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Walking and Cycling The Camino De Santiago


Woodlands walking, Roncesvalles


The  Camino  De  San-ago  or  simply  ‘  The  Way’  is  one  of  the  World’s   greatest  walking  and  cycling  routes,  an  800km  journey  through  northern   Spain  and  the  French  Pyrenees  that  dates  back  over  1,000  years.  To  follow   the  Camino  is  to  walk  in  the  footsteps  of    millions  of  Pilgrims  who  have   passed  this  way  before  you  over  the  centuries.  There  is  a  palpable  sense   of  history  as  you  set  out  on  the  way  of  St.  James  and  all  along  it’s  length   you  will  find  monuments  that  tesFfy  to  it’s  former  glory.  Some  of  Europe’s   most  magnificent  and  ornate  Cathedrals  where  built  along  the  Camino,   such  as  the  incomparable  Burgos  cathedral  and  the  Gothic  masterpiece  of   Leon,  not  to  menFon  of  course  SanFago  De  Compostela  itself.   People  are  drawn  to  walk  the  Camino  for  many  different  reasons   today,  less  than  20%  do  it  for  religious  reasons  and  the  rest  for  personal,   spiritual  or  pure  adventure.  It  is  the  Camaraderie  amongst  the   “Peregino’s”that  makes  the  Camino  such  a  special  experience.  You  will  rub   shoulders  with  people  of  every  naFonality  on  the  way  and  of  every  age   group.  Some  people  come  to  walk  or  ride  the  whole  790km,  seVng  off   from  St.  Jean  De  Pied  Port  in  the  French  Pyrenees.  To  walk  you’d  need   around  6  weeks  average  to  complete  the  Camino  or  2.5  -­‐3  weeks  by  bike.   Many  people  choose  to  do  a  secFon  at  a  Fme,  coming  back  to  complete   the  Camino  over  several  years.     No  ma]er  what  you  choose  to  do  you’ll  find  warmth  and  respect  from   your  fellow  “Peregrino’s".  The  Spanish  people  are  remarkably  accommodaFng  and  hospitable,  Pilgrims  have  been   protected  (  iniFally    by  the  Knight’s  Templar)  by  the  Spanish  crown  and  to  walk  the  Camino  is  an  accepted  and   honourable  tradiFon.  The  Camino  also  bring  vital  income  to  some  very  remote  parts  of  Spain  and  communiFes  that   could  have  otherwise  been  impoverished.  

The Camino de Santiago www.caminodesantiago.com.au


Walking over The Pyrenees

Which way is the right way for you? There  are  no  shortage  of  ways  to  enjoy  the  Camino  -­‐  in  fact  there  is  more  than  one  Camino,  there  are  numerous   routes  across  Europe  coming  from  France  to  converge  on  the  Pyrenees  or  cross  Spain  and  from  Portugal.     All  Roads  ulBmately  lead  to  SanBago!     The  route  that  we  offer  is  the  ‘Camino  Frances’  or  the  French  way,  which  is  the  most  recognized  &  popular  route  -­‐     and  arguably  the  most  interesBng  as  it  incorporates  so  many  historical  monuments  and  ciBes  along  the  way.  Most   modern   Pilgrims   use   the   Camino   Frances,   though   some   of   the   more   intrepid   ones   my   return   to   choose   another   Camino   for   their   next   pilgrimage.   If   you   relish   solitude   then   you   may   prefer   one   of   the   quieter   Caminos   such   as   the   coastal  route  across  Northern  Spain.  If  you  enjoy  meeBng  people  and  some  company  then  the  Camino  Frances  will   suit   you   well   -­‐   you   are   never   that   far   from   another   Pilgrim   and   the   camaraderie   &   signage   along   the   route   is   excellent.   A  lot  will  depend  on  who  long  you  can  go  for    -­‐  if  you  are  planning  a  short  taste  of  the  Camino  then  the  Camino   Frances   has   several   short   secBons   that   you   can   dip   and   out   of.   To   collect   your   official   Stamp   of   the   Pilgrim   at   SanBago   De   Compostela   you   must   either   walk   the   last   100km   from   Sarria   or   cycle   the   last   200km   from   Ponferrada   to   ‘qualify’   as   a   bonafide   Pilgrim!   The   Pilgrim   Passport   can   be   picked   up   locally   and   is   stamped   at   Refugio’s,   Churches  or  other  places  along  the  way.  It  becomes  a  great  souvenir  of  your  trip  along  with  the  Scallop  Shell  -­‐  the   official  symbol  of  the  Camino.  This  is  something  that  you’ll  always  remember  along  with  the  countless  thousands  of   yellow  arrows  that  mark  the  way.    


Examples of short itineraries for cycling and walking Walking  the  first    10  days     Day  1:  St.  Jean  de  Pied  Port  Day  2:  St.  Jean  de  Pied   Port  -­‐  Roncesvalles  (25km)
 Day  3:  Roncesvalles  -­‐  Akare]a  (29km)
 Day  4:  Akare]a  -­‐  Pamplona  (18km)
 Day  5:  In  Pamplona
 Day  6:  Pamplona  to  Puente  de  la  Reina  (24km)
 Day  7:  Puente  de  la  Reina  to  Estella  (22km)
 Day  8:  Estella  to  Los  Arcos  (21km)


Cycling  the  last  week  of  the  Camino   
 Day  1  In  Leon
 
 Day  2  Bike  Leon  to  Astorga  53km
 Day  3  Bike  Astorga  to  Villafranca  78km
 Day  4  Bike  Villafranca  to  Samos  63km
 Day  5  Bike  Samos  to  Palas  de  Rei  56km
 Day  6  Palas  De  Rei  to  SanFago  68km
 Day  7  In  SanFago

Day  9:  Los  Arcos  to  Logrono  (28km)
 Day  10:  Depart  Logrono  

Both  these  iFneraries  are  featured  on  our  website  but  we  can  put  together  tailormade  trips  to  suit  the  number  of   days  you’d  like  to  spend  on  the  Camino  and  your  ability.  Ask  about  our  tailormade  trip  opFons,  we  are  happy  to   advise.  Any  tailormade  trips  usually  require  a  booking  deposit  which  is  refunded  off  the  cost  of  your  trip.  

The Camino de Santiago www.caminodesantiago.com.au


Which  sec-ons  to  walk  and  cycle?   So   your   next   decision   is   whether   to   walk   or   cycle   the   Camino?   For   many   people  that’s  an  easy  answer  as  they  fall  into  one  or  the  other  camp.  But  if   you  are  equally  happy  on  a  bike  as  on  foot  then  it  will  depend  on  your  Fme   frame  and  which  areas  you’d  like  to  see.       The   middle   secFons   of   the   camino   through   the   elevated   plains   of   the   ‘Meseta’   can   be   a   draining   experience   for   walkers   as   there   is   no   shade   and   about   a   weeks’s   worth   of   walking   -­‐   so   you   probably   wouldn’t   choose   that   secFon  if  you  only  had  a  week  to  walk.  The  beginning  and  end  secFons  of  the   Camino   offer   a   great   introducFon   with   history,   hill   walking   and   green   verdant   scenery.   Our   personal   favourite   is   the   first   stages   of   the   Camino   from   the   Pyrenees   through   to   Logrono   -­‐   it   has   a   mix   of   great   towns,   historical   accommodaFon  wonderful  scenery  and  food.   Thoughts  for  cyclists   Cycling  the  Camino  opens  up  different  possibiliFes  and  challenges.     If  you  are  a  fit  cyclist  then  you  may  relish  the  mountain  challenges  of  Galicia  or  the  Pyrenees,  which  offer   spectacular  cycling  for  those  able  to  keep  their  wheels  turning  up  steep  hills.  If  you  are  more  of    a  casual  cyclist   then  the  thought  of  big  hills  may  fill  you  with  dread.  In  which  case  you  may  be  be]er  riding  the  relaFvely  flat   secFons  of  the  Meseta  which  lie  mid  way  along  the  Camino.   Combina-ons  &  highlights   We  can  offer  trips  where  you  can  both  walk  and  cycle  on  different  secFons,  and  rather  than  doing  a  block  of   walking  or  riding  along  one  secFon  you  may  prefer  to  do  the  highlights  of  The  Camino  -­‐  taking  in  the  variety  of   experiences  along  it’s  length  by  doing  a  few  days  at  a  Fme  then  skipping  to  another  secFon  using  Spain’s  excellent   public  transport  system.  The  Camino  has  many  train  staFons  in  the  larger  towns  as  well  as  buses.  

The Camino de Santiago www.caminodesantiago.com.au


Parador Hotel at Leon

The Camino de Santiago www.caminodesantiago.com.au


The village of Castrojeriz


THE  WAY  OF     ST.  JAMES   The  Way  of  St.  James  has   existed  for  over  a   thousand  years.  It  was   one  of  the  most   important  ChrisFan   pilgrimages  during   medieval  Fmes,  together   with  Rome  and   Jerusalem,  and  a   pilgrimage  route  on   which  a  plenary   indulgence  could  be   earned.  It  grew  in   importance  once   Jerusalem  was  lost   during  the  Crusades.     Legend  holds  that  St.   James's  remains  were   carried  by  boat  from   Jerusalem  to  northern   Spain  where  he  was   buried  on  the  site  of   what  is  now  the  city  of   SanFago  de  Compostela.   A  thriving  Medieval   Pilgrimage  route   developed  aner  the   discovery  of  the  remains   and  the  ‘verificaFon’  by   the  local  Bishop  -­‐  a   shrewd  move  on  his   behalf  given  the   extraodinary  wealth  and   prominence  that  the  new   Pilgrimage  brought  to   the  region.    

Tomb Of St. James, Santiago

The  bones  of  St.  James   are  kept  in  a  silver  coffin   can  be  viewed  in  a  crypt   directly  under  the  altar   of  the  SanFago  de   Compostela  Cathedral.

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Paradore at Santiago

Beautiful & unique accommodation The  Camino  is  well  set  up  for  accommodaFon  en  route  and  offers  the  chance  to  stay  in  very  unique  hotels,  some  of   which  are  like  living  museums.  The  regular  standard  trips  we  book  use  many  historic  &  bouFque  hotels  which  are   the  ones  featured  on  these  pages.  In  smaller  places  we  use  Casa  Rurales  and  at  the  other  end  of  the  scale  are  the   grand  Parador  Hotels  which  offer  palaFal  accommodaFon  in  historic  buildings.     We  have  chosen  our  accommodaFon  carefully  to  offer  a  mix  of  comfortable,  historic  and  inFmate  accommodaFons   in  the  best  locaFons.  We  use  historic  hotels  where  possible,  some  daFng  back  to  the  11th  century,  through  to   inFmate  posadas  and  ‘Casa  Rurales’,  beauFful  country  houses.  We  avoid  modern  hotels  (except  on  budget  trips  or   where  all  our  preferred  accommodaFon  is  already  booked  out)    and  go  for  places  that  have  more  character  or   excepFonal  locaFons  &  hosts.  All  the  accommodaFon  that  we  use  have  comfortable  en  suite  rooms.            Please  note  that  we  do  not  use  the  Albergues  &  dorm  style  on  our  trips!    

The Camino de Santiago


Our Leon Hotel

The Parador at Santiago

The Camino de Santiago The Parador at Santiago

Burgos Hotel


View from your Hotel Room, Viana

The Parador at Santo Domingo

The Camino de Santiago Our Hotel at San Anton


Hotel at Roncesvalles

Parador at Santiago

View from your room at Burgos

Hotel in Leon

The Camino de Santiago www.caminodesantiago.com.au


Our Hotel at Pamplon These are our regular standard hotels ( not our Budget trips which use small hotels & casa rurals)

Our Hotel at San Anton

Our Hotel at Viana

Our Hotel at Pamplona

The Camino de Santiago www.caminodesantiago.com.au


Pictorial guide to places on the Camino

The Camino de Santiago www.caminodesantiago.com.au

Notare quam littera


St. Jean de Pied Port

The Camino de Santiago


Pamplona

The Camino de Santiago


Navarre

The Camino de Santiago


Navarre

The Camino de Santiago


The Meseta

The Camino de Santiago


Burgos

The Camino de Santiago


Leon

The Camino de Santiago


Galicia

The Camino de Santiago


Galicia

The Camino de Santiago


Santiago de Compostela

The Camino de Santiago


RAW Travel Ph: 03 5976 3790 Notare quam littera gothica info@rawtravel.com www.rawtravel.com www.rawtravel.com

2009


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