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ISSUE FOUR / SPRING / TWO THOUSAND EIGHTEEN


Editor-in-Chief JORDAN MOORHEAD Senior Editor RACHAEL THOMAS Creative Director KAITLYN LAUER Assistant Creative Director NICK SULLIVAN

Photo Director BINGE YAN Graphic Design Director ANNAH HORAK Editorial Director KATIE LENNINGER Advertising Director KATE SAKOSKI

Social Media Directors JULIA ALLEN ASHLYN DELANEY CATIE CARNAGHI

Event Managers KILEY TIPPMAN INDIA AMBROSE

Photographers AUTUMN PINKLEY MJ MALDONADO Writers MAKAIA SMITH BROOKLIN WHITE GABRIELLA BEAUVAIS RICKEY PORTIS KYLIE THARP NICK SULLIVAN SUZANNAH KOOP INDIA AMBROSE


TABLE CON TENTS of


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ROUGE.................................7 BOLD AND DEVIANT......13 DETAIL ORIENTED..........18 SPRING EDITORIAL........21

BEAUTY 28 WORKPLACE KINKS.................29 THAT FEMININE TOUCH..........36

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LIFESTYLE UNISEX THRIFTING..........................41 MOVEMENTS AND FASHION..........45 EXPOSED.............................................50


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Letter Editor RAW MAGAZINE

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Throughout the past year, it seems as though there’s some new controversy every day. It can be the way a person decides to dress, express their political or religious views, or even wear their hair that can cause an uproar. People often don’t want to be at the center of a controversy, but for this issue we did the exact opposite. RAW makes its stance known and sheds light on some controversial issues in this edition. However, not everything in the issue is serious. We also give some lighthearted fashion inspiration for the spring seasons. Check out “Detail Oriented” on page 18 to see how to make the most of your accessories, and “Unisex Thrifting” on page 41 for inspiration on finding that perfect piece at the thrift store…..especially if it’s not in “your section.” Overall I want the readers to see that going outside of the norm is never something to be afraid of, but to embrace. As college students, this is our time to try new things and not place ourselves inside of any box that limits who we can be. It’s our mission here to help everyone see new ideas through the fashion world. It’s the true purpose of RAW magazine, and why I helped create this publication 2 years ago. CMU needed something so all students who may not fit the

typical mold had a place to express their creativity. As I am getting ready to graduate and writing my last letter as editor-in-chief, I’m proud to say that we’ve successfully done that. Keep a close eye on RAW as we continue to flourish.

Jordan Moorhead Editor-in-Chief


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Letter Editor

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We as a society are very vocal about what we stand for. The news constantly informs the world on protests and marches, speeches and marches. Social media is increasingly used as a platform to raise awareness on important matters and have insightful conversations with anyone in the world, just by a couple taps of the finger. So it is only right that we as a publication live up to our name and candidly participate in these conversations. Through our visuals and written stories, we want our readers to think of things in a different perspective; step away from what you already know and take the time to think about what life is like for people who don’t look, think or act like you. Explore how we take society’s “gender norms” and break them in “That Feminine Touch” on page 36. Understand how the “Time’s Up” and “Me Too” movements have affected how some women think about their bodies and what they wear through the eyes of some of some CMU students in “Movements and Fashion.” on page 45. Take time to think about fast fashion’s impact on the environment in our visual story, “Exposed.” on page 50.

This issue is meant to be controversial; start conversations, reconsider what you know and how you think. We accept that you may not necessarily agree with the points being made in this issue. But at least we got you thinking about it.

Rachael Thomas Senior Editor


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“ROUGE” PHOTO STORY PHOTOGRAPHED BY: NICK SULLIVAN MODELS: RACHAEL THOMAS & TREVER LLOYD


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BOLD & DEVI Written by: Kylie Tharp Photos by: Jordan Moorhead Models: Marissa Maldonado-Hammond, Rachel Fritti, Kendal Shorter


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s a college student, your style probably rotates around your schedule. On any given day, the majority of students on campus are wearing comfortable and ordinary clothing. This usually means some combination of leggings, sweatpants, sweatshirts, t-shirts and baseball hats. There are few that challenge the system of wearing ordinary clothing to class every day. Many are afriad to stand out against the crowd, or go against the norm when on campus. But there are those who are never afriad to show off their sense of style on campus. From bright colors to new trends, Central Michigan can turn into a catwalk when these fashion-forward few head to class. There’s no rule that you can only wear your best and trendiest clothes during a night out. Rock that new dress at the UC! Wear those heels to Grawn! Ignore any stares you may get from those around you, and enjoy the attention knowing you look and feel great. Everyone should enjoy their chance to act a bit deviant.


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DETAIL ORIENTED Photostory by: Jordan Moorhead Model: Ngosa Pepala


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SPRING EDITORIAL PHOTOSTORY BY: BINGE YAN MODELS: MEREDITH PALOUCEK, EVAN JORDAN


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WORK PLACE KINKS Proving the point that natural hair belongs in the corporate world Written by: India Ambrose Model: Faithe Simpson, Christina Carter, Jene’a Johnson, and Alexis Copeland Photos by: Nick Sullivan

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n the bustling and fast-paced business world, an underrepresented group stands out against the grain: black women with natural hair. The stigma around black women wearing their natural curls has been heavily discussed in recent years. Studies have shown and proven that natural hair bias is in fact relevant and a real issue in our society. “In the workplace, I have gotten comments that have made me feel uncomfortable with wearing my hair naturally. I’m not sure if they understood how their reactions made me feel. But when I would get a comment every 10 minutes during an 8- hour shift, it made me self-conscious,” said Faithe Simpson, sophomore. “I don’t feel like hair should matter in getting a job, but in a lot of cases it does. I know for me personally, I find myself putting my hair in an updo whenever I had an interview because I want to look ‘polished.”


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Everywhere black women have to adapt to their work environment by turning to straighteners or chemicals to appease their bosses. A study conducted by Perception Institute titled “The Good Hair Study” identified some of these biases that women face in many different work environments.Fourthousandpeoplewereinterviewedusing an online IAT (Implicit Association Test) which showed photos in rapid succession of black women with smooth or natural hair and associating words. The results showed that “ a majority of people, regardless of race and gender, hold some bias towards women of color based on their hair.” These truths are evident in certain workplace scenarios where black women with natural hair are asked to ‘tame’ their kinks and curls or cut off their dreadlocks. Sophomore Christina Carter once wore weave hairstyles in the past, but has changed in the past four years to only wearing her natural hair. From changing the way she

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wore her hair, she also noticed a change in the way she was treated. “I realized how I became more unaccepted by customers when I wore my hair natural. When I used to work in fast food, I often would get bad looks from customers when I would wear my hair in a big puff. They told me my hair needed to be tamed despite the fact that my hair was in a high puff on top of my head. I was given a hair net while my white coworkers would just swing their hair everywhere,” said Carter. Another CMU student, Jene’a Johnson had a similar experience. “A few summers ago, I worked for a photo company at Legoland and Sea Life. The management and administration were predominantly white women, and my coworkers were mostly urban black kids. Most of the families I had seen were white or foreign. One or two of the

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There needs to be some cultural and personal exemptions and definitions for what “professional or presentable” even mean because as of now, it is very prejudiced and unfair.

- JENE’A JOHNSON

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30 young ladies who took pictures with me had natural hair as well, but they wore ponytails and sew-ins. Needless to say, I felt that my lil fro was under constant scrutiny,” said Johnson. Even federal courts rule that companies have the right to fire people just for having dreadlocks in the business place, as in the case of Chastity Jones. Christina Cauterucci of Slate stated that Chastity Jones, a black woman applying for an insurance claims processing company, lost her employment offer after refusing to change her hairstyle. Rooted deeply in underlying racism, these rulings are not uncommon. In terms of interviews and introducing yourself, all four women agreed that how you present yourself is still very important, and you should look professional. The outfit you wear, and the way you speak can definitely affect whether you are offered a position or perhaps how you are treated at work. But, natural hair should not equal unprofessional to some companies. There is no correlation between a women’s ability to do her job well and what her hair looks like. “Natural hair does not give off non-business like vibes, at least in my opinion. So why make that a restriction too? I think it is important to remember that people who think natural hair isn’t acceptable in the workforce are the same people who don’t possess hair of the kinky curly qualities. So, the decision to rule it out in the workplace is based off ignorant exclusionary principles,” said Alexis Copeland, CMU sophomore. Here on Central Michigan’s campus, there is an array of bright black women on campus who want to take the business world by storm. Though the outside world and the corporate world try to displace these women on campus, they are pushing past the stigmas of black women and their natural hair and reclaiming their rightful place in the business world.


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THAT FEMININE TOUCH Photostory by: Autumn Pinkley • Makeup by: Saceila Gonzalez • Model: Austin Reeves


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UNISEX THRIFTING

Written by: Suzannah Koop Photographed by: Brooklin White Model: Emily Crombez, Myles Baker, Chantel Frank


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ne of the most difficult things for college students shopping for new clothes is the price-tag. Brand name items can cost upwards of hundreds of dollars and keeping up with trends becomes expensive as new pieces sway in and out of popularity. One solution to this problem: thrift shopping. The best way to save money and still have a kickass wardrobe is to go thrifting. In many secondhand clothing stores, it’s hard to find something that costs more than $15. It’s very common for used clothes to be priced at less than $10. This makes it easy to buy a good amount of clothing for an extremely cheap price. The price of thrifting is especially appealing when looking at the popularity of items you could potentially find. Tommy Hilfiger shirts and jackets, Calvin Klein jeans, and many other popular branded clothing pieces get dropped off at thrift stores across the country. The chances of finding a specific clothing item, popular brand or not, are slim. This doesn’t mean it’s not worth a shot, though. Another benefit to thrift shopping is the concept of sustainability. The second largest leading cause of pollution in the world is the fashion industry. According to the Huffington Post, the average American will throw away 81 pounds of clothes each year. A large part of this waste can be attributed to fast-fashion brands like Forever 21 and H&M. Retailers like Forever 21 push out new products

nearly every week. The clothing they sell is made from cheap material using outsourced cheap labor, so they are able to sell new and trendy items for an extremely low price. Customers will buy things they don’t really want simple because the price is so low, thinking “Oh, I’ll wear it someday,” or “I already have something like this, but it’s so cheap that I have to get it!” The clothing items they purchase typically get

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 42 worn around once or twice, sit in their closet for months, and then end up in the trash. But the consumers don’t learn their lesson, they simply go back to do it again with the next big sale in a never-ending cycle. The best way to help diminish the amount of clothing waste you produce is to shop sustainably. This means buying from ethicallysourced brands, thrift shopping, doing a clothing swap with your friends, or really anything that makes you aware of where your clothes are coming from. Thrifting is an incredible way to explore your creativity. Thrift stores are actually a great place to find in-trend pieces for a low price.There are an abundance of oversized sweatshirts and t-shirts sold at thrift stores that could be paired with some thigh-high boots to make a cute dress. Thrift stores are also a great place to find vintage high-waisted “mom jeans” which are fairly popular right now. One of the best things about thrift stores is that men and women’s clothing seems to effortlessly blend together. Many women even prefer shopping in the men’s section, as they can find the oversized, comfortable pieces that the women’s section seems to lack. Alternatively, men can find cool jackets or accessories in the women’s section that help complete an outfit. Everything is fairgame and open to everyone. The best place to find a unique addition to your wardrobe is the thrift store. You have to be willing to take a step outside of your comfort zone and try on pieces that you typically wouldn’t give a chance. You can always alter pieces you buy, like

cropping a t-shirt or a pair of jeans. This is an easy way to make something unique to you. As time progresses, the stigma against what kinds of clothes you wear seems to be decreasing. People are becoming more open to trying new things and accepting what other people want to wear. The idea that clothing is unisex is an idea that needs to be broadcasted across the United States. It’s much more fun to stand out, anyway.


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Written by: Kylie Tharp Photos by: Rickey Portis


E TS The Times Up and Me-Too movements have blown up in across social media, news and everyday life. Both of these movements have started from celebrities and public figures taking a stand against their own sexual abusers. Very quickly the movement has moved into everyday women stepping forward to fight for each other, themselves and their own experiences. This movement allowed for these women to really talk about their own experiences with sexual assault to others, and allowed these women to be the change needed within these issues. The phrase “Girl Power” has taken a whole new connotation. Girl Power is now a phrase of change and power; to give hope to victims and educate future generations.

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As college students, we are the future. Within these pasts few months, over 150 women stood up in court and prosecuted a man that hurt them all. Many of these women are our peers, friends and role models. Truly the strength of each of these women together helped empower other women to stand up and fight. Millions upon millions of women across all social media platforms have banned together to create a girl gang like no other. They are expressing that dress, appearance and views shouldn’t make woman more susceptible to sexual harassment. I asked a few of my fellow Central Michigan students about what girl power is to them and how they foresee change in their own experiences with sexual assault and fashion.


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RAW Magazine: What does Girl Power mean to you? Chloe Tulgetske: “Girl power is all about empowering yourself as well as other women to be independent and radiate confidence, becoming the best you can be by not letting anything or anyone hold you back.” Has the Me Too and Times Up Movements either strengthened or changed your views? Chloe: “Strengthened because so many women are banding together to help one another.” Have you ever felt personally harassed because of what you were wearing? What advice would you give to anyone going through this? Chloe: “Yes, I have and to just keep your head high and remain confident in yourself, because you are above anything anyone can say to you.” RAW Magazine: What does Girl Power mean to you? Isabella Johnston: “To me it means being true to who you are and achieving a goal no matter what anyone else says.” Has the Me Too and Times Up Movements either strengthened or changed your views? Isabella: “I’d say they have strengthened my views because it shows women coming together on an issue can encourage others to speak up and keep trying to achieve a larger goal.”

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Have you ever felt personally harassed because of what you were wearing? What advice would you give to anyone going through this? Isabella: “I’ve been harassed because of what I’ve worn. Sometimes people make comments about an outfit. We all just need to continue to wear whatever we want. It doesn’t matter what anyone but yourself thinks about your style. Wear what makes you happy and don’t be afraid of what others say or thing about it.” RAW Magazine: What does Girl Power mean to you? Lizette LeBoulch: “Girl power means to me that you’re confident and independent. That you’re not afraid to stand up for yourself.” Has the Me Too and Times Up Movements either strengthened or changed your views? Lizette: “Yeah definitely, these movements have taught me how common sexual assault truly is, its horrifying! Girl Power is definitely needed so we can stand up, stick together and fight.” Have you ever felt personally harassed because of what you were wearing? What advice would you give to anyone going through this? Lizette: “Yes, because of what I was wearing. My advice would be to tell someone. Get someone to help with the situation and don’t be afraid to speak up because nobody is alone.”


PHOTOS BY: BROOKLIN WHITE MODELS: BRANDON YORK, VICTORIA VITALE, CLARISSA KELLY


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“While quick trips to Forever 21 may be great for when you need a new top, it is detrimental to the environment. Manufacturing for fast fashion brands often means serious cases of water pollution, the use of toxic chemicals, and increased textile waste.�

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The Controversial Issue / Issue 4  

RAW Magazine's latest spring issue; focused on showing college students the a side of many controversial issues we face in our culture.

The Controversial Issue / Issue 4  

RAW Magazine's latest spring issue; focused on showing college students the a side of many controversial issues we face in our culture.

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