Page 1

ED Manager Wins Award. . . . . . . 38

Dental Questions Answered . . . . . 74

F.I.T. Give Chance a Chance. . . . . . 82

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

DARING DUO:

PHOTO BY NORMAN KENT

Skydivers Sara & Steve Curtis

SUMMER FUN WITH KIDS

MEDICAL HEALTH & WELLNESS SPECIAL SECTION

The Interview: Travis Robinette

Sun Life Family Health Center $4.95 Complimentary • Early Summer 2017

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA


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ED Manager Wins Award . . . . . . . 38

Dental Questions Answered . . . . 74

F .I .T . Give Chance a Chance . . . . . . 82

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

Contents

Early Summer 2017

THE MEDICAL EDITION MEDICAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

DARING DUO:

PHOTO BY NORMAN KENT

Skydivers Sara & Steve Curtis

SUMMER FUN WITH KIDS

SPECIAL SECTION

The Interview: Travis Robinette

Sun Life Family Health Center $4.95 Complimentary • Early Summer 2017

ARIZONA CIT Y • C A SA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • MARICOPA

Married couple and co-owners of Arizona Arsenal Sara and Steve Curtis embrace after landing from a jump with famous skydiving photographer Norman Kent. The jump was part of a series of approximately 60 jumps made in one day for Norman’s 60 Cycles Project where he shot around 60 portraits in the plane and in freefall for his 60th birthday. For more information on Norman Kent and his 60 Cycles Project go to http://www.normankent.com/norman.

NORMAN KENT

Features: The Casa Grande Herald

16

The LIVING Interview:

26

Medical, Health & Wellness Special Section

60

Travis Robinette, CEO Sun Life Family Health Center

Economy & Local Business

Health, Wealth & Education

Travel, Dining & Entertainment

What’s Developing in Eloy . . . . 19

Out & About. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

The Serendipity of F.I.T.. . . . . . . 82

Creating Healthy Communities Throughout Arizona . . . . . . . . . 30

The Importance of Early Childhood Development . . . . . 46

CG Chat Says… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Smart Home Technology. . . . . 36

Play Healthy: Student Athlete Success . . . . . 48

Economic Development Manager Wins Prestigious EDDE Award. . . 38

39 AZ Schools Earn A+ . . . . . . . 56

Community Arts Playing in the “Box”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 From the Witness Chair to Law School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92


PHOTO BY NORMAN KENT

About the Cover

SKYDIVING IN ELOY I

n Eloy, Arizona you may be aware that people are falling out of planes every day. Well, a lot more than that is happening in Eloy’s skydiving industry! Competitive teams, social events, world records and new and old businesses alike surround the jumpers that flock to our sunny state for skydiving training. Sara and Steve Curtis, of Arizona Arsenal, provide skydiving training to serious jumpers, both military and civilian, who come to Eloy and want to take their freefall skills to the next level. Arizona Arsenal was first known as the pioneering Vertical Formation Skydiving (VFS) team. VFS was developed in 2005 and is one of the most difficult competitive freefall disciplines. In VFS, jumpers must create formations falling at high speed fall rates in a head down or feet down orientation, rather than the traditional belly orientation. Over its years of competition, Arsenal won 12 National USPA medals, four World FAI medals and medals from many tunnel competitions all over the world. Even though they no longer train seriously, a group of Arsenal members recently got together in Virginia for a wind tunnel competition and

took home a spot on the podium. Now, the Arizona Arsenal is more known as a training school with many of the local skydiving greats joining them for a variety of projects and jobs to train military and civilians alike. They also do stunts for TV and movie projects that often require performing freefall maneuvers in costumes or falling with special objects. They have flown with pianos, tv sets, couches, trees, footballs, cars and dressed up as sports pros, animals and LA club-goers. In related Eloy business news, Sara Curtis joined with Amy Chmelecki of the Red Bull Airforce to create the Eloy-based company “Broken Records.” Broken Records is another skydiving company that trains groups of advanced skydivers in preparation for world records and similar advanced freefall projects. Sara and Amy, with the help of many other top skydiving organizers from around the world, have jointly organized nine world records involving hundreds of jumpers and representation from approximately 30 countries. Related to skydiving in Eloy, there are many long-time businesses that non-jumpers can

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

PHOTO BY NORMAN KENT

There’s a lot more happening than just falling out of planes!

take advantage of, even though they were started to support the skydiving industry. The Road Runner B&B, right near the Eloy Airport at the corner of Shedd and Tumbleweed roads, recently opened by Steve’s father Dan Curtis, is a great, new relaxing place to stay for jumpers wanting to be near Skydive Arizona or even just check out Pinal County. You might even get lucky and stay during one of Dan’s famous jam sessions, where local musicians get together and play modern, classic rock and country tunes. On the dropzone itself, you can enjoy lunch at the Bent Prop,

have your kids fly in the wind tunnel and shop for fun T-shirts and accessories at Square2. If healthy living is your thing, you can get a massage or take a private pilates class from Katharine Powell, LMT at the Toltec Wellness Center. Craig Amrine, LAc, from Hidden Rhythm Acupuncture in Tempe can also be found on some weekends at the TWC doing cold laser therapy, traditional Chinese acupuncture and dry needling. He has been a jumper for over 20 years. So,check out what the skydiving community and its local businesses have to offer next time you are in Eloy, Arizona!

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

9


Letter from the Editor

FROM THE IMMORTAL WORDS OF ALICE COOPER...

S Bea Lueck

chool’s out for summer – or it will be very shortly after this edition of Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine hits the street. Congratulations to the graduating class of 2017! Whether you are graduating from kindergarten or receiving your Ph.D. from a university, it is an exciting time for you as you begin a new chapter of your life. Congratulations are also in store for several institutions and individuals this edition. Pinal County Economic Development Manager Tim Kavanel recently received, from the Arizona Association for Economic Development, the prestigious EDDE award for Economic Developer of the Year, Small Community. For the second time, Villago Middle School has been recognized with an A+ School of Excellence award from the Arizona Educational Foundation. Five students from Central Arizona College were selected to the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society All Arizona Academic Team. And lastly,

CORRID OR LI VLIING GOLDEN CORRIDOR VING 10GOLDEN

• EDITOR LE T TER

Banner Casa Grande Medical Center was rated “B” from LEAPFROG. Read the details on these achievements in this issue! Normally this time of year, it’s a blast furnace. We have been blessed with moderate and almost frigid temperatures (at least to me!) for mid-May. It even SNOWED in Flagstaff – how crazy is that? Nonetheless, it will be over 110 very soon, and we will seek out every sliver of shade and coolness we can find. Summer is a time for family vacations as well as searching for fun ways to keep the kids entertained. Check out some of the fun ideas from our Facebook friends on CG Chat, starting on page 80. This edition is our Medical, Health & Wellness edition. You will find a wide variety of topics covered, from diet and exercise to pet health to colds/allergies and more. I find that with every special section we produce, I learn something I did not know before. I hope you do as well. This

issue my newfound fact is courtesy of Sun Life Family Health Center -- you can have a sore throat with allergies. If there is ever a topic you think would be of interest, please drop me an email (editor@roxco.com). I will close with a special thank you to Harold Kitching. This is Harold’s last issue as a contributing writer with Golden Corridor LIVING. He is once again claiming to retire. I will miss your curmudgeony emails, my friend (yes, I know that isn’t a real word but I like it when describing you!). Harold’s departure leaves a big gap in our ‘hard-news’ section. Or does it? Only time will tell – you know us, we ALWAYS have something in the works. Our readers will just need to pick up the next edition to see what we have in store. Until then – ENJOY!

–Bea


FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SHOW & ACTIVITIES JULY 4TH FAMILY FUN DAY AT THE POOL

July 4 Events

6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Paul Mason Sportsplex 2525 N Pinal Ave., Casa Grande

Palm Island Family Aquatics Park 1150 N. Brown Ave. Casa Grande $1 For Adults .50 Cents For Kids 17 and Under

4TH OF JULY FREEDOM FEST

3 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Heritage Park 600 N Main St. Coolidge

4TH OF JULY INDOOR PICNIC AND BINGO

10 a.m.

Dorothy Nolan Senior Center 330 N Pinal St., Florence $4

GREAT AMERICAN 4TH MARICOPA

6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Copper Sky Regional Park, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Blvd. Maricopa

ARIZONA CITY

6 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Held on July 3rd

Arizona City Golf Course 13939 S. Cleator Rd., Arizona City


VOICES PUBLISHER Elaine Earle, CPA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bea Lueck MANAGING EDITOR Katie Mayer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Harold Kitching Donna McBride ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES Debbie Cortez CREATIVE DIRECTOR/GRAPHIC DESIGN Tim Clarke GRAPHIC DESIGN Jake Pagano Tad Smith

Craig McFarland

Born and raised in California, Mayor McFarland has lived in Casa Grande since 2005. He is a graduate of California State University of Fresno, and retired from Golden Eagle Distributors in January 2015 as VP of Sales after a ten year run with the company, and 36 total years in beverage business sales management, marketing, and operations. McFarland began his first term as Mayor in December 2016.

Helen Neuharth

Helen was hired as the President/CEO of the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce in August 1991 and is a graduate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Institute for Organizational Management from Boulder, Colorado. Helen is an active member of the Arizona Chamber Executives.

DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER Chip Souza ADVERTISING INQUIRIES info@roxco.com COMMENTS & IDEAS editor@roxco.com CALENDAR INQUIRES calendar@roxco.com

Donna McBride

Donna McBride is the Program Administrator/Public Information Officer and Supervisor for the CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) Unit for Pinal County Juvenile Court . McBride is actively involved as a Board Member for Casa Grande Alliance, Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, BlackBox Foundation, Mayor’s Reading Program, Pinal County Town Hall Vice-Chair, Parks and Block Watch Captain for the Casa Grande Police Department. A freelance writer and photographer, Donna and husband Mike enjoy white water rafting, kayaking and spending time with their 2 sons and 3 grandchildren who live in the valley.

(520) 426-2074 442 W. Kortsen Rd, Ste 101 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

Harold Kitching

Harold has worked for newspapers across the country. He was city government reporter for the Casa Grande Dispatch for 11 years until he resigned after the newspaper began downplaying local news.

Golden Corridor LIVING is published by Raxx Direct Marketing. Editorial content is provided by affiliates of Raxx Direct Marketing, community members and local organizations. The publishers of Golden Corridor LIVING assume no responsibility for errors or omissions of any advertisement beyond the actual cost of the advertisement. In no event shall the publishers be liable for any consequential damages in excess of the cost of the advertisement. Golden Corridor LIVING shall not be liable for inaccuracies, errors, omissions, or damages from the use of information contained herein. Submitted articles do not reflect the opinions of the owners or management of Golden Corridor LIVING Information contained within submitted articles had not been verified for accuracy and readers are responsible for forming their own opinions. Real CORRID OR LIof V ING 12 GOLDEN estate information is as 5-1-17 and is subject to current availability and pricing.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


of the

Community

Evelyn Casuga

Evelyn Casuga CEcD, serves as Economic/ Community Development Advisor for Access Arizona, the area’s regional economic development foundation. Evelyn works part time at CAC and consults with the Center for the Future of Arizona, and other non-profit/private entities. She volunteers with numerous organizations in economic and community development throughout Arizona.

Breanna Boland

Breanna is the Executive Director of the Casa Grande Alliance. She started working for the organization in 2012 as a Prevention Specialist. Breanna studied Public Health at Northern Arizona University and is a Arizona Certified Prevention Specialist.

Jackie Paunil

Jackie is founder of Terra Medela: Personal Health Coaching. She earned her MFA at Texas Woman’s University and CHC from the Institute of Integrative Nutrition. Jackie coaches individuals in her private practice, as well as providing classes through the City of Casa Grande Parks & Recreation programming.

Tiffanie Grady-Gillespie CPT

Tiffanie is the owner of WickedFiTT, in Casa Grande, AZ. She is a well-known personal trainer, group fitness instructor, and all around fitness junkie. Tiffanie specializes in weight loss, strength and conditioning, and general fitness.

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

BUSINESS INDEX 100 Academy Mortgage - CG 31

Access Arizona

67

Agave Dentistry

53

American Family Ins-Hobbs

37

Annie-Mac Home Mortgage

73

Banner / CGRMC

4

Brutinel

50

Calvary Chapel of Casa Grande

51

Calvary Chapel of Casa Grande

39

Capital R Construction

49

Casa Grande Alliance

55

Casa Grande Elementary

69

Casa Grande Family Dentistry

52

Central Arizona College

5

Coldwell Banker ROX Realty

23

Coldwell Banker ROX Realty

35

Coldwell Banker ROX Realty

47

Coldwell Banker ROX Realty

57

Coldwell Banker ROX Realty

97

Coldwell Banker ROX Realty

7

Coldwell Banker ROX - Property Management

21

Cole & Leal

75

Desert Sky Dental

6

Desert Sun Heating, Cooling

62

Dick & Mitchell DDS

77

DM Family Dentistry

79

Doctor’s Choice Mobility & Medical Supplies

37

Elegance N Images

91

Eva’s Restaurant

32

Fitzgibbons Law Offices

33

Foothills Bank

2

Freeway Chevrolet

53

Grande Innovation Academy

81

Grande Innovation Academy

66

Kelsie Pate FNP-c Medical and Aesthetics

21

Mankel Mechanical

65

Oasis Pavilion Nursing & Rehabilitation

94

Ochoa’s Restaurant

37

Rich’s Auto Repair

45

ROX Casa Grande Insurance

81

Rox Travel CG

71

Sircle Pain Clinic

39

Star Towing

3

Sun Life Family Health Center

79

The Hearing Center

93

The Landmark Event Center

85

The Studio of Dance, LLC

91

Title Security

53

Window Tinting By Rosie

70

Yang and Horsley Dentistry GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

13


Submit your events online at goldencorridorliving.com MAY

2

6

13

AUCTION AT WESTERN TRADING POST - 10:00 AM - Western Trading post 403 N. Florence St., Casa Grande

21

2

BENT PROP IN AUGMENTED REALITY - 5:00 PM-11:00 PM Bent Prop Dallon & Cookery 4828 N Taylor St., Eloy

8

13

23

3

10

13

11

13

12

14

13

16

13

20

GUITAR RECITAL - 7:00 PM CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS - 9:30 AM-11:30 AM - Vista Grande High School 1556 N Arizola Rd., Casa Grande ROCKTACULAR ON STAGE - 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge

4

ATHLETIC BANQUET - 6:30 PM-10:30 PM - Vista Grande High School 1556 N Arizola Rd., Casa Grande

4

FFA 81ST ANNUAL BANQUET - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Coolidge High School 684 W Northern Ave., Coolidge

4

BREAKFAST WITH THE MAYOR - 7:30 AM-8:30 AM - Artisan Village 351 N Arizona Blvd., Coolidge Free For Members $5 Non Members

5

DANCE CONCERT FEATURING MIDDLE OF SOMEWHERE 7:00 PM - CAC - 8470 N Overfield Rd., Coolidge

5

SPRING DANCE CONCERT 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Coolidge Performing Arts Center 684 W Northern Ave., Coolidge

5

GOLF TOURNAMENT - ASU PREP ACADEMY - 8:00 AM Francisco Grande Resort-12684 Gila Bend Hwy, Casa Grande

14

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

SPRING BAND CONCERT - 6:30 PM-7:30 PM - Vista Grande High School 1556 N Arizola Rd., Casa Grande LADIES NIGHT OUT & FASHION SHOW - 6:00 PM8:00 PM - Old Town Ale House 412 N Florence St., Casa Grande RECOGNITION NIGHT - 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Casa Grande Union High School 2730 N Trekell Rd., Casa Grande

SUSAN J KOMEN FUNDRAISER - 6:30 PM9:00 PM - Old Town Ale House 412 N Florence St., Casa Grande NFOCUS: LIVE MUSIC - 5:00 PM - Paramount Theatre 420 N. Florence St., Casa Grande Presale:$25 At Door $30 SPRING CONCERT - 1:00 PM-4:00 PM - Casa Grande Union High School 2730 N Trekell Rd., Casa Grande

13

SPRING CONCERT - 7:00 PM-10:00 PM - Casa Grande Union High School 2730 N Trekell Rd., Casa Grande

BRIDAL FAIR - 11:00 AM-3:00 PM - Robson Ranch-5750 N. Robson Blvd., Eloy LADIES NIGHT AT THE SPA - 5:00 PM-8:00 PM - Bay of Islands Massage & Spa 992 E Cottonwood Ln Ste 107 MOVIE IN THE PARK - 6:30 PM-9:30 PM - Aquatic Center Multi-Purpose Fields 174 1st St Florence

MOTHERS DAY SPECIAL 12:00 PM-5:00 PM - Aquatic Center Multi-Purpose Fields 174 1st St Florence

CHOIR CONCERT - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Coolidge Performing Arts Center 684 W Northern Ave., Coolidge SPRING SATURDAY RECREATION SERIES: SOCCER SKILLS CHALLENGE - 9:00 AM-12:00 PM - Grande Sports World 12684 W Gila Bend Hwy., Casa Grande

20

2017 WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES - 11:00 AM - Peart Park 350 E 6th St., Casa Grande

TIL I FALL CONCERT - 1:30 PM-4:00 PM - Old Town Ale House 412 N Florence St., Casa Grande CASA GRANDE UNION HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 8:00 PM-10:00 PM - Casa Grande Union High School 2730 N Trekell Rd., Casa Grande

25

VISTA GRANDE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 8:00 PM-9:00 PM - Vista Grande High School 1556 N Arizola Rd., Casa Grande

25

COOLIDGE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION - 7:30 PM9:00 PM - Coolidge High School 684 W Northern Ave., Coolidge

26

CASA GRANDE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS LAST DAY OF SCHOOL - 8:00 AM-12:45 PM - All Casa Grande Elementary Schools

26

CASA GRANDE MIDDLE SCHOOLS LAST DAY OF SCHOOL - 8:00 AM-1:45 PM - All Casa Grande Middle Schools

27

POWWOW - 6:00 AM-9:00 AM - Herbalicious of Arizona 423 N Florence Street Casa Grande

29

MEMORIAL DAY EVENT 9:00 AM-12:00 PM - Artisan Village 351 N Arizona Blvd., Coolidge

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


MAY

JUNE

May/June 2017 JUNE

3

15

10

FATHERS DAY SPECIAL 12:00 PM-5:00 PM - Aquatic Center Multi-Purpose Fields 174 1st St Florence

16

10

16

SHRED-A-THON - 9:00 AM11:00 AM - Heritage Park 600 N. Main St., Coolidge $5 a box

AUCTION AT WESTERN TRADING POST - 10:00 AM - Western Trading post 403 N. Florence St., Casa Grande

3RD ANNUAL LIBCON - 1:00 PM-4:30 PM - Vista Grande High School 1556 N Arizola Rd., Casa Grande

WATER FUN - 5:00 PM-6:30 PM - Youth Center 660 S. Main St., Coolidge Free MOVIE NIGHT - 7:00 PM Youth Center 660 S. Main St., Coolidge Free

17

SPRING SATURDAY RECREATION SERIES: FOOTBALL SKILLS CHALLENGE 9:00 AM-12:00 PM - Grande Sports World 12684 W Gila Bend Hwy., Casa Grande

19

- WILDMAN PHIL - 9:00 AM-3:00 PM - Vista Grande High School 1556 N Arizola Rd., Casa Grande

23

FAMILY FRIDAY NIGHT SWIM - 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Aquatic Center 174 1st St Florence $3 For Adults $1 For Children

30

SUMMER TEEN NIGHTS 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Aquatic Center 174 1st St., Florence Ages 13-17 Free

JULY

4

4

8

21

4

4

4TH OF JULY INDOOR PICNIC AND BINGO - 10:00 AM-12:00 AM - Dorthy Nolan Senior Center 330 N Pinal St., Florence $4

AUCTION AT WESTERN TRADING POST - 10:00 AM12:00 AM - Western Trading post 403 N. Florence St., Casa Grande

14

28

8

14

29

FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SHOW & ACTIVITIES - 6:30 PM9:00 PM - Paul Mason Sportsplex2525 N Pinal Ave., Casa Grande JULY 4TH FAMILY FUN DAY AT THE POOL - 10:00 AM-2:00 PM - Palm Island Family Aquatics Park 1150 N. Brown Ave. Casa Grande $1 For Adults .50 Cents For Kids 17 and Under

4TH OF JULY FREEDON FEST - 3:00 PM-9:00 PM - Heritage Park 600 N Main St. Coolidge

MUSEUM BINGO - CRAFT & GAME ACTIVITY - 12:00 PM4:00 PM - Dorothy Powell - 405 E. 6th St., Casa Grande

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

WATER FUN - 5:00 PM-6:30 PM - Youth Center 660 S. Main St., Coolidge Free MOVIE NIGHT - 7:00 PM12:00 AM - Youth Center 660 S. Main St., Coolidge Free

FAMILY FRIDAY NIGHT SWIM - 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Aquatic Center 174 1st St Florence $3 For Adults $1 For Children SUMMER TEEN NIGHTS 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Aquatic Center 174 1st St., Florence Ages 13-17 Free

CASINO NIGHT - 7:00 PM10:00 PM - Green Tree Inn & Suites 240 AZ-287 Florence $50

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

15


The Casa Grande

• A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA • A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOL

CG News by Harold Kitching

cgnews-info.webs.com or www.haroldkitching.com

Officials discuss new details of planned recreation center

W

ork toward a community recreation center continues to progress, the City Council was told during the April 3 study session

16

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

to present the latest building and grounds schematics. It was also announced that the city is working with the Gilbert family who is donat-

ing the land west of Peart Road south of Kortsen Road. The family had initially set a deadline of this December or the land offer could be withdrawn. Mayor Cra ig McFa rland asked if the time limit has been dealt with. James Burke, interim Community Services Department director responded, “Well, not in a fashion that would make our attorney stop and say ‘yes, ’ but we have had the conversation with the property owners. They know the situation of where we’re at in the process, how much it’s going to take, and they’ve expressed an interest of working with us

to accommodate.” McFarland said the issue needs to be resolved before planning gets much further along. “I don’t want to spend a bunch of money, of the city’s money, if in fact they are going to renege on something,” he said. City Manager Larry Rains responded, “One of the reasons why we’ve staged getting to this point with the schematic design and getting their approval is to ensure that even though the mayor and council have already given us consent to start moving forward, from

continued on page 24...

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Herald

Visit GoldenCorridorLiving.com/news/cg-news for Up-to-date Local News from Golden Corridor Living Magazine

LIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA • A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA •

Casa Grande Mayor gives State of the City

I

n his State of the City address in March, Casa Grande Mayor Craig McFarland highlighted some items that will have more of an immediate impact on the community than future new industry and business. He told the audience at The Property Conference Center that City Manager Larry Rains has been meeting with each City Council member to get their views and find out what residents have been telling them about needs and wishes. Earlier focus areas, he said, were to maintain high quality of life, enhance transportation routes, revitalize and redevelop historic Casa Grande, be a leader in economic development and ensure long-term viability of the Casa Grande region. “After meeting with everybody, Larry kind of capsulized the comments,” McFarland continued. “We think that the existing focus areas are broad enough to encompass the goals and objectives for 2018, maybe removing the long-term viability of the region since that should be a kind of implied focus and direction of the city and then add a little more emphasis to the quality of life focus.” He added, “And what I found interesting, when I went through Larry’s notes, is the commonality between all of us in the belief and needs for the city. I’m not going to list all of them, but I do have a short list. They were to develop a transit plan, build the community center, develop a parking plan for downtown, stay focused on workforce development, create initiatives to

Other community efforts

address the homeless issue – like the health community initiative – and create entrepreneurships and programs for the community for industry, interact with community and industry, assess our boards and commissions, create a volunteerism program and community pride outreach campaign, develop a marketing plan, develop a city customer service initiative, cover the rodeo grounds and plan to address the public safety retirement shortfall. Those were the top initiatives that you’ll probably see coming out from the council.” McFarland touched on another community need area. “There’s a community health initiative that I’ve asked Lisa (Fitzgibbons) and Donna (McBride) to take on for the council,”

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

he said. “We’re going to try and work with all the local service groups to try and bring everybody together. The city can’t do it all by ourselves. We need that community involvement. So, we’re working on that initiative to try and bring all of those together to deal with the homeless problem, talk about the homeless problem, talk about mental health issues that we have in the community and bring everybody together, all the service organizations, all the ministries, so that we can all work together on this problem.” He continued, “It is my firm belief that the city should take a role in being that collaborator, trying to be that element that brings all of those parties together.”

“We’ve got our transit study underway, so we’re going to be continuing on that. I think we’re about halfway through that,” McFarland said. “We’ve got a new city website coming out by June 1. It should have a lot of exciting stuff and interaction. You’ll actually probably find the maps to CG Mountain.” He continued, “The community center, it is coming, I promise. It should be here before Council in the next month or two.” Rains said the center would be under design by summer. McFarland also mentioned Voices, a local project by Chuck Wright, highlighted in a new magazine. “If you haven’t seen this magazine,” he said, “this highlights about 12 individuals here in our community, ordinary people but they have an extraordinary impact on our community. This is the kind of positive stuff that we need to be shouting about here in Casa Grande.”

Special events “We’ve got a lot of things that are going on,” McFarland continued, “such as Grande Sports World with the pro soccer and lacrosse and the cross country events that happen out there. In addition, we’re working with Grande Sports World to develop a Play Day, where the residents have the opportunity to use the fields there. We have all those beautiful fields out there, so we’re working with

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17


CITY

SPEAK

GET UP AND MOVE CASA GRANDE... by Craig McFarland, Mayor of Casa Grande

M City announces Spring Saturday Recreation Series and Open Play at Grande Sports World, plus the Community Recreation Center is now on the move.

y watch goes off and reminds me, “You haven’t moved in the last hour – get up and start moving.” So, I thought I would talk about two things to help us all “GET MOVING.” We have two public facililites available to us, the Grande Sports World and our future Community Recreation Center. Grande Sports World has state-of-the-art and world-class soccer/play fields. The city has put together some activities and schedules to help us all use and enjoy these fields:

• No registration is required, however a waiver will be provided at the event for all interested parties. • Spring Saturday Recreation Series Event Schedule: ◊ Saturday, May 20: Soccer Skills Challenge, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. ◊ Saturday, June 17: Football Skills Challenge, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Grande Sports World Open Play allows any Casa Grande resident to use these world class fields: •

• Casa Grande Community Services Department is hosting a series of free activities at Grande Sports World on select Saturdays in the months of May and June. • The Spring Saturday Recreation Series will showcase a different activity each month and is open to all members of the public, regardless of age or skill. • The fields at Grande Sports World are a high quality recreation asset and everyone in Casa Grande is invited to join in and enjoy them on these community days. • Recreation staff is organizing each event and all participants who attend will be entered into a drawing for a $200 gift card.

• •

Free use of Grande Sports World's two southern fields (two fields located closest to the ASU Preparatory School Building). Available for free use May 8 - August 31 from 8:00 am until dusk each day. Grande Sports World is located at 12684 W. Gila Bend Hwy, Casa Grande, AZ 85193 (a six-minute drive west from the Holiday Inn to Grande Sports World).

Casa Grande Community Recreation Center Architectural Layout (see image) has been approved. The final architectural plans will now be developed, which should take about 6 – 8 months. Final City Council approval will take 30 days and construction is 12 – 14 months.

phase I

| 03.08.2017

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Casa Grande Recreation Center | Conceptual Site Plan

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


WHAT’S DEVELOPING IN ELOY? by Mark Benner, CEO, Eloy Chamber of Commerce

Save the Date!

On Monday, May 29 at The Eloy Memorial Park Cemetery, the people of Greater Eloy will gather to remember and honor those who died in service to our country. Celebration starts at 9 a.m. and is followed by an open house / picnic lunch at the Veteran’s Heritage Park at the Eloy Veterans Center on Main Street. All are invited.

New City Hall Update Plans for the new City Hall are under way with visioning and programming. Civic Groups and the community at large have all participated in providing their input. Why does Eloy need a new city hall? To better serve the residents of Eloy. Currently, city staff is spread out and the community planning department is three miles away at the DPW offices. The existing city hall is nearly 50 years old, and the space is at capacity. With the new facility, which is planned to be 20,000-24,000 square feet and housing some 30 employees, city services will be centralized, and will offer enhanced services to customers and efficiency for staff. City Hall will be built downtown on the east side of Main Street Park. Currently the project manager is Abacus (Construction Manager at Risk) and the Design Architect is Smith Group JJR. Both companies will work hand-inhand during the design process to ensure the project stays on budget. Core Construction Co. has been selected to build the facility. Look for ground breaking in late winter 2018, with a schedule to be completed by early 2019. Eventually, Eloy’s current City Hall will be put to good use and revamped as a Justice Center.

Eloy, Germany & Skydiving

What does Bitburg, Germany have to do with Eloy’s History? Quite a bit, because about 40 years ago, a young man in the U.S. Air Force met his wife Lillian while stationed at the Bitburg Air Force Base. Yes, that man is Larry Hill of SkyDive Arizona. Continuing the connection, one of the premier parachute product manufacturers in Bitburg is Firebird Products, and they now have a U.S. connection right here in Eloy. Firebird USA is up and running – training seamstresses to manufacture parachutes. The owner is George Reuter, and his new facility is on Main Street. His product line will also include tandem parachutes, reserve parachutes and harness products. Parachutes and allied products require 40 to 70 test jumps for certification. Incidentally, we have quite a few world class jumpers in Eloy. When you are looking for an experienced pilot for your first tandem jump, know that to become a certified pilot you need at least 500 jumps under your belt. At Skydive Arizona, their pilots maintain the highest standards in the country, with over 5,000 completed jumps, compared to the required 500. Eloy is home to the Arizona Arsenal, with a

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

PHOTO BY NORMAN KENT

champion jumper named Steve Curtis, who has over 20,000 jumps. His wife Sarah has completed 12,000 jumps herself. Eloy is proud to be home to two more “superstar” jumpers – Craig Girard, a former U.S. Army Golden Knight who logged his 30,000th jump last month, has seven gold medals and has now become the most successful Formation Skydiving competitor in the history of the sport. Another legend in the sky diving industry is Sandy Reid, whose company, Rigging Innovations, has been manufacturing parachutes in Eloy for over 20 years.

New B&B Open for Business Eloy has a new bed-and-breakfast, RoadRunner BNB, located on Tumbleweed at the corner of Shedd Road. The owner is Dan Curtis, and he recently housed

the skydiving team from France.

Let’s Get on the Air in Eloy KURE 106.7 is set to begin broadcasting in July. The Desert Rose Arts Institute has received the FCC license to operate a low power FM station. The broadcast range is 10 – 30 miles. The tower and necessary equipment are being installed this month. This station is Community Radio, KURE 106.7 on your FM dial, serving Eloy, Arizona City, Casa Grande, Coolidge and Florence. Programming includes a variety of music, local news, community calendar and informational and interview segments. Volunteers are needed, including opportunities for our youth to learn about radio broadcasting and perhaps present a show on their own. Classes are planned for radio engineering and on-air hosting. Chris Rule, an experienced on-air personality, is the station manager. Janie Toth will handle public relations. Visit http://www.drbi. org/DRBI/drbi-Radio.html

Lunch and Learn

Join us for “The State of the City of Eloy” Business Luncheon. This annual program will be held on Thursday, June 1 at the Robson Ranch Hermosa Ballroom. To reserve your seat, contact the Eloy Chamber of Commerce at info@EloyChamber.com

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A COOLIDGE TREASURE Visit Casa Grande Ruins National Monument

T

he Casa Grande Ruins National Monument is one of Arizona’s lasting treasures. Built around 1400 CE by Native Americans who inhabited the area, this Casa Grande or “Big House” stands as a symbol of how these people lived, worked and played. Not much is known about the purpose of this building, as experts have varying ideas. Some theorize it was a meeting place due to an intricate chamber of rooms lining the structure. Others say it had a more meaningful significance. Many agree that the multi-floor structure is an amazing timepiece that still stands as it did hundreds of years ago. In 1892, President Benjamin Harrison set aside one squaremile of Arizona Territory surrounding the Casa Grande Ruins as the first prehistoric and cultural reserve established in the

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United States. A few years later, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Casa Grande Ruins to be a National Monument on August 3, 1918. The management of the Ruins was transferred to the National Park Service during this time. Today, the Indians of the Gila River Community, O’Odham, Hopi, Zuni and others celebrate this great achievement by holding various events. The Native American Music Fest is one of the largest, celebrating the rich history of native music through the ages. The Casa Grande Ruins Monument expansive area incorporates over 400 acres and includes a visitor center, guided tours, a museum, theatre and gift shop. Plan your visit to the Casa Grande National Monument by visiting https://www.nps.gov/ cagr/ or call 520-723-3172.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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95

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21


ARIZONA’S $21 BILLION TOURISM INDUSTRY by Helen Neuharth, President/CEO, Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce

T

ourism is a $21 billion industry in Arizona, generating $2.9 billion in federal, state and local tax revenue in our state. Each year, National Travel and Tourism Week is celebrated in May – recognizing what travel means to American jobs, economic growth and personal well-being. The travel industry employs a prosperous and diverse workforce, from hotel employees to restaurant, attraction and retail workers, and supports related sectors such as construction, manufacturing and finance. Each of us can assist in bringing in more tourism dollars to Casa Grande and Pinal County through maintaining positive messages when talking to visitors and residents about our community and county. Tourism dollars brought in through hotels, motels and resorts, golf courses, restaurants, stores and business services benefit all of us, either directly or indirectly. Almost every business and industry in the area enjoys the positive benefits of tourism. How can you help generate tourism in Arizona? How about planning your summer vacations as staycations in Casa Grande and/or explore Pinal County and Arizona? We invite you to stop by the Chamber office and pick up a Pinal County Tourism map so you can begin exploring Pinal County. The Chamber is the official Arizona Office of Tourism and Visitors Center in Casa Grande. The Chamber office is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. Let’s see our beautiful state and build our economy at the same time!

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THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Sophisticated, Glamorous & Dramatic

1227 E Clearview Drive, Casa Grande $438,888 This expansive home is sophisticated, glamorous and dramatic. Ideally located, it is also inviting, charming and cozy providing the perfect environment for casual living and lavish entertaining. The main floor features 3,124 square feet, the nicely finished basement has an additional 725 square feet and the detached guest house provides another 389 square feet. There are 6 bedrooms, 4.5 baths and a three car garage. The backyard is truly wonderful and boasts a huge covered patio, a sparkling pool, putting green, and a carefree children’s playground.

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520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com Š2017 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


The Casa Grande Herald

CONTINUED…

A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA

RECREATION CENTER...cont. from page 16 an expenditure and a contract perspective, on the design work, that ultimately we’re putting ourselves in a better position to ensure that we’ve got appropriate timing and whatnot.” He continued, “As Mr. Burke has pointed out, we in fact have had some very preliminary dialogue. There’s willingness. We will be working on a document that they ultimately can execute, as well.” McFarland repeated, “Before we get too far.” “Yes,” Rains responded. Turning to the latest schematics, Burke said they are the result of several meetings of the design committee to discuss the building and its design. “They came in and we did a couple of exercises where we dealt with the site itself and the arrangement of the building, the size of the building – kind of cut and pasted and played with blocks, if you will – and looked at different ways to approach it,” he said. “The designers went away and analyzed that, came back with proposals and went away and came back. And we did that in partnership with the staff and the Boys & Girls Clubs. Matt Lemberg (clubs director) was with us on all those exercises. We did it with the City Manager’s Office and with Community Services’ involvement looking at that. And then, we spent quite a bit of time working with the Gilbert family and showing them all those same exercises and getting their acceptance and their approval of where we’re at today. They have signed an acknowledgement that we’re in compliance with the special warranty deed. We still fully intend for the family to be involved as we take this through final design, as we’ll be bringing it to the council for discussion and review.

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They’re very excited to see us try to get to the end game and getting the building under construction and being built.” It was decided that the main building would be angled toward Peart Road. “In looking at the site and thinking about how we might use it,” Burke said, “the committee and the design team came up with the conclusion that we should put the building to the far northeast of the site and try to have a presence on Peart Road, because that is the major street, not try to dominate it and deal with it like maybe a commercial building would where you’d have the front door out on Peart. We really thought about dropping it into a park site and having you see the edge and see the landscaping, experience the building as you go by it. And that’s why there’s some articulation to the shape and the building is kind of

turned sideways to the road so that you won’t see just a big wall with a big building, because the gymnasium will have a big wall. You’ll see different shapes and different sizes and then experience the building in different ways as you approach it.” There will be a driveway through the center of the property for maintenance and delivery, Burke said, but the main drive will be to the south. “That’s the drive that has potential,” he continued, “because to the south is a private development parcel that will be developed sometime in the future. We have the potential there to share that driveway with that site, so that could be a very prominent entrance. But initially, it will just be our own driveway. Come to the parking lot. You can see the parking lot is pushed also to the north of the site. You can just see in the lower left-hand side of the

slide a single-family resident lot, but there are others that are platted on each side of that, so there will be additional residential houses there. We sited this building as far away from that as we could. That was really in deference to the family. They wanted to make sure that we didn’t encroach on residential uses. If we did a two-story building, the building wouldn’t be imposing right on the resident…so you can see from the lower sketch that we’re 570 feet or more away from that single-family residence.” The initial landscape plan has lawn around the building and a separate lawn where the aquatics complex will be in the future when money becomes available. To the southwest of that would be a small landscaped area that could be used for festivals or other activities. The green Y-shaped area at the left of the illustration would

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


The Casa Grande Herald

CONTINUED…

A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA

STATE OF THE CITY...cont. from page 17 them. The calendar will be on the new website under “Parks and Rec” and you can see the play days out there. In addition, the city will be scheduling play day events. You can see that on the calendar and if you want to reserve one of the fields that are open for play day, you can call Parks and Rec and make that arrangement. That’s a new thing that’s coming out.” McFarland also said, “I can foresee trying to talk to somebody about maybe bringing in a balloon festival or doing something big along those lines. We have the facilities to do it. We have some beautiful grounds out at Francisco Grande that could certainly house a lot of people.”

City promotion McFarland’s presentation included a silent two-minute video highlighting Casa Grande. “This is the kind of communication we want to start sending out on maybe a quarterly basis to developers, potential businesses,” he said. “It will be information about Casa Grande, so we will try and make sure that we control

RECREATION CENTER...cont. be open space. Councilman Matt Herman asked if that open space could ever be used for special events. Burke responded, “That’s a great question and one we have kicked around and I believe the answer is yes. Now, there are some conditions on that. I don’t believe we can put a building there. That also taps into the greater community trail plan that you’ve approved, and as that subdivision next door gets built, people can connect to it. That little grass area just south of the parking lot might actually ex-

“I know that the city doesn’t control or manage the education here in town,” McFarland said, “but we do have an opportunity to talk about what’s positive about our schools. When I first got here, there were two things being said – the hospital is terrible and the schools are terrible. Well, that is not true today. Our hospital is wonderful; it has changed a lot. And the schools are good.” He continued, “I’ve been to probably six of the schools here in town in the last three months. They have a program of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

I went to an event at Ironwood where first and second graders and Kindergarten were talking about the seven habits and it was amazing. Who talks like that – first-graders? I was very impressed and if you haven’t seen any of it, you really should. Cactus Middle School with the 7 Mindsets program that they have, and all middle schools incorporate the 7 Mindsets, and if you haven’t seen any of that, you really need to. Our schools are in great shape, I think, personally, from my observation. Also, we need to talk about our A+ schools. We’ve had a lot of A+ schools here in Casa Grande — and they’re public schools. Villago just went through their rating (to be notified in April). Ironwood had it three years in a row. The accreditation at Vista Grande, they’re going through right now, so these are the kinds of things we need to talk about being on the positive side.” Education ties in with workforce development, McFarland said. We’ve talked about this, as well,” he said. “This whole partnership is actually being led by CAC and has done a wonderful job

building curriculums for our local industry, looking at any trades – might be plumbing, electrical, warehousing and technicians, maintenance, you name it. Doing warehousing today is not like your father’s warehouse, where you just moved forklifts around. It’s all robots. It’s all technical technicians, computers. It’s a lot more involved than it was back in the day.” The high school district is also involved. “(They are) all moving together in collaborative ways to help move forward with our workforce development,” McFarland said. “I think it’s been a great thing. It’s awesome to watch it happen.”

pand into that green space.” Turning to the layout of the building, Burke said there would be two entrances, one for the Boys & Girls Clubs at the northwest side and one for the general public near the future aquatics area. Pointing to the building layout schematic, Burke said “The yellow area is the area that’s dedicated to Boys & Girls Clubs uses. The light pink area is the area that’s shared uses between both the city and the Boys & Girls Clubs and then the red area is for the city public recreation programs. “You can see the entrances there and how they share that big gray area. It’s a shared lobby,

it’s a generous lobby and it’ll be a two story lobby, because the second part of this diagram on the left hand side is the upper floor,” he said. “If someone’s coming for an activity in the multipurpose room, which is these two large rooms on the direct south side that spill out onto the aquatics complex area, a lawn initially, you can assemble in the lobby and have grand space where you can do your meeting, greeting and ticketing or whatever might be going on and then go into that multipurpose room. The same if you’re going to a bigger activity in the gymnasium or the youth and teen center that’s right there

in the center of the lobby, which we thought really focused our energies on teen activities right in the center of the building, right in the center of the lobby.” He continued, “The kids care area is right to the left of the main front door. That also has an outdoor space that’s walled and dedicated and shaded, so it’s completely confined and then there are also shared classrooms that you can see that are also on that left wall. The second floor has the walking track around the gymnasium and the exercise area where the equipment will

our message as to who we are and what we want people to think we are here in Casa Grande.” The city, in cooperation with the local chamber of commerce, is also working on destination marketing. “We’re trying to get some signage on I-10 to help talk a lot about that,” McFarland said. “That’s been a challenge because of particular state law that kind of dictates what we can and can’t do. My hope is to try to get that state law changed.”

Education

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

Infrastructure “We continue to push the state on I-10 widening,” McFarland said, noting projections of jobs, population and visitors centered in Casa Grande. “If I-10 doesn’t get widened, it’s going to be a parking lot if all those things come to fruition, so we really need to all be talking to anybody who will listen about widening I-10. And believe me, I’ve been a

continued on page 34...

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SUN LIFE FAMILY HEALTH CENTER A look back at our journey from job training to healthcare services by Renée Louzon-Benn

ABOVE: Grand Opening for Sun Life’s Apache Junction Office

F

ebruary 2016 marked the 40th anniversary for Sun Life Family Health Center (Sun Life). Since 1976, Sun Life has delivered health care to the underserved, uninsured and insured people living in rural Pinal County. The nonprofit organization has grown to become the county’s largest primary health care provider, committed to providing both the insured and uninsured with access to quality and price-conscious services.

Sun Life’s Historical Journey Sun Life staff truly care about the people we serve. It has been our legacy since Sun Life started. We

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OR LI GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR LIV VING ING • THE INTERV IE W

began as an outgrowth of the Arizona Job College, which provided job training for migrant and seasonal farm workers. The farm workers who were interested in health services were trained at the center. Over time, as the training funds ran out, the health funds kept coming and the job college became solely a health facility. In 1976, the Center became incorporated as West Pinal Family Health Center (West Pinal), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit which staffed one full-time and one part-time physician. In the first year, the center provided 12,000 patient visits. March 1977, the center moved from the Job College to the Esperanza Building at 201. W. Cottonwood Lane. This move provided a larger facility, allowing the center to

increase staffing to three full-time and three part-time physicians. This new facility was built to offer laboratory, X-ray and pharmacy services as a convenience for patients. By 1978, the center had introduced family dentistry and women’s health and maternity care services (OB/GYN) and could now provide an array of services to the community, truly becoming a “family health center.” 1980 saw the start of growth to communities outside of Casa Grande, starting with the center’s second office in Maricopa, and in 1981 becoming established as a Federally Qualified Health Center, allowing a shift in funding from migrant grants to the Community Health Center Program grant. The center operated

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


The LIVING Interview

on a sliding-fee schedule; patients paid according to their income. This was by no means a free clinic, as there was a minimum fee charged. This meant West Pinal was able to ensure that everyone in the community was eligible to use the center’s services, regardless of income or insurance status. Even in these early years, the goal was to offer good, quality, conventional care, focusing on preventative health services. This level of care supported continued growth, and in 1983, we opened in Eloy, and 1984, opened in Coolidge, bringing the organization to four offices in the county. In 1996, West Pinal underwent some big changes and rebranded itself, thus changing its name to Sun Life Family Health Center. Along with its new name, the organization also moved into a newly constructed building on Arizola Road in order to serve the growing insured and uninsured Casa Grande population. The facility expanded in 2003 and still stands today as the organization’s largest family health center location, and includes

dental services and a pharmacy. A mine closure presented Sun Life with an opportunity to fill more needs in the community, and in 1999, we opened an office in San Manuel, operating out of this small town’s newly vacated hospital. This office houses a family practice, lab, X-ray and a pharmacy. As the years went by, Sun Life continued to try to provide patients and communities the best possible patient experience and to be where there is a need for accessible and price conscious health care. 2001 saw new construction for the Maricopa office and the Coolidge office in 2003. In 2004, Sun Life opened an office in the Oracle community. Sun Life experienced amazing growth over the past 10 years of operation. In 2010, Sun Life added integrated behavioral health services into the existing health care model. 2010 also marked the move of OB/ GYN into its own building alongside the newly added pediatric services. 2010 also marked the completion of a new building for Eloy, which houses a family practice and a pharmacy, a service the town had been without for over 14 years. Increased patient need spurred more growth in 2014, resulting with Casa Grande’s Sun Life Center for Children, Sun Life Center for Women, and a new Apache Junction office offering family practice, pediatrics, OB/GYN and a pharmacy. In 2015, Sun Life moved Maricopa’s family practice to a new, larger facility, added pediatric care and a pharmacy and renovated the original Maricopa office to provide OB/GYN. In 2016, Sun Life marked its 40th year by opening a new family practice office in Florence and a pediatric dental office in Casa Grande. From its humble beginnings, Sun Life has grown from a small office with one full-time and one part-time physician to staffing 61 health care providers at 12 offices in eight Pinal County communities. Over the 40 years of Sun Life’s journey, the board of directors and leadership have set goals to provide the highest level of quality care to our patients, and to

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

provide excellence in health, wellness and education.

What Makes Sun Life a Leader? In addition to meeting community health needs with comprehensive medical services in Pinal County, Sun Life is also dedicated to training the next generation of health care workers by acting as a clinical education resource. Sun Life provides opportunities for students with majors related to health care careers, to serve in interdisciplinary primary health care teams at area community health centers. Sun Life was the first medical practice in Pinal County to participate in the nationally acclaimed Reach Out and Read program, where doctors give babies and toddlers free books at well-child visits to encourage readership and literacy. Although the organization has been culturally branded as a nonprofit entity that relies on federal grant funds to operate, Sun Life’s Health Center Program grant monies make up only about 7 percent of its annual revenues. The rest of the organization’s revenue is earned by serving all area populations from the insured to self-paying patients. Quality health care are not only words in the organization’s mission statement, but a real everyday effort throughout the organization. Sun Life is accredited by the Joint Commission, which is completely voluntary. Being accredited by the Joint Commission means that Sun Life adheres to the commission’s mission, which is “to continuously improve the safety and quality of care provided to the public.” “Quality care,” Sun Life’s CEO Travis Robinette said, “is the right thing to do for our patients and staff.” “I believe that to be a leader in anything, it is not a state of being or a plateau you reach; it’s a constant, never-ending effort. We don’t just sit back and rest on our laurels. At Sun Life, we will always continue to strive and raise the bar in delivering quality health care and achieving excellence.”

Quality health care are not only words in the organization’s mission statement, but a real everyday effort throughout the organization.

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Travis giving a welcome address at the Apache Junction Grand Opening

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THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


The LIVING Interview

Travis Robinette

Casa Grande native and CEO of Sun Life Family Health Center talks about his journey from trading post to the highest post at Sun Life. Along the way, he shares an update on the changing landscape of health care and how Sun Life is leading the way. Interview by Bea Lueck GC LIVING: Thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to join us. Let’s start with your personal history. Tell us about yourself. Are you from Casa Grande? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Well, sort of, I was born in Casa Grande, but we actually lived in Stanfield. There are pictures of me wearing two toy six shooters in the front yard at a house in Casa Grande, probably up over by the railroad tracks where the Holiday Inn is now, in that area. But I don’t remember exactly where. I was too young, so my stronger memories are of Stanfield. And then, of course, you know, our life was somewhat complex. It was maybe a little bit out of the ordinary in that Dad, in 1955, bought a trading post on the Tohono O’Odham reservation, 87 miles south of here. It was about 50 miles southwest of Sells, closer to Ajo and not very far from the border with Mexico. It was probably one of the most remote trading posts on that reservation anyway. So, I spent much of my youth there. My first exposure to culture was with Native American people. You can’t underestimate the powerful effect of culture on your life. I learned to play with Native American boys and girls. GC LIVING: Travis, was that Pisinemo? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Pisinemo, Yes! That’s the name of the village. And I think Mom said I was born 10 days after they purchased that trading post. It was an interesting adventure, the five years when that was our

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

only home. More often than not, when we were going down there or coming to town to get supplies, or what have you, we would get stuck, because the last 12 miles was dirt road with lots of washes. And if it was raining we knew we were going to get stuck eventually. Those washes were going to hang the vehicle, because they filled up the sandbars, right? And it was an adventure to us kids. We’d get to walk home. Yippee! Be it dark or not, lots of times, it was at night. We’d get out a flashlight, if we had one, and we were usually barefoot. But that’s kids, right? My parents would say, “Where’s your shoes?” We’d say, “I don’t know.” So we would get to walk barefoot. GC LIVING: Typical kids... TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Dad later bought another business in Stanfield. He bought a second-hand store. One business wasn’t enough, I guess. I’m kind of that way too. So, he bought a second-hand store in Stanfield and we had a house on the premises in addition to the one in Pisinemo. There I was introduced to school, having been brought up before that point playing with Native American kids. And I distinctly remember thinking of my Caucasian classmates that they were very different. They didn’t behave right. They didn’t act right. Of course, I thought it was them. I didn’t realize it was me. We don’t look at ourselves that way, right? So, I’m like, “You people are different.”

It wasn’t until years later I put together they just don’t act the same way that Native Americans do. You know, that’s what I’m more comfortable with. I think I discovered that when we had a Native American kid join the school — I think I was in seventh grade – of course I fit right in with him. We understood each other. He gravitated to me as a friend right away so I guessed he also felt as I did. Anyway, I went to high school here in Casa Grande. I rode a bus for a couple years until I was old enough to have a car and got to drive myself. So, yes, I have been around in this area all my life. GC LIVING: Now, did your family have the Vekol market in on the Ak-Chin reservation as well? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: No, that is a first cousin, Jimmy. My dad had two other brothers who also had trading posts – one younger brother, one older. Don is a younger brother to dad and he owned and operated Santa Rosa Trading Post for many years and Jimmy is one of his sons. An older brother to dad, Babe, owned Santa Rosa before Don bought it and also started a second store in Sacaton after his Santa Rosa days. Loyd, one of Babe’s sons, still operates the Sacaton Store. And then, I also had an uncle on my mom’s side with somewhere around 10 years of trading post history in Covered Wells. That was definitely an older type of store. I remember going in there. They

continued on page 40... OR LI V ING THE INTERV IE W • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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Economy • Local Business

CREATING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES THROUGHOUT ARIZONA

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ou may not know it, but where you live is proving to be more important to your health than your genes. A Phoenix area map released by the Robert Wood Johnson and Foundation and Virginia Commonwealth University shows a 14-year life expectancy difference between a Scottsdale zip code (85 years) and a South Phoenix zip code (71 years). It is becoming clear that where we live directly impacts how we live. And factors in our everyday life have a big effect on our health. Access to a good education, economic opportunity and safe housing are all positive factors. On the flip side, stores offering unhealthy foods and limited opportunities for exercise, walking and cycling can weigh us down -- literally. Other influencing factors include access to public transit, proximity to toxic agents from highways and industry, as well as issues of community segregation and isolation. Of course access to healthcare matters, -but perhaps not as much as we might think. No matter what happens with changes to or the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, we must address the policies, systems and environments that have a direct effect on health. How will this be accomplished? It will take coordinated efforts from organizations and agencies throughout Arizona. Vitalyst Health Foundation has been engaged in conversation, engagement and action with a number of partners around the state. In fact, we have dubbed our efforts The 2017 Year of Healthy

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Communities. Step by step, we are making progress. All across the state, hundreds of organizations are doing the hard, focused work needed to transform the health of our communities. Here are just a few examples: 1. In Phoenix, the city passed two ordinances in support of Complete Streets policies: design and structural changes that make streets welcoming and useful environments for all users – pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, people with disabilities – and not just for cars. Complete Streets not only make streets more effective in connecting people, but they also spur economic growth, improve health and enhance quality of life. 2. Across the state, schools are embracing “shared use,” the practice of opening school yards, gyms and libraries for community use. Children and their parents need to move more, but neighborhood parks are not always available – and building new ones requires new funding, while perfectly suitable school facilities are locked up on evenings and weekends. Places like the Nadaburg School District in Wittman, with help from the Maricopa County Department of Public Health and other funders, launched a new plan to open gyms and schoolyards at night and on Saturdays. Further support will provide transportation to students who can’t easily get here on the weekend. It puts families on the right track toward a healthier community and helps to support children who are healthy, alert and ready to learn.

I’m pleased to share the Access Arizona space this month with Suzanne Pfister, President and CEO of Vitalyst Health Foundation. The Foundation’s 2017 Healthy Communities Initiative is a statewide and local collaboration that appropriately aligns to this health and wellness edition. Suzanne provides insights for us in the Golden Corridor to consider for action. - Evelyn Casuga, CAC and Access Arizona

3. In Payson, they’re innovating. Concerned about conserving water, in 2012 the city opted for one 165-plot community garden with drip irrigation that produces for its gardeners as well as local food banks. For four years, residents have shared, learned, socialized and grown together. More recently, Payson residents and business owners have raised over $16,000 to support an apple orchard adjacent to the farmer’s market that will feature the same heirloom apples planted by early settlers here. In February 2017, the Town Council approved the plan to transform part of an underutilized public utility property into this future gathering space in the heart of Old Town Payson, featuring park pathways that will meander through fields of lavender and hops. It will be a venue where local businesses and the community will “grow” together. We need residents, neighborhoods, cities and towns, and businesses large and small, to join in with the chorus of voices that recognizes the importance of well-being and how our surroundings affect our quality – and length – of life. I would personally like to invite the public to participate -- by providing resources, attending our partner events, joining an upcoming webinar, or attending a workshop. Connect with us at livewellaz.org. Suzanne Pfister is president and CEO of Vitalyst Health Foundation, on Twitter: @vitalysthealth and Facebook: facebook/vitalysthealthaz. THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Helping you build your business in PINAL COUNTY, ARIZONA

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LEGAL

TAX ELECTIONS FOR SPOUSES WHO OWN A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY by Tina Vannucci, Fitzgibbons Law Offices

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hen it comes to taxation, a single-member LLC is considered a “disregarded” entity that, by default, is generally taxed as a sole proprietorship. In most cases, the member of a single-member LLC simply reports the LLC’s profits or losses on their personal tax return, and the LLC does not have to file a separate tax return. In contrast, a multi-member LLC is, by default, taxed as a partnership and must file an informational tax return to allow the IRS to confirm that the individual members are correctly reporting their income. The LLC must also provide each member with a Schedule K-1 that reports their share of the LLC’s profits and losses for reporting on their personal returns. Community Property LLC. One exception where a multi-member LLC can be treated as a disregarded entity and taxed as a sole proprietorship is when the LLC is wholly owned by spouses as community property. In Revenue Procedure 2002-69, the Treasury Department and IRS clarify that they will respect a taxpayer’s treatment of an entity as a disregarded entity or a partnership if it is owned solely by a husband and wife as community property. In order to qualify to be treated as a disregarded entity: • The LLC must be wholly

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owned by a husband and wife as community property. No person other than one or both the spouses would be considered an owner for federal tax purposes. The business is not treated as a corporation under §301.7701-2.

In some instances, it may be to the couple’s advantage to have their LLC taxed as an S corporation. That tax treatment requires an affirmative election by the LLC and acceptance by the IRS. Spouses who wholly own an LLC should consider the effect that their LLC’s tax designation will have on their personal tax liability and their administrative workload. That determination should be made in consultation with a tax or legal professional. For assistance in determining your LLC’s appropriate tax designation, contact Fitzgibbons Law Offices (520-426-3824).

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


MARICOPA COUNCILMEMBER NANCY SMITH APPOINTED TO PINAL PARTNERSHIP BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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aricopa Councilmember Nancy Smith has been appointed to serve on the Pinal Partnership Board of Directors. The Pinal Partnership was created with a vision of uniting community growth efforts in Pinal County. “I am thrilled to be invited and approved by the Pinal Partnership to serve as a new board member,” said Councilmember Nancy Smith. “Serving on this board provides a tremendous opportunity for the City of Maricopa and I am honored. Pinal County has so much to be excited about, and Maricopa is a vital part to what makes our county so fabulous. Pinal Partnership’s vision of uniting community growth efforts in our county is perfectly in sync with my vision for establishing partnerships that will help benefit Maricopa. I look forward to being a part of their subcommittees, which will allow for sharing ideas from a Maricopa perspective.” Pinal County has become the fastest growing county in Arizona with some of the most exciting possibilities in the country. With so many diverse resources and so much opportunity, Pinal Partnership was formed to bring together all the people and ideas that will ultimately lead Pinal County to its full potential. We are thrilled that Councilwoman Smith accepted our invitation to join this great

board,” said Pinal Partnership Board Chair Jordan Rose. “Her leadership, optimistic outlook, ability to find solutions to difficult problems, and her commitment to doing the right thing for our community makes her an ideal board member for Pinal Partnership as we strive to make sure that Pinal County is better each day than it was the day before! We are incredibly grateful for her willingness to donate precious time to our group.” In addition to monthly breakfasts about timely topics, the Partnership brings together stakeholders to advocate for efforts such as the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) highway improvements designated by the Governments of Pinal County and Pinal County’s Cities and Towns. Active Pinal Partnership committees that support issues facing Pinal County are: Education; Parks, Trails, Open Space and Public Lands; Health and Human Services: Government Relations; Economic Development; Transportation and Infra32 Karen Pines Street structure and Water Resources. Dedham, MA 02026 978.264.3264

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

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1433 N. Pinal Avenue, Casa Grande, AZ 85122 1433 N. Pinal Avenue, Casa Grande, AZ 85122 Client:

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Live Area: N/A

Publication:

ROX! Magazine

Trim: 3.85” (w) x 10.375” (h) Art Director:

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The Casa Grande Herald

CONTINUED…

A RIZONA CIT Y • CASA GR ANDE • COOLIDGE • ELOY • FLORENCE • M A RICOPA

STATE OF THE CITY...cont. from page 25 thorn in their side. The Kortsen Road interchange at I-10 and the sewer line extension to serve the east side are moving forward. The I-10 interchange at Kortsen will probably be a private-public partnership, so therefore it will actually be done. The Dreamport Village and Henness Road interchange and

RECREATION CENTER...cont. from page 25 be. The exercise area is about 3,500 square feet. We put it upstairs along with the multipurpose exercise room, which will be the dance room or dedicated program space for activities. That’s where you’ll go for all your organized activities with the city for recreation activities as part of your membership.” Councilwoman Lisa Fitzgibbons asked if 3,500 square feet is adequate space. “Yes,” Burke replied, adding, “I think it’s a good compromise size, a good functioning size for this community and the size of this facility. Certainly, you could build it bigger and then you could spend a lot of money on equipment and always doing replacement of equipment. I’m not sure that we’ve done the analysis that you’ll make that much more money doing it that way. And you could make a smaller, but if you get too small then it’s really not going to be a functional size. We think it’s a good size and the location of it up there (second floor) kind of set by itself works pretty well in our assumptions.” It was also decided to put all offices on the second floor, Burke said. “The Boys & Girls Clubs staff and the city staff share common spaces so the work spaces

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the Selma interchange will probably be moved up on the (Arizona Department of Transportation) timetable. Thornton Road work, to service our industrial park, is moving forward. The plans are already being reviewed and that will probably happen here in the next year.”

Summation “There’s lots of work ahead,”

and the copiers and the break room will all be in one area and then the various cubicles and small offices,” he continued. “Put them all on the second floor where they’d be kind of up and a step away from the community and the activity on the first floor where there’s really the meeting and greeting of the customer base and the interaction that’s really important to how this building is going to function. Then, there’s open space looking off that exercise room area or the staff space down into the atrium below, so you can still hear and monitor and see what’s going on.” Councilwoman Donna McBride asked if the cost factor between general memberships and the Boys & Girls Clubs membership had been considered. Burke responded, “Absolutely. And we don’t have a definitive answer yet. It’s something we’re looking at and still between the two parties figuring out exactly how that will go. We do see, especially in that teen area, that some partnership might go both ways. I don’t think we have a final resolution on all the nuances of that.” City Manager Rains added that, “We’ve worked very closely with the Boys & Girls Clubs to get us to this point. And to just build on the response to Councilwoman McBride, we have had some very

McFarland said in closing. “As I’ve said many times, these are exciting times, but working together I know we can make this happen. So please remember that because everything is possible, with passion first, because we are all connected and 100 percent accountable with our attitude of gratitude and live-togive mindset, because the time is now.”

Video of the entire presentation can be found at https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=8HpNQYbpmYY

preliminary dialogue with Mr. Lemberg about beginning to establish some meetings regarding the agreement component that really is going to define the financial pieces and what they’re going to look like. And we’ll certainly be bringing that back to the mayor and council in advance of us getting to the point where construction is taking place.”

approvals and permits that are required in that process. The goal is to get a guaranteed maximum price from the builder, who is part of this team and will doing the analysis along the way on cost estimating. We think right now, our best guess, is that it’s going to take six to eight months. Construction could be as long as 14 to 18 months. On all of these schedules, we’re going to work really hard to compress and shave and get down as short as we can possibly get them in the process, because we know the community’s waiting and we really want to see this get completed.”

Next steps As Burke explained to the council, “The next steps are to continue and finalize the schematic design, and there’s a whole series of submittals that are defined in the contract that, once we get general approval on this, they will submit some details on how the walls and the roofs and the materials start to come together. It won’t be all the design decisions, but they start to get into the details of how we’re going to build this building. We’ll do a series of design workshops that will involve going to all the city departments and making sure we do the technical reviews that have to happen, especially with the Building Department and the site plan review and all those. We’ll have the 30, 60 and 100 percent construction drawing preparations to get us to where we’re actually at a permitted set of drawings, have all the city

The city promotion video can be found at https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=LUIVfzY16gw

Thank You Harold!

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Horse Property.... Great riding out the front door!

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SMART HOME TECHNOLOGY

Advances in home safety gain popularity among older adults

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eyless entry, smart smoke detectors, wireless doorbell cameras and other technological safety improvements are gaining popularity among adults who are 50 years of age or older. This was a recent finding based on research from the MIT AgeLab in cooperation with The Hartford. According to researchers, these helpful technologies make life easier for all ages. However, older adults have changing lifestyles and needs and can especially benefit from these technologies. For example, wireless doorbell cameras give older adults the option of seeing who is at the door without having to get up first, and keyless entry gives them the ability to quickly unlock a door. Older adults who are fumbling for keys at the door are often targets for residential robberies. The research performed by these two organizations analyzed 25 different technologies to identify the top 10. The top picks for usefulness include the following: • Wireless doorbell cameras • Smart smoke and CO2 detectors • Keyless entry • Smart water shutoff valves • Automatic lights • Smart home security systems • Smart electrical outlets

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• • •

Moisture and mold sensors Smart thermostats Smart window blinds

A person's lifestyle has a major impact on happiness and wellness, and these technologies were all proven to help facilitate well-being and peace of mind. The two organizations interviewed older homeowners to see what they thought about the chosen technologies. When asked about their main concerns, the majority of respondents said that maintenance was their top worry. With smart home technology, security was the main concern of about 50 percent of participants. More than 45 percent said that saving energy was important, and almost 35 percent said that technologies to improve everyday life were important. Since security and maintenance were some top concerns, experts addressed technologies that could help in both areas. Water and mold sensors, smart thermostats, smart water shutoff valves and smart smoke or carbon monoxide detectors were some of their top suggestions for these specific purposes. According to their research, the organizations found that about 50 percent of the surveyed homeowners already had smart home

technologies or were planning to purchase one or more of these items in the near future. Of those who did not yet have any of these technologies, but were planning to buy some, about 50 percent said that they would spend between $100 and $500 per year if necessary. These are the top recommendations from the two organizations: • Research the available technologies, their benefits and independent reviews. • Determine which options are best for individual needs. • See www.thehartford.com/ smarthome for a digital tour of a smart home. Some smart improvements such as smoke alarms, burglar alarms and other safety features can actually help reduce insurance costs. To learn more about money-saving features, speak to a ROX Casa Grande Insurance Agent. Call 520-836-7660 or visit roxinsurance.com

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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A YEAR OF EXTRAORDINARY ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Pinal County Economic Development Manager Recognized by Peers by Joe Pyritz, Public Information Officer

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n a year that saw Pinal County jump to the forefront of economic development opportunity in Arizona, a statewide group has recognized one of the architects of the county’s success. Economic Development Manager Tim Kanavel, became the first-ever two-time recipient of the Economic Development Distinguished by Excellence Award for Economic Developer of the Year, Small Community. Kanavel first won the award in 2004. “It’s hard to believe that it has been 13 years,” Kanavel said. “I am honored beyond belief at being recognized by the Arizona Association for Economic Development, but this is truly an award for the entire 1,800 employees for Pinal County. Our success is a direct result of everyone’s hard work to help land these projects for the county.” In the Small Community Category, Kanavel was in competition for the award with 13

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other counties and any city that has a population of 50,000 or less. “I could say I am surprised that he won the award, but I am really not,” stated Chairman Steve Miller. “Just look at the accomplishments. Tim and his team have been involved in bringing over 15 projects to the county totaling over $2.5 billion in economic investment. They are working with our communities to help bring them on board with what we are doing. I mean, he is in the true sense a leader of this effort.” Kanavel is a familiar face with many of the Chambers of Commerce throughout Pinal County. It’s not unusual to see him tout Pinal County before groups of mayors, city council people, town managers and anyone who will listen to why they need to invest in Pinal County. Kanavel does this while waiting for kidney transplant.

“I had a double transplant in 2009 of the kidney and pancreas,” Kanavel said. “The transplanted kidney has failed and I am on the list awaiting a new one.” Kanavel can be found at dialysis three days a week and still manages to get a fullday in when he can. He is looking forward to the day when he gets a call from the Mayo Clinic saying a kidney has become available. “Once I get that call, I will have to drop everything I am doing and head up to Phoenix,” Kanavel said. “I’m not really worried that our work will drop off when it comes to economic development. We have a good team in place and they will be able to pick up where I left off.” When asked how he does everything while going though dialysis and waiting for a kidney, his answer is simple. It’s a matter of a positive mindset. “The only person who can hold you down is you,” Kanavel replied.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 29 had a cowbell on the door and which announced your entry. Inside was a small area surrounded by counter with the grocery and other goods all on shelves behind the counter. In the center of that small entry area there was five or six wood barrels of about fifty gallons capacity each. These barrels held various beans, wheat, things like that. Everything else was behind the counter, and you’d just give them a list and then they would retrieve your stuff – just like you see in Western movies. Now, Dad’s store was not set up that way. It was more, you know, more contemporary with what was up here. GC LIVING: So, does your family have a lot of native art that you collected in trade over the years? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: We do, yes. I have my prized pieces. And my dad, of course, had his. Dad is deceased, so we kind of spread those among the family. It’s primarily basketry, but some pottery (from the Tohono O’odham people, who used to be called the Papagos). [Editor’s note: The Tohono O’odham have rejected the former name Papago, used by Europeans after being adopted by Spanish conquistadores from hearing other Piman bands call them this. The Pima were competitors and referred to the people as Ba:bawu ˘ko’a, mean-

Travis and his father, James L. Robinette

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ing “eating tepary beans.” That word was pronounced papago by the Spanish and adopted by later English speakers. Source: Wikipedia] There were some villages down there that did make pottery, but pretty much it was a reclaimed art to them, because they hadn’t had the need to make pottery for functional purposes for a long time, so it kind of died and then came back more of an artistic kind of activity. Their pottery, rather than being a reddish clay, it’s more of a light sandy color. I don’t know if that would be traditional or not. But we do have some pottery. But by and large, basketry is their real forte. And I have a fair amount of baskets, both old and new. GC LIVING: Do you speak Tohono O’odham? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Some. I speak enough to get by. My dad, of course, was fluent because when he went down there, he kind of had to learn fresh. I mean, there was nobody there who spoke English, so he taught some of the younger men and women English and they taught him Papago, so he was fluent. GC LIVING: Where did you go after high school? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: I went one year to Central Arizona College (CAC). I started working on an accounting degree. And then like many 18, 19-year-olds, I had a girlfriend. And I was thinking, “You know, I need to settle down and get married.” So I quit going to school, asked Dad for a job, and I’ll never forget what he told me. He said of the job I asked for, “Those are big shoes to fill. You sure you can fill them?” And before I could answer, he said, “But, before you answer, you should know that I will fire you for much less than I will any of these other people if you’re not doing the right job.” I was like, “Uh, I think so.” So I went to work for Dad. GC LIVING: Were you ever fired by Dad? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: No, but I made sure I wasn’t fired by him. No, I listened very good and I mopped the way he wanted me to mop, or whatever he wanted me to do, I did. I tried to excel at it. And then, probably about a year after that, I married Cindy who’s still my wife. She’s from Coolidge – born and raised there. We met at church, and I think I terrorized her for probably like a year or two before I actually convinced her to let me take her on a date. After we married, I took her down to Pisinemo, and we

Young Travis sporting his toy six shooter

lived with Mom and Dad for probably about a year – a year too long. Most people would probably tell you that, right? But, funny. You know, I have to tell this. If Cindy reads it, she’ll be upset at me. She had never seen the store or where it was. I told her where it was, of course, but you really can’t understand unless you go there. For safer driving reasons, I would purposely wait until later at night to drive down there because it’s all open range, and that’s still true today. In winter time, there is a danger (the cattle) may be lying down on that asphalt, because it’s warm. Well, I purposefully waited until about 11 p.m., and as we left, a thunderstorm brewed up. For me, after going many times down there and having many rainstorms, I pretty much knew this one was bad enough that we probably weren’t going to get there in this car. The car was going to get stuck somewhere on that last 12 miles of dirt road. I was driving a Firebird, hopped up engine and all and I was putting the gas pedal to it. And – I’m still a teenager at that point in time, so I did like to have a little fun – and I thought, “Well if we’re gonna get stuck, I might as well go out in style.” Your only chance in a Firebird – something that low to the ground – when you’re crossing

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


With Dr. Joseph Edwards, OB/ GYN, providing a tour to (former) Congresswoman Ann Kirkpatrick

water is high speed, right? Hydroplaning. GC LIVING: To kind of float across versus drive through? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: But the car is going to want to turn sideways on me, you know, at 90 or whatever speed you deem necessary to cover the span of water. And the road is muddy and soft. GC LIVING: That fast? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Oh, it’s the honest-toGod truth. You can ask Cindy. And you know, of course the road is muddy, so when you’re in a car with some horsepower, you’re spinning your tires when you enter the water and you keep them spinning so the car can climb the opposite bank of the wash.. Anyway, I made about three washes – and there’s probably 50 ... I think we counted them one time – and on the fourth one the car got just a little bit sideways so that when it touched the muddy opposite bank it spun on me and I couldn’t recover it, so we ended up in the desert. We were stuck with about 10 miles to walk. GC LIVING: And you’re still married after how many years now? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: A long time – over 40 years. Anyway, this is the introduction part. I shut off the engine, and I said, “Well, we’re gonna have to walk.”

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

And then she says, “Well, somebody will come along, right, and give us a ride?” I said, “Look around you,” She’s looking, and I said, “Do you see any lights anywhere?” “No.” I then said, “Well, nobody’s going to come and get us. We’re going to walk.” “What about the water?” she said. “We’re going to cross it,” I answered. Yeah, she was not real happy with me. I think I heard her say something about she was going to tell her father on us, but we made it. So then, I have to tell this part. Probably 15 years later, we now own the store. Dad had retired for health reasons, and I bought the store from him; we made payments. We had one day off a week, and for years hadn’t had a vacation. So we had scheduled a one week vacation, my Mom and Dad came down to sort of oversee the store while we took the kids to Disneyland and it started raining early that morning. And by then, Cindy knew a little bit more about what that might mean. The road was paved then, though. But nevertheless, you still had some long quarter-mile runs where the water might be two-and-a-half feet deep. And, because of the water, you can’t see the

road. If you know how to follow it, you can, because there’s a little boil on the edge. Anyway, as we finally get away for our first vacation in years, we rounded a corner and there’s a quarter-mile of water just running like crazy. I looked at Cindy; she looked at me and she said, “Hit it!” So there’s what 15 years of being down there will do to you in desperation. Yeah, we owned the store, and I actively managed that for about 10 years. GC LIVING: Okay so you’re married 10 years. How many children did you have then? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: We had three children. GC LIVING: How did you make the transition from trading post owner to health care? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: That’s not a real simple story, just because I had to leave a family business. That was very tough, but I could see that … first of all the tribe was self-evolving. They wanted to have their own businesses and things like that. I was aware of that and you don’t want to stand in the way of that. I had to really look at what is my future and what does it mean for my family. It was a very tough decision to make. I had first offered to Cindy, “Well if you go to school first, and then you can get a job and then we can transition that way.”

continued on page 55... OR LI V ING THE INTERV IE W • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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Out & About Exciting events and striking scenery in Pinal County

DEBBIE CORTEZ

ALEXIS RAMIREZ

If you would like to contribute images of area events, people, pets and scenery, please post on our Facebook page or email to: editor@raxxdirect.com

HAROLD KITCHING - STATE OF THE CITY

JOEI ADMIRE

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ALMA ESTRADA THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Health • Wealth • Education

ARLENE REYNOSO - BURROWING OWLS

ALMA ESTRADA

ALMA ESTRADA

TISH SOPHA

ERICA YBARRA OF COOPER ANDERSEN EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

DEBBIE CORTEZ GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

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HOME INSURANCE

It may not cover everything in a storage unit Homeowners who have valuable art, jewelry, firearms, furniture, rugs or other rare items should not store them outside of the home unless they are individually appraised and insured separately.

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elf-storage units are growing in popularity, according to a recent report from Bloomberg. New units and warehouses are being built every month to accommodate the growing demand for paid storage. From simple small garage-like units to large temperature-controlled luxury spaces, there are a wide variety of options. In 2015, about 10 percent of U.S. residents rented a storage unit. However, very few people think about what happens to their belongings if there is a burglary, fire, flood or other catastrophe.

Home Insurance and Storage Units If a home insurance policy covers belongings that are stored away from the property, the coverage is limited to a specific dollar amount. Also, physical damages are covered, but theft is not. This is important to know before filling a storage unit full of costly belongings, antiques or luxury items. Homeowners who have valuable art, jewelry, firearms, furniture, rugs or other rare items should not store

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

them outside of the home unless they are individually appraised and insured separately. In the event of major damages, the dollar limit for stored items would not cover the replacement cost for the majority of such valuables. To store these items away from home, discuss preferences and needs with an insurance agent.

Storage Unit Company Insurance Some storage companies offer insurance to customers. For those who already are covered with an individual home insurance policy, this coverage may be redundant. However, it may be a good option for those whose home insurance policies do not cover belongings stored away from the property or for those who do not have home insurance. A renter's insurance policy may also cover some stored belongings. Always read the company's policy before buying it. What does it cover and exclude? Does the coverage come with a time limit? Is there a policy deductible? These are important things to know

before making a decision. If storage businesses sell insurance, they must be licensed insurance producers. If possible, talk to an agent before signing a contract to rent a storage unit and placing items in it. Be aware of how long any stored items are covered and the maximum dollar amount for compensation. Also, be sure to understand what types of damages are covered and those that are not. For example, fire damage to a large rug may be covered, but mold growth because of normal moisture in a humid climate may not be covered. Always keep an inventory of items in the storage unit, and take pictures of the stored belongings. There are even apps for such purposes. To learn more about these apps or the next steps to take, speak to a ROX Casa Grande Insurance Agent. Call 520-8367660 or visit roxinsurance.com

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Your local hometown

HERO Your local independent agent is your neighbor – someone you can trust and someone who’s here for you when it matters most.

THE BEST LOCAL INSURANCE AGENCY CITY • 000-000-0000 CASA GRANDE | 520.836.7660 www.bestinsuranceagency.com WWW.ROXINSURANCE.COM


THE IMPORTANCE OF EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

by Andrew H. Jones, Community Relations Coordinator, Sun Life Family Health Center

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hildren are constantly learning, and parents are a defining factor for the child’s developmental milestones. According to the Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development, “The emotional, social and physical development of young children has a direct effect on their overall development and on the adult they will become, thus understanding the need to invest in very young children is so important, so as to maximize their future well-being”. A positive, happy home, full of love and emotion is the best environment for a child to thrive. Parents can help to achieve a stable learning environment by developing a routine for the child to include healthy eating habits, play-time learning, personal hygiene care and simple tasks relative to the child’s age and competency level. Below is a list of benefits that effect early childhood development and have a lifelong impact: • Good nutrition, health and exercise are critical. • Children are born ready to learn. • The best learning happens in nurturing relationships. • The brain develops through use. • Children’s well-being is critical to brain development and learning. • Children learn through being engaged and doing. • Children learn from watching and copying. • Children learn language by listening to it and using it . Children are stimulated with various opportunities that can be incorporated into everyday activities. The parent should make the daily routine a positive learning experience to explore new (and exciting) ways for the child to expand his or her developmental goals. Allow and empower the child to do for themselves what he or she is capable of doing. For example, teaching children, as opposed to taking over and doing even the smallest task for the child, is a huge example of how developmental milestones can be met. Reading to your child will also build communication, language and literacy skills. Describing shapes, textures and colors for the child will allow him or her to begin to know the world around them, increase their general knowledge and stimulate their thinking abilities.

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Describing shapes, textures and colors for the child will allow him or her to begin to know the world around them, increase their general knowledge and stimulate their thinking abilities.

While these activities address some of the overall development for the child, there are factors that will greatly determine your child’s ability to learn. Genetics can determine the child’s prognosis of learning and retaining information. If there is a learning difference in the bloodline, chances are the child will inherit the difference as well. Therefore the parent will then need to take measures to understand how the child learns conducive to his or her ability. Want to see where your child stands on their developmental landmark? Please follow up with your Sun Life Family Health Center pediatrician to discuss your concerns with a provider.

Tip of the Month: Educational Activities

Visit your local library for fun educational activities that will stimulate your child’s development.

#OneSmallChange Sun Life Family Health Center in Maricopa presents: Meet the Expert Sun Life Family Health Center is partnering with the Maricopa Public Library to promote early learning literacy and educational programs within the community. Please join Dr. Stella Raposas, MD, FAAP and Dana Rodriguez, PHD, APNP-BC the first Wednesday and third Thursday of every month from 9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. at the Maricopa Public Library. This event will provide story time for the children and an opportunity for parents and adult family members to meet with local healthcare providers. Our goal is to help and provide information to parents about non-medical wellness, development and health behaviors. This is a great opportunity to meet our pediatric providers and ask non-medical questions relating to the day-to-day physical and emotional health of your children.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Horse Property

11378 N. Sombra del Monte, Casa Grande $450,000 3 BR 2 BA DEN/OFFICE | 2,604 SF | 2.67 ACRE HORSE PROPERTY • Gracious country living in this custom Dan Harris home! • 2.67 acres horse property with mountain views, sunrises, sunsets & city lights! • Completely fenced horse set-up with a 4-stall mare motel. • Newly painted inside and out, lovely hardwood flooring, carpet & plantation shutters. • A grand vaulted ceiling in the living room with a magnificent stone fireplace. • There is a family room is adjacent to the formal dining room plus a den/office. • The bright kitchen has a breakfast bar, pantry and includes all appliances. • The large master suite is split with separate garden tub and shower, and roomy walk-in closet. • A detached 2 car garage with storage for tack. • The breakfast room has mountain views. • This picturesque location has Ironwood, Mesquite and Palo Verde trees.

GEORGIA F. SCHAEFFER ASSOCIATE BROKER, REALTOR , GRI, ABR, CDPE, SRES, SFR ®

520.560.3333 | georgias@coldwellbanker.com

DAWN M. ZIMBELMAN REALTOR , CDPE, ABR, SRES ®

520.431.2875 | dawnz@coldwellbanker.com 520.423.8250 | ROXsells.com ©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


PLAY HEALTHY:

STUDENT ATHLETE SUCCESS by Breanna Boland, Executive Director | ACPP II, Casa Grande Alliance

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s parents and community members, we put time and effort into helping our youth be successful in life. One way we do this is by encouraging our children to participate in extracurricular activities such as school sports and community sports leagues. Participation in sports provides youth an opportunity to grow mentally and physically. Some of the benefits of participating in sports include: learning to work well with others, building self-confidence, enhancing communication skills, learning how to set and achieve goals, relieving stress and improving physical and mental health. The list could go on and on. It is important for parents to understand that a youth’s participation in sports does not make a child immune from substance use. According to President and CEO Steve Pasierb of The Partnership at Drugfree.org, “Sports can be a positive protective factor in a young person's life because of all of those great things - structure, goal setting, fair play and achievement, but it's not a silver bullet.” Studies indicate there is a link between youth who play sports and substance use. A review of 17 different studies, all but one taking place in the U.S., indicated that alcohol use was greater among students who engage in sports. They also found that participation in sports was associated with less illegal drug use, other than marijuana. The association with marijuana use wasn't clear.2 Substance use can lead to substance abuse, and it can happen to anyone. Some of the common misperceptions are that youth who are involved in sports don’t have time to use alcohol or drugs and being an athlete and using drugs or alcohol don’t go to-

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gether, because athletes are health-conscious. In actuality, some factors make student athletes more prone to substance use then their non-athletic peers. Being a student athlete can be tough and even stressful at times. Think about it – student athletes have to perform at school, at practice, at games and at home. Some of the reasons why student athletes turn to alcohol and drugs are to deal with the pressure to perform well in school and in sports, enhance performance, deal with injuries and to self-medicate to relieve physical pain.4 In Pinal County, 27 percent of our youth state they use alcohol or drugs to help relieve stress.1 As a parent, coach or caring adult in the community, it is crucial to understand how stress presents itself in youth and how to help our youth relieve stress without turning to alcohol or drugs. Stress can manifest in physical manners (headaches, stomach aches, sweaty palms, etc.), emotional manners (anger, frustrations, fear, sadness, etc.), behavioral manners (saying something mean, blowing up at someone, etc.) and in relationship (self-isolation, feelings of being unwanted) issues.3 Participation in physical activity is one way to relieve stress, but if that is already contributing to a child’s stress level, it is essential to help them find some alternative stress-relieving activities. Some suggested ways of relieving stress, besides physical activity, include arts and crafts, talking to friends, talking to parents, writing in a journal and meditation. Working with our student athletes to identify alternative ways to relieve stress will help them be more successful in sports and in life.3 In addition, having conversations about the risks of substance use and setting clear

no-use policies is another way to protect your student athlete from substance use. Youth who have good relationships with their parents are two times less likely to use alcohol and three to four times less likely to use marijuana.5 One of the main reasons youth give for not using drugs or alcohol is they don’t want to disappoint a parent (or another caring adult in their life).1 The Casa Grande Alliance has a free evidence-informed presentation for parents, coaches and student athletes called Play Healthy. Play Healthy talks to student athletes about what it takes to be a student athlete including: nutrition and water intake, sleep and abstaining from alcohol and drugs. The Play Healthy presentation for parents adds a piece about what parents can do to help their student athlete be successful. For more information about Play Healthy, substance abuse prevention or how to have conversations about drugs and alcohol with your child visit www.casagrandealliance.org, or call 520-836-5022. 1 Arizona Criminal Justice Commission-ACJC. (2014). Arizona Youth Survey. Retrieved from http://www.azcjc. gov/ACJC.Web/sac/AYS.aspx 2 Cairney, J., et. al. (2014). Sport participation and alcohol and illicit drug use in adolescents and young adults: A systematic review of longitudinal studies. Addictive Behaviors, 39(3), 497-506. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/ S0306460313003766 3 Molgaard, V., Kumpfer, K. & Fleming, E. (1993). Iowa State University Strengthening Families Program for Parents and Youth 10-14. 4 Reardon, C. L., & Creado, S. (2014). Drug abuse in athletes. Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation, 5, 95–105. Retrieved from http://doi.org/10.2147/SAR.S53784 5 The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. (2012). The Importance of Family Dinners VIII.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Youth are 25% of our population‌ ..and 100% of our future.

One caring adult can make a difference in a child’s life...be the one. Drug abuse prevention and treatment referrals 1460 N. Pinal Ave. Casa Grande, Arizona 85122 520-836-5022 | CasaGrandeAlliance@gmail.com www.CasaGrandeAlliance.org Facebook: CGAlliance | Twitter: @CG_Alliance


THE BIRTH OF GRACE (PART II) The Birth of Grace is the four part story of KVNG—91.1FM, “The Voice of Never-ending Grace”, Eloy and the whole The Birth of Grace is the four-part story of KVNG—91.1FM, “The Voice of NeverCasa Grande Valley’s Hometown radio station, by H. David Landry and Eric Kruzel.

ending Grace”, Eloy and the whole Casa Grande Valley’s hometown radio station

by H. David and Eric Kruzel quencies would have been a tremendously exis intense and of the signal covThe Birth ofchild Graceisis an theamazing four part story of KVNG—91.1FM, “The Voice Never-ending Grace”, Eloy and the whole The birth of aLandry Grande H. David Landry and Eric Kruzel.due to pensive venture. A copy of the Tohono eragebyarea extremely regulated miracle ofCasa God. The Valley’s birth ofHometown a non- radio station, government notice on-air presence of the Phoe- rules,tribal profit, nfull-power FM, Christian the first installment of the Birthradio of Grace, the two large years went by and nothing was heard they only had 36 months to getwas the sent to quencies is intense and the signal cov- would have been a tremendously exThe birth of a child is an amazing we explained how the miracle of the birth from Mexico in reference to the application. station built and on air. theAFCC, who in turn allowed us to file nix and In to granting station, though notofon the pensivethe venture. copy of the Tohono erage area Tucson extremelymarkets. regulated due miracle ofdefinitely God. The birth a nonof a child is an exciting, yet a very tryKVNG’s lawyer suggested they hire a MexiDuring this difficult time Calvary Chapel tribal government was sent to large on-air presence ofhas the Phoeprofit, full-power FM, radio for anotice change of tower location and the application, the FCC a process same level as the birth of aChristian child, is still the ing experience. The same was true with can lawyer to speed the process along. But, continued in much prayer and contacted nix and Tucson markets. In granting the the FCC, who in turn allowed us to file station, though definitely not on the this venture called KVNG – Grace that would advantage have cost additional money and experts theLicense. field to assist in assessing Cityinof As them it turns out, a new whereby is given to for new miraculous in ofitsfaith own right; particularly a change of tower location and the the FCC has a process same level as the birth of a child, is still application, 91.1FM. The conception began as Calvary it turns out, the delay was to be a blessing the feasibility of continuing this venture. It tower location wasn’t the only birthing station ownership and ofbecame the birth of Casa Grande locally whereby City of License. As clearer it turns out, a new advantage is given to the new longevity miraculous in its ownValley’s right; particularly Chapel of Casa Grande sent in an application in disguise. than ever, this radio station tower location wasn’t the only birthing station ownership and the longevity of the birth of Casa Grande Valley’s locally difficulty. anThe owner’s location the area. The would owned locallyFM produced KVNG time made availableinduring the “Mexfor aand full powered radio station during stretch the church beyond what it difficulty. had ever thought possible and if the staanican owner’s location in theCalvary area. The owned and locally produced KVNG stand-off” allowed the opportuan FCC filing window in 2007. The birthing (KVNG 91.1FM) would go result was that in June of 2008, Calvary 91.1FM –91.1FM “The –Voice of Never-ending (KVNG –Grace 91.1FM) would go–to result wassearch that in of 2008, “The Voice Never-ending needed to be profitable operate, the nity to forJune a new towerCalvary location sinceGracetion process went through manyof labor pains and through many difficulties, of Chapel became the “tentative select-wantselectGrace” (known as Grace 91.1FM). through difficulties, of Chapel became the “tentative Grace” asnoGrace 91.1FM). process should many bestretches aborted now. Feelersstretches were the Tohono O’odham nation didn’t the long(known stretches of activity at all. faith and the revealing of multiples of ee” to build the full powered FM staThe conception of Grace (KVNG) out, looking for possible buyers the tower inthe Chuichu (the original FM city of Partconception of the inactivity due to the fact and the revealing ofofmultiples of ee” tolocated build full powered sta- sentfaith The ofwas Grace (KVNG) miracles over the next several in their area. the There were, howevcanUnited be dated back 2007 when Construction Permit. months There were many severe license). During two-year search, several that the States andtoMexico had aat the tion miracles overpains thetaking nextplace. several months tion in their area. There were, howevcan be dated to 2007 when at the er, and yearsand before finally being complications yet to overcome in area urgingback andtreaty encouragement of other worrisome labor birthed sites within the allowable geographical communications dealing specifically on-air full birthingyet process. Christian radiooriginating stations around the na- the and being birthed er, complications yet to proved overcome in We will years continuebefore the thirdfinally of four installments were found, each location toand be coming urging encouragement of other withand FM broadcasts within 200km original City of License wasbuildCalvary Chapel of Casa Grande of The Birth of Grace in the next issue of the anKVNG’s expensive and technically difficult of thetion, common border of the two countries. and coming on-air the fulllocated birthingthe process. Christian(CCCG) radiofiled stations aroundforthe na- Chuichu, an application a nonGolden LIVING You can out. Even if the on stationnorthern-most built a 350-foot We tower, KVNG’s possible tower location required the will continue the Corridor next installment of magazine. The portion of the Tohono O'odham Nacommercial educational radio station KVNG’swould original Citybeen of License tion,Mexican Calvary ChapeltoofourCasa Grande listen to next KVNG Grace 91.1FM 24-hours a day the coverage not have worth theofwas equivalent FCC to approve the Birth Grace in the issue–of the Golden south of Casa Grande. licensed withthe theUnited Federal CommunicaCorridor Living magazine.the In the meantime, throughout Casa Grandeyou valley. You can vastdirectly expense. application before States Chuichu, located on the northern-most (CCCG) filed an application for awould non- tion, can listen toalso KVNG – Grace 91.1FM twenty-four Shortly after the tions Corporation (FCC). We will the next installment In 2010, afterFCC’s failingannouncement to hear from Mexico, listen viacontinue live-streaming on the internet at of The offer a valid Construction Permit (CP) for the hours throughout the Casa Grande Valley of the Tohono O'odham Na-a day www.grace911.com. commercial educational radio theFCC favorable selection, sover- ConFCC filing windows are rare. ofportion the issued Calvary a the conditional Forthe further information, station. In These late 2008, the FCC sentstation KVNG’s Birth of Grace in next issue of the Golden or via live-streaming on any computer or smart nation of the south Tohono O’odham Although many whoapproval. would like to build eign struction Permit (CP) andof theCasa clock Grande. began to at www.grace911.com. to make a donation ormagazine. sponsor of our application tothe Mexico for tion, directly licensed with Federal Communicaphone For further infor- a portion Corridor Living In the meantime, you Calvary Chapel that they were mation about operate a full-powered station, notified Theand normal gestation period forFM a human tick. KVNG was still without a perspective programming, email us at info@grace911.com or the station, to make a donation, can listen to KVNG – Grace 91.1FM twenty-four Shortly after theaccording FCC’s announcement tionsbaby Corporation (FCC). pleased withand Grace, as a non-tribal the FCCdays onlyor allows a few For openings and not portion of 426-7911. our programing you can is 280 40 weeks. KVNG, tower location to the FCCor sponsor acall (520) hours a day throughout the Casa Grande Valley email us at info@grace911.com or call us at station being located the soververy limited time frames.are Calvary of theradio favorable selection, Theseat FCC filing windows rare. owned (520) 426-7911. or via live-streaming on any computer or smart nation’s border. Although a Casa Grande was fortunate eign their nation of the Tohono O’odham AlthoughChapel manyofwho would like to build within set-back, this notification would later to be ready and prepared when the phone at www.grace911.com. For further infor Biblically Focused • Locally Produced •Chapel Community Minded • Broadcasting 24/7 notified Calvary that and operate a full-powered FM station, become a blessing in disguise. To buildthey were mation about the station, to make a donation, October 2007 window opened. maintain a tower that location competition available frenot pleased withinat Grace, as a non-tribal or sponsor a portion of our programing you can the FCC onlyThe allows a fewforopenings and and Streaming Live Grace911.com email us at info@grace911.com or call us at owned radio station being located at very limited time frames. Calvary Chapel of Casa Grande was fortunate within their nation’s border. Although a (520) 426-7911. set-back, this notification would later to be ready and prepared when the become a blessing in disguise. To build October 2007 window opened. The competition for available fre- and maintain a tower in that location

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THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


o

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g

s

u r y t r-

n

Church

Directory

Adventists:

Calvary Chapel:

1867 N. Trekell Rd

962 W. Gila Bend Hwy.

Casa Grande Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Calvary Chapel of Casa Grande

Arizona City Ward

Kingdom Living Ministries

Genealogy Family History Center

Ministry Center

1555 N. Colorado

297 W. Rock Creek Place

Apostolic:

Roman Catholic:

241 W. Cottonwood Ln, Ste 132

201 N. Picacho St.

Casa Grande Stake Office

Sun Valley Community Church

Liberal Catholic:

Lutheran:

Universal La Iglesia Del Reino De Dios

Abundant Grace Church & Bible College Apostolic Tabernacle - United Pentecostal Church 432 W. Saguaro St.

Iglesia Apostolica De La Fe En Cristo Jesus in the USA 16460 W. Ashmore Rd.

Torre Fuerte Strong Tower Church 409 W. Cholla St.

Unity of All Nations New Testament Church II 417 N. Trekell Rd.

Assemblies of God: First Assembly of God 501 E. Kortsen Rd.

Grace Assembly of God 200 S. Florence St.

Iglesia Apostolica Del Dios Vivo 220 N. Lincoln Ave.

St. Anthony Of Padua Catholic Church

St. Michael And All Angels Liberal Catholic Cathedral 545 E. Palm Parke Blvd.

520.836.7519

1555 N. Colorado

1556 N. Arizola 412 N. Brown

Central Lutheran Church 324 N. Sacaton St.

Christian:

Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church

400 E. 3rd St.

Conland Lutheran Church

Bethel Christian Community Christ Life Church

2016 N. Pinal Ave.

1805 E. Sierra Pkwy.

18171 W. Hopi Dr.

Trinity Lutheran Church and TLC Preschool

Living Waters Church Of God

1510 N. Casa Grande Ave.

Messianic:

Pentecostal Church Of God:

Indian Hills Community Church

3153 E. Cornman Rd.

Hwy 86, Milepost 90, Covered Wells AZ

Compass Christian Church

20110 W. Hopi Dr.

Victory Chapel Christian Fellowship Church

1482 N. Pueblo Dr.

Beit Roi

Methodist:

Pentecostal Holiness:

1576 E. Cottonwood Ln.

640 W. Ocotillo St.

109 E. 11th St.

People Of The Son Emc

Greater Evangelist Temple Church Of God In Christ

Church of Christ:

The United Methodist Church

More Than Conquerors Ministries

Nazarene:

Outreach Church Of God In Christ INC.

1915 N. Casa Grande Ave.

Presbyterian:

805 W. Racine Place

Templo Cristiano

Desert Valley Church of Christ

212 S. Drylake

2172 N. Arizola Rd.

Baptist:

Episcopal:

Nondenominational: 241 W. Cottonwood Ln., Ste 132

Calvary Southern Baptist Church

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church

2492 N. Trekell Rd.

704 E. McMurray Blvd.

Eleven Mile Corner First Southern Baptist Church

Interdenominational:

Desert Sky Baptist Church 891 W Kortsen Rd.

First Shiloh Baptist 1121 N Pinal Ave

Grace Baptist Church

1319 E. Cottonwood Ln.

Iglesia Bautista Emanuel Church 112 N. Brown Ave

Landmark Missionary Baptist Church

Christ Assembly

411 Saguaro St.

Crossroads Church

3151 N. Piper Rd., Ste. 101

North Trekell Southern Baptist 2492 N. Trekell Rd.

Primera Iglesia Bautista Del Sur 305 E. 4th St. Tohono O’Odham Baptist Church 18280 W. Hanna Rd.

Trinity Southern Baptist Church 1100 E. Trinity Place

Victory Baptist Church of Casa Grande Independent

Faith Community Church

Off Rodeo Rd. on Kadota Ave.

Arizona Plaza, Ste ll

First Presbyterian Church 702 E. Cottonwood Ln.

1104 N. Pinal Ave.

Jesus Joy Jubilee National Fellowship 241 E. Cottonwood Ln., Ste. A

525 N. Peart Rd.

204. N. Trekell Rd.

Covenant Presbyterian Church

Abundant Grace Church

Iglesia Apostolica Centro De Fe

Religious Organizations: The Supreme Council Of The House Of Jacob Inc. 114 N. Amarillo St.

Other:

Cowboy Church

18171 W. Hopi Dr.

1300 E. Jimmie Kerr Rd.

Native Christian Fellowship 16816 W. Hanna Rd.

Redemption Church 275 W. Viola Dr.

Latter Day Saints:

950 N. Peart Rd.

New Beginnings Church Of The Nazarene

Harvest Family Church

10245 N. Pinal

Hope Baptist Church 9745 N. Trekell Rd.

Newlife Baptist Church

511 W. 1st St.

Desert Joy Church

The Salvation Army

83 N. Pueblo Dr.

1515 N. Trekell Rd.

Gateway Temple Of Worship Non-Demoninational Garden Chapel

201 E. Kortsen Rd.

New Hope Baptist Church

211 E. Date Ave.

Quijotoa Mission

815 E. 6th St.

Corner of 8th & Olive

425 N. Lincoln Ave.

Eagle Summit Ministries

423 W. Ocotillo St.

Casa Grande Church Of Christ

First Baptist Church

Victory Outreach Ministry

Pentecostal:

Love Fellowship Center

767 Castledale

1415 W. Trekell Rd.

Calvary Chapel Casa Grande

1333 N. Center

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 1555 N. Colorado

Casa Grande First Ward 787 E. Kortsen Rd.

Casa Grande Second Ward 1555 N. Colorado

Casa Grande Third Ward 787 E. Kortsen Rd.

Casa Grande Fourth Branch Spanish 2841 N. Trekell Rd.

Casa Grande Fifth Ward 2841 N. Trekell Rd. Casa Grande Young Single Adult Branch 2841 N. Trekell Rd.

1225 E. Cottonwood Ln.

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

962 W. Gila Bend Highway David Landry, Senior Pastor Services

Saturday: 6:30pm Sunday: 9:00am & 11:00 am

Mid-week

Wednesday: 6:30pm Awana Club: 6:30pm Youth: 6:30pm

freegrace@calvarycg.org • 520-836-9676

www.calvarycg.org

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI V ING YOU! • GOLDEN

51


EDUCATION

CENTRAL ARIZONA COLLEGE STUDENTS EARN ALL-ARIZONA ACADEMIC HONORS by Angela Askey, Executive Director Public Relations and Marketing

F

ive of Central Arizona College’s outstanding students have been selected to the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society All-Arizona Academic Team. The All Arizona Academic Team awards are a positive collaboration between Arizona's community colleges and the state universities to provide educational opportunities for students. Cheyenne Dickey (Aravaipa Campus), Justin Huxel (Signal Peak Campus) and Dominic Savana (Maricopa Campus) were awarded First Team honors and each received a $1,000 scholarship. Thao Nguyen (San Tan Campus) was named a Second Team member and received a $750 scholarship. Edna Garcia (Superstition Mountain Campus) was chosen as a Third Team member and was granted a $500 scholarship. The awards were announced at the All-Arizona Academic Team Recognition Ceremony held at the Hilton Phoenix/Mesa on Thursday, March 9. Phi Theta Kappa, USA Today, community college presidents and community college state associations co-sponsor All-State Aca-

demic Team recognition programs in 32 states. Students nominated to the All-USA Academic Team are automatically named to the All-State Academic Team. Ranking on the All-State team is determined by the student's score in the national competition. Nominations are based on outstanding academic performance and service to the college and community. Recipients are also eligible for full tuition scholarships to any of state’s three public universities: Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University or the University of Arizona. Cheyenne Dickey (Aravaipa Campus) – First Team Dickey plans to transfer to Arizona State University. She plans to earn her master’s degree in special education with a minor in psychology to become a behavior analyst.

Huxel plans to earn a bachelor’s and master’s degree in materials science and engineering at Arizona State University. Dominic Savana (Maricopa Campus) - First Team Savana is a special education major who holds a 4.0 grade point average. He plans to earn his bachelor’s degree in special education and to earn an advanced degree with a specialization in autism. Thao Nguyen (San Tan Campus) – Second Team Nguyen plans to earn her bachelor’s degree in actuarial science at Arizona State University within the next two years and become an actuary in the insurance market. Edna Garcia (Superstition Mountain Campus) – Third Team Garcia plans to earn a bachelor’s degree in graphic design with an emphasis in animation at Grand Canyon University and become an animator. She hopes one day to be able to work at an animation studio such as Disney or Pixar.

Take leap the

Justin Huxel (Signal Peak Campus) – First Team As a student, Huxel has been involved at CAC as a tutor and served as the finance and appropriations officer for student leadership.

Register for the Fall Semester today at centralaz.edu

Your Future Begins Today at CAC. 52

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

53


EDUCATION

VILLAGO MIDDLE SCHOOL EARNS A+ by Bryan Harris, Ed.D., Director of Professional Development & Public Relations Casa Grande Elementary School District Gaining A+ recognition is not easy to attain. In fact, only 39 schools across the State of Arizona were awarded this distinction in 2017.

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or the second time in school history, Villago Middle School has been recognized with an A+ School of Excellence award from the Arizona Educational Foundation. Given to only a small handful of schools around Arizona each year, this award acknowledges the efforts of the students, staff and leadership at creating a school that excels at meeting both the academic and non-academic needs of students. Principal Jeff Lavender explained, “At Villago, we believe it’s our job to help students reach their full potential in academics and in life. We offer students opportunities to grow, develop and explore in a safe environment where we truly understand the uniqueness of middle school students. We have an outstanding and dedicated staff that truly cares about meeting the needs of all of our students.” According to Executive Director Bobbie O’Boyle of the Arizona Educational Foundation, the goal of the A+ School of Excellence Program is to celebrate outstanding schools and to share stories of success. Gaining A+ recognition is not easy to attain. In fact, only 39 schools across the State of Arizona were awarded this distinction in 2017. In order to be considered, schools had to complete an extensive application process that required

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

evidence of high levels of student achievement, an in-depth description of the programs and practices designed to meet the needs of all learners, and documentation of parental and community involvement in the school. In addition, part of the application process included a site visit and staff interviews. According to the Arizona Educational Foundation, winning schools are recognized for their “superior ability” to meet the needs of students. In May, the Villago students, staff and parents will celebrate this accomplishment with an assembly highlighting the many programs, staff and practices that helped to achieve this distinction. “We are incredibly honored to have received this award, but I am even more proud of the students and staff at Villago. We truly have something special here and I’m honored to be part of it,” said Principal Lavender. The Casa Grande Elementary School District is home to many A+ School of Excellence Awards. The following schools have been awarded this distinction in past years: Cactus Middle School (2007), McCartney Ranch Elementary (2013), Villago Middle School (2013), and Ironwood Elementary (2016). In fact, the Casa Grande Elementary School District has received more A+ awards than any other school district in Pinal County.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

continued on page 58...

ity

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The responsibility is Yours and Mine

m un

Success for Every One

ol

I was always forward looking. I promised her when we had bought the store; it was a stepping-stone – just a transition. We’d pay our way through college. But usually that stepping stone ends up being maybe a bit longer than you thought it might be. In this case it took about 25 years. She didn’t want to go to college, so I said I would and she could manage the store and I’d help by phone. I’ll also be Mr. Mom. We had children that needed to be in school, too, and there was still really no public school down there. So, I went to college and helped her by phone when she had questions or things came up. And so I did four years of college. It took me four years because I was working, and also being Mr. Mom. GC LIVING: Which college? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: I attended CAC for two years and finished at ASU. When I graduated, I prepared immediately for the CPA exam, because it was an accounting degree. Everybody said, “You should get your CPA.” I really didn’t know what I wanted to do. It’s was an entirely new profession for me. After college, I went to w ork for a CPA firm in Tempe, James Beaton, PC. I worked in their Tempe office for a year and then they purchased the Dixon and Masters CPA firm in Coolidge. By then, they kind of had a feel for my work, so they essentially assigned me that office to be both the head accountant and manager of the office. I probably was there (Coolidge) for a year-and-a-half, with James Beaton for about three years. But I was missing something…I wasn’t sure what. We were primarily income tax and very busy

ho Sc

...continued from page 41

The choice for families in Casa Grande ts en ud St

The Robinette Family: Travis, Cindy and daughters, Melissa, Latisha and Christi

during that season. We did a lot of accounting write-ups, but that’s a week or so a month for the rest of the year, so I was bored and wasn’t really sure what I was missing. I had a colleague from ASU call me who was working for Picacho School District. She was leaving and so she thought I would be good for that job. And I thought, “Well, why not? I’ll try it.” And so I took that job at Picacho. I worked there three years and, still I was just trying to find out where I was going to fit into this world. It wasn’t until I was at this school district and got a little bit of exposure to management again…but after three years there I was still not content. I was like, “You know what? I’m missing the business (management) side.” That store had given me exposure to management, because I grew that store. I did everything I could. I applied everything I learned at CAC in that one year, plus what dad taught me, to make that business grow…and I did pretty well at it. I significantly increased the income. It was a tremendous challenge and a tough business environment and there is no boring in that! Anyway, I realized at Picacho that I was missing the business side. That competitive spirit where we are in this market and this is our share of that market. Do we want to grow it? Can we grow it? If so, what do we need to do to grow it? I wish I had a crystal ball, but of course you don’t have a crystal ball. That was the sort of thrill, or challenge, that I was missing there. Then I had another colleague call me, who was working at some medical clinic. She actually said, “I think this job is perfect for you.” She apparently knew me better than I knew myself, in terms of what I was missing. She actually encouraged me to apply and that’s how I ended up at Sun Life as the Chief Financial Officer. I actually researched the medical field before I went and applied for that job. It was very daunting what I read because, even then in 1998, there was massive change underway – massive political pressure on that system. The reimbursements were being

Casa Grande Elementary School District is

Fa m ilie s

The LIVING Interview (cont.)

Did You Know? • Casa Grande Elementary has more A+ Schools and A+ Programs than any other school district in Pinal County • The District has a proven, rigorous instructional program built upon “Success for Every One” • More than 8 out of 10 families in Casa Grande choose the Casa Grande Elementary School District. • For more than 10 years in a row, 96% of families rate their child’s school an A or a B.

Visit Your Child’s School Today! ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT

WWW.CGESD.ORG

520.836.2111

GOLDEN CORRID OR LI V ING

55


39 ARIZONA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

EARN A+ School of Excellence™ AWARD Casa Grande school makes the list! by Arizona Educational Foundation

I

t’s official. We have announced the names of the newest 39 Arizona public schools receiving the coveted A+ School of Excellence™ award for the 2016-2017 academic year!

The 2017 A+ School of Excellence winning schools and principals are: • Benson High School, Benson (Benson Unified School District), Ben Rodriguez • Cherokee Elementary School, Paradise Valley (Scottsdale Unified School District), Walter Chantler • Clarendon School, Phoenix (Osborn School District), Theresa Nickolich • Connolly Middle School, Tempe (Tempe Elementary School District), Kathryn Mullery • Crismon Elementary School, Mesa (Mesa Public Schools), Sandi Kuhn • Desert Vista High School, Phoenix (Tempe Union High School District), Dr. Christine Barela • EDUPRIZE SCHOOLS – Gilbert, Gilbert (EDUPRIZE SCHOOLS, LLC), Dr. Robbie McCamman • Elvira Elementary School, Tucson (Sunnyside Unified School District), Andy Townsend • Flowing Wells High School, Tucson (Flowing Wells Unified School District), James Brunenkant • Francis M. Pomeroy Elementary School, Chandler (Mesa Public Schools), Dr. James Driscoll • Gilbert High School, Gilbert (Gilbert Public Schools), Christopher Stroud • Hartford Sylvia Encinas Elementary School, Chandler (Chandler Unified School District), Heather Anguiano • Horizon High School, Scottsdale (Paradise Valley Unified School District), Linda Ihnat • Islands Elementary School, Gilbert (Gilbert Public Schools), Chris Birgen • Jefferson Elementary School, Mesa (Mesa Public Schools), Genessee Montes • John M. Andersen Elementary School, Chandler (Chandler Unified School District), Dr. Shannon Hannon

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GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • YOU!

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Kyrene de la Estrella, Phoenix (Kyrene School District), Michael Lamp Kyrene de los Cerritos, Phoenix (Kyrene School District), Darcy DiCosmo Kyrene de los Lagos Dual Language Academy, Phoenix (Kyrene School District), Dr. Ana Gomez del Castillo Mabel Padgett Elementary School, Goodyear (Litchfield Elementary School District), Gina DeCoste Marshall Ranch Elementary School, Glendale (Peoria Unified School District), Marla Hobbs Metro Tech High School, Phoenix (Phoenix Union High School District), Bryan Reynoso Oak Tree Elementary School, Gilbert (Gilbert Public Schools), Dale Lunt Osborn Middle School, Phoenix (Osborn School District), Marty Makar Patterson Elementary School, Gilbert (Gilbert Public Schools), Lucas Blackburn Perry High School, Gilbert (Chandler Unified School District), Dan Serrano Rattlesnake Ridge Elementary School, Tucson (Marana Unified School District), Cindy Lewis Rio Rico High School, Rio Rico (Santa Cruz Valley Unified School District), Shelly Vroegh Santa Fe Elementary School, Peoria (Peoria Unified School District), Robert Miller Santan Elementary School, Chandler (Chandler Unified School District), Amy O’Neal Santan Junior High School, Chandler (Chandler Unified School District), Barbara Kowalinski Stapley Junior High School, Mesa (Mesa Public Schools), Kenneth Erickson Superstition Springs Elementary School, Mesa (Gilbert Public Schools), Dr. Timothy Moses Tavan Elementary School, Phoenix (Scottsdale Unified School District), Margaret Serna Villago Middle School, Casa Grande (Casa Grande Elementary School District), Jeff Lavender Walden Grove High School, Sahuarita (Sahuarita Unified School District), Teresa Hill

Walter Douglas Elementary School, Tucson (Flowing Wells Unified School District), Tamara McAllister • West Wing School, Peoria (Deer Valley Unified School District), Dr. Linda Price-Barry • Willie and Coy Payne Junior High School, Queen Creek (Chandler Unified School District), Paul Bollard Applicant schools are evaluated in the areas of student focus and support, school culture, active teaching and learning, curriculum, leadership, community and parent involvement and assessment data. Applications are made available to Pre-Kindergarten through 12th grade public schools statewide. Evaluation of schools is based on a lengthy written application submitted by the school and a rigorous site visit conducted by a team of trained judges. In the application, each school provides demographic information, a description of current programs and practices, documentation of parent and community involvement, and a profile of the school’s principal and the school community’s commitment to excellence, equity, service and sustained high achievement. Preparation of each school’s application involves collaboration among all stakeholders including students, faculty, staff, administrators and community members. Schools receive $500 and a banner designating them as an A+ School of Excellence™ winner. All staff and faculty at the award-winning schools will be eligible for partial scholarships from Argosy University Phoenix. The award is valid for three-anda-half years. Recognition through the A+ School of Excellence™ program can help increase confidence in Arizona’s public schools and create greater parent and community support. For additional information on the A+ School of Excellence program, visit azedfoundation.org Applications for the 2018 program will be made available soon.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 41 pushed down. Still, it was considered a field of opportunity, so I thought I’d give it a try. I was a little bit intimidated. I was like, “Well, you’re working with doctors and I’m from a reservation.” I thought they may not like me, or they may find me crude or whatever. But I took that job and hadn’t looked back really. There’s no boredom in health care. As soon as you get to thinking you might have mastered the business model, it changes and you have to start all over again. GC LIVING: So now you’re the CEO at Sun Life. How have the changes in health care – both the business practices and patient care – changed since you started at Sun Life? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: A fair amount. From the business side, since ‘98, there have been continuous, although small, increments of pushing down of the reimbursement side. Whether it’s Medicare ... I mean Medicare usually leads the way. Whatever Medicare

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does, it’s not long until the private insurances follow suit and/or the state medical program. GC LIVING: At the same time a steady increase in the operating costs? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Yes, because costs have been going up. I think for a good portion of those years the medical price index was among the steepest in rate of increase. That index measures the cost side of the medical profession and with costs soaring upward you can increase your patient encounters and still have a net loss in bottom line traction. Add to that mix any reductions in payment structures and you have a recipe for disaster. That’s part of what I’m saying – it’s a very challenging business model. You can’t really rest. You have to constantly stay on guard. I think that most people working in the healthcare system realize that it was broken...in terms of duplicated labs, X-rays and a general disconnect from one service provider to another. For example, I have personally told my providers, “I recently had that lab taken already; do you want me to have the results sent to you?” They often say, “No, I’ll run it again.” There’s a general reluctance in health care to rely on a lab result that you didn’t order yourself. So even if you had the records that may not solve that problem for you. There’s an established healthcare culture that is determined to remain the same. We’ve been fighting that, because if you’re going to be affordable, efficient and accountable, you can’t take that old culture along. I’m not saying that healthcare professionals are at fault, rather, they are caught in a healthcare system in which they also struggle with to survive. That’s sort of been the setting and I think that what has emerged out of that is this whole new concept of value-based reimbursement, or outcome-based – the improvement in one’s health outcome score being tied to reimbursement somehow. That’s the current direction which I think was pretty firmly locked in place in the Affordable Care Act. That’s the highway, if you will, for value-based healthcare and to prepare the healthcare system to handle a larger population and provide better health outcomes with an overall lower system cost. So, at this point there is a lot of focus on

changing the healthcare system from an encounter based (reactionary healthcare) to health outcome based (proactive or preventative). No one really knows how that revenue stream is going to be tied. And, what do you do about patient compliance? You may have the best doctor using the best treatment available, but if the patient isn’t compliant, you’re not going to have the desired outcome. And does the healthcare provider then lose the associated revenue? Who takes the hit? That’s what I mean when I say it’s still very vague. I think it’s fair enough to say that they are still in the concept form, but they’re rolling these reimbursement models out now. I guess that’s okay, you have to test it somehow. You have to develop those ... it has to go from concept to reality based on trial and error and that’s kind of where healthcare is today. If the Affordable Care Act is repealed we will still be on the road to reform healthcare because system cost is not sustainable without it. GC LIVING: Is the community health center model different from the typical family practices office in that it has the ability to educate the patient in greater depth, then measure those changes? Things like diet and exercise? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: That’s one of the keys to better health, but who wants to exercise? Who wants to take that two- mile walk and eat healthier all the time? Yes, education is a critical piece of convincing all of us to eat better and to exercise our bodies. Yes, community health centers are expected to provide patient education and find innovative ways to work with and along-side the patient to make significant progress in terms of chronic disease management. Grant funds help us with the cost of these services temporarily. The long term sustainability will require that funding be part of the outcome based revenue streams. GC LIVING: Is insurance driving the outcomes versus the clinician driving the patient and outcome? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Ultimately, one would hope that it would be a combination, but for right now, the insurance companies are approaching us and saying, “These are the health metrics we want you to work toward and we will incentivize you, because if you achieve these goals, then you’ll receive these bonuses.” I wouldn’t say that they’re

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


United Way VITA Program Partner, with Beverly Prueter (UWPC), (Mayor) Bob Jackson & Ricardo Banuelos (UWPC)

not something a physician wouldn’t want, though, because they are. I want to be fair to the health insurance companies. They employ Medical Directors (physicians) that are familiar with local markets, so they know what the three top health issues or chronic conditions are in a given population. It may be diabetes. It may be cardiology-related issues. They may even have some health indicators that are centered on wellness. They’re trying to tackle the biggest problem areas first. An emerging issue for the healthcare system is that you may have twenty different insurance contracts with twenty different health care goals each for your providers to improve upon. On the provider side how do we tackle this many different objectives at once? Reality is that you must pick and choose which are in common and drive those outcomes simply because you will risk losing out completely if your work is greatly diluted. So, they’re currently not being driven by the physicians, except from the plan side. However, the plans are trying to spend their money to get better health outcomes which, in return, should save money for the healthcare system, because that and healthier customers is the point. If we get better-controlled diabetes, then over time,

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

that patient is going to cost less in terms of their health care. It may be 15 years or longer before they get into that next step, or that next chronic disease state. With diabetes, If you can prolong that next stage, or stop it entirely, then the person can live their normal lifespan without getting into kidney failure, or any other of the many complication of diabetes. The latter stage of disease care is where the major health care expenditures pile up. GC LIVING: So how is Sun Life evolving to provide the ancillary services to go with the medical needs of the community, as well as paying attention to the business side of the operation? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: And always hoping you’re doing that with a good, healthy balance, right? As a community health center, we have, for a long time, gathered patient health-related statistics. It’s a requirement of our 330 grant and it’s called a UDS report, a Uniform Data Set. All community health centers are required to submit this report and the data is aggregated to see where each CHC stands in terms of meeting national health goals as well as other statistical comparisons. Therefore, we have a head start in that area, because we’ve been collecting that kind of statistical information

and trying to improve it. I wouldn’t say we had a 10-mile head start, but we certainly have a little exposure. Those are very rudimentary measures, and to achieve what they want the new healthcare system to be, we’re going to have to really greatly enhance those efforts. So, how have we changed? We have brought in a certified diabetes educator, who meets with patients, both group-basis and one-on-one, and those patients think the world of her. She can truly help them. She teaches you what the ingredient thing on this box means to you and to your diabetes. And how do you manage that? She developed an education series, and she has multiple classes that cover nutrition, exercise, medication management, and helps people not feel discouraged when improved results are not happening fast enough. GC LIVING: Now, you just mentioned one part, because we do have in our communities that you serve, a high Hispanic population and a high Native American population, whose traditional diets have been pointed to as causes of some of the health issues. TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Yes. We do serve a few Native Americans. However, they are largely served by Indian Health Services

continued on page 70... OR LI V ING THE INTERV IE W • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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Special Section:

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THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Y

ou can’t have healthcare without the word “care,” and in the Golden Corridor, we’re lucky to have so many practitioners who care. Our community boasts incredible dentists ensuring our oral health, hospitals bringing us leading-edge technology, comprehensive health centers making high quality services accessible to anyone and specialists, health and fitness coaches and even veterinarians helping support the health of our furry “family members.” In this edition of Golden Corridor LIVING Magazine, we are excited to bring you some tips for staying healthy throughout your life as well as introduce you to some caring practitioners in our community who can help you along the way.

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

BANNER HEALTH HOSPITALS GIVEN HIGH MARKS FOR PATIENT SAFETY FROM LEAPFROG

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he Leapfrog Group, a national patient safety watchdog organization, has released its spring 2017 safety grade list. Eleven Banner Health hospitals have received high grades for patient safety ratings. Three hospitals received an ‘A’ grade (the highest patient safety rating), while eight others received a ‘B’ grade (an above average score). The Banner hospitals that received high marks include: • Banner Boswell Medical Center – Sun City, Ariz. • Banner Estrella Medical Center – Phoenix, Ariz. • Sterling Regional MedCenter – Sterling, Colo. • Banner Baywood Medical Center – Mesa, Ariz. • Banner Casa Grande Medical Center – Casa Grande, Ariz. • Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center – Sun City West, Ariz.

Banner Payson Medical Center – Payson, Ariz. • Banner Desert Medical Center – Mesa, Ariz. • Banner Gateway Medical Center – Gilbert, Ariz. • North Colorado Medical Center – Greeley, Colo. • McKee Medical Center – Loveland, Colo. The Leapfrog Safety Grade uses 30 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades to more than 2,600 U.S. hospitals twice per year. It is calculated by top patient safety experts, peer-reviewed, fully transparent and free to the public. A full description of the data and methodology used in determining grades is available online at http://www.hospitalsafetygrade.org/. “Hospitals that earn top marks nationally in the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, have

achieved the highest safety standards in the country,” said Leah Binder, president and CEO of The Leapfrog Group. “That takes commitment from every member of the hospital staff, who all deserve thanks and congratulations when their hospitals achieve an ‘A’ Safety Grade.” Headquartered in Arizona, Banner Health is one of the largest nonprofit health care systems in the country. The system owns and operates 28 acute-care hospitals, Banner Health Network, Banner – University Medicine, academic and employed physician groups, long-term care centers, outpatient surgery centers and an array of other services; including Banner Urgent Care, family clinics, home care and hospice services, pharmacies and a nursing registry. Banner Health is in six states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nebraska, Nevada and Wyoming. For more information, visit www.BannerHealth.com.

Experienced, Quality Care for the Entire Family Living & Serving in Casa Grande for over 60 Years After-hours Emergency Treatment Available Most Insurance Accepted Services Provided by an Arizona Licensed General Dentist

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(520) 836-7111 • 721 N Olive Ave. • Casa Grande, AZ 85122 • www.dickandmitchelldds.com

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THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

Experienced and Compassionate Physicians Serving the Pinal County Community for Over 20 Years

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remier Cardiovascular Center is a thriving cardiology practice with office locations in Casa Grande, Chandler and Maricopa. Our experienced and compassionate physicians have been serving the Pinal county community for 20 years and have earned a trusted reputation for providing excellent cardiac care. PCC physicians are affiliated with many major hospitals, including Banner Casa Grande Medical Center, Chandler Regional Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert and Banner Desert Medical Center. Our practice includes five board-certified cardiologists including two non-invasive cardiologists, Ashok Solsi MD and John Tretter MD; two interventional cardiologists, Georges Nseir MD and Romas Kirvaitis MD; an electrophysiologist, Ziad El Khoury MD; and a nurse practitioner, Nancy Biehl-Judge ANP. Dr. Solsi is the president and founder of PCC. Dr. Nseir is actively involved in ongoing research. We are proud to be an IAC-accredited facility for Nuclear Cardiology, Vascular Testing, and Echocardiography with state-ofthe-art diagnostic equipment. We have fully-integrated certified electronic medical records, including our new Patient Portal that allows you to connect with our doctors and staff through a convenient, safe and secure online environment.

PCC offers a full range of diagnostic services, including consultation and evaluation, exercise stress testing, cardiac catheterization, cardiac interventional procedures, Holter/ Event monitoring, Pacemaker assessment/implantation, Arrhythmia Ablations, Stress Echo/Pharmacological Stress Echocardiogram, Transesophageal Echocardiography and Cardiac, Carotid, Abdominal, and Vascular. Our interventional cardiology services include: Intravascular Stenting, Artherectomy, Balloon Angioplasty, Intravascular Ultrasound, Peripheral Vascular Interventions and Thrombolysis. Our Casa Grande location is conveniently located at 803 N Salk Drive, adjacent to Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. Our office hours are: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays. We accept all major commercial, Medicaid, Marketplace and Medicare insurance plans. Many of our staff members and doctors are bilingual and can speak Spanish and French. Our friendly office staff is a dedicated, experienced and caring team who share our vision and values for providing 100 percent patient satisfaction. Please call or stop by to schedule an appointment for a complete cardiac checkup, because “Prevention is better than a cure!”

Our friendly office staff are a dedicated, experienced, and caring team who share our vision and values for providing 100 percent patient satisfaction.

Your Number One Heart Specialists Ashok C. Solsi, MD • Georges Y. Nseir, MD • John Tretter, MD • Ziad El Khoury, MD • Romas Kirvaitis, MD Visit us online at www.pcvc.md or on Facebook

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

OFFICES LOCATED IN: 803 N. Salk Drive • Casa Grande, AZ 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway Bld. 7, Unit 116 • Maricopa, AZ Phone: (520) 836-6682 • Fax: (520) 836-6703 77 S. Dobson Rd. • Chandler, AZ Phone: (480) 814-0266 • Fax: (480) 814-0018 OR LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • GOLDEN GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR VING

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

IS IT A COLD?

OR IS IT REALLY ALLERGIES? Allergies or a Cold: How to tell the difference

by Andrew H. Jones, Community Relations Coordinator, Sun Life Family Health Center

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s it a cold or allergies? This is a question that plagues many people this time of year. On one hand, you’ve been sneezing and sniffling and swallowing over-the-counter meds every few hours. On the other hand, it’s been going on for two-and-a-half weeks now, and it seems there is no end in sight. Let’s take a closer look at some of the similarities and differences to better understand what may be ailing you.

Similarities of allergies and colds: • • • • •

Sneezing Runny nose Congestion and stuffy nose Coughing Sore throat

Differences of allergies and colds: • • • •

Itchy eyes is a less common symptom of a cold Severe colds can cause fevers and body aches, and are not usually signs of allergies Sore throat in allergies is most often caused by postnasal drip Allergies can cause rashes

“People with allergies are sometimes more prone to catching colds. Recovery from a cold is usually quick. In fact, the average duration of a cold is 7 to 10 days. If symptoms last more than a week or two, the cold may have progressed into a secondary bacterial infection such as bronchitis or sinusitis. Allergies are more difficult to predict, and can be a little tricky. They can be seasonal or come and go daily and reoccur often,” said Dr. Ted Crawford, DO, Medical Director of Sun Life Family Health Center. As the season begins to warm, the plants begin to pollinate, spreading the “joy” in the air to all of us who are susceptible to seasonal allergies. However, we are still in the

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Allergies range from mild to seasonal allergies, with more severe symptoms, which can cause lifethreatening reactions. People can have an array of symptoms and allergic reactions to any number of things, including various airborne pollens, foods, medications and allergy shots.

middle of cold and allergy season. So, the sniffles may very well be one last ride on the Rhinovirus bandwagon. Allergies range from mild to seasonal allergies, with more severe symptoms, which can cause life-threatening reactions. People can have an array of symptoms and allergic reactions to any number of things, including various airborne pollens, foods, medications and allergy shots. Whether you have a mild or severe allergy, you should know the proper response to a reaction, address accordingly and minimize your discomfort. Keeping track of the local daily pollen percentages in your area can be very helpful and might make you “Ah-AhAh-choose” to stay inside, wear a preventative mask or limit your outdoor activities. Here is a helpful website that can help keep you informed of your local air pollen content: https://www.pollen.com Scheduling an appointment with your Sun Life Family Health Center provider is the first step to treating your cold or allergies. He or she will be able to diagnose your symptoms and refer you to a local (specialist) allergist. The allergist can then test you to find out what triggered your allergic reaction, and can prescribe medication or give you allergy shots to help manage your symptoms.

Tip of the Month: Cut down on dust in your home. Concentrate on cleaning your bedroom where you sleep. Wash all of your bedding regularly. Wipe dust off dressers, nightstands, appliances and ceiling fans. Wear a dust mask while doing so. Clean your house regularly with a vacuum.

#OneSmallChange THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

8 REASONS FOR FACIALS by Kelsie Pate, FNP-C, Aesthetician

1. Deep cleaning - Deep-cleansing facials thoroughly remove dirt and oil build-up without drying the skin and make up for those nights of sleeping in your makeup! Proper cleansing means your complexion will look and feel rejuvenated. 2. Clear pores - Who doesn’t love extracting blackheads, pores and pimples? Unfortunately, picking at your skin results in facial scarring, broken capillaries and acne flare-ups. Extraction is a delicate procedure best left to the skilled professionals to ensure it is done hygienically and carefully. 3. Professional strength exfoliation - Our skin is bombarded daily with toxins, sun and damaging UV rays and dirt that cause our skin to look ruddy and congested. Professional strength exfoliation treatments such as microdermabrasion or fruit acid-peels remove dead skin cells and leave your skin looking fresh and youthful by promoting healthy cell turnover when used regularly. 4. Masks and peels - Healthy skincare routines are something we all plan to do regularly, but seldom stick with. A little pampering goes a long way. Your aesthetician will start by steaming your skin to help open pores and prepare for a mask or two. Masks may be used to calm, hydrate or decongest the skin.

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5. High-tech treatments - Many facials provide high-tech treatments that can only be performed in a spa. Your aesthetician will recommend specific treatments based on your individual skin assessments. 6. Lymphatic drainage - Most facials include a certain amount of face, chest/shoulder and scalp massage. Not only is this relaxing and feels heavenly, but it helps to promote lymphatic drainage– ridding the body of toxins and reducing fluid retention. 7. Anti-aging - By getting regular facials, we promote cell turnover, boost collagen production and maintain healthy skin balance–all of which are great anti-aging remedies. 8. Alleviate Stress - Spending an hour in a peaceful, relaxing environment can help restore balance to your mind, as well as your skin. Not only will you look good but you will feel good all over! Kelsie has been in the skin care industry since 1998 and specializes in Botox, dermal fillers, permanent make-up, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, dermaplaning and laser treatments. Along with offering facial and body treatments, full-body waxing and spray tans, Kelsie enjoys the many realms of skin care and is always researching to find the best skin care solutions available. 836-6576

The Lumenis® Photofractional™ for Face, Chest and Hands This treatment is a complete skin rejuvenation solution, tailored to address even the early signs of aging. It offers noticeable results for pigmentation, age/sun spots, texture and overall skin appearance the unique Optimal Pulse Technology (OPT) gently and effectively removes skin imperfections and stimulates collagen and elastic fibers production. with Photofractional™ downtime is minimal, so you can get a “lunch time” treatment and return to your busy lifestyle.

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Model not actual patient

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The Lumenis® Photofractional™ is a non-invasive treatment for improving the appearance of stretch marks on different areas of your body. No matter if you have older stretch marks from puberty, or newer ones from pregnancy, Photofractional™ laser treatment will help you regain smooth skin on the thighs, buttocks, abdomen and chest. Risks may include redness and swelling. Consult your physician regarding contraindications and risks.

Laser Vein

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after

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photo courtesy of Mariela Nazar, M.D.

The Lumenis® Vein and Vascular treatment enables tailoring of light and energy to effectively address your skin concern and eliminate it. Your leg veins, facial veins, broken capillaries and rosacea can be treated with noticeable results and no downtime. before

after

KELSIE PATE,

FNP-C, AESTHETICIAN MERLESalon NORMAN Shear Gossip & Med Spa COSMETIC STUDIOS AND DAY S PA N. Florence Street 119402 E 4th St., Casa Grande Casa Grande, AZ 85122 520-426-1618 520.836.6576

photo courtesy of Robert Weiss M.D.

Book online www.casagrandedayspa.com before

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after

Model not actual p

photo courtesy of Franklin Johnson M.D.

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THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

SENIOR CONNECTIONS by Terri Durham, Office Coordinator Daily programming could consist of a coffee hour, board games and cards, puzzles and crafts.

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his summer, a new program designed to offer socialization opportunities to low-income seniors begins to take shape at the Mondo Anaya Community Center (MACC). While some senior adults enjoy the benefits of resort living and active lifestyles, slightly fewer than half of seniors live in poverty. The quality of life for senior adults living in poverty can be improved by reducing social isolation and improving health and nutrition. Board President Cindy Schaider researched seniors living in poverty for a City of Casa Grande Community Development Block Grant application and found that poverty affects senior health if the individual is unable to afford medical care, medication, and other senior health and lifestyle needs. Additionally, although social ties are one of the strongest predictors of well-being, about 12 percent of adults aged 65 or older report that they

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“rarely” or “never” receive the social and emotional support they needed. Senior Connections will be open to all senior adult residents of Casa Grande, with a special focus on the needs - and wants - of low-income households. An advisory group consisting of local residents and those familiar with senior program development will help shape and design what the program offers, maintaining that the group adequately reflects the cultural and unique needs of this senior population. Depending on funding, the program could be offered from 3 to 5 days per week, year-round. Daily programming could consist of a coffee hour, board games and cards, puzzles and crafts. Seniors will have access to resources currently at the MACC including the computer lab and tutoring for basic computer literacy. Workshops and presentations on health and well-being topics such as exercise and fall prevention will be

provided by outside partners Sun Life Family Health Center and University of Arizona. Other presenters can be made available for topics specific to participant needs and interests. Field trips to arts or social events outside the area could also be offered based on the interest of the participants. We are excited to expand our current programming at the MACC to the morning hours. The new Senior Connections program aligns with the mission of Seeds of Hope to promote opportunities to improve lives through relationships and community development. And, as with all of our programs, there is no cost to participants. If you have an interest in knowing how you can be a part of this new opportunity, or may have a family member who is qualified, either in program development or program participation, we’d love to hear from you. Contact our office at 520-836-6335 and share your thoughts.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

HEARTWORM AWARENESS Arizona Veterinary Medical Association reminds pet owners to be vigilant

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ith the beginning of a new mosquito season, the Arizona Veterinary Medical Association (AzVMA) is reminding pet owners to be aware about the risks of heartworm. The organization increased educational outreach efforts last month during Heartworm Awareness Month. “We are seeing an increase in the number of heartworm-infected dogs in our practice. I have also talked to other veterinarians in Arizona who are also seeing more cases as well. We are recommending that all dogs be screened for this parasite and placed on prevention,” said Dr. Brian Serbin of Ingleside Animal Hospital, located in Phoenix. Heartworm infection is a devastating illness that is seen primarily in dogs, but also affects cats and ferrets. It is spread by mosquitoes

that become hosts to the parasite by feeding on infected animals and then pass on larvae to other animals. Because mosquitoes get into our homes, even animals that are strictly indoors are at risk for heartworm disease. The infection results in worms, up to 14 inches long, living in the right side of the heart and arteries of the lungs. The worms damage the arteries, leading to heart failure. The good news is that the disease is preventable with a variety of methods. Most of the products are either a liquid that is placed on the pet’s skin or an oral medication. Most provide protection for 30 days, so pets need to be re-dosed every month. The vast majority of pets don’t seem to mind getting their heartworm prevention, and many of them look forward to their monthly “treat”. It is recommended to have animals tested

for heartworm disease prior to starting preventative medication. In the past, heartworm was found primarily in climates prone to mosquito infestation and wasn’t an issue for pets living in Arizona. In the past 10 years, however, veterinarians here have seen more cases of heartworm, caused by a combination of more breeding areas for mosquitoes (such as golf courses, irrigation puddles, stagnant pools) and heartworm being introduced into the state by relocated and/or traveling pets. Coyotes, foxes and wolves are also carriers. According to the American Heartworm Society, many of the pets impacted by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 were shipped across the country for adoptions, and a significant number of these pets were infected with heartworm. For more information, call the AzVMA at 602-242-7936.

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Daryl B. Potyczka, D.D.S. Tri-Valley Plaza 1355 E. Florence Blvd., Ste 107 Casa Grande, AZ 85122

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 59 and usually seek their healthcare services through that venue. But when you look at our Hispanic population, it is a different story. Our diabetic educator provides both English and Spanish classes, which is critical for those individuals who are monolingual Spanish and her presentation also adapts to those cultural differences. We have recently integrated our Pharm D staff into her program to enhance the nutritional education, add a more intense medication consultation review process, and expand the program to reach more patients of our community. That was one of our earlier additions in trying to better manage our UDS outcomes – having to deal with the A1C. [Editor’s note: A1C is a measurement of how well-controlled the blood sugar is in someone with diabetes] You don’t have a chance at improving those A1Cs if you don’t have the educator

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there; teaching those patients how what they eat affects their diabetes and the importance of exercise and consistent blood sugar monitoring. Looking down the road then, if in fact we are going to be compensated based on patient outcomes, we know that we have to find ways to help the patient manage the behavioral side of health outcomes. Our behaviors can be a huge health determinant. So, the integration of behavioral health professionals and treating the whole individual is another service concept that we think critical to success under outcome based compensation. We use licensed social workers, so they are able to talk with people about setting and achieving behavioral goals. In our offices, these services can be obtained as part of the visit to the doctor and in the same exam room. This is important since it de-stigmatizes such services where great benefits can be observed with a patient that may be in denial

or expressing some depression over their diagnosis or maybe other things going on in their life that are affecting how they take care of themselves. To be able to tell the patient, “We have someone here who might be able to talk with you a little about this,” and you bring them (the behaviorists) in. Now you’re providing that patient a counselor in the doctor’s office and helping with some life coaching and some behavioral health coaching to improve his or her health outcomes. And, ideally they’ll come back with subsequent visits. If successful, we’ve overcome the stigma of being referred to a counselor’s office, which many people are not willing to do. We introduced that seven years ago, and we have behavioral health in all of our offices. Finally, in the past two years, we’ve worked to establish and integrate dental hygienists and our PharmD’s into the

continued on page 86...

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

WE’RE EXCITED FOR THE GRAND OPENING OF THE NEW WOMEN AND INFANT SERVICES UNIT by David Lozano, Banner Health – Earned Media Senior Manager

What was once an empty lot on the hospital property, with nothing more than dry dirt and a few trees, has transformed into a beautiful new building set to open up at the end of July.

R

emember when you were a kid and you were excited to go someplace like Disneyland, or grandma’s house to see all your family? Remember how much anticipation you built up in preparation of the great event? We have that same excitement at Banner Casa Grande Medical Center! We can hardly wait for the opening of the new Women and Infant Services unit at the hospital when it’s completed this summer. It was just last year when we broke ground on the new building, announcing to the community and the local media that we would be providing even more exceptional maternity services. What was once an empty lot on the hospital property, with nothing more than dry dirt and a few trees, has transformed into a beautiful new building set to open up at the end of July. “It seems like forever when we

broke ground on the new unit last year,” said Rona Curphy, CEO of Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “I remember how hot and dry it was, and a little windy. We invited a lot of people from the community to come out. We grabbed our hard hats and shovels, and celebrated what we anticipated would be an important milestone at this hospital and in this community. You look back at that time and think that the summer of 2017 was still far off. Now, the completion is almost here, and you realize how quickly things are moving. We’re moving so fast it’s hard to believe we’ll be opening in just a few weeks.” The new 27,000 square-foot unit will help strengthen our commitment to provide excellence in maternity care. Complete maternity care will include doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, technicians and other staff members. However, the most important members of our team will be the moms who will welcome their new bundles of joy into the world. Complete maternity services in the new unit will include: • Pregnancy care • Labor and delivery care • Mother and baby care • Dedicated cesarean section suite • Joe Jonas Nursery for babies • Pain management, including epidurals, available during labor 24 hours a day • Pediatricians who will see newborns within 24 hours of delivery and on the day of discharge Other high-level specialty services provided at Banner Casa Grande’s new Women and Infant Services unit will include: • Lactation consultants – Profes-

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sional breastfeeding experts who help mothers feed their baby and educate them about the benefits of breastfeeding. • Level II Perinatal Services for highrisk pregnancies – Certified by the Arizona Perinatal Trust, a group dedicated to improving the lives of Arizona’s mothers and babies, this designation allows Banner Casa Grande to provide a much-needed service in the area, focusing on high-risk obstetrical patients and newborns requiring selective continuing care. The new unit will also include an intimate, family-oriented environment and spacious labor, delivery and recovery rooms. In addition, new moms will be able to use a “peanut ball,” a peanut-shaped, vinyl exercise ball, as a labor tool to help reduce labor pain and speed up the process of delivery. Curphy said, “With so many great services we currently offer, we obviously have all the tools. We just needed more space to make sure we were able to give expectant mothers the opportunity to take advantage of these services if they ever need them. It’s been phenomenal to see the community rally around us and support all the changes and the growth at the hospital.” To help celebrate the grand opening, Banner Casa Grande Medical Center will invite the public to tour the new Women and Infant Services unit, once it opens. More details about that will be provided soon. For more information about Banner Casa Grande Medical Center’s Women and Infant Services, please visit www.BannerHealth.com.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Do you dream of getting a good night’s sleep? Approximately 22 million Americans suffer from a disorder known as sleep apnea. Fortunately, the sleep center at Banner Casa Grande diagnoses and treats Obstructive Sleep Apnea and other sleep disorders in children and adults. • • • • •

Are you tired and doze off during the day? Do you snore? Have you been told you stop breathing during sleep? Do you have high blood pressure? Is your neck size larger than 16 inches (for women) or 17 inches (for men)?

If so, it may be time to put your sleep problems to rest. We can examine your sleep issues at home or with an overnight sleep study at our center. Ask your doctor if a sleep study is right for you or your child.

Sleep Center Appointments: (520) 381-6423

BannerHealth.com/CasaGrande


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

YOUR TOP

What’s the difference between a DDS and DMD? If you’re looking to find a dentist you may notice that while most are listed with a “DDS”, some may be listed as “DMD”. They both mean the same thing—your dentist graduated from an accredited dental school. The DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery) and DMD (Doctor of Medicine in Dentistry or Doctor of Dental Medicine) are the same degrees. Dentists who have a DMD or DDS have the same education. It’s up to the universities to determine what degree is awarded, but both degrees use the same curriculum requirements.

How do I prevent baby bottle tooth decay? You can help prevent your baby from getting cavities or developing what is called Baby Bottle Tooth Decay or Early Childhood Caries, by beginning an oral hygiene routine within the first few days after birth. Start by cleaning your baby’s mouth by wiping the gums with a clean gauze pad. This helps removes plaque that can harm erupting teeth. When your child's teeth begin to come in, brush them gently with a child's size toothbrush and a small amount of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice. For bottle feedings, place only formula, milk or breast milk inside and avoid using sugary beverages such as juice or soda. Infants should finish their bedtime and naptime bottle before going to bed.

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Is flossing important? Although some have questioned the benefits of cleaning between your teeth, using an interdental cleaner (like floss) is an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services also said flossing is "an important oral hygiene practice" in an August 2016 statement. The American Dental Association recommends cleaning between your teeth once a day. Cleaning between your teeth may help prevent cavities and gum disease. Cleaning between your teeth helps remove a sticky film called plaque. Plaque contains bacteria that feeds on leftover food or sugar in your mouth. When that happens, it releases an acid that can eat away at the outer shell of your teeth and cause cavities. Plaque that is not removed by brushing and cleaning between your teeth can eventually harden into a rough substance called tartar (or calculus). Tartar collects along your gum line and can lead to gum disease. Once tartar forms, only your dentist can remove it.

What is gum disease? Gum disease is an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth. It is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it. Also referred to as periodontal disease, gum disease is caused by plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that is constantly forming on our teeth.

Here are some warning signs that can signal a problem: • Gums that bleed easily • Red, swollen, tender gums • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth • Persistent bad breath or bad taste • Permanent teeth that are loose or separating • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite • Any change in the fit of partial dentures • Some factors increase the risk of developing gum disease. They are: • Poor oral hygiene • Smoking or chewing tobacco • Genetics • Crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean • Pregnancy • Diabetes • Medications, including steroids, certain types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives See your dentist if you suspect you have gum disease, because the sooner you treat it the better. The early stage of gum disease is called gingivitis. If you have gingivitis, your gums may become red, swollen and bleed easily. At this stage, the disease is still reversible and can usually be eliminated by a professional cleaning at your dental office, followed by daily brushing and flossing.

Is there a link between medication and cavities? You may wonder why you’re suddenly getting cavities when you haven’t had them in years. As we get older, we enter a second round of cavity prone years. One common cause of cavities in older adults is dry mouth. Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. However, it is a side-effect in more than 500 medications, including those for allergies or asthma, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, pain, anxiety or depression, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. This is just one reason why it’s so important to tell your dentist about any medications that you’re taking.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

DENTAL QUESTIONS ANSWERED Your dentist can make recommendations to help relieve your dry mouth symptoms and prevent cavities. Here are some common recommendations: • Use over-the-counter oral moisturizers, such as a spray or mouthwash. • Consult with your physician on whether to change the medication or dosage. • Drink more water. Carry a water bottle with you, and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Your mouth needs constant lubrication. • Use sugar-free gum or lozenges to stimulate saliva production. • Get a humidifier to help keep moisture in the air. • Avoid foods and beverages that irritate dry mouths, like coffee, alcohol, carbonated soft drinks, and acidic fruit juices. • Your dentist may apply a fluoride gel or varnish to protect your teeth from cavities.

• Use a whitening toothpaste with the ADA Seal of Acceptance • Cleaning between your teeth once a day • Limiting foods that stain your teeth, like coffee, tea and red wine • Not smoking or using tobacco • Regular visits to your dentist for checkups and cleanings

How can I keep my teeth white? The best natural ways to keep your teeth white are everyday healthy habits, including: • Brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes

If you want to try a specific whitening product or service, just talk to your dentist before you begin. Whitening may not work on all teeth, and if you are a candidate, some methods—whether at-home or in the dental office—may be better for your teeth than others. Answers provided by the American Dental Association at mouthhealthy.org

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

TOP HABITS OF HEALTHY PEOPLE (AND HAPPY)

by Tiffanie Grady-Gillespie, CPT/Certified Wellness Coach & Owner WickedFiTT

I

’m not a very profound thinker when it comes to why I love exercise. My parents introduced me to gymnastics at four years old, and I was hooked. Fitness was a vital part of my childhood and a practice I carried into adulthood. But unfortunately, not all of us are exposed to fitness as kids and may grow up without an understanding of how exercise promotes health, self-esteem and happiness. This got me thinking about the inspirational people in my life. Some of these people have always been healthy, and others have overhauled their lifestyles to become healthy. But there seems to be habits they all have in common. So, to inspire all of you today, I am sharing some of these habits. It may not surprise you to know that happy individuals tend to really (don’t freak out) enjoy getting out of bed in the morning. Fit people work out in the morning, which gets it out of the way early, so they can focus on the day ahead. Here are a few more habits that healthy, happy people tend to share: Healthy people love food, and generally don’t “diet.” There is no under-eating or starving themselves. It’s never a fad diet; it is a lifestyle. And that includes drinking lots of

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water. Water has oodles of benefits and is an #FITFAM is real. Healthy people surround essential part of a healthy lifestyle. Don’t get themselves with other healthy people. They me wrong – fit and healthy people can drink stay connected through gyms, group fitness too much at a party and eat too much during and social media. They build a network of the holidays. After all, life isn’t fun without a healthy, like-minded friends to share tips, little excess! But, they have learned food isn’t success stories, struggles and just overall punishment, nor is it a reward – everything in accountability. The most important habit in my opinion is moderation. sticking to it when it gets tough. Some days So, we all know lack of sleep wreaks havoc the snooze button seems like on your metabolism, a much better idea than that your mood and your Healthy people make 5 a.m. workout, and that ability to think. This leads me to my next themselves a priority. That deep-dish pepperoni pizza or habit – SLEEP! Because includes scheduling workouts. chocolate cupcake screams louder than that healthy fit people exercise, they Life is unpredictable, so meal. But, they always push burn off stress that can planning is key to sticking to through and focus on the keep us up at night. bigger picture. It is an They understand that a healthy routine. understanding that results rest is just as important don’t come overnight, but as movement. occur with commitment and consistency. Healthy people make themselves a priority. I have been so lucky to acquire these habits That includes scheduling workouts. Life is from the inspirational people in my life. Which unpredictable, so planning is key to sticking to of these healthy habits do you already do or a healthy routine. They are also ambitious do you want to start doing in your life? Let me and want to keep improving, so they set know. There is no reason every single one of goals. And they listen to their bodies. That you can’t create a healthy and happy lifestyle. includes taking a rest day when it is needed.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

PARVO J

ust the word alone strikes fear into the heart of a person with a puppy or dog in their family. Canine Parvovirus (CPV) is a very contagious viral illness that can affect all canines, especially puppies from age six weeks to six months. The virus may present itself in two different forms. The intestinal form is the most common. It presents with diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss and loss of appetite. Puppies may be happy and playful one day and the next day, show any of these symptoms. There is a very distinct odor that comes with parvo diarrhea. The scent is the result of the lining of the small intestine dying. The second form of parvo strikes the heart muscles of very young puppies and most often leads to death. Keeping the parvo virus from your dog can be greatly reduced by vaccinating puppies early. In our practice, we recommend vaccines start at six weeks with boosters given every two weeks until the pup has reached 16 weeks old. Discuss vaccine guidelines with your veterinarian. When purchasing a puppy from a breeder, ask that the breeder provide proof of vaccine – ideally from a licensed veterinarian. Until your puppy is fully vaccinated, it is highly recommended that you keep it away from other non-family dogs, and when at the vet's office, keep the pup in a carrier or on your lap. Do not place the pup on the floor.

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by Gigi McWhirter

The virus is typically passed on through direct contact with an infected dog or the not-so-direct method of sniffing the feces of a parvo-infected canine. The virus can also be passed through the soles of shoes that have come into contact with parvo-infected feces. CPV virus can remain in the soil for up to a year or longer. The best way to clear your yard of the virus is to spray the yard with a disinfectant of 10-parts water to 1-part bleach. It is recommended that you do this even if you are considering adding a new puppy or grown dog to your household or if you are moving into a new house. Not following vaccine protocol and vaccination failure increases a parvo outbreak. Proper injection techniques and proper handling of the vaccine is also essential. Parvo virus can attack any puppy, but for reasons unknown, certain breeds are more vulnerable – Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, Pit Bulls, Alaskan Sled Dogs, Labradors, German Shepherds and English Springer Spaniels. Puppies that receive a proper diagnosis from a veterinarian (Not Dr. Google, a breeder, or a friend...) have a better chance of survival. To diagnose, the doctor

will perform a physical exam, run a parvo test, and in some cases, take X-rays. As the vet palpates the dog's abdominal area, it may respond with discomfort or pain. A low temperature may also occur instead of a fever. The wet tissues of the eyes and mouth may become red and the heartbeat may be rapid. Because parvo is a viral infection, there is no real cure for it. The vet will create a treatment plan to cure the symptoms and to prevent secondary bacterial infections. Intensive treatment and system support are critical to recovery. IV therapy is crucial for treating the dehydration caused by diarrhea and vomiting. Medications to curb vomiting and reduce nausea along with antibiotics may also be used. The survival rate is about 70 percent. Severe dehydration or secondary infection, bacterial toxins in the blood or intestinal hemorrhage can lead to death. Puppies infected with CPV often suffer shock and sudden death. Parvo is painful and is best described as running a scrub brush along the walls of the intestines. The best prevention you can offer your canines is to correctly follow the vaccine schedules as directed by your veterinarian. Vaccines are less expensive and far less painful than treating a parvo puppy.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


There are no limitations except those we set ourselves Your one stop shop for all mobility, medical supplies & more!

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(520) 836-4907 www.DoctorsChoiceMobility.com A place for your preschooler to start creating and innovating. The Grande Innovation Academy is proud to announce the opening of the Little Innovators Preschool for the 2017-2018 school year! The Little Innovators Preschool provides preschoolers a developmentally appropriate early childhood experience that centers on play, group collaboration, problem solving and critical thinking, allowing them to develop a growth mindset to help them excel in elementary school. Our program provides an integrated experience for students with varying abilities and levels. We’re offering a full-time and part-time program with 5, 4 and 3 day schedule options to accommodate you and your child’s needs. Our culture speaks for itself. To learn more about our preschool or to download a registration packet, visit: LittleInnovatorsPreschool.com. Or to schedule a tour, call our office at (520)381-2360.

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950 N Peart Rd, Casa Grande, AZ 85122 • (520) 381-2360 • www.LittleInnovatorsPreschool.com EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

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Special Section: Medical, Health & Wellness

EATING TO PREPARE FOR AN EXERCISE PROGRAM

by Jackie Paunil, MFA, CHC, terramedela.com

T

he foundation to fitness really begins with the nutritional support provided to our bodies through the foods we eat. It is certainly possible to begin an exercise program without changing your diet, but to benefit optimally, create a positive exercise experience, avoid injury and unnecessary fatigue, and build strength, flexibility and stamina, the foods you choose to eat can affect your results considerably. As an integrative nutritional health coach, I recommend devoting some time and attention to the quality of the foods you are eating prior to engaging in a new exercise program. If the thought of exercising is causing you a flare of anxiety or despair, you are not alone. The majority of Americans today are heading down a very unhealthy path to a large selection of lifestyle-related diseases and conditions. Being motivated to exercise can begin with consistently providing your body with the nutrients it needs to rebuild at a cellular level, resetting the hormones, detoxifying the system and re-energizing yourself. It all begins with some simple additions and subtractions from your food choices. • Make a commitment for a three-week change in your diet. This is the minimum time it takes to prepare the body to begin the exertions of a new exercise program. • Eliminate foods that come in boxes and cans, from restaurants or fast food joints, or basically any processed foods. Processed foods are prepared for your convenience, to increase shelf-life, and are very effective at getting you hankering for more of these nutrient-poor, toxic options. • Prioritize clean (preferably organic), whole foods. Real food will go bad or spoil if left too long. You may have to cut, chop or even cook these, but they are basically foods that have grown from this earth, not from a laboratory or processing facility.

Begin eating a breakfast of steel cut oats over boxed cereal, organic sausage with sautéed spinach, or smoothies with a variety of greens and fruit. Remember to look for organic options as many of our fruits and vegetables are sprayed heavily with pesticides that are counterproductive in providing the best options for your exercise preparation clean-up. Eat a protein source (nuts, beans, meats) every three to four hours. Even if you have just a handful of walnuts, make sure you are provid80

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ing this protein consistently. You’re reassuring your body that you are not going to starve by having this available on a regular basis. Allow your midday meal to be the largest as your metabolism is most effective at this time. Shoot for 75 percent of your plate to be veggies with a 25 percent protein source. Skip the baked or bread products as these are generally just processed food. Eat a lighter dinner, again with a protein source, and a large proportion of vegetables. Begin with vegetables you are familiar with and, through the weeks, add in a variety of colored vegetables – raw, steamed, sautéed or grilled. Skip the canola and vegetable oils altogether, opting for extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil or flax oil. These are the antiinflammatory omega-3 oils we tend to neglect. Probably the most challenging prospect is to eliminate the added sugars for your threeweek change. Sugar is one of the most pervasive additions to our foods, and we have all developed an expectation for a level of sweetness in everything we eat. By avoiding processed foods (including sugary sodas and juices), you eliminate a large amount of added sugar. Watch out for salad dressings, sauces and condiments for these have hidden sugars. Lemon juice or vinegar and olive oil are safer choices for salad dressings. When you have successfully provided an exercise preparatory diet for three weeks, it will be time to choose an exercise option that best suits you. Casa Grande has a nice selection of fitness centers and many will welcome you to visit and try out their facilities. Maybe the gym scene isn’t for you. Tai Chi, belly dancing or yoga may be a better fit, all of which I know are available right here in Casa Grande. But perhaps you have tried these and have not been able to stay motivated. Remember by starting with the preparatory nutritional support, you will be changing your initial status for beginning your exercise program. If you believe you need more information regarding nutritional changes, free introductory classes, “Choosing My Healthy Foods” will be offered this summer, as well as more in depth series, “Food Is Thy Medicine Series” and a “Guided Elimination & Detox” program. You can register for these, as well as many other exercise options through Casa Grande Parks & Recreation Summer schedule online at casagrandeaz. gov/rec or call 520-421-8677. Always discuss changes in exercise activities with your doctor. THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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THE SERENDIPITY OF

F.I.T. “Give chance a chance!”

by Rock Earle, Founder Chief Executive Officer, ROX Group, LLC

H

uh? What on earth is F.I.T.? F.I.T. is an acronym that can stand variously for Free, Frequent, Foreign, Fully, or Flexible Independent Travel. What it really means is a tourist or tourists travelling independently, designing their own itineraries and making their own travel arrangements without being part of any group or imposed schedule. Yes, travel agents can certainly help with the actual bookings, but in your mind and on the ground, you’re on your own. F.I.T. Travelers by definition have bigger everything than group or tour travelers: bigger tolerance for change, uncertainty and the possibility of disappointment (bigger brains?); bigger budgets (maybe bigger bankroll?); bigger interest in surprise (bigger curiosity?); bigger need for intensity (bigger bandwidth?) and bigger distaste for human herding behavior, but most of all, a bigger desire for serendipity (bigger hearts?). But just what, actually, is serendipity? We hear it all the time, and it sure sounds good. According to Wikipedia, serendipity means a "fortunate happenstance" or "pleasant surprise”. It was coined by Horace Walpole in 1754. In a letter he wrote to a friend, Walpole explained an unexpected discovery he had made by reference to a Persian fairy tale, The Three Princes of Serendip. The princes, he told his correspondent, were "always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of.” In the travel world, F.I.T. is how you get that. So, as the wisdom of the years piles up, I have learned to get comfortable - maybe even a little intimate - with a little uncertainty. Of course, not with regards to my airplane seats, but if everything always turned out as expected, where would the fun be in that? I like to call it the “Oops!” factor. Like going without hotel reservations and driving up to the only hotel in sight at the end of a long driving day in foreign territory, with no choice but to spend more than you ever thought possible, then you say “yes” and the room exceeds all of your expectations, and you regale your friends with

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Traveling • Dining • Entertainment

stories for years. Reservations? We sneer at reservations! Even with reservations, as a (prematurely, as it happened) confident young man, I once strode confidently into a quite nice hotel in Munich on September 12, just in time for my first visit to Oktoberfest, after having nicely freebooted about Europe for several days. For what was to be a threeweek road trip throughout Europe, these were the only reservations I had bothered to make in advance, such is my respect for the attendance to this event. So, imagine my surprise when the desk clerk, upon hearing my name, frowned and shook his head: “Sorry, we have no reservation for a Mr. Earle for tonight.” Oops. Me: “How about Mr. Rock?” He: “No, no.” Me: “Ummm ... “ He: “Ahhh … I see … [you stupid Amerikan] you have made your reservation for December 9th.” Me: “Ummm …”

arrangements of seats, beds and toilets than we would have arranged on purpose. Or consider the food place in the Rome airport where we recently ordered rice bowls; take-away turned out to be permitted for rice, but not beef, so we just ate in the lounge - where’s the fun in that? Not to mention our guide in Tuscany, who said not to bother going to San Marino or Rimini. So, on a “free” day in Tuscany, that’s exactly what we did. She was right about Rimini, but oh so very wrong about San Marino - it was spectacular and well worth our effort! Just one more example of why we always do the opposite of what we are told, by friends, co-travelers, guides and people who should know, but non-prescient and with no relationship at all to whom we like to refer to as the “Travel Gods”. Speaking of Guides - sure, hire a guide every now and then? They’re just like everything else. There are good ones and bad ones, but the bad ones provide more grist for the storytelling mill, and you will eventually come to cherish even the expensive wastes of time. Most people we talk to desire trouble-free travel and will

In other F.I.T. tales, imagine taking a ferry to a tropical island off the shore of Tanzania, only to find that there is no actual dock.

Get it? Yes, our 9/12 is their 12/9, and yes, it was my fault. And, everything turned out okay after an initial minute or 10 of tremors, shock and fear. Of course, the internet and hotel booking engines have largely mitigated that particular risk now, but this was back in 1997 – before GPS, Google maps, smartphones and, of course, data roaming – decidedly pre-Anthropocene. In other F.I.T. tales, imagine taking a ferry to a tropical island off the shore of Tanzania, only to find that there is no actual dock. Passengers wishing to disembark must do so into the water at their destination, with whatever paraphernalia they carried. That particular situation didn’t happen to me personally, but it did happen to someone I know, and it certainly could have happened to me. Or imagine missing the connection to Jakarta in Tokyo one evening (Grrr!) only to be handed a voucher for a wonderful hotel room and a ticket for a flight out, nice and fresh the next morning - a much more satisfactory

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For me, the greatest enjoyment of travel is the remembering and recounting of the actual adventures, followed closely by the ideation and imagination of a journey.

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go to great lengths to get it, like traveling on a bus in a group with a guide. But the more you plan, the fewer chances there are for mess ups, and lesser still the possibility of serendipity. But with the right demeanor everything is enhanced on F.I.T. - even the, shall we say, mistakes, which there will be, of course. These are the things no one could possibly plan for. And some things, you could have. So, when people ask us how our vacation went, we bite our tongues, because F.I.T. isn’t really a vacation! Sitting on a beach, or in a boat, or in a spa is; the conscious act of pushing one’s awareness into foreign realms is decidedly not. Really, the actual act of travel itself is NOT anything resembling a vacation - it’s just work. Or as I like to think, if you can grow by the experience, it ain’t a vacation. Sounds like F.I.T. to me. For me, the greatest enjoyment of travel is the remembering and recounting of the actual adventures, followed closely by the ideation and imagination of a journey. In my case, at least, memories are always embellished - bad becomes good - or poignant, at least, and usually funny in the retelling, and good becomes great. Absent bodily injury or extreme financial pain, what’s not to love about a little uncertainty that could lead to challenging circumstances which give rise to timeless and viscerally funny stories? I don’t particularly care for traveling - it’s just hard work - but I love having traveled. And, for sure, this type of “serendipity” happens to even the most experienced travelers, even after 75 countries, which, for me, is the driver to continue on to 85! So get on the internet, take a deep breath, buy some tickets and give chance a chance!

GOLDEN CORRID CORRIDOR OR LI LIVVING ING • FUN!

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


2017 CASA GRANDE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT NEWS Sponsored by Dance Studio

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 70 patient visit. Imagine you’re the patient you’ve been roomed; you’ve had your vitals done; we’ve gone over your history; the doctor’s going to be here in a few minutes, but we’ve got a dental hygienist who’d like to come in and offer you an educational screening regarding your oral health. They ask, “When was the last time you went to the dentist?” and go from there. And children, they’re notoriously afraid of dentists, just because it’s somebody working in your mouth. Having the hygienists in this exam room is a much more comfortable way for you to get introduced to dentistry. They may put a sealant on if it’s a child and Mom or Dad agrees. This prevents cavities. All of this is done while you’re in the exam room waiting for your doctor or your nurse practitioner to come around. And there’s no revenue stream, by the way, except for a little bit of grant funding for the sealant program. If it’s not a child of sealant age, we’re paying for this service and our hope is that we get more patients in to see the dentist, so they’ll try to encourage them to schedule a visit if there are cavities, or what have you, because it’s about their overall health. Finally, there’s one other service that’s our newest integration model, Clinical Pharmacy, which is to have a PharmD in the exam room. [Editor’s Note: A PharmD is a pharmacist with a doctorate, which is more education than is required to become a registered pharmacist.] Of course, the patient is asked if these people can come in. The PharmD will sit down and talk to the patient about their medications. They’ll update their medication list. These are your real experts in pharmaceuticals, drug interactions, drug efficacy. How well it’s working? They know the side effects. They can talk to the patient and ask them, “Are you having any symptoms of this?” For example, there may be a better drug that doesn’t have the same side effects, or a drug which may be a better option to patient outcomes, or may be more cost-effective for the patient. We have moved to hiring only PharmD’s so we can integrate them in and get them interfaced with the patient. Most PharmDs are trained in patient assessment and are capable of assessing lab values. They truly focus on the whole patient and the effect

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that the patient’s treatment is having on them. Most people are reluctant to talk to them in the pharmacy. You’ll get some that want to be counseled in the retail setting but not many. These are integrated models that we are supporting ourselves, but at the end of the day, it’s trying to learn how to better manage those health outcomes for the patient for more than one reason. First and foremost, we’re there to make people better, and if you’re not pushing toward patient outcomes then you’re really not seriously approaching that, I would argue. And then secondly, we know that down the road, health care almost has to go that way to achieve significant cost reduction. Accountable care, fix or repeal, will not alter this course in my opinion. The healthcare system, as it was prior to ACA, needed to be moved into a sustainable model. Consider the universally accepted mandate for the healthcare system to see more patients, with higher quality outcomes, for less compensation. Consider the healthcare cost as a percent of the Federal budget and you can see why this mandate exists. I don’t see this issue going away anytime soon. You can see today that it’s very controversial and it should be, our health is important to each and every one of us! GC LIVING: How do you feel Sun Life is important to the communities you serve here

in Pinal County? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Unquestionably, the most important factor is that we are a community health center. We are also an FQHC, which is a federally qualified health center, and all FQHCs have the same critical mandate. That is that we cannot refuse care based on the ability to pay. We all have a sliding fee scale for charges based upon income and family size which makes healthcare services affordable to your situation. This has been a great relief to many individuals in our communities and has made the difference between getting well and getting a job or a better job, than being too sick to even get out and look for a job or being healthy enough to go to work and keep your job. GC LIVING: Now, is that for all of the services that you offer? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Yes. Anything that is in our scope of service and at Sun Life and everything that we offer is so the sliding fee scale applies. We also have about 26 percent of our patients that our privately insured. This is important because these are patients that can go to any health provider they choose to, in general, and they choose Sun Life. We strive to be the healthcare provider of choice. We offer a lot of different services. Having the benefit of a sliding fee isn’t very effective if you only get the discount on

Mountain and mine family vacation

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


the visit itself. If you go to the pharmacy and the medication is $200.00, the sliding fee applies to that too. That’s why we try to bring in ancillary services like X-ray, lab and pharmaceuticals…when it makes sense and we are able to. This is a huge convenience factor to all and an absolute necessity to the family using the sliding fee program. Another thing about health centers like Sun Life is we open up in places that are in rural locations and may have small populations. You are more likely in these locations to have more uninsured individuals and, equally important communities that don’t have access to healthcare, insured or not. GC LIVING: What are the top three challenges you face? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Top three challenges are patient wait time, prescription refill turnaround time and timely patient reporting on lab and x-ray results. On patient feedback issues we have been working towards finding that good reliable and timely process. I think that having to wait four or five days and sometimes longer is ridiculous. However, there are lots of systemic issues to work through to make sure patient privacy is held securely and that patients sensitivity issues are respected. Wait time is difficult and always have been for several reasons. You have patients that wait and in effect “save up” health issues to stretch their health care dollars further. In addition, many patients have multiple chronic issues and the healthcare provider is, in good faith, going to address all of them and that puts them behind for the day. There are probably many practices in the county who have those same three top complaints. There are systemic issues. There are software issues. There are complexities with e-prescribe where multiple processors introduce time lag. They’re not easy to conquer, but still, they have to be. GC LIVING: Do you see any challenges in attracting providers? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Yes, it is definitely a challenge. The providers tend to like the urban areas. So yes, most of them choose to live there. We’ve tried to make it a condition of employment and we just can’t make that stick. We do have a few that chose to join our community. So yes, it is definitely a handicap.

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

with Arizona Senator David Farnsworth

GC LIVING: Where do you see the vision of Sun Life going in the next decade? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: In the next decade, assuming we don’t encounter some gigantic stumbling block which trips us up, we would need to talk about our vision for Sun Life. I believe that there is nothing stopping Sun Life from being the premier health care provider in Pinal County, and maybe outside of Pinal County, except ourselves. Now, that’s saying a lot for a kid from Stanfield (he smiles). However, we’re well-positioned. We do have a broad spectrum of coverage, and really, if we hit every ball as best as we can and apply ourselves to continue to drive the organization toward high quality care that is affordable, there is literally nothing stopping us. GC LIVING: What do you like about leading the organization? And also, let me ask one question that I neglected earlier, when did you take over as CEO of Sun Life? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: I became CEO in 2006. So what do I like about leading Sun Life? First, I need to tell you a little about myself. I am a dreamer as my wife would say. I routinely set goals for myself. I’ll push myself pretty hard to try to reach those goals and sometimes it’s some pretty big leaps. What I like is the ability to actually drive a direction, to lead, to get other people ignited, to get them to believe that they can do something greater than they are individually. GC LIVING: Do you lead by example at Sun Life? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Most of the time, I do

have my faults. Generally, why should people follow someone who can give good advice, but can’t follow it them self? Otherwise the advice you are touting is untested. I’ll quite often say filter the advice, my habits, my traits, my management style, pick the best, and where you’re better than me, keep that. Don’t take my weak areas; take the strengths, build on those and then if you add your own strengths where I don’t have them, then I have assisted in producing a better leader than I am and that makes a better team. GC LIVING: Sun Life is a charitable organization that utilizes fundraising, in addition to the grants and government reimbursements and insurance reimbursements, so fundraisers are part of your financial future. You’ve recently increased your community awareness and fundraising efforts. TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Yes, we have. GC LIVING: So tell me about some of the things like the recent chocolate run coming. How did things like this come to be? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: The credit for these events goes to a team of people, a small but mighty team! We have a fundraising committee that tries to do things a little differently because there are a lot of other fundraising events that happen in our county. Sun Life wanted to put together a health related event where people would have fun for a good cause. The run, “For the Love of Chocolate,” is fun, health related (there is running and walking)…and who doesn’t love chocolate?

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Summer is fast approaching, and kids are almost out of school! How do you plan on staying sane and keeping them busy, safe and MINDY RITTER healthy? Camps! Career camp (through the CG Chat says:

KRISTEN SCHLAGEL Send them to grandma and grandpa's! Lol!

school district), wrestling camp and anything to keep them from getting an early onset of "I’m bored" syndrome.

DREYA SIGARROBA-JAQUEZ My middle schooler can't wait to attend this year’s career camp, thanks to the CGESD. Last year, she was in the Veterinary Camp and loved it. She learned so much & had a blast!

WANDA KARTCHNER We go to Hamilton High School swimming pool. It’s open every day and is a $1 admission and a really great pool. It’s about 35 minutes away and far exceeds Casa Grande pool, plus open many more hours and days. It’s well worth the drive!

KAREN SCOTT Explore new places we have not seen yet here in Arizona that have water, fishing camping hiking, animals and history.

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The thrill of summer is in the air! It's time to dive into the pool; sip a cool drink or maybe escape the heat entirely. It's also time to find activities to keep kids busy and engaged while school is out. We reached out to you for a few ideas, and you gave us lots of great ones -- as well as a few ice cream and sunglasses emojis!

ANA ROSIQUE

Tonto Creek has some good programs, most three days. St. Joseph at Mormon Lake -- my kids have been going there for years. They are picked up in Tempe on Sundays and they are back the following Saturday. Grande Innovation Academy -- they have weekly programs through a third party. Check the schools. Boys & Girls Clubs and the City of Chandler have great programs too.

KELLY HARTIN

Go to the pool, make homemade popsicles, enjoy a hose and water balloons and picnic under a shady tree.

PAM CRISP WILLIAMS We’re going to cooler country.

DARLA DAWALD

Thrive Academy has summer electives on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday afternoons. They include dance, guitar, theatre arts, voice lessons, beginning Karate, film, art and hands-on science.

DREYA SIGARROBA-JAQUEZ

We do family camping trips.

BRITTANY LONG

The library always has a lot of events going on. Also, swimming, arts and crafts, mornings at the movies, K’NEX or LEGO projects.

BRAD PHILLIPS We’ll camp, garden, fish, travel to Canada, hunt rabbits, go four-wheeling, visit the arboretums and visit the museums.

DARLENE MOBERLY

We’re planning on spending a lot of time in San Diego this summer to escape the blistering heat.

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ENTERTAINMENT

COMMUNITY ARTS PLAYING

IN THE “BOX”

AT BLACK BOX FOUNDATION

C

ommunity arts are alive and well in Pinal County thanks to nonprofit organizations such as Black Box Foundation. Although Black Box Foundation is celebrating five years, its journey started much earlier in a storefront on Florence Boulevard nearly eight years ago. Its mission has always been, “To enhance the quality of life of people in our community by providing them with opportunities to experience the arts through performance and education.” Through a variety of shows, classes and performances, Black Box has been full steam ahead. Fast- forward seven years later and a location change to Historic Downtown Casa Grande as well as the addition of more community volunteers and a year-round offering of youth and community theatre education and performance opportunities, Black Box Foundation has become a recognized leader in the community for the performing arts. In 2016, it received the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce “Business Excellence Award,” and in 2017 it was nominated for the Governor’s Arts Award. Black Box has a unique dedication to the youth of Pinal County, by offering

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a variety of youth theatre experiences, camps, improvisational acting and comedy classes and outreach to local schools by sponsoring after school programs. When not busy with these opportunities, the organization is supporting local high school and college programs by promoting their performances and other community arts experiences. The foundation’s belief in support and collaboration has made them invaluable to the youth of our communities. Black Box Foundation has also proven to be versatile in staging high quality programs for all ages. Whether a performance occurs in their intimate space downtown, at Heritage Hall or on the larger stage of a local high school, the performances are always high quality. Performers come away with positive experiences, and so do the audiences. One does not need to travel to any metropolitan area to find quality community arts, thanks to Black Box Foundation. For more information on upcoming shows, or to become a volunteer or performer, visit www.blackboxaz.org or contact BlackBox Foundation at 413 N. Florence Street Casa Grande, AZ 85122 or 520-428-7050.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


Puzzles Answers

• Title & Escrow Services • Commercial Services • Direct Title Services • 1031 Exchange • Account Servicing • Land Development / Trust 421 East Cottonwood Lane Casa Grande, Arizona 85122 Office: 520-426-4600 Fax: 520-426-4699

latisha.sopha@titlesecurity.com EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

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FROM THE WITNESS CHAIR

TO LAW SCHOOL: Mock Trial Program Celebrates 15 years of Success by Donna McBride

A

slender elderly woman shuffled up the aisle to make her way to the witness chair. Her cane helped carry the burden of her soon-tobe testimony, which had probably caused a few of the gray hairs that were visible on her head. Once sworn in, she wrapped her shawl tighter around her shoulders as her frail voice answered the attorney’s questions. This might sound like a typical day in a trial at Pinal County Superior Court in Florence – but not on this day. That “lady” was actually teenager Lindsey Mau of Apache Junction High School. Lindsey was showcasing her skills at the Mock Trial Competition hosted by Juvenile Court and its Community Advisory Board (CAB). Lindsey was so good in her role as a witness that she made history as one of the best witnesses of all time in the competition’s 15-year history. Even the superior court judges, who were in the room that day, remember her stellar performance. She came dressed for the part, acted out her role and demanded the courtroom’s attention. Her team stood out from the competitors by creating lifelike personalities out of fictional characters. That was back in 2005. Fast-forward to 2017. She is now Lindsey M. Lamey, J.D. and

is married with a young son. Did her mock trial experience affect her in any way? It must have! In December she obtained a Juris Doctor degree, and recently took the Arizona Uniform Bar Exam to become an attorney. Lindsey reveals that, “Mock Trial influenced my career path by allowing me an opportunity to explore the criminal justice system through a hypothetical case. After participating on the team, I knew my career path would take me into the world of litigation.” Another success story is Dennis Hull from Miami High School, who was involved with his high school team and now as a senior at the U.S. Air Force Academy. He’s about to be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant and undergo training to become a Combat Systems Officer. Dennis is part of the Mock Trial Team at the CS-28 “Blackbirds” USAF Academy, where students have traveled throughout the country competing. Dennis said being on the high school team took him out of his comfort zone and allowed him to do some traveling. Reflecting on the influence the Pinal County Mock Trial Competition had on his career path, Dennis shared that it “did a tremendous amount to develop public speaking skills and confidence. These skills have been and will continue to be

invaluable in helping me speak before a large audience and give professional briefings.” The courthouse hosts roughly 250 middle and high school students in March, as educators and family members (silently) cheer the teams on! The day is fast-paced, high-energy and nerve-racking as the students perform in front of official judges. The day ends with team and individual awards in each division. Schools register for the free competition in October and then spend over four months practicing, strategizing and perfecting their roles as attorneys, witnesses, bailiffs and other roles in the courtroom. Pinal County is the only county in the state that offers such a competition for middle school and high school students. The Mock Trial Competition has been growing steadily over the past 15 years thanks to dedicated volunteers and Juvenile Court. Partnerships with attorneys from the Pinal County Attorney’s Office, city courts and justice courts have provided mentoring to our students as they perfect their skills. Schools, such as Cactus Middle School, under the coaching of teacher Lisa Flores, received an A+ rating because of their program. In fact, Casa Grande Elementary Schools have included a Mock Trial class in their curriculum. It takes a great deal of time and energy to make the competition happen. But in the end, we provide opportunities to educate youth about the justice system and build character, confidence and lifelong skills for our students. And the outcome is worth it. Just ask Lindsey and Dennis!

2017 MOCK TRIAL COMPETITION CHAMPIONS Middle School Division I

Middle School Division 2

1st Place: Casa Grande Middle School #1 team 1st Place: Villago Middle School #2 Team 2nd Place: Cactus Middle School #2 Team 2nd Place: Villago Middle School #1 Team

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High School Division:

1st Place: Poston Butte High School 2nd Place: Miami High School #2 Team

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


The LIVING Interview (continued)

Mountain vacation

...continued from page 87 And the goal with the gala was, again, to create something different, to organize a great fundraising event where people could dine, dance, have fun and maybe even make a staycation out of it. GC LIVING: Does Sun Life have volunteer opportunities? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Yes, we do. We bring volunteers in. First, we find out what their interests and skills are. We have people who are greeters. We can find a place for our volunteers. They can become an advocate; they can knit blankets for our new born Sun Life babies; they can become involved in many ways. Let me touch base on the fundraising, and how it ties into the integrated services we touched on earlier. There are only a few insurance plans that will pay for these types of services. There really isn’t even a billing code for most of these services. Behavioral health services are paid on a limited basis by the state Medicaid plan or AHCCCS. Diabetes care is similar. The rest of the services are in the pioneering stage and are funded through operations as we can afford to do so. That will hopefully

change as awareness increases based on success stories on improved patient outcomes. Back to the point, fundraising activities then help support our efforts to find ways to improve the patient outcome, whether it be through education or by hosting a cross functional team of professionals to interface as the patient’s healthcare team. GC LIVING: You’re not following what others are doing. You’re leading the path for them to follow. TRAVIS ROBINETTE: That’s right. Sometimes that puts a financial strain on us. If your cold and flu season isn’t quite as big, like it was this year, it may strain us financially. But we’re going to hold that course anyway because we believe that there is value to be found in terms of an improved outcome for the patient. So fundraising is something that we are looking at in more of a long-term basis to building that up to support some of those programs that aren’t reimbursed today. But then there’s a whole education element that we know we have to pick up. Somebody has to educate the patients about their condition, and not just the surface of the condition, but educate the patient so that

he or she has a fighting chance to keep the chronic condition in the earlier stages for a much greater time period. We know that there are more areas that we have to pick up to get at effectively helping our patients in a more affordable way. GC LIVING: What’s your greatest achievement? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Oh, I struggled with that one. I don’t know, I think my greatest achievement was in 2006 when the board asked me if I had an interest in the CEO’s position. And of course I did, but I was also full of the normal fears. People would ask me, “Are you considering maybe someday being the CEO?” And I’d say, “Well yeah, sure, I guess at this

age and phase of my career path I either have it or I don’t”. In a sense, I was weighing whether or not I really wanted to know the answer to that question. The dreamer won out! I have a great management team and at eleven years tenure, I’m past the average tenure of a CEO at an organization and not burned out. I’ve still got a little bit of game left in me, so I think that’s probably my major accomplishment. GC LIVING: Now we’re going finish with two questions I skipped earlier. What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever done? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: I’ve got a lot of those moments, but I think

continued on page 95...

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www.thelandmarkeventcenter.com EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

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2017 SPORTS SCHEDULE – CITY OF CASA GRANDE Sponsored by Ochoa’s

5/20 Spring Saturday Recreation Series Soccer Skills Challenge 9 a.m. to Noon Grande Sports World

5/30 to 7/21 Aquatics – Recreation Swim Team – 6791 Each Tuesday from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. Each Wednesday from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. Each Thursday from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. Each Friday from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. Carr McNatt Park

6/12 to 6/16 Junior Golf Program – 6944 Monday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Thursday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Friday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Dave White Park

Each Monday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Each Tuesday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Each Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Each Thursday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Dorothy Powell Senior Adult Center

6/12 to 6/15 Basketball Camp (Ages 6-10) – 6283 Monday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Thursday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Len Colla Recreation Center

6/5 to 6/8 Football Camp – 6288

Monday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Thursday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Carr McNatt Park

6/19 to 6/22 Basketball Camp (Ages 1114) – 6284

6/6 to 6/20 Advanced Gymnastics – 6102 Each Tuesday from 4:15 p.m. to 5:40 p.m. Each Thursday from 4:15 p.m. to 5:40 p.m. Teen Center

Monday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Thursday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Len Colla Recreation Center

6/12 to 7/12 Casa Grande Youth Theatre – 6303

6/19 to 6/29 Kindergym – 6294

Each Monday from 8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Each Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Each Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Each Thursday from 8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Teen Center

7/5 to 7/13 Swim Lessons – Adult Beginner – 6615

Each Tuesday from 7:55 p.m. to 8:25 p.m. Each Wednesday from 7:55 p.m. to 8:25 p.m. Each Thursday from 7:55 p.m. to 8:25 p.m. Each Friday from 7:55 p.m. to 8:25 p.m. Carr McNatt Park

For registration information please contact Casa Grande Parks & Recreation at 520-421-8677.

YOUR HOSTS: Lucy Garcia & Jazzmyn Rutledge

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Casa Grande's Oldest and Finest Mexican Restaurant Serving the Valley since 1950

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 93 the craziest thing was when a bunch of guys from Casa Grande decided we were capable dirt bike racers. We raced each other all the time with, of course, a few accidents…nothing serious. We were into racing and were fairly certain of our good riding capabilities. We heard there was a big cross country race in Gila Bend and there were going to be 400-500 riders there, including big name professionals. It was a 100 mile three lap cross country race through mountains, washes, and every other impossible terrain there is around Gila Bend. There were about five or six of us Casa Grande guys entering this race – all beginners. So there we were. Oh my gosh, I had no idea you could make a motorcycle run that fast with zero visibility and stay upright on it. I mean, I had ridden bikes fast, but not quite like that. They started the professionals off first. The beginners were last. So, by the time we got to start out on the first lap, these professionals were coming around on their second lap. GC LIVING: Yeah, I was going to say they’re coming up behind you. TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Yeah, or over your head, and hitting the ground with the knobby tires throwing big rocks. They had all this gear on, these plastic leg shields and everything, and chest plates, and we Casa Grande guys were out there with a helmet, and that’s it. And we’re catching rocks in the face, on the shin bone, and when you’re going as fast as you can go and this pro rider on a Maico 500 comes over your head, hits the ground, and his tire shoots rocks into your shin bone, I was thinking, “Oh my gosh, I am going to be killed.” I can’t even get off the trail. There were bikes everywhere. There were so many motorcycles that literally you were surrounded and had them coming over and around you. We were riding way beyond our skill, which we were so sure we had, being from Casa Grande and all. That’s probably the stupidest thing I ever did. GC LIVING: Did you finish? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: I did not. I was hit in the head by one of those (bikes) that ... actually I was turning and he came on down the hill air born and lightly landed on my helmet. He used my motorcycle and body to affect his turn and was gone. He hit me with

EARLY SUMMER 2017 • THE MEDICAL EDITION

the bottom of his engine frame, busted my helmet, knocked me out and gave me a concussion. So I limped in. My guys had to come out and get me because I couldn’t recognize anyone or where I was. One of my friends was hit about the same way I was, except it was his bike that took the brunt of the hit and it busted a hole in his engine – his prize bike. So that was our introduction to racing. That was the first and only motorcycle race I ever participated in. GC LIVING: So was that your dream profession? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: A professional motor racer, until I saw what that meant. GC LIVING: What do you do in your spare time? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: I’m an avid outdoors man. I love to hunt. I like to fish, but primarily hunt, camping, hiking…anything that gets me out into the wilderness. GC LIVING: What is the most exotic outdoor locale you’ve been? TRAVIS ROBINETTE: Northwestern Montana, I think would have to win that. There are big rivers, not Arizona rivers, but real rivers a mile wide. They flow all year long and have big fish in them. There are lots of grizzly bear, brown bear, moose, elk, deer, turkey and other wildlife. It’s awesome just to see those animals, maybe less so to actually harvest one. I do hunt for the meat. I’m not a trophy hunter. I’m satisfied just to see them so if I don’t end up getting one, that’s ok too.

When I am successful in harvesting game animals I know that it was a fair hunt on both sides and that I have put in the years and study to learn the animal and its habitat. If I don’t get something, it’s because I just wasn’t sharp enough to outsmart that animal or did not do my homework before hunting the particular area. I have never used a guide that puts you right on the animal. To me that is not hunting; that’s not the way. You might guess from that, I don’t very often get an animal. They usually outsmart me –except for turkeys, I’ve got that down pretty good now. 

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SIMPL E SUMMER RECIPE

Fish Tacos

You don’t have to vacation to Mexico to enjoy some fun and flavorful fish tacos! Make them at home, and consider pairing with a chilled Corona, Dos Equis or your favorite Margarita. INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

⁄2 cup sour cream 1 1 ⁄2 cup mayonnaise 1 ⁄4 cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 package taco seasoning mix, divided 1lb cod or 1 lb white fish fillet, cut into 1 inch pieces (about 4) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1( 12 count) package taco shells, warmed or 1 (12 count) package flour tortillas

DIRECTIONS

1. Combine sour cream, mayonnaise, cilantro and 2 tablespoons seasoning mix in small bowl. 2. Combine fish, vegetable oil, lemon juice and remaining seasoning mix in medium bowl; pour into large skillet. 3. Cook, stirring constantly, over medium-high heat for 4 to 5 minutes or until cod flakes easily when tested with a fork. 4. Fill taco shells with fish mixture. 5. Top with toppings.

TOPPINGS • • • •

s hredded cabbage chopped tomato lime juice taco sauce

Per Serving: 259 CAL, 14 G Fat (4.5 G SAT FAT), 42 MG CHOL, 155 MG SOD, 16 G PRO, 17 G CAR, 1 G FIB

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UPCOMING LIBRARY EVENTS

Vista Grande Library - 1556 N. Arizola Rd 421-8652 Main Library - 449 N. Dry Lake Street 421-8710

TEEN MOVIES at VISTA GRANDE: Fantastic Beasts Friday, 6/9: 1:00 pm Rogue One Friday, 6/16: 1:00 pm Bye Bye Man Friday, 6/23: 1:00 pm Max Steel Friday, 6/30: 1:00 pm Before I fall Friday, 7/7: 1:00 pm To Be Determined Friday, 7/14: 1:00 pm

FAMILY MOVIES at VISTA GRANDE: Finding Dory - Thursday, 6/8: 10: 15 am Pokemon Volcanion - Thursday, 6/15: 10: 15 am Lego Batman Movie - Thursday, 6/22: 10: 15 am Moana - Thursday, 6/29: 10: 15 am Lego Scooby Doo - Thursday, 7/6: 10: 15 am Inside Out - Thursday, 7/13: 10: 15 am

MATINEE MOVIES at MAIN LIBRARY A Monster Calls - Saturday 6/10: 1:30 pm A Dog’s Purpose - Saturday 6/17: 1:30 pm Middle School Worst Years of my Life - Saturday, 6/24: 1:30 pm Fences - Saturday 7/1: 1:30 pm Collateral Beauty - Saturday, 7/8: 1:30 pm

FAMILY MOVIES at MAIN LIBRARY Moana - Friday, 6/9: 2 pm Sing - Friday, 6/16: 2 pm Secret Life of Pets - Friday, 6/23: 2 pm Storks - Friday, 6/30: 2 pm Pete’s Dragon - Friday, 7/7: 2 pm Monster Trucks - Friday, 7/14: 2 pm

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GOLDENCORRID CORRID CORRIDOR OR ORLI LI LI ING ING •• FUN! FUN! GOLDEN VVV ING

3rd Annual Casa Grande FREE LibCon! When: Saturday, July 15th: 1-4:30pm Where: Vista Grande Public Library What: Costume contests, comic book artists, cosplay professionals, martial arts demos, Tucson roller derby, zombie makeup demo and MORE! FREE FUN for the whole family!

City of Casa Grande Library Presents the Teen Summer Reading Program

Kick Off @ the Pool, June 3rd, 9 a.m.-11:00 a.m. Escape the Room-(pick your time)- Wednesdays @ Vista Makers in the Makerspace (1:00-2:30)-Thursdays @ Vista Teen Movie and Grub: (Movies start @1:00) -Fridays @ Vista Saturday Matinee-(Movies start @ 1:30)- Saturdays @ Main Teens are considered ages 12-17 or Grades 6th –12th. Julie AndersenYA/School Librarian – Vista Grande Library; David Brown – Youth Librarian – Vista Grande

Library; Julie Lash - Youth Librarian – Main Library; Library Comic-Con July 15th 1:00 p.m. @ Vista Grande Scholastic Book Fair– July 17th22nd Turn in your reading log for your FREE book Register your child online for the 2017 Summer Reading Program at www.cgsummer. eventbrite.com or in person beginning at our kick-off event. All programs are FREE! • Kickoff Event: Sat. June, 3rd @ the public pool! 9-11:30 am • Library Comic-Con: Sat. July, 15th @ Vista. 1-4:30 pm • Scholastic Book Fair: July 1722nd @ Main and Vista.

2017 Summer Reading Program Encourage your child to read 20 minutes a day and visit your local library over the summer to receive cool prizes, attend awesome events, and receive a free book at our Book Fair. Participation is free and helps your child prepare for the next school year! For more info visit www.facebook.com/cglibraryaz or call (520) 421-8710.

THE MEDICAL EDITION • EARLY SUMMER 2017


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Branch LS #177235 Branch Manager Manager Producing Producing ||NM NMLS #177235 (520) 421-1171 ▲ Cell: (480) 221-9826

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Golden Corridor Living Magazine  

Early Summer 2017