUITIES INCLUDED

CRYSTAL ESPRIT

No

No

Premium included

Some included

Yes

REGENT SEVEN SEAS

Yes

International business air included

Premium included

All tours included

Yes

SILVERSEA

1 hour free and more in higher suite categories

No

Premium included

Some in some regions

Yes

SEABOURN

No

No

Premium included

Some in some regions

Yes

VIKING OCEAN

Yes

No

Included beer and wine

At least 1 in every port included

Yes

Top 5 All Inclusive Luxury Cruise Lines updated September 2017, according to Cruise Critic.

others require you to purchase the more expensive brands. Another feature that luxury cruises provide is the amount of attention each guest receives. Staff-to-guest ratio is high, so that guest pampering is expected and gratuities are usually already bundled into the fare. According to Cruise Critic, Crystal Cruise Esprit has the highest staff-to-guest ratio of any ship, with more than one staff member assigned to each guest and the maximum guest capacity at 62 on the yacht. Each guest enjoys a suite with butler service, a fully stocked bar and other high-end amenities. SeaDream Yacht Club, another yachting cruise line, also has a high staff ratio serving the 112 guests on its two ships. You may also charter the yacht to have a more intimate experience. The inclusion of business class airfare in the price of the cruise package is another enhancement of a luxury cruise experience. Although this isn’t an offer that all of the top-tier cruise lines provide, many do include discounted business air or free economy air in the price of their vacations. Some cruise lines, such as Viking, have promotional offers that include air travel at times during the year. Airport transfers at the start and conclusion of the cruise are typically included. Of all the charges that passengers pay for on a cruise, the one that receives the biggest complaint is the fee for internet access. AmaWaterways, Viking and Uniworld offer

free internet, while others may, at least, provide a few complimentary minutes. Finally, the inclusion of some or all of the port excursions is a feature that often brings the luxury cruise fare closer to what a passenger will end up paying when the cost of excursions is factored into the final cost of the cruise. With all the inclusions and enhancements offered on a luxury cruise, clients often are surprised that for a few dollars more they could have had a much more luxurious experience. If you’d like to explore your options, I would be happy to help you select a cruise to

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

meet your budget. We’ve worked hard, saved and invested. Now it’s time to invest in pampered pleasure. Tahiti was a paradise in which to experience a luxury cruise, and in the next issue we’ll travel around French Polynesia with a layover for a few days in the Hawaiian Islands. Victoria “Tori” Ward is a cruise and resort specialist with an interest in traveling and seeing the world since she first began to crawl. For more information on these tips and others, contact Tori at tori@roxtravel.com or 928-254-9968.

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“OURTHETOWN” GREAT AMERICAN CLASSIC by Corianna Lee “The goal is to find our own community vision in the process, to define our own little neck of the desert” Ferguson said.

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T

he popular, Pulitzer Prizewinning drama “Our Town” by Thornton Wilder is coming to the Pence Center of the Performing Arts at Central Arizona College on April 6, 7 and 8. The production is being produced by Blackbox Foundation in conjunction with Central Arizona College, and will feature a cast of Pinal County locals, directed by Blackbox Foundation’s Ken Ferguson. The play nostalgically represents what was known as “small-town America” and tells the story through the everyday lives of the residents of the fictional town of “Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire” in a time period spanning 1901 to 1913. The main character is the stage

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • FUN!

manager, who relates the story to the audience directly, as if it were a memory. Typically this play is performed on a bare stage with the performers pantomiming without the use of props. The production is in three acts, and quickly draws the audience members into the story. With the poignant love story of a young couple growing up in “Grover’s Corners” and characters that can be recognized in so many small towns, this production resonates with those who have ever lived in a small town. There are so many themes explored, such as love, mortality, friendship and others. “The goal is to find our own community vision in the process, to define our own little neck of the desert” Ferguson said.

Blackbox Foundation chose “Our Town” because it is such an American classic. “We wanted to explore the sense of community by doing a show that allowed many ensemble players as part of telling the story.”Ferguson said. Blackbox strives to provide a positive experience on stage, whether an actor is a first-time performer or a seasoned veteran. “Our Town” was a story and production that clearly met that vision. “Our Town” will be performed April 6, 7 and 8 at Central Arizona College’s Pence Center for the Arts. Tickets are $12. For more information contact Blackbox Foundation at blackboxaz. com or Central Arizona College at eventsatcac.org.

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


PINAL COUNTY FAIR BRINGS FUN, FOOD AND FESTIVITIES

Don’t Forget to Enter Items for Judging

G

et ready for a week of fun as the Pinal County Fair brings five days of fun and celebration with something for everyone! Gates officially open March 21 and close March 25. Music is always a big part of the fair. Headline entertainment is shaping up to be a great lineup! Be sure to watch the website for the official announcement of upcoming acts. Don’t miss The Big Blue Bear! She rides along in a miniature car with her friend Nancy. Balloon Artist Steven Rosen will be at the fair all five days. Awesome creations of all kinds will thrill onlookers. Lots of magic will be on hand with Godfrey the Magician and Adam the Great! Be sure to participate in this year’s fair by entering an item for judging. Jams, Jellies, quilts,

photographs and more will be on display. No matter what your hobby, we’d like you to enter. See how your talents stack up against your neighbors. Exhibitors from 4-H and the general public work all year to compete for the coveted blue ribbon, which comes with bragging rights. At only $8 for adults and $4 for children ages 6-12, everyday admission to the fair is a bargain when you consider that all the shows are free. Budget-conscious guests are encouraged to take advantage of the several discounts the fair offers, from free admission and rides for youth readers to discount senior day and free military admission. Save on unlimited rides by purchasing your ticket in advance! Additional discounts are available with details online at the fair’s website: pinalfairgrounds.com

SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI V ING FUN! • GOLDEN

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PINAL COUNTY PRESS HOME

A R I Z ONA C I T Y • C A S A GR A N DE • CO OL ID GE • E L OY • F L OR E NC E • M A R ICOPA

CONTINUED…

Find. Buy. Protect. Protecting Your

Property Rights Title & Escrow Services Commercial Service 1031 Exchange

Direct Title Services Account Servicing

Land Development/Trust

421 E. Cottonwood Lane Casa Grande, AZ 85122 Office: 520.426.4600 I Fax: 520.426.4699 Email: latisha.sopha@titlesecurity.com

www.titlesecurity.com

The school where everybody knows your name!

VISION

Every student will be prepared to succeed at the nation's top institutions of higher learning.

STAFF

15 Highly Qualified and caring teacher 7 Administrators and supportive Office Staff

PARTNERSHIPS

• AVID (Advancement via Individual Determination • YE (Youth Entrepreneurs) • CAC (Central Arizona College) • CAVIT ( Central Arizona Valley Institute of Technology)

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Exceeded CGUHS, VGHS and the Pinal County passing rates for AzMERIT in both Reading & Math. • National Mathleague qualifiers three years in a row. • Student who placed 2nd in State at the Speech and Debate competition.

Spring is springing in Eloy

A

s spring gets into high gear around Pinal County, the City of Eloy continues to advance some very important projects, said Eloy City Manager Harvey Krauss.

Fiber A network of fiber cable is being extended through the Eloy region. City offices will be connected and operational within 45 days after the project starts.

Transit Service City staff, Sun Corridor Metropolitan Planning Or-

ganization and its consultant are in the initial stages of a comprehensive feasibility study to bring transit service to the Eloy area.

City Hall The city’s development team is working through the guaranteed maximum price and looking forward to a groundbreaking in April 2018.

Street Improvements The city’s public works department will soon be designing and reconstructing portions of Phoenix Avenue and selected cross streets

to continue its program of improving Eloy’s roads.

Adopt A Street The city sponsors a spring clean-up of the street rights-of-way that have been adopted by its residents and businesses. This event will occur on Saturday, April 21. Anyone can volunteer – meet at North Park at 7 a.m.

Additional Residents The City Council has recently approved another final plat in Robson Ranch for 80 new homes.

ATHLETICS

Football, Volleyball (Conference Champions), Cheerleading, Cross Country, Basketball (3 on All-State team), Wrestling, E-Sports, Soccer (2nd in State), Softball, Track & Field (Individual State Champions)

CLUBS

Student Council, National Honor Society, Bowling, Ping Pong, World Travel Club, Rodeo, SADD, Yearbook

Mission Heights Preparatory High School

1376 E. Cottonwood Ln., Casa Grande, AZ 85122 (520) 836-9383 • www.mhprep.com

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GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


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512 E. COTTONWOOD LANE, CASA GRANDE • 520-836-9867

Casa Grande's Oldest and Finest Mexican Restaurant Serving the Valley since 1950

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THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


Puzzles Sudoku

Word Search

Answers to puzzles on page 69 SPRING 2018 • THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI V ING FUN! • GOLDEN

97


Library Creative Writing Contest

Casa Grande Public Library

CREATIVE WRITING CONTEST WINNER

T

he Vista Grande Public Library Creative Writing Contest is an ongoing monthly contest where children write stories at the library’s Creative Writing Station. Each monthly winner gets his or her picture taken and placed on the Creative Writing Hall of Fame, receives a free book of his or her choosing from the creative writing cart and gets the winning story published in Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine. Youth can also write stories

at home and submit them to the library. Winners are selected by library staff members, who read through monthly submissions and choose the one that stands out, based on creative merit. Vista Grande Public Library has hosted this contest since 2013, and receives hundreds of submissions every year. The Creative Writing Station is a fun way to get kids involved in writing and storytelling by allowing them to write about whatever they want and making it a fun experience.

December Winner

The Swap

by Christina Stueland

O

ne day in the pond, a fish thought to herself, “I should like to be a bird someday.” The fish swam around the pond looking for a wish. Meanwhile, a bird in the sky thought to himself, “I hope to be a fish.” So he flew around looking for a wish. In the pond, the fish found herself a very pretty wish. The wish was also very nice. “What wish will you wish, fish?” The wish jingled. The fish was very pleased. “I want to be a bird!” she cried. The wish sparkled and then the fish disappeared. In the sky, the bird found a wish. It was very nice too. “What wish will you wish, bird?” it asked. The bird didn’t wait a second. “I want to be a fish!” he cried.

Have your child stop by the Vista Grande Library in Casa Grande to enter the Golden Corridor LIVING essay contest!

The wish sparkled and the bird disappeared. Meanwhile, the fish reappeared in the sky as a bird. Right away she was terrified. She found a wish and wished to be a fish. In the pond, the bird-now a fish-was so scared. He found a wish and wished to be a bird. Both of them never swapped again. 98

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • FUN!

THE MEDICAL, HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITION • SPRING 2018


your local full servicetravel agency

! y a d o T l l a C 442 W. Kortsen Rd., Ste.101 • Casa Grande, AZ 85122

520.836.8517 • WWW.ROXTRAVEL.COM Peg@roxtravel.com • Jerry@roxtravel.com • Tori@roxtravel.com


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Profile for ROX Media Group

Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine  

Spring 2018

Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine  

Spring 2018