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WORK IN PROGRESS 2018-19

RAW L A M TERIA

5 2 YEARS

1993–2019


“WE’RE DEALING WITH PEOPLE WHO ARE CAUGHT UP IN INSTITUTIONS, WHETHER IT’S EDUCATION, OR HEALTH, OR POLICE, AND THEY COME HERE. THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT AS WELL AS THE EMOTIONAL ENVIRONMENT IS SOMETHING THAT IS NOT AN INSTITUTION. IT’S AS FAR AWAY FROM THAT AS YOU CAN GET. WHAT THIS PLACE GIVES, PARTICULARLY KIDS WHO HAVE BEEN KICKED OUT OF SCHOOL THEY COME TO SOMEWHERE WHICH IS A SAFE SPACE. INITIALLY THEY CAN BE ALL OVER THE PLACE, BECAUSE THERE ARE NO STRICT RULES. ULTIMATELY IT’S SOMEWHERE WHERE PEOPLE CAN FIND THEMSELVES AND EXPRESS THEMSELVES RATHER THAN BE TOLD YOU HAVE DO THINGS IN A CERTAIN WAY”. Sue Balmer, Chair


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TO GROW “MY OWN THING IS TO CREATE A SPACE IN WHICH PEOPLE CAN GROW. THAT’S ALWAYS BEEN CLOSE TO MY HEART. THE FOCUS HERE IS QUITE STRAIGHTFORWARD- IT’S MUSIC AND ARTS”. Tim Brown, CEO

Raw Material is a creative arts and music centre for young people and adults, working in both the local area in Lambeth, further afield across London, in other regions of the UK and internationally. The extensive and widely inclusive programme maintains access for those with the greatest needs and our ethos places positive transformation at the forefront of creative pursuits. We believe that the arts and music, delivered in a socially and culturally relevant way, have the power to change and shape people’s lives. The knowledge, skills and experience made possible by the performing and visual arts, music, film and in creative experimentation, are essential to young people’s and adults’ development, including access to professional resources to create and celebrate the outcomes, both in real time and digitally.

The cultural learning and practice we support takes place in the community, in hospitals, in museums, with arts, voluntary and community organisations, schools and colleges and informally in the wider world, creating opportunities for children, young people and adults to express their ideas and form their values. Through cultural learning and experience, young people and members of the community are encouraged to explore and be inspired to contribute to the arts, music and culture of the present – and the future.


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

SO WHAT’S UP

RAW MATERIAL ARTISTIC PROGRAMME Our work creates outcomes with a focus on engaging with groups that are currently facing inequality and under-representation. This under-representation extends across a number of diversity strands including gender, ethnicity and disability or special educational need. We provide services that deliver:

• S tronger communities through increased cultural learning, self-expression, community ownership and leadership

• Inclusive growth through increased

employability and access to employment and enterprise, including higher value careers in creative industries

• Improved emotional health, wellbeing and

resilience, including for those already engaged with statutory mental health services

• LIVE & LEARN Youth arts & music – Sound School, Junior artist development, New Producers, Summer Arts Lab and Special Projects

• ARTIST DEVELOPMENT – facilitating emerging young artists early career development- composition, songwriting, production, recording, rehearsal, live performance events and showcases

• ARTIST MENTORING – weekly sessions with a limited number of young musicians, artists and producers

• COMMUNITY ACCESS – individual

and group access to recording sessions, production facilities and rehearsal space

• R AW SOUNDS – music and mental health projects in hospitals and the community, instrumental tuition, vocal workshops, live music, production and DJ’ing, In Reach sessions on hospital wards, live music events and touring

• R AW LIVE MUSIC EVENTS –

with professional venues and festivals, partnerships and collaborations

• S UPPORT AND HOSTING LOCAL

GROUPS – Youthsayers youth music ensemble, School Ground Sounds and the Grit School, Raw Creative Connect, young entrepreneurs group

• PARTNERSHIPS – projects and

development projects with local partners including MOPAC (working against youth violence and knife crime) with Juvenis community group, Lambeth Sounds, Photofusion and 198 Contemporary Arts and Learning, with museums, arts and cultural organisations – Imperial War Museum, Hackney Museum, Tate Modern, the ICA, Lambeth Peer Support Network with the Wwalcot Foundation

• C AMHS/SEND – child and adolescent

mental health support project and special educational needs sessions with schools, groups and individuals

• N ATIONAL TOURING – Raw Roads bespoke residential multi arts projects

• INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATIONS – Senegal, Jamaica, USA (New York) EU ‘Creative Europe’ partnership development with Spain, Belgium and Greece


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“AS A TRUSTEE OF RAW MATERIAL, I AM ALWAYS IMPRESSED BY THE CHARITY'S AGILITY. THE TEAM HAVE AGAIN SHOWN THEIR ABILITY TO RESPOND QUICKLY TO NEW OPPORTUNITIES, ESSENTIAL FOR RESILIENCE IN A CHALLENGING ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT”. Anna Terry, Trustee


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

GETTING INVOLVED

MUSIC AS AN ENGAGING & INCLUSIVE FORCE

There is a reason why music underpins our practice at Raw Material: it is a humanising force, unprejudiced, with the power to bring people together and overcome otherwise insurmountable obstacles – social, physical, emotional, cultural.

The ability for musicians to transcend traditional educational practice through informal, unstructured learning is intrinsic to Raw Material’s success. The elements of informal music teaching and learning that are commonplace at Raw Material have long been part of progressive, community learning and educational models in the UK, but are not often studied or documented in any formal way. These elements are at play at Raw Material across its three main areas of musical provision: professional studio work, its Mac suite for making music in a digital environment and live room and resources for acoustic rehearsal and performance.


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& Equality INCREASED ENGAGEMENT WITH THE LEAST ENGAGED There is no longer a common form of youth, youth arts and cultural services across England – everywhere services are different. Councils are rapidly re-shaping services according to local circumstances rather than a national vision. This is a significant factor in Raw Material’s work with two of its largest participant groups: vulnerable young people in challenging circumstances and those suffering from mental ill health. We address engagement by providing an appropriate space and activities for music, instruments, specialist teaching, and support and care for the young people and adults in their local area and the provision of courses. In addition partnerships and strong links with other organisations help to both assist and provide opportunities to increase and develop young people’s career opportunities and participation in professional music and arts activities. It helps with getting into training/employment/enterprise positions and encouraging them in making informed decisions. Engagement through cultural arts learning we support spans both formal and informal learning and this happens in our communities. Our work is experienced as listening, playing, seeing, watching and interacting, performing, devising, designing and composing, making, writing and doing.

Engagement involves learning through culture and learning about culture and includes critical thinking, creativity and the development of original ideas and action. Participants from other projects have been involved on touring projects, performed widely at events, attended summer schools in France and international projects in Senegal and the US.

“A KEY STRENGTH IS THEIR ABILITY TO REACH THOSE LESS ENGAGED IN THE ARTS AND CULTURE, ENGAGEMENT OF PEOPLE WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES, WHICH IS NOT ONLY LIFE CHANGING FOR THE PARTICIPANTS BUT RE INTRODUCES PARTICIPANTS THAT HAVE SUFFERED FROM A VARIETY OF MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES AND THROUGH THIS PROGRAMME HAVE BECOME PRODUCTIVE MEMBERS OF SOCIETY AND SOME HAVE GAINED EMPLOYMENT THROUGH THE PROGRAMME”. Natalie Pryce, Arts Council England


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

In The Zone THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPERIENCE AND PARTICIPATE We enable children, young people, teachers, families and communities to create, participate in or be audiences; they are its makers and consumers. Our staff practice at all levels in the organisation with local and wider communities. They innovate and drive the creative learning process. Raw Material is founded on a cooperative spirit. This ethos stems from a belief that staff and facilitators are operating on an equal level with participants, in the same space, alongside them. The activities, interactions

and processes involved in taking part at Raw Material are relevant to the participant. Relevance could be related to a person’s personal identity, physical or mental wellbeing, music style, music production process, approach to learning, or cultural background. The freedom to innovate flows through all aspects of Raw Material’s teaching practice, in tandem with the creative bedrock of the organisation, which is music education.

"IF WE’RE INVITING LOCAL PEOPLE FROM THE COMMUNITY FOR EXAMPLE, WHO ARE INTO RAP, GRIME, HIPHOP OR REGGAE, WE’RE NOT HERE TO TELL THEM HOW TO PLAY IT. WE’RE PROVIDING A SPACE FOR THAT TO TAKE PLACE. IT’S AN OPEN SPACE.” Tim Brown, CEO


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Raw Material and our partners are a driver for social cohesion and change, a provider of skills, creative and cultural development and aspiration – and offering progression routes towards sustainable futures. It is about promoting inspiring settings for cultural learning and helping young people in particular to progress and thrive, and investing in our social, economic and cultural futures. Our focus is on children, young people and adults being able to enjoy music in a positive environment and being supported through their adolescence and beyond through the provision of appropriate resources and expertise. In our work this encompasses a wide range of provision, including formal and informal youth settings and services, local authority, voluntary, community and private sector provision, services for vulnerable people, disabled young people and those at risk. The music and related arts programme is delivered by people who know and love music, and understand and support the needs of the young people in an appropriate way.

We address the need by providing the right space and activities for music, instruments, specialist teaching, and support and care for people in the local area and beyond and through provision of courses and projects.

“THE HIGHLIGHT OF MY YEAR WITH RAW MATERIAL HAS BEEN INTRODUCING A NUMBER OF VISUAL ART PROJECTS. I COFACILITATED "MAPPING SOUNDS" AN EXPERIMENTAL ABSTRACT ART PROJECT- COMBINING SOUND AND MARK MAKING, WITH MUSICIAN AND CEO TIM BROWN. THIS WAS A GREAT SUCCESS ENABLING RAW SOUNDS MEMBERS TO EXPLORE THEIR CREATIVITY THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE MEDIUM. BUILDING ON FROM THIS I DESIGNED AND FACILITATED A SPRAY PAINTED ART WORKSHOPWHICH SAW RAW SOUNDS MEMBERS USING "FOUND STENCILS" TO CREATE ABSTRACT LAYERED COMPOSITIONS, WHICH HAVE BEEN USED IN PROMOTIONAL FLYERS AND TO ADD COLOUR AND INTEREST TO OUR PREMISES. WE DELIVERED OUR SUMMER ARTS LAB, A 3-DAY ANIMATION PROJECT FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AGED 10-14YRS. THIS WAS A MULTI PROJECTWHICH ENABLED THE YOUNG PEOPLE TO DEVELOP SKILLS IN MODEL MAKING, CHARACTER DESIGN, STORY BOARDING, FILM / PHOTOGRAPHY, AND RECORDING SOUNDS IN THE STUDIO.” Kirsty Reynolds, Arts administration, visual arts and animation session leader


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

IN MENTAL HEALTH & WELLBEING

The Raw Sounds mental health programme works with young people and adults across a range of weekly creative activities that support their emotional wellbeing, mental health, survival and development through music, performance and arts activities. Our staff work to build confidence and resilience so that they may lead better and improved lives. Our work with referral agencies and support services guarantees that they can access the right services to enable them to have the best possible options for their wellbeing. Raw Sounds has become a solid favourite of young people and adults and is one of the few resources that people actively request to be referred to. In a world where it is difficult to get people to engage in services and attend

appointments, this service is unique in the fact that people readily attend, without needing reminders. The programme has engaged over 90 people per 12 week term and with 157 on hospital wards through the In Reach programme. We've seen participants grow in skill and confidence throughout the year. “RAW SOUNDS HAS BEEN FANTASTIC ON LUTHER KING WARD. THE NATURE OF THE ACUTE SETTING IN MENTAL HEALTH IS THAT SERVICE USERS MAY BE AT VARIOUS STAGES OF THEIR RECOVERY SO MAY STAY FOR AN ENTIRE SESSION OR JUST A FEW MINUTES. HOWEVER EVEN MINIMAL ENGAGEMENT CAN BE THERAPEUTIC AND ALL SERVICE USERS WHO ATTENDED RAW SOUNDS ON THE WARD HAVE HAD POSITIVE THINGS TO SAY”. Lambeth Hospital ward staff


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There is a real lack of these type of support services available to young and underprivileged people and feedback those we work with is that they wish that there could be access to more sessions, and more opportunities to engage in creative activities, in our case to both perform and create musicin reality this service should be ever expanding.

“MENTAL HEALTH IS A HUGE, HUGE SPECTRUM. THERE’S A LARGE PERCENTAGE LIVING IN OUR COMMUNITY WHO HAVE ANXIETY, DEPRESSION OR A MORE COMPLEX TRAUMA OR NEED. OUR AIM IS NOT TO ATTEMPT TO REACH ALL THESE PEOPLE, BUT TO REACH THOSE WHO ARE CURRENTLY LIVING IN HOSPITAL AND HAVE HAD AN ADMISSION FOR AN ACUTE PSYCHIATRIC ISSUE, AT THE CRISIS POINT OF DISTRESS. OUR AIM IS TO ENGAGE PEOPLE WITH MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS WHO HAVE THE MOST ACUTE AND COMPLEX CHALLENGES AT TIME OF REFERRAL.” Hannah Kemp-Welch, programme manager

Creating progression routes for participants from our projects through and beyond our programme is a key element. Many Raw Sounds project participants have had ten week placements the Amy Winehouse Foundation, performed at CoolTan Arts and Core Arts, Lambeth Country Show, Pie Factory Ramsgate and the Elder Stubbs annual festival in Oxford. Members have joined Tate Collective, and now programme events at the gallery. Ten members are volunteers at Raw Material are now delivering workshops alongside our staff. “THE RAW SOUNDS MENTAL HEALTH PROJECT CONTINUES TO GO FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH WITH AN EXCITING BLEND OF NEW AND EXISTING TALENT. THE SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENT HELPS TO NURTURE CREATIVITY AND FOSTERS COLLABORATION AMONGST THE PARTICIPANTS. THE QUALITY AND STANDARD OF THE PERFORMANCE COME THE END OF TERM OF SESSIONS IS SOMETHING TO BEHOLD. I AM IN SUCH A PRIVILEGED POSITION TO SEE THE WEEKLY PROGRESSION AND DEVELOPMENT OF PARTICIPANTS, YET IT IS ALWAYS SUCH AN EMOTIONAL AND JOYOUS EXPERIENCE AT THE PERFORMANCE EVENT”. Jide Ashimi, Trustee and volunteer


RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

Young talent development We have promoted an aspirational approach to music and related arts. These projects gives access to a whole range of music styles and experiences, including not just learning to play instruments, singing and performing but also developing music in a studio environment and managing the music production process. It gives young people experience at a professional level so they can see what opportunities are available in an area they aim to do, within the context of a healthy understanding of the realities of work and employment. This provides access to an artistic programme of excellence and innovation. It enables people to gain professional skills and experience quality music creation, production and performance. 2018 has been a great year for developing live music with our artist development group and across the whole range of our work. We added a more live elements to the project, giving artists the opportunity to develop their songs with professional musicians, performing at events in and around London and internationally in Dakar, Senegal, New York and with ‘Intraspection Music Experience’, a new Creative Europe project with Spain, Greece and Belgium.

RISING

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LAMBETH MUSIC NETWORK HUB, now LAMBETH SOUNDS – Our commitment continued with the music education hub both, by being on the strategy group and through delivering projects. Joint projects continued with the music hub members in particular Lambeth Live Explosion events, featuring up and coming musical talent in the borough. FACTORY – this is a group of creative organisations working collectively with lead organization 198 Contemporary Arts and Culture towards realising a new creative centre for Lambeth, to provide viable employment opportunities for young people and to develop creative businesses. Our live events where all the work is showcased are highlights of the programme. The performances, both in house and Raw Sounds events at POW Brixton, POP Brixton, artist development members performances at the Southbank centre for the Outlook Orchestra, at the House of Common festival with Madness, at the Urban Women Week festival in Senegal, the collaboration with The Place for the Tune-d In dance festival, Lambeth Country Show, the ‘Breaking the Silence’ performance piece commissioned by the Imperial War Museum and Lambeth Sounds events for the Winterville festival were no exception – the quality of music produced on our programme is a testament to the dedication of participants and the talented staff who support them. Through our youth programme, Sound School, New Producers and Artist Development and partnership projects with Youthsayers, SGS and Grit School, we have over 60 young people attending weekly sessions. Our work attracted the attention of mainstream acts like The XX and Madness and Skin from Skunk Anansi, who visited the sessions and some of whom subsequently made large donations.

“FOR LIVE MUSIC, I CAN TEACH PERFORMANCE SIDE OF IT – PROJECTING VOICE, GETTING OVER YOUR NERVES. IN THE STUDIO THERE’S SO MUCH TO TEACH. MICROPHONE TECHNIQUES, SETTING UP THE STUDIO, CABLING, SETTING THE RECORDING INPUT LEVELS, TO JUST THE GENERAL MIXING. WITH STUDIO THERE IS SO MUCH YOU CAN LEARN, AND ON THE SIDE YOU CAN TEACH THE PIANO A BIT. THE KEYBOARD IS THE DOMINANT MIDI CONTROLLER. YOU HAVE TO KNOW YOUR WAY AROUND IT TO WORK IN THE STUDIO. IF YOU WANT TO PLAY A CHORD, LIKE A C MAJOR, YOUR HAVE TO KNOW IT OR UNDERSTAND HOW IT WORKS. SO I SHOW PARTICIPANTS, “HERE’S A C MAJOR, HERE’S AN A MINOR”, KIND OF SLIP IT IN A BIT. THAT’S ONE WAY OF TEACHING PIANO.” Chavez Shillingford, Project tutor


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

On the Edge Part of our work in Brixton is concerned with working with young people on the edge of violence and knife crime.

We have been working alongside local organisation Juvenis, firstly with girls and young women in the ‘Milk and Honey’ project and through other courses in radio and music. For some boys picking up a knife before leaving the house is like putting on shoes. Cuts to services, youth and community centres prevents addressing any of the social, economic and environmental problems. Violence among teenagers is a common feature of local life and postcode defined gang wars between groups of disenfranchised male teenagers living in rival housing estates have cemented over years. The psychological commitment to carrying a knife has been normalised, perceived as the most accessible means of survival. According to research published this year at least £22 million has been cut from youth arts and community service budgets across London since 2011. More than 30 centres have closed, at least 12,700 places for young people

lost and youth service employment reduced by 39%. There is no cruder example of how the governments austerity project is placing a stranglehold on the lives and needs of the most vulnerable. Common to all young people our area are high levels of ethnic inequality and deprivation, broken families, single parent families, a high number of families on benefits, youth unemployment and an increased number of young people in criminal justice system. There are higher than average levels of mental ill health and a disproportionate amount of people from BAME communities involved in gang culture. Drug dependency and trafficking (County Lines) are on the increase with the added peer group pressure, territorial issues (Post Codes). The Service cuts in local authority youth provision and little support on offer with a lack of integration between existing services means little care in the community.


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Due to all this, some young people end up in gang crimes for protection or territorial issues, money, status and conditional friendship. This situation has become endemic and spread to other towns and cities through the so called ‘County Lines’ operations of main city drug dealers using children and young people to carry drugs and set up cells across the country.

Members of Raw Creative Connect project promoting alternative models of opportunity and progression for young people

“IF WE’RE TALKING ABOUT DEALING WITH SOCIAL NEED AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND TRYING TO FIND WAYS OF WORKING WITHIN THE ARTS AROUND THOSE ISSUES THERE IS NO BIGGER ISSUE AT THE MOMENT THAN MENTAL HEALTH. MORE AND MORE PEOPLE ARE SUFFERING FROM MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES. IT GOES HAND IN HAND WITH OTHER AREAS WE WORK IN. GANG VIOLENCE, DRUGS, RISK OF VIOLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY – ALL THESE THINGS ARE ALSO CONNECTED TO MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING. A LOT OF THESE YOUNG PEOPLE HAVE DEVELOPED MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS DUE TO BEING AROUND VIOLENT PEOPLE AND ATMOSPHERES, TRAUMA, SMOKING STRONG MARIJUANA THAT’S FLIPPED THEM OUT, BEING IN POVERTY. MANY HAVE ACQUIRED MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS THROUGH THEIR SITUATION IN LIFE.” Marc Brown, Creative Youth Programme manager


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

On the Move The success of our third national touring project ‘Imagine’ that invited participants over a full week of workshops to identify unwanted elements in their lives and, using whatever artistic elements they chose- rap, songs, music, visuals, lyricism and performance, create and perform their own unique reactions to it.

The Raw team was on hand to mentor, train and support each young person on her or his journey of acquiring creative skills, devising and performing their creations to the public.

A new touring project ‘Songlines’ is in the development stage, where we are planning an ambitious 18 month programme, training “ESSENTIALLY young facilitators and touring to partners THERE IS NO STRATEGY and venues across the country. This will TO GETTING A CHILD OR again feature free artist led workshops YOUNG PERSON TO TRUST YOU. and performance opportunities for YOU JUST HAVE TO: marginalised young people; music A) WANT TO DO IT AND: collaborations between young B) BE ABLE TO DO IT.” people from up to five cities; bringing Alexis Adimora, Creative Projects tutor high quality and original art to The quote above highlights a core principle of effective areas of low provision; training of work with young people: trust. In addition to the five organisation facilitators; and sharing pillars of our ethos – Equality, Freedom and Agency, bespoke methodologies with partner Inclusion, Relevance and Ownership – building organisations and a sustainable legacy. a foundation of trust is essential for our work with young people.


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Raw World

International projects

Our international work is about connecting across countries and continents where artistic and creative skills, expertise, resources and good practice are shared and showcased.

EUROPE Our commitment to working with European partners remains despite set backs with the Erasmus + programme – and continues in 2018–20 with an EU ‘Creative Europe’ project about music and mental health, with partners in Spain, Greece and Belgium.

USA We set up contacts in New York with Art Start and Building Beats education projects, visiting there in October 2017 and since we have exchanging music tracks and recordings via the internet.

The proposed Erasmus + Strategic Partnership project with Croatia, Italy and Netherlands Is on hold at this point due to uncertainties over the UK leaving the UK this year and so no further applications will be attempted until we are sure of the outcomes.

SENEGAL There is a continuing partnership with Africulturban Association in Dakar, Senegal, where a team of our young artists performed at the Urban Women Week festival in 2018.


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

PROJECT EXAMPLES Roots, Rhythms and Records multimedia project The RIX Centre has been working with Raw Material as part of their purpleSTARS initiative that supports people with learning disabilities to work with Museums and Heritage sites, to make them more relevant and inclusive for visitors with learning disabilities or similar challenges. We are working with the purpleSTARS team members who have devised their ideas for how they can re-interpret the Hackney museum Roots, Rhythms and Records exhibition. The purpose of their re-working is to explore creative ideas that they feel will bring the exhibition display to life for people who find the more complex content difficult to understand. Their ideas tease out the sensory dimensions of the themes and stories and consider ways to help disabled people access and enjoy the themes of the Roots,

Rhythms and Records. They use multimedia authoring to help to organise and progress their research, their thinking and their ideas. All participants are from Afro-Caribbean lineage and they are particularly interested in the way their work on this project has already enabled them to reflect upon and share their own culture as young black people – so breaking away from their pigeon-holing as being ‘disabled’ people. The installation is based on the purpleSTARS producing a suit case that contains an interactive and multi-sensory interpretation of the exhibition. It will be like a portable market-seller’s suitcase and will capture the themes that the team has developed ideas around; ‘Objects’ that tell stories, ‘Attire’ that captures the Windrush era and the African roots of Afro Caribbean people and their music, ‘Food’ that brings the smells and the tastes of Afro Caribbean culture to life and ‘Music’ that connects the original sounds of the 1960s with its legacy for young black people in today’s sounds. news.hackney. gov.uk/roots-rhythms-records

‘BREAKING THE SILENCE’ AT THE IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM This was a specially commissioned performance piece at the IWM for Armistice Day 2018. It was produced by ten young spoken word artists, singers and the Youthsayers music ensemble, working over ten weeks at Raw Material. The performance was based on the moment of silence when the First World War ended, and explored war from different perspectives, from a child, to a soldier, from historical to contemporary conflicts. Subversive and challenging, it was performed on Remembrance Sunday to an audience of over 1000 at the museum and again at the Winterville festival on Clapham Common.


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INTRASPECTION MUSIC EXPERIENCE An EU Creative Europe project with Fondacion Intras in Valladolid Spain and partners Raw Material, KSDO ETRAS in Greece and KAOS in Belgium. Introspection Music Experience is a three-year project (November 2018 – June 2021) which not only seeks to support the music sector by promoting emerging artists, but also captures vibrant and authentic stories coming from the grassroots – with people suffering from mental health issues and usually not accessible to the public, to keep music diversity alive. It is clear that music can contribute to mental health, however, the IME project demonstrates that mental illness can also contribute to the music sector. The projects primary objectives are to promote the value of diversity, to increase the representation of artists (singers, composers) who experience mental illness, to attract and develop new audiences and to support mobility of emerging artists. The results of the IME project are the creation of the a wide range of materials including a curated list of songs about living with mental health issues, producing a collaborative album with a documentary film and twelve local concerts in Athens, Brussels, London, Valladolid Spain. Finally the production and publication of the IME e-book, to provide external organizations with all the information needed to replicate this experience and setting up the ‘Get Involved’ programme, which will help sustain the project beyond the European funding period.


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

ICA BBC RAW MATERIAL ‘YOUNG CREATIVES’ The ICA’s and the BBC’s ‘Young Creatives’ programme is a two year, youth-focused, experimental broadcast programme generating audio, film and interactive content that will be disseminated across all the BBC’s platforms (online, radio, TV) as well as across the ICA and core production partners networks. They have invited associate partners to commission selected works, so Raw Material is producing audio work with the people we work with, recording in our studios, running workshops at the ICA, and inviting other young people to become part of the programme’s steering group. The programme enables young people to produce and engage with new content with a particular focus on experimental, non-conventional audio works. Core production partners include Dazed, NTS, Space, Kingston Uni, Werkflow and Chisenhale Gallery.


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URBAN WOMEN WEEK, SENEGAL Helping women find their own urban voices Urban Women Week: Promoting Women on the Senegalese Rap Scene

The growing interest in gender equality at festivals contrasts with the relative lack of attention given to festivals as sites of gender politics. Organised by Africulturban, a Senegalese association which promotes urban cultures, the example of ‘Urban Women Week’ – a Senegalese festival which aims to promote women in hip hop and rap music – leads us to revisit a gendered perspective on festivals while tackling the neglected issue of women’s presence in a rap music scene, dominated by the “patriarchal impulses of the Senegalese hip hop establishment” (Neff 2015). How are we to understand the adoption of a focus on women by the organisers of the festival in Senegal? Is rap music a specific place where women are empowered in the Senegalese context? Based on fieldwork carried out on the rap music scene in Senegal, the establishment and evolution of the festival is a way for the Africulturban to respond to local claims for the inclusion of women in rap music while benefiting from a global agenda of gender mainstreaming, thereby exploring the global intricacies of gender politics in music.

Hip-hop takes serious work. That was the refrain of a week of workshops and live performances for the team of young women from Raw Material who travelled to the International Urban Women Week festival in Dakar, Senegal, ‘Be who you really are’ Prominent Senegalese organized by the local organisation rapper Keyti coached the women on their Africulturban. There was a graffiti art show, writing during the week. “Up to now”, he slam poetry, music and dance instruction says during an open debate before their and a host of performance events they performance, “… it's been the two extremes – engaged in. the women acting like tomboys or trying to be Rihanna. Can we get to a point where female Hip-hop may still be a man's world in Senegalese rappers just get up on stage and Senegal, but more women are breaking into be who they really are without feeling like they urban arts. In Dakar, Africulturban is holding have to play a part?” workshops to mentor, train and help the country's next generation of female hipThat isn't stopping this new generation of hop artists find their own voices. For the female rappers from taking on big issues aspiring female rappers upstairs, it was in their verse – motherhood, love, poverty, an intense week of writing, rewriting and education. When they take that mic, they laying down tracks in the studio. say, their voices must speak for thousands.


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

Promoting an Arts Strategy for young people With Young Lambeth Cooperative, Photofusion and 198 Contemporary Arts and Learning we produced ‘Culture at Heart’, a strategy for a sustainable arts, creative and digital sector for Lambeth’s young people.


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There is a general appreciation of the importance of creativity to society and it is an exciting time for the country with a huge amount already achieved across the education sector and beyond. But we believe there is further untapped potential that can be unlocked. We see a vibrant and bold future. A diverse yet united borough where people of all ages, from every nook of the community, can access higher value careers and improved wellbeing by experiencing and acquiring skills in the cultural, artistic and digital industries.

The proposal takes the form of a pragmatic plan for change to deliver outcomes that are cohesive with local strategies including the Lambeth Plan, Lambeth’s Children and Young People’s Plan and the Creative and Digital Strategy. Critically, it also serves as a rallying cry to give backing to these organisations today and ensure that Lambeth can continue to burst with talent and pride as we embrace the future together.

But there is a dark shadow ever more present. Organisations are being forced to scale down or close their doors through lack of resources. What does this mean? Young people disengaging from education and unable to reach their potential? Communities struggling to understand one another and work together? Young adults experiencing poor mental health with nowhere to turn before crisis hits? Unless we act now, the wellbeing of Lambeth’s residents is at stake and Lambeth’s unique identity hangs in the balance.

BLE R A SUSTAINA CTOR STRATEGY FO DIGITAL SE & VE TI EA LE ARTS, CR S YOUNG PEOP FOR LAMBETH’ // PHOTOFUSION L // 198 CAL // RAW MATERIA OPERATIVE CO H ET MB YOUNG LA

“I’M OLD ENOUGH TO REMEMBER WHEN ISSUES AROUND DIVERSITY AND PARTICIPATION IN THE ARTS AND SOCIETY WERE SEEN AS SOCIAL JUSTICE OBJECTIVES. BUT THEY ARE ECONOMIC OBJECTIVES NOW AS WELL; WE KNOW THAT DIVERSITY IS THE SOCIAL ENGINE OF CREATIVITY. WE RECOGNISE THAT CREATIVITY, THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES ARE ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL TO OUR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC FUTURES. SO I THINK FOR THE FIRST TIME THERE IS A CONGRUENCE ACROSS ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, CULTURAL, ARTISTIC, DIGITAL, CREATIVE AGENDAS THAT WE’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE.” Jonathan Neelands, University of Warwick


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

DIVERSITY MATTERS Raw Material’s artistic programme, objectives, user groups, partnerships, staff and Board reflect the diversity of contemporary UK. Our local demographic is a microcosm of true diversity and is reflected in all our work, both locally, regionally, nationally and on international projects across African diaspora. To inform this, Raw Material’s equalities objectives and commitment to equalities are at the heart of our equalities and diversity action plan which has been developed during the past three years. The plan sets out the outcomes the company has achieved and will be working toward and describes our approach to implementing and embedding this as our way of working. We have worked with members of the local community to jointly agree the equality objectives for the company. We started with a desk based evidence review on what equalities challenges the company was facing, and then held conversations with a range of people to pin down what goals we should be working towards. These conversations have included staff, community groups, young people and residents

“CULTURAL DIVERSITY IS REFLECTED AND IS A CLEAR AIM ACROSS ALL RAW MATERIALS’ ARTISTIC PROGRAMME, WITH A VERY CLEAR FOCUS ON ITS USERS: 75% BAME BACKGROUNDS, 60% WITH DISABILITIES, 5% LBGT, 40% OLDER PEOPLE, 40% HEALTH AND WELLBEING AND 100% WITH SOCIO ECONOMIC BARRIERS”. Arts Council England annual feedback


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EVALUATION Raw Material carries out critical self assessment with the management, staff and Board, of where change is needed in the organisation in order to continue to improve quality and the actions required to bring about change, reform and development. Constant reinforcements of aims are implemented in every project and programme. We have been able to explore new approaches, pushing the boundaries of our practice and engaging more people. In an increasingly challenging environment, we have pursued ways of working and strategies to both confront these situations and find creative solutions. We aim to capture the approach, expertise and methodologies of Raw Material in accessible formats so the organisation can strengthen its education, training and progression of young people through provision of learning opportunities for the long-term, and so others (outside of the organisation in the UK and internationally) can be inspired by and adopt to help more people. AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Raw Material offers an increased number of arts schemes, with up to ten different projects for over 500 participants and audiences of many thousands, plus outreach and touring projects. These are available to a diverse and challenging demographic, in some of the poorest and most deprived areas. We offer an invaluable resource for both the local area and wider regions through touring and will be more able to create opportunities for increased participation and engagement

with people outside of the normally engaged sections, such as we achieved in our Raw Roads touring activities in UK towns and cities. Our mental health, special needs groups and work with deprived communities are enabling us to engage with an even wider demographic. The target audiences range from people with good level of arts abilities to people with low educational attainment level, some of whom have experienced school exclusion or have been caught in a cycle of anti social behaviour and offending, mental health and learning difficulties. While the core provision is aimed at young people, audiences have broadened in recent years to include older people with severe and forensic mental health problems.


RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

Increasing resilience. Sustainable development.

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“The funding environment remains challenging. Despite much hard work from its staff and volunteers, austere economic conditions mean that government funding is in short supply and competition for grants is fierce. This raises doubts about the long-term sustainability of many of our well attended community programmes, plus makes developing new services difficult. Throughout the latest financial year, careful planning alongside the development of paid programmes enabled the charity to maintain a modest operating surplus. However, this cushion will not be sufficient to offset further declines in government or grant funding. In recognition of these challenges, the Trustees continue to explore additional funding streams, such as corporate sponsorship, personal giving, improved cash management (including short term investing to generate income) and further chargeable programmes. All these additional sources of income will take time and resources to develop. As such, the charity is taking a purposefully slow and opportunistic approach to securing funds from the broader community, while continuing to work closely with the Arts Council and a broad array of grant giving bodies to maintain and develop its resources”. Sara Yates, Trustee


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We are building on previous strategic reviews and are developing our plans for the next period, yet at the same time we aware of the challenges that lie ahead for our sector, especially in the light of government strategy at home and abroad and the impact of leaving the EU. We are fortunate in being awarded funding as an ACE National Portfolio Organisation (NPO) and we have had some success in raising additional funds and support from our major funders, providing the stability and investment required to enable us to grow and continue to develop. Our sustainability requires the reconciliation of environmental, social equity and economic demands. While sustainability is mainly about the future of our society, for today's arts sector it is also about our success. The mandate to transform our organisation to a sustainable future while fulfilling social wants and needs has become an unparalleled platform for innovation on strategy, design, and brand, offering opportunities to compete and to adapt to a rapidly evolving world.


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

Ethos

Freedom and Authority Raw Material operates on the principle that everyone has the freedom and authority to develop their own path. “Authority to do new things here isn’t earned – it is given.” J.Gaskin This ethos runs across the whole organisation, so that staff, volunteers and participants have the authority to try out new ideas, innovate, make suggestions, and – crucially – learn from their mistakes.

Equality Raw Material is founded on a cooperative spirit. This ethos stems from a belief that staff and facilitators are operating on an equal level with participants, in the same space, alongside them.

“WHEN I WORKED IN THE MY PREVIOUS JOB AT THE COCKPIT THEATRE IN NORTH LONDON, WE’D HAVE A FEW THINGS SET UP IN THE LIVE STUDIO ROOM, WE’D JUST START SOMETHING OFF. IT WAS A BIT OF A JAM, AND WE’D SEE WHERE WE’D GO WITH IT. I WAS PARTICIPATING ON AN EQUAL LEVEL. I WASN’T PUTTING MYSELF UP AS AN EXPERT. FOR ME WHAT WE DO HERE IS ABOUT YOUR OWN PERSONAL EXPLORATION AND WORKING ON AN EQUAL BASIS WITH PEOPLE, ALLOWING OTHERS TO DEVELOP AT THE SAME TIME AS YOU’RE DEVELOPING.” T.Brown

“WE’RE NOT SAYING, “THIS IS HOW YOU DO IT”. WE’RE SAYING: “YOU DO IT HOW YOU DO IT.” AS LONG AS IT’S SAFE AND NOT HARMING ANYONE.” T.Brown


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Acceptance We accept difference in all its forms. When a new person arrives at Raw Material, whether they are a staff member, volunteer or participant, they are free to operate in ways that are familiar and comfortable. “YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A CERTAIN TYPE OR BEHAVE IN A CERTAIN WAY TO BE HERE. WE WANT YOUR CREATIVITY. WE RECOGNISE THE WAY YOU THINK IS GREAT. LET’S USE IT. LET’S EXPAND IT. LET’S GET IT ON PAPER, LET’S SING IT, LET’S PLAY IT. ACCEPTANCE OF DIFFERENCE IS MASSIVE HERE – THAT’S WHY WE WERE ABLE TO TAKE ON THE MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMME, BECAUSE ACCEPTANCE WAS ALREADY THERE AS A PRINCIPLE.” S.Balmer

Ownership Central to Raw Material’s ethos is that all of its shared activity is rooted in a sense of personal ownership – of the physical space and the creative process. Barriers to access are kept to a minimum. Participants and staff can – and do – use the building as if it is their own.

“PEOPLE COME HERE AND THEY FEEL LIKE IT’S THEIR BUILDING, THEY CAN DROP BY. AND THEY’RE HERE TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THEIR MUSIC. WE’RE NOT TELLING THEM WHAT TO MAKE. WE’RE NOT TELLING THEM HOW TO MAKE IT.” H. Kemp-Welch

Relevance The activities, interactions and processes involved in taking part at Raw Material are relevant to the participant. Relevance could be related to a person’s personal identity, physical or mental wellbeing, music style, music production process, approach to learning, or cultural background.

THIS IS A SAFE PLACE. PEOPLE CAN EXPRESS THEMSELVES. BUT THERE ARE SOME RULES, FOR EXAMPLE WANTING TO RAP ABOUT VIOLENCE, WHICH IS NOT ACCEPTABLE. VIOLENCE IS NOT TOLERATED. DIGNITY AND RESPECT ARE CENTRAL, AND YOU’LL SEE THAT BIG TIME IN ALL THE GROUP WORK. THEY’RE NOT CLOSED DOWN. THERE ARE BOUNDARIES, BUT THEY ARE LOOSER.’ S.Balmer


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

SHOP

Raw Material shares much of its DNA with community arts organisations of the 1980’s and 90s: “People coming together formed organisations rather than institutions, to make something happen or to tackle issues, often local ones … being settled and embedded in one place, and occasionally venturing out to local areas or abroad where the same issues recurred and the practitioners felt that they could be part of that conversation.” (Bas, 2016)

“TRYING TO REMOVE THE BARRIERS THAT WOULD MAKE CREATING ARTWORK PROBLEMATIC, REMOVING THE NEED TO TALK ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE In the past, a shared political, educational DOING, REMOVING THE NEED TO SIT or social vision was often sufficient to STILL. NOT DEFINING THE SPACE AS underwrite support. That is no longer the TYPICAL EDUCATION SPACE. NOT LIMITING case. The cultural and financial landscape BEHAVIOURS THAT COULD INFORM in which community arts organisations CREATIVE PRACTICE. IN DESIGNING A operate has changed beyond recognition SESSION WHERE YOU’RE OPEN TO over the last 30 years. Competition for grant DISRUPTION YOU IMMEDIATELY funding from trusts and foundations, and from REMOVE THAT BARRIER.” Metz, 2016

other sources – including local and central government – is intense. One of the most significant effects of these pressures has been an increased requirement for evaluation and measurement of outcomes, in order to secure and to maintain financial support and for internal development.

“STICKING TO YOUR OWN AGENDA IS A BATTLE. WE DO FIND OURSELVES AFFECTED BY EDICTS THAT WE ALL GET FROM OUTSIDE, WHERE THE GOVERNMENT HAS IDENTIFIED CERTAIN PRIORITIES. HOW DO WE RESPOND TO THAT?” T. Brown


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QUESTIONS & ANSWERS At Raw Material, the answer has been to take a threefold approach. Firstly, it has focused on its own ethos, strengths and core principles, identifying what it does well. Secondly it has focused on identifying need and filling gaps in current provision, engaging in partnership working where relevant to offer the right services, to the right people at the right time. Thirdly, it has instituted a system of monitoring and evaluation to better understand its own impact and to share insight with stakeholders and interested parties, including funders. HUMANISTIC APPROACHES Raw Material has retained its ability to work at an individualised level with its participants, in part by not growing excessively, but largely by having a strong emphasis on individual responsibility and agency for its staff and volunteers. This ethos is then transferred to the participants. Raw Material’s community mental health programme is based on a humanistic approach, which rests on the therapeutic benefits of engaging in musical activity, and the benefits of social proscribing on mental wellbeing, including self-esteem. BOUNDARIES With a working practice based on freedom of access and expression, it is important to acknowledge that there are boundaries to behaviour for participants and staff, while remembering that the overall ethos is one of care and compassion. As a staff member you will have a duty of care towards participants, which includes taking responsibility for setting boundaries. OUTCOMES Internally, Raw Material evaluates its outcomes for each programme against set benchmarks. For the mental health programme, it uses an adapted version of the Arts Observational Scale

developed jointly by Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and the Royal College of Music (Fancourt & Poon, 2015), to measure engagement, track outcomes, monitor performance and help steer future developments. Wherever possible, Raw Material trains volunteer placements to assist with evaluation, leaving tutors and staff free to deliver services. Although there is no formalized structure, the process of understanding a shared approach to youth projects and participants is open-ended and ongoing between staff.


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

NETWORK FRANCE Carcassonne Festival du Carcassonne and International summer school

FRANCE Limoux Feria, Toques et Clochers, Sieur d’Arques Calais Help4 Refugee Children

USA New Orleans Team Vision Entertainment, Takrema Arts Centre, RAE House, Gasa Gasa venue, University of New Orleans

NETHERLANDS Nijmegen New Arts, De Lindberg

USA New York Building Beats, ArtStart

BELGIUM Kunstatelier Opperstraat

ITALY Aosta Fulmine in Linea Retta Turin CLG Chamois Musicabilmente festival

CROATIA Labin Alfa Albona Youth Association SPAIN Fondacion Intras

GREECE Kinonikes Sinetereristikes Drastiriotites Efpathon Omadon

INDIA Mumbai Imran Khan JAMAICA Kingston Alpha Institute

SUDAN Khartoum National Museum, British Council

COLOMBIA Buenaventura Associazione Folklorico Buenaventura

BRAZIL Salvador Gruppo Culturel Olodum

THE GAMBIA Serrekunda Alliance Francais Bakau AfroManding group

SOUTH AFRICA KCAP Kwamashu Community Advancement Project

SENEGAL Dakar Institute Francais Pikine Association Africulturban

AUSTRALIA Alice Springs /Mbantua CAAMA Studios, Australasian Aboriginal Arts and Education Association, Macdonnel shire youth service, Red Hot Arts, Bush Bands Bash festival Ntaria /Hermannsberg Macdonnel shire youth service

= active projects


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“RAW MATERIAL HAVE PROVIDED A WELCOMING ENVIRONMENT TO EXPERIMENT AND DEVELOP MY CRAFT. IT’S NOT JUST A STUDIO BUT A HOME FOR MANY, AND I’M TRULY THANKFUL FOR THE TALENTED, AMBITIOUS SOULS I GET TO CREATE WITH, THE FRIENDSHIPS I’VE MADE, AND THE CONTINUED SUPPORT I RECEIVE. BIG LOVE!" Sarah, Project Member

NOTTINGHAM Stone Soup Academy, College Street centre SEND Project

PETERBOROUGH Chime studios, John Clare Theatre, Beat This, Galleries of Justice OXFORD Elder Stubbs festival RAMSGATE Pie Factory

LONDON Photofusion, 198 Contemporary Arts and Learning, Juvenis, Young Lambeth Cooperative, Hackney Museum, Imperial War Museum, School Grounds Sounds, Youthsayers, The Place -London School of Contemporary Dance, Southbank Centre, Lambeth Sounds music hub, Octavia House school, Phoenix House school, Lambeth hospital, Maudsley hospital, Amy Winehouse Foundation, Industry on the Streets, Alwayz Kreative

FOLKESTONE Quarterhouse Theatre Folkestone Fringe


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

KEY FACTS 2018

450 PEOPLE ARE ENROLLED ON OUR YOUTH PROJECTS ON AN ANNUAL BASIS

185

70

people aged 16–65 yrs attend Raw Sounds community sessions weekly

REFERRED THROUGH MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

PATIENTS ENGAGED IN OUR I N REACH SESSIONS ON HOSPITAL WARDS of which:

19% 50% 29% are 16–24 yrs

are 25–44 yrs

24% 11%

Mixed/ Multiple

6%

Asian/ Asian British

are White

Other

3%

are 45–64 yrs

50% Black/African/ Caribbean


75%

WE NOW HAVE

OF PARTICIPANTS ARE FROM BAME COMMUNITIES

FULLY TRAINED VOLUNTEER MENTORS

65%

4

OF MEMBERS ARE MALE

INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS:

Senegal, Spain, Belgium & Greece

35%

3

OF MEMBERS ARE FEMALE

ORGANISATIONS SUPPORTED & HOSTED

SGS AND THE GRIT SCHOOL / YOUTHSAYERS AFROBEAT YOUTH ENSEMBLE / ALWAYZ CREATIVE / RAW CREATIVE CONNECT YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS

20 110 LIVE EVENTS DURING THE YEAR

INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS HAVE WORKED WITH RAW MATERIAL FROM FRANCE, ITALY, CROATIA & JAMAICA

Artists and musicians have been involved in and performed at live events

25 75% LOCAL & NATIONAL PARTNERS

of members live in the Borough of Lambeth

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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

THE LAST WORD We want to ensure that our work will contribute to a better civil society as detailed in the following; Power: consciously shifting power in big ways, sharing more decision-making and control, being a model in society and doing whatever is needed so that everyone can play a part in the things which matter to them. Accountability: holding ourselves accountable first and foremost to the communities and people we exist to serve, revolutionising our approach – including being more accountable to each other and to future generations. Connection: broadening and deepening our connections with people and communities – especially when it’s hardest – for this is the heart of civil society’s purpose, bridging the frequent divides that span our society and investing in a new social infrastructure for civil society. Trust: devoting the time and resources necessary to building trust – our core currency and foundation – earning trust by staying true to our values and standing up for them, and trusting others with vital decisions that affect them.


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TH

OM P S

O

FUNDERS &

RI X

N

G

R

Mrs Smith & Mount Trust

THE NBE

TH

OM P S

O

R

O

RI X

N

R

R

G

O

THE NBE

SPONSORS & DONATIONS

The xx

Madness

Stockwell Park Residents Association


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RAW MATERIAL: AWARD WINNING ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

STAFF Trustees Sue Balmer, Jide Ashime, Robin Hopcraft, Sara Yates, Sacha Denton, Anna Terry, Tessa Read, Indra Khera

Volunteers Raw Creative Connect – Kheron Kenardo, Emmanuel Sugoi, Reuben Braithwaite 10 Raw Sounds volunteer mentors

Patron Dr David O’ Flynn Staff CEO – Tim Brown Finance manager – Jenny Gaskin Administration and arts project facilitator – Kirsty Reynolds Youth programmes manager – Marc Brown Creative programme team – Chavez Shillingford, Alexis Adimora Visiting staff – Reuben Brathwaite, Sarah Hutton, Robin Hopcraft, Idris Rahman, Sam Robinson UK Touring project director – Shir Freibach Mental health programme manager – Hannah Kemp-Welch Mental health support and delivery staff – Milly Chowles, Joe Cribbin, Marc Brown, Louise Beer, Lara Lee, Jon Bristol, James Hill, Tanagna Chambers, Rhoda Dakar, Sam Wilkinson, David Henry, Michele Strocchi, Latoya Palmer

“EVERYONE HAS SOMETHING THAT DRIVES THEM. SOMETIMES ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS LISTEN AND SEE HOW YOU CAN HELP AND HOW YOU SLOT IN. YOU CAN’T TEACH SOMEONE HOW TO BE AN AMAZING RAPPER, BUT I TRY AND LOOK FOR HOLES I CAN FILL. AS MUCH AS THE INTENTION MAY BE THE SAME IN EVERY SESSION, THE WAY I GO ABOUT IT WILL BE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT. SOMETIMES YOU HAVE A CHILD THAT IS CHALLENGING AND SOMETIMES A KID VERY EASY TO WORK WITH. I START AN INITIAL CONVERSATION AND GAUGE THE VIBE AND START FROM THERE.” A.Adimora


AK


PROMOTING ACCESS AND OPPORTUNITY IN THE ARTS MUSIC AND MEDIA 2 Robsart Street, London SW9 0DJ c 020 7737 6103 b hello@rawmusicmedia.co.uk www.rawmusicmedia.co.uk /RawMusicMedia /rawmusicmedia /rawmusicmedia Photography Tim Brown Design oakshed.co.uk

AWARDWINNING

ARTS COUNCIL ENGLAND NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ORGANISATION

Charity Number: 1020066. Company Limited by Guarantee registered number: 2807620.

Profile for Raw Material

Raw Material Annual Review 2018-19  

Award-winning Arts Council England National Portfolio Organisation, promoting access and opportunity in the arts music and media

Raw Material Annual Review 2018-19  

Award-winning Arts Council England National Portfolio Organisation, promoting access and opportunity in the arts music and media

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