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MARLB OROUGH COLLEGE, MARLB OROUGH, W I LT S H I R E S N 8 1 PA

T H E M A R L B U R I A N M AG A Z I N E


Siegfried Sassoon (CO 1901–4) and Charles Hamilton-Sorley (C1 1908–13) two celebrated pupils at Marlborough College wrote some of the most powerful and moving literature of the First World War. Whilst Sassoon survived, Sorley was killed at the Battle of Loos, just two years after leaving school. Sassoon went on to campaign against the war, despite winning the Military Cross, being wounded and volunteering to return to the Western Front.

Have you forgotten yet?… For the world’s events have rumbled on since those gagged days, Like traffic checked while at the crossing of city-ways: And the haunted gap in your mind has filled with thoughts that flow Like clouds in the lit heaven of life; and you’re a man reprieved to go, Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare. But the past is just the same – and War’s a bloody game…

The Memorial Hall was re-opened in June by HRH Princess Eugenie of York (MM 2003 – 2008). Following a £6.5 million refurbishment it is now a world-class performance venue. With the names of the 749 now brilliantly illuminated inside, the completion of the restoration also brings to a close the commemoration of the First World War centenary at the College.

Have you forgotten yet?… Look down, and swear by the slain of the War that you’ ll never forget. Do you remember the dark months you held the sector at Mametz – The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled sandbags on parapets? Do you remember the rats; and the stench Of corpses rotting in front of the front-line trench – And dawn coming, dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless rain? Do you ever stop and ask, ‘Is it all going to happen again?’ Do you remember that hour of din before the attack – And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and shook you then As you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of your men? Do you remember the stretcher-cases lurching back With dying eyes and lolling heads – those ashen-grey Masks of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?

C ove r i m a g e : Sie g f r ie d S a s s o on (C O 19 0 2 – 0 4)

Have you forgotten yet?…

P u bl i s he d by M a rl b orou g h C o l le g e , Wi lt s h i re S N 8 1PA E d itor : Ja ne G re en

Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you’ ll never forget.

Wit h s p e c i a l t h a n k s f or t he photo g r a ph s of Pe t e D av ie s , I a n L e on a rd a nd M a t t B row n a nd to C h r i s Ta n ne r f or c ompi l i n g t he s p or t s s e c t ion .

Aftermath by Siegfried Sassoon written in 1919

D e s i g n by S u n hou s e Cre a t i ve

©Andy Matthews


The Marlburian Magazine, Michaelmas, Lent & Summer 2017/18

The Master’s Speech

2

College Community Common Room News

6

The Master’s Portrait

8

John Dancy Speech

10

Anniversary Celebrations

14

Print REbels 15 House Shout

16

Modern Languages 18

English Department Literary Trip History of Art Study Trip to Paris

56 56

Sports Performance Tour to California

57

Art School Trip to Venice

58

PE Trip to Swaziland

59

History and the Arts Trip to Morocco

60

USA Lacrosse Tour

62

Mount House Gallery Exhibitions

100

Artist-in-Residence

103

Art Scholars’ Year Review

104

GCSE Storage

106

GCSE Electronic Projects

107

A2 Product Design

108

Sports Rugby

112

Cricket

118

Football

124

Girls’ Hockey

128

Boys’ Hockey

132

Lacrosse

136

Girls’ Tennis

138

Boys’ Tennis

140

Netball

142

Athletics

147

CCF

20

Arts & Reviews

House News

22

The School Play

66

Clubs & Societies

34

Lower School Play

68

Battle of the Bands

41

Illumination

69

The Penny Reading

70

Exam Season Plays

72

The Shell Play

74

The Musical Year

76 82

Basketball

148

Trips & Expeditions Netball Tour to Barbados

44

Swedish Lapland Trip

46

Geography Trip to China

48

Post GCSE Trip to Iceland

50

175th/50th Anniversary Gala Concert

Post GCSE Trip to Berlin

50

Showcase Concert

83

Cross-Country

148

Post GCSE Trip to Milan

51

Orchestra and Ensembles

84

Fencing

148

Post GCSE OA Trip to The Gower

51

MCCS

86

Fives

149

Post GCSE Creative Writing in Pembrokeshire

A Level Fine Art Examination 88

Golf

149

52

A Level Photography Review 90

Polo

150

A Level Fine Art

92

Rackets

150

Visual Arts Week

94

Shooting

151

Post GCSE Diving in Malaysia 52 Physics Trip to Switzerland

53

CCF Trip to San Diego

54

Hundred Fine Art Exam Work 96

Squash

151

History of Art Study Trip to Northern Italy

Remove Ceramics Project

98

Swimming

152

55

The Art of Drawing

99

Water Polo

152

CONTENTS

Introduction

THE MAR LBUR IAN

Contents

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THE MAR LBUR IAN

The Master’s Speech Prize Day, May 2018

W

THE MASTER’S SPEECH

elcome to this special Prize Day celebrating 175 years of this remarkable place and the 50th year since girls joined.

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Another year and so much to credit, happily confirmed by the Independent Schools Inspection, who gave us a glowing report of which we are very proud. Of particular pleasure were the achievements of the top grade of ‘Excellent’ for the two things they measure – the quality of academic and other achievements and pupils’ personal development. The report highlights our educational attributes, praises excellence of teaching and learning, and refers to the strongest possible educational values producing confident and responsible adults. They also said that pupils across the school were keen to progress but understand that success is not solely about examination results. Thanks go to the very large number of parents who responded so positively to the questionnaire. Our Outreach programmes were praised and productive relationships, irrespective of culture or background, were signalled out. Finally, my colleagues were commended for promoting curiosity in other cultures through the multiple trips which occur in holiday times. Close links with Swindon Academy and our interaction with the now 900-pupil strong Marlborough College Malaysia were highlighted. They concluded that “pupils leave the school as confident individuals having acquired the necessary skills which

prepare them well for the next stages of their lives, helping them to make a positive contribution to society”. This is a core value of a Marlburian education. All pupils matter. As Master, I am most appreciative of a remarkable number of colleagues who will be talked about for years to come; they inspire a love of learning or specific commitments to sport, music, the arts, charity partnerships, technology or science. The best teaching or coaching creates understanding through encouragement. Great education was always about ‘knowing why’, not ‘knowing how’. What is the end product for a graduating pupil? That is always tough to answer but if our boarding institutions do a decent job, it is to bring up civilised human beings with a concept of what it means to be in the service of the globe. What one does in the next 20 to 30 years after one’s school life is the final endorsement of the lessons learnt through adolescence. Such service is still about reaching out to others, not just ‘me’ first and the rest nowhere. Happiness blossoms when people are true to their values. The all-encompassing nature of Marlborough is such that one can never do more than skim the surface. This speech pays tribute to the wider elements involved in Marlborough starting with the Chairman and the Council, especially Sarah Hamilton-Fairley, reaching out and on through the increasingly committed and hugely supportive Old Marlburian


THE MAR LBUR IAN Foundation and Club (and the latter sees Martin Evans reach his 50th year). Then moving on through the realms of friends in the locality and finally, within the College itself – all Support Staff in the Bursary, the extraordinary service of the Security Staff, the commitment of the Catering team, the energy of the Exam Office or the care lavished on the grounds by all our gardeners and groundsmen. Beyond that, HR, Development, Enterprises, the Summer School (in its 43rd year), the Dames and all who make the Houses work through the domestic staff, not to mention a host of other ancillary figures are all part of this large enterprise. As ever, there are colleagues who have given extraordinary service to Marlborough who will be moving on. Whilst Dr Richard Hook hands over his Chief Medical Officer role to Dr Jenny Campbell, our thanks goes to them, the Counsellors involved in the School and all the staff in the Sani. The notable service this year and ending after 20 years for Eleanor Ross as Dame in C1, is a key example for all. She has trained four Housemasters during her time and has provided care to large numbers in C1. Further long service is represented by Ian Crabbe (28 years) who has held multiple roles. Primarily, he will be remembered for being an Organist of top Cathedral standard; now he hands over his role and fully retires from the College at Christmas. Less time here, but nonetheless, having played a massive

Swindon Academy

role, my senior colleague, Jaideep Barot (Deputy Head, Academic), will become Headmaster of Bristol Grammar School, a richly deserved accolade for a formidably talented administrator and character. One other major change this year has seen Dr Niall Hamilton, Senior Admissions Tutor, hand over the reins of his incredible innings to Mrs Julia Hodgson. His unique knowledge of Admissions affairs and knowledgeable pursuit of a vast range of Prep Schools is unparallelled. Finally, Mrs Katy Hudson moves on after four years as Director of Sport. Thanks to her as she takes up a similar role at Benenden. She is succeeded by Mrs Rebe Horton, another who has given unstinting service this year. This brings me to those with whom we have had closest dealings. Every year, key administrative assistants and secretarial posts around the College sustain a multitude of projects. From the Master’s point of view none can be more important than the two ladies who have been front of house for Emma and myself. Our debt of gratitude to Sheryl Nicholas and Jane Edwards is infinite, (incalculable) impossible to express strongly enough and something where we have had a special bond which will last for a lifetime. It is impossible to see beyond the end of our time here so I would like to reflect briefly on what it has meant for the two of us to round out our career here at Marlborough. Frankly, the job of Master would have been impossible for me once,

Cycle to the Somme

let alone three times, had Emma not been alongside. We wished to nurture warmth, productivity and inclusivity and to encourage OM alumni/ae of character and compassion, such as those whom we saw from all age groups during October’s three-day cycle ride to Thiepval Memorial Arch on the Somme. For me, this was the highlight of conjoining the knowledge of the past so that the present is informed and the future inspired. Being here during the years of centenary commemoration of so many events associated with the Great War, has been an opportunity to try to learn from those events of the past so that history is made relevant. The work of David du Croz and his committee, as well as many OMs in realising our project in the last six years, has been exemplary and is mirrored in the forthcoming opening of the Memorial Hall. Its refurbishment should set it up for another 100 years, at least, in tandem with the town where the admirable Lisa Farrell, our Hospitality Manager, is now Marlborough’s 708th Mayor. There will be so much more to be gained from events in this most celebrated building. Hence, the position of the College and Town in this beautiful valley of Wiltshire continues to add meaning to the region and far further afield. For me, somewhat unexpectedly, to have had the chance to be Marlborough’s 18th Master, has been an ultimate privilege.

THE MASTER’S SPEECH

Ian Crabbe

JL

Martin Evans

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COMMON ROOM NEWS 6 THE MASTER’S PORTRAIT 8 JOHN DANCY SPEECH 10 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS 14 PRINT REBELS 15 HOUSE SHOUT 16 B1 performing in the House Shout

MODERN LANGUAGES 18 CCF 20 HOUSE NEWS 22 CLUBS & SOCIETIES 34 BATTLE OF THE BANDS 41


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COMMON ROOM NEWS

Common Room News W

e welcomed a total of 29 new colleagues in September. Owen Elton as Head of Maths, Terry Gilmour as Head of Rugby, Tim Novis as Senior Chaplain and Edward Twohig as Head of Art. Other new colleagues included Daniel Adamson (History), John Birchall (Mathematics), Christopher Border (Lacrosse), Jodie Brain (Psychology), Andrea D’Angelo (Spanish), Jamie Fenton (Lighting), Orlaith Gallagher (Mathematics), Alistair Hamilton (History), Scott Hawthorn (Chemistry), Victoria Herrenschmidt (Classics), Helen Horsell (OA), Georgina Lewis (Sport), Matthew Loxton (Mathematics), Daniela Moran (DT), Joe Morell (Economics),

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Andrew Muir (Sport), Joe Quinn (Sport), Emma Ramsey (Classics), James Richardson (Sport), Julia Schuster (Artistin-Residence, Alison Sharp (Biology), Adam Staines (Choirmaster), Ruth Taylor (Strength and Conditioning), Rebecca Thomas (English), Sophie Wolf (Sport) and Bryony Woods (RS). We were sorry to say goodbye to a number of friends and colleagues as the year progressed. Jaideep Barot leaves us to take up the position of Headmaster of Bristol Grammar School, James Bartlet to teach music at Ibstock Place, Katy Hudson to be Director of Sport at Beneden, Annabelle Paterson to teach Biology at King’s High

School for Girls, Warwick, Emma Ramsey to teach Classics at Wellington, Our sports graduates move on to positions at the following schools; Christopher Border to Rendcombe, Ruth Taylor to Marlborough College, Malaysia, James Richardson to Stamford and Josh Wall to St Helen and St Katherine’s. A number of colleagues have left to pursue life outside of teaching: Daniel Adamson, Jamie Fenton, Charlotte Green, Joe Morell, Julia Schuster, Andrew Muir, Daniela Moran, Georgina Lewis and Sophie Wolf. This year also saw the retirement both Martin Evans and Jonathan Leigh. NJLM


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Jaideep Barot (CR 2014–2018)

Jaideep inherited the mixed economy of modular A levels, linear Pre-Us and the International Baccalaureate, and whilst he tried to increase the uptake for the IB, he eventually realised that this wasn’t going to be viable, given how small the numbers were and skilfully managed the return to life without IB. 2015 saw A level courses change dramatically with the return of linear A levels to replace the modular courses that had been the norm since curriculum 2000. This required considerable upheaval of academic routines with the Summer Term of the Lower Sixth year in particular needing considerable redesigning. If upheaval in the Sixth Form wasn’t enough, Jaideep’s time at the College also saw changes to the GCSE curriculum with the new specifications and 1–9 grading system being phased in over a couple of years. There cannot be any Director of Studies in College history that has had to oversee such widespread change to our curriculum in such a short period of time. Jaideep was always mindful of keeping our subject offerings fresh and initiated the introduction of Psychology as an A level subject.

time getting to know his colleagues. We wish Jaideep all the best with his move to Headmaster at Bristol Grammar School. NJLM

Katy Hudson (CR 2014–2018) Katy Hudson, or Katy Bennett as she was then, joined the College as Director of Sport four years ago. During this time Katy worked hard to raise the profile of sport amongst Marlburians and managed the change to a number of initiatives being embedded into how we go about our sport. The conversion of the Old Gym into an up-to-date strength and conditioning facility, and the employment of a whole department dedicated to the physical development of our top sportsmen and sportswomen, will continue to have a dramatic impact on how our pupils engage with sport. As a result, we should see more Marlburians excel in their chosen sports as they progress to university and beyond. Part of this drive has been the appointment of a number of high profile heads of sport who have worked hard in their own areas

to further the overall profile of sport in the College. Another aspect of Katy’s work was to alter the process by which sports scholarships are awarded so that we have more chance of identifying real talent. Treatment of sports injuries has also developed, with pupils understanding more about how to manage and live with injury as part of the overall experience of sport. Beaks, as amateur coaches, have also had updated our approach by publishing teams and results on a web-based system as well as us wearing uniform liveried sports clothing to set an example to our charges.

COMMON ROOM NEWS

Jaideep joined the College in January 2014 as Director of Studies. He quickly established himself as an innovator and introduced a whole raft of changes to the way we manage all academic aspects of the College. Being a physicist, Jaideep was confident with numbers and was able to present the plethora of data that we collect on our pupils with considerable clarity. The traditional end-of-term reports were replaced with more frequent PIR reports whilst Firefly became the mechanism by which we communicate all aspects of our teaching to the pupil body including prep assignments. Planet e-stream, an electronic video library, replaced the vast collection of VHS video tapes that occupied most departments. Electives, an initiative that saw Beaks deliver short courses to the Sixth Form on their own areas of interest was introduced.

Katy arrived at the College just as we were introducing Psychology A level and was quickly engulfed into this fledgling department which meant many hours preparing lessons. Fortunately, she did find time for herself and whilst at the College married Tim Hudson, an OM. Katy came to us from Wycombe Abbey where she was Head of Sport and goes on to Beneden as Head of Sport. We wish Katy and Tim all the best for this exciting new chapter in their lives. NJLM

The workload has been daunting and whilst many would use this as an excuse to limit their input into the wider life of the College, this was not Jaideep’s style. He taught physics to the whole range of ability we come across in the classroom and even took up teaching Lower School chemistry in his final year when the need arose. He coached cricket in the summer and developed an excellent rapport with not only those he coached but also those he coached with. Jaideep engaged fully in the life of the Common Room, being ever present at Common Room Guest Nights, volunteering to play soccer and cricket for the Common Room and spending

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The Master’s Portrait Jonathan Leigh, 17th Master of Marlborough (2012–18)

THE MASTER’S PORTRAIT

T

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he portrait of Jonathan Leigh, seventeenth Master of Marlborough College, adorns Norwood Hall, taking its place amongst his sixteen predecessors. The work was unveiled, to great acclaim, on Prize Day last May. Ten months prior to this, the Master’s Portrait Committee met and unanimously voted to approach renowned artist and engraver, Richard Shirley Smith, and ask if he would accept a commission from Marlborough College to paint for posterity, the Master’s portrait. To the delight of all, the artist graciously accepted and began work almost immediately. The composition chosen portrays Mr Leigh standing in Court holding a book in morning light with the Chapel of St Michael and All Angels in the background and Court in the middle distance. And why Richard Shirley Smith? Richard Shirley Smith is that very rare thing: a thoroughly civilised artist whose love of tradition does not cramp his style. His work contains extraordinary imagery: references to ancient sculpture and

and at Yale University. The Ashmolean Museum purchased this artist’s entire output of engravings and the Bodleian Library has requested his main archive.

buildings, Renaissance painting, history and poetry combine in entirely original decorative flights of fancy. Examples of this artist’s work can be seen in The British Museum, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Mr Shirley Smith’s association with Marlborough College goes back over half a century. He was appointed by John Dancy (Master from 1961 to 1971) as Head of Art in 1966. Richard ran Art at the College very successfully for five years. Since then during a distinguished career, Richard Shirley Smith has worked as a painter, a draughtsman and illustrator and a woodengraver of great distinction. As well as this he has found time to create a substantial body of work as an architectural muralist, projecting on a larger scale fantasies that seem effortlessly to combine the worlds of Tiepolo and Piranesi to Rex Whistler, but in those subtly delicious, ice-cream tonalities that are so instantly recognisable, too, in his smaller easel pictures and decorative caprices.

“Richard Shirley Smith is that very rare thing: a thoroughly civilised artist whose love of tradition does not cramp his style.”

EFJT Head of Art


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THE MASTER’S PORTRAIT Portrait work in progress March 2018, completed April 2018.

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On the Opening of Dancy House Speech Given by Professor John Dancy, Master 1961–72

I

JOHN DANCY SPEECH

must begin by thanking you all most sincerely on my own behalf and that of my late wife Angela for the honour you have conferred on us both by naming this House after us both Dancy House. The general background is this. Fifty years ago Marlborough College was a secondary boarding school for boys, run under Church of England auspices. When I took it on all such schools taught either boys or girls, not both. But in 1968 it fell to us by a happy chance to admit some girls as well, thus becoming co-ed. We were the first, but it was only by the narrowest of margins, viz. one year, before many other similar schools followed suit – and that’s what all this fuss is about. To someone coming from outside, the Marlborough Common Room offered a sudden sharp shock. The first concern of its members was their own teaching programme. This concentration sprung first from the realisation of their good fortune in possessing among their colleagues no fewer than 10 Firsts in mathematics with the wider responsibilities that arose from that. The first consequence was the setting up, with Winchester and Charterhouse, of the School Mathematics Project, which was flourishing when I arrived. The concern of the SMP soon spread to include science and technology, but then went much wider. The influence of postwar left-wing politics was still strong, and that stimulated the question: how would this approach to teaching fit in a school which included boys from a working-class background?

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This was a question of wide interest, and we at M.C. were fortunate in having a chance to help solve it. It came in the form of an offer from a US charity (for the study of the works of Plato in translation!). It was closing down, and its owners kindly gave me a large enough grant to enable Marlborough to carry out one small experiment of our own. So we subsidised 21 boys from secondary schools in Swindon to spend their two Sixth-Form years as part-time boarders in selected Houses at Marlborough. This they did from 1964, but with less success than we all hoped. Some of them got to university and one achieved a knighthood as a doctor. But in general there were nothing like enough of them and they did not stay long enough to make any lasting impact (e.g. in the form of family friendships) among young Marlburians. So already before the end of the ‘Swindon Scheme’ there was widespread feeling that ‘we’ (i.e. not just the Left) must roll up our sleeves and sort this business out once and for all but . . . Where could we go for honey? Now the Marlborough – Swindon Scheme had already attracted interest in the Headmasters’ Conference, where there were plenty of people with a social conscience. Indeed pressure from HMC in 1965 led the then Labour Government to set up a Public Schools Commission to investigate possible progress in the matter. They invited HMC to appoint two men to the Commission, of whom I was one. Our progress was very slow, and it gradually became clear why. I learned eventually that both Chancellors of the

Exchequer, the incumbent and his shadow, were privately agreed that the country could never afford to subsidise all those who would take advantage of a nationwide scheme of places at Public Schools. The Commission was closed in 1967. But among my friends on it had been Bernard Williams, professor of philosophy at Cambridge and brother of Shirley Williams, a leader of the fashionable Social Democratic Party. In February 1968, when Bernard was staying with us, he dropped a bombshell. ‘The thing I can’t understand about you, John, is why you don’t take the single significant step which is entirely open to you’. Questioned, he answered simply, ‘admit girls to Marlborough’. I soon realised that there was more to this idea that met the eye. Co-education would not alter the social class of the school’s intake, but it would humanise it in various ways: e.g. boys tend to be brash and inconsiderate compared with girls. Angela, when hastily consulted by me, agreed; indeed she had long said to me privately what good husbands Marlburians would make, being open and frank and straightforward as most of them are. As to the Marlborough staff, some senior members, when consulted by me, made slightly more non-committal remarks like ‘We wondered when you’d get round to thinking of that’, but nobody expressed outright hostility. Myself, I warmed quickly to the idea and decided to put it to the school Council. There was just time to do so at its next meeting in March with a view to admission of the first girls in the coming September.


Neither contained any proposal for a continuation of the scheme beyond two years. That enabled Henry Brooke, who as Home Secretary was the senior OM on the Council, to issue this somewhat Delphic statement to the Daily Telegraph that ‘Marlborough is still a boys’ school, but it is a better boys’ school for having some girls in it’. But since Dancy House is rightly named after Angela as much as me, I must introduce her too. I shall do so by quoting from her at length on a subject which always looms large in a secondary school for girls, namely their school dress. She wrote in a letter to Housemasters, (there were no Housemistresses yet) : ‘My thoughts on dress for girls at Marlborough. Firstly, whatever dress you put a scruffy girl into she will always look scruffy. This is even truer of girls [than of boys], who have a more difficult shape to contend with. If, in an attempt to tidy them completely, you restrict still further their choice of clothes [to uniform], you will be seriously handicapping part of their education’. It is uncertain how all this went down with the girls themselves. Their chief concern (and amusement) was about her technique for keeping the girls’ skirts to what she regarded as a ‘decent’ length. She set up a table-tennis net on our dining room table in the Lodge and got the girls to kneel on the table: their legs had then to be covered by skirts down to the height of the net.

For of course this greater maturity of the girls lay not just in their physique but also in their emotional life and in their value systems. This is what underlay my hope that the girls would unconsciously help to erode some of the less attractive features of the public school ethos. I am thinking of such things as the rigid hierarchy, the obsession with competitive games, the changing room culture and the raucousness. With such a small number of girls (15) divided amongst five boarding houses, it was important, both for pastoral purposes and for ease of administration, that the girls should meet together daily. This was achieved by Angela’s introduction of ‘Girls’ Break’ lasting 20 minutes each weekday morning in the Master’s Lodge. To jump forward a little, Angela’s contribution to the principles and programme of coeducation had of course been from the start crucial. It began with her joining me in interviewing all the girls before admission, both with their parents and by themselves. Next, she joined me in making arrangements for their contributions outside the classroom. Of these, two were compulsory: (i) attendance at a series of evening talks to cover sex education and (ii) one of the following: cooking, dressmaking, art and craft. Otherwise there was no pressure except when the boys also were under pressure, namely in choosing one ‘Wednesday

Afternoon Activity’ (WAA) to fill the gap left by the recent ending of compulsory service in the Cadet Corps. In a similar category she now organised a series of evening visits by our new girls to local Youth Clubs. This was a speciality of hers, she having been trained as a youth leader before her teacher training. She was indeed the current Chairman of the Wiltshire Association of Youth Clubs, and ViceChairman of the National Association.

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‘For goodness’ sake shut up. You simply can’t talk to people like that’. The boys did stop – but then asked what all the fuss was about. The conversation went on – until it became clear that the fundamental difference between the sexes was one of maturity.

We are getting to the point now when the first day of coeducation is about to begin. Here is an extract from the diary of Jenny Scott, one of the first 15 girls. ‘Weird as it may seem, the experiment made the headlines and attracted the paparazzi . . . The notes I made in my fiveyear diary give a flavour of the surreal first week. 9th Sept 1968. We’ve been plagued by photographers and reporters from the Mirror, the Daily Mail and The Times (though we’re not even allowed to answer questions). By the end of the first week we had clearly settled in, since I noted that four of us went for a pint with some of the boys, which is clearly out of bounds’. Initial reports suggested that the introduction of girls had been a total success. But within days a doubt had arisen from a report (whose factual accuracy was not in doubt, only its interpretation). It had fallen to Hugh Weldon, a Latin master, to take the beginning of term roll-call of a Form containing one new girl, Elizabeth Clough.

JOHN DANCY SPEECH

In the event, I put to the Council two alternative proposals. The first was to admit 15 day-boys from Swindon for a twoyear Sixth Form course. This the Council spent half an hour rejecting; the second, for 15 girls, they passed on the nod. The 15 girls were to be (i) daughters of staff or (ii) sisters of boys in the school or (iii) daughters of OMs (in that order). Most of them likewise were admitted for a two-year A level course.

Now at Marlborough it was the custom in class to address boys by surname only: no instructions had been given for addressing girls, but Weldon did what was apparently

I move to the first term of co-education, which brought a number of surprises. At one end of the scale, a 16-year old boy I knew wrote in answer to a question at the time; ‘I have three girls in my form, but I don’t seem to have noticed them much’. At the other end I myself admitted surprise at finding the girls no better than the boys at keeping their rooms tidy and in avoiding bad language. A more interesting difference between the sexes was revealed by a boy whom I asked in what respect the presence of the girls had altered the boys’ lives. After some thought he said ‘Well, probably in our conversation’, and he told me of an occasion when, as he put it, ‘the boys present were engaged in the usual kind of boys’ talk: which had led to argument; argument eventually turned personal, with put-downs becoming more and more unpleasant, until suddenly one of the girls clapped her hands and burst out

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his best, calling out: “ATKINS, BAILEY, ELIZABETH – CLOUGH – Oh! I suppose that is hyphenated”. At first sight this was just a slip by Weldon; but he was known among staff and boys as prejudiced against women, and so the idea began to circulate that he was dissociating himself from the general enthusiasm among the staff. But if so, having made his initial point, he did not try to push it further; so gradually confidence returned. Considerable advances were made during that first year of the first 15 in the techniques of coeducation. Michael Davis, Housemaster of B1 (who had altogether four girls in his House) wrote a brief but penetrating account now in the school Archives.

JOHN DANCY SPEECH

‘At the start of their first term, the girls were much sought by the press: photographers, rebuffed, snooped about with telescopic lenses. Boys showed their interest in them by inviting them to a whirl of coffee-parties and treating them as very special people. Masters too, unused to teaching girls, tended to keep them in the classroom limelight. But by the end of the first term the girls were becoming less obtrusive. By the second term the boys’ conversation tended to be less coarse, and the senior boys were beginning to treat each other more gently. Unfortunately, the position of the girls was too artificial to permit a natural growth of relationships with boys. Their work was going very well, though: some of them were making a useful contribution to the school’s music, art and fencing: on the whole they seemed to be happy, but by the end of term

very tired. They had coped remarkably well, we thought, with the stresses and strains. The Lent Term began much more auspiciously: the boys paid less attention to the girls, who became increasingly part of the community; and after the Easter holidays the success of the scheme was apparent. The Summer Term showed that the girls had become an integral part of Marlborough College. They were fully welcome to the school and to my house for the good sense, diligence, gaiety and gentleness which they brought with them. Why, we now consider, didn’t we have the good sense to accept girls here years ago?’ As the end of the calendar year (the first term of the first 15 girls) drew near Marlburian eyes were very much on the Council in the hope that they would approve entry of a second 15. This, to almost everyone’s relief, they did. We chose, from a larger number of applications, girls

to start in September 1969, and set about their programme of initiation a year behind the first 15. That was exciting, and so was the news that a number of other boys’ boarding schools in the UK had in mind to follow suit. The telegraph wires were humming, and we, being a year ahead, felt this was considerable cause for a celebration. The last event of the first 15 girls was the end-of-year dinner, at which Elizabeth Clough kindly asked me to dance. I did – the last dance of my footloose life and the last event of my Marlborough life before Angela and I left for a university post. By a bit of good timing Elizabeth has now been appointed President of the Marlburian Club for 2017/8. Professor J C Dancy

As an introduction to the life of the first 15 girls Maggie West, who was one of them, later wrote a description of what it was like. What? Join the Sixth Form at Marlborough – a novel idea

We agonised daily: oh what should we wear?

Thus John Dancy’s vision began to come clear:

Maxi or mini or micro, and as for our hair . . .

Just fifteen young ladies would join the great school

I came by a hairpiece of which I was proud –

And co-education would be the new ‘cool’.

Just to think of it new makes me wail out loud.

My father, Mike Davis, had taught there for years

To chapel we’d go after prep in the dark

So finding my way around held no great fears.

And play Bach on the organ – a musical lark!

We met in September nineteen sixty eight

Trysts in studies were kept though house tutors did prowl

And knew from the start that this school would be great!

Girls lived in boys’ houses: “oh, wow”, you may howl.

Our skirts were inspected by Angela D

We lazed by the Kennet on sultry hot days

Not a smidge more than six inches above the knee;

And at Shakespeare and Milton would fitfully gaze.

In classes we were just amazingly few,

The swimming pool cooled us, we really did freeze

And always got asked for the ‘female view’.

In that old bit of moat nestling under the trees.

We starred in House Plays, sang in opera and choir,

We wandered in Court, crossed the bustling Bath Road;

Graced the games fields in sun, wind or good ‘up field’ mire;

Oh, what freedom we had – and not one door a code!

I made gooey cakes which with relish we ate

Good luck to the girls who in number have grown

In John Emerson’s zoo class on Fridays v. late.

Make the most of the coll, it is great as we’ve shown.

The dining hall had a draw all of its own

So 50 years on we look back at MC

With notes hand delivered, their contents unknown.

and three cheers we raise to our HM John D! Maggie West (B1 1968–69)

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COMMUNITY

JOHN DANCY SPEECH The completed Dancy House ready to open in September 2018.

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COMMUNITY

Anniversary Celebrations 175 Years and 50 Years of Girls

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS

The 2017/18 academic year marked the 50th year of girls at Marlborough and the 175th year since the College was established.

School Walk

Festival of Sport

Cycle to the Somme

The celebratory events have included a 20-mile school walk in September, supported by over 1,000 pupils, parents, Old Marlburians and members of Common Room which raised over £63,000 for ShelterBox, The Kipungani Schools Trust and the Marlborough College Bursary Appeal.

School matches against St Edward’s, Canford, Winchester and Sherborne and Old Marlburian rugby, football, mixed hockey and netball teams played alongside each other in the Festival of Sport which celebrate the sporting acumen that has been such an integral part of school life for the last 175 years.

Some 64 riders completed a poignant three-day cycle from the College to the Somme in October, culminating in a moving ceremony at the Thiepval Memorial and a commemorative dinner where all those gathered remembered Marlburians who died in the First World War and on the beaches of Normandy.

Commemoration and Prize Day

Sotheby’s Art Exhibition

The events of the year culminated in a magnificent Prize Day that celebrated all the achievements of the current school as well as the past, in pioneering full boarding education and, in 1968, in being one of the first schools to admit girls. We also said goodbye to Jonathan and Emma Leigh whose tenure as Master has left an indelible mark on Marlborough’s history.

In December, Marlborough guests raised £30,000 to support the Marlborough SpringBoard/RNCF Bursaries at a Private View hosted at Sotheby’s. An exhibition of work by four former pupils, taught by inspirational Head of Art, Robin Child (CR 1971–92), celebrated the 50th anniversary of co-education.

@MarlboroughCol May 26 Commemoration & Prize Day 2018, celebrating 175 years of @MarlboroughCol and 50 years of girls. A day to remember.

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JG


COMMUNITY

Print REbels Celebrating the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers This year, the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers (RE) in London, marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the founder and first President of the RE, Sir Francis Seymour Haden, with an exhibition reflecting on its past and present members, the history, and the legacy of the Society. Print REbels brings together prints by Haden and those who inspired him such as Rembrandt and Dürer, and his contemporaries, including Samuel Palmer and Whistler. rt Scholars and Art staff from Marlborough College attended the opening of this important show at Bankside, in London. Edward Twohig the new Head of Art at Marlborough College, and a Fellow of the Society of PrintMakers, was interviewed by the Director of the Bankside Gallery, Natalie Suggit, in preparation for the exhibition, some of which is below: Natalie Suggit: “Print REbels is the brainchild of Edward Twohig RE, whose passion and knowledge for the medium of print has fuelled this ambitious project. He has generously loaned many works from his private collection for this exhibition, and has worked extensively on the accompanying catalogue to the show. Where did the idea for ‘Print REbels’ come from?” EFJT: “Print REbels grew out of these three creative etchers successfully navigating their way into the mainstream of British

Art during a period in mid-Victorian London when printmaking was considered merely a means of reproducing artists’ paintings rather than as a richly creative medium in its own right”. Natalie Suggit: “Has your admiration of the artists whose work you collect affected your own practice and if so, how?” EFJT: “Of course! My attraction to the endless range, dialogue and expressive beauty of line is constantly sharpened and heightened. Knowing when to stop, reticence and the bravery in employing empty space are three of the many lessons gained on observing works from my family of prints.” Print REbels was held at Bankside Gallery from 25 April – 13 May 2018.

PRINT REBELS

A

EFJT

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COMMUNITY

Revolution & Anarchy The Erpingham Camp Seventeen students and three teachers touched down in Barcelona, eager to uncover some of the cultural, artistic and architectural treasures of this diverse and spectacular city. The first evening’s visit to a Flamenco Tablau just off Las Ramblas soon had our heads filled with dancers, hauntingly beautiful voices and resplendent outfits.Barton Hill – Boys Winner

House Shout

S Competition House Harmony & Song HOUSE SHOUT

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n the final week before half-term, the annual House Song and Harmony competition descended upon the College. With two new venues in place to substitute for the Memorial Hall, the format of the competition had to change, but the Houses produced some music that was no less impressive than in previous years. The Chapel held the competition for House Harmony, and there was a palpable buzz about the place. Some serious close harmony competition was held in front of the reredos, which stood as a poignant setting full of golden lustre for some a capella accomplishment. The audience listened to an eclectic range of songs, arranged by the students, and performed to incredible standards. Always supportive, they whooped and cheered for each act

eventeen students and three teachers touched down in Barcelona, eager to uncover some of the cultural, artistic and architectural treasures of this diverse and spectacular before and after city. they The had first sung evening’s – a real visit to a to Flamenco Tablau just off give Las testament the support Marlburians Ramblas soonIt had headstofilled with one another. was our excellent see some dancers, beautiful voices wonderfulhauntingly and thoughtful singing fromand all resplendent outfits. yeargroups, and certainly very encouraging to At see eight variouso’members the Shell we be clock onof Tuesday, given solos, too. wandered smudgy-eyed down to breakfast

and, at nine, first culture-packed day Later cameour the House Song competition began. La Sagrada Familia, Antoni Gaudi’s in the Norwood Hall. It was quite unfinished andschool ‘Cathedral something tomasterpiece have the entire in one of the Poor’, had our jaws dropping and place for the competition, and the building pencils scribbling for over an hour; some of certainly coped by providing great acoustics our more intrepid artists braved the height for the competition. It also provided the of the bridge theofTree of Lifefun to school with anbehind evening excellent sketch dramatic vistas of the city. after such a busy start to this academic year. standard of each performance La The Pedrera is another Gaudi building, was incredibly high, and it is clear that the magnificent in its sculptural embellishment trend is turning from a ‘shout’ to a ‘song’, that extends to the roof top. From the but still with no less volume than before! terrace, we drew giant chimney stacks that stand up like historical warriors. The museum below exhibits some of Gaudi’s natural forms, models of his architecture and examples of his other work.

The Picasso Museum, set in the beautiful Gothic quarter, surprised us with some of the artist’s early works (he moved to Barcelona when only fourteen). Huge oil paintings hang next to tiny traditional landscapes, the subjects almost unrecognizable in their exploratory, cubist forms. Our culinary treat that evening was a seafront restaurant followed by a visit to the iMax Cinema where we watched an account of Shackleton’s adventures, and then a documentary in 3D about deep sea sharks. Wednesday brought us Figueres, outside Barcelona, and the birthplace of the surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí. The Teatre-

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Museu Gala Salvador Dalí immersed us in the weird and wacky world of a man whose sanity, at first glance, comes into question. We left struck by the obvious genius of a highly skilled draughtsman. In the words of the illustrious Philip Dukes ‘great competition great From there, we followed needs the river to adjudication’ and this year saw Joanna Gerona, Catalonia’s answer to Venice, with L’Estrange the streets fold to the its winding enter cobbled andjudge crooked competition. Awarding C1 with the houses leaning creakily over the river. Harmony prize, she was met with rapturous Back in rambled on Las applause as Barcelona, it was clearwethe consensus for Ramblas andwas enjoyed supper at thewinning hotel. the choice correct. Cotton theParc Mixed Houses competition Barton Guell, under a brightand February Hill winning the Boys’ House competition sun on Thursday, proved the undisputed saw tumultuous celebration the highlight of our trip. Instead from of taking Houses in question, and Elmhurst were the metro, we walked for about half an crowned Girls’uphill, Houseeventually and overallreaching winner hour, mostly this academic year. Congratulations to the a series of outdoor escalators that took us winning Houses and commendations to up a further few hundred metres. From all the Houses for their enthusiasm and here, we had not only a magnificent view dedication. of the city but also our first glimpses of an emerald paradise through theAdam gaps Staines in the trees ahead. Choirmaster Gaudi’s exceptionally beautiful jewellike mosaic sculptures, created from shards of broken crockery, had us mesmerised. Palm trees, gorgeous cave-like stone arches and parakeets were just a small part of what we saw. For hours, we were content to capture, in drawing, the spectacular architecture and serpentine shapes. Gaudi’s own house, transformed into a museum, is situated within the park. Not one person was happy to leave such a wonderful place but the Maritime Museum proved a haven of air-conditioned spaces and fantastic naval artefacts. Later, a trip to the aquarium became the second of our underwater experiences and this was followed by an extravagant array of delicious salads, pasta and pizza and a wander through the Gothic Quarter for an evening of soul and fJazz club. Friday dawned and our suitcases were

Elmhurst – Girls and Overall Winner


COMMUNITY

HOUSE SHOUT

Cotton – Mixed Winner

Cotton – Mixed Winner

Elmhurst – Girls and Overall Winner

C1 House Harmony

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COMMUNITY

A Year in Modern Languages Defying Barriers and Bridging Divisions It has been another active year in Modern Languages, with an enthusiastic spirit for taking up the challenges of language learning joining with some exciting new initiatives as we aim to maintain and strengthen our links with partner schools ahead of next year’s Brexit.

MODERN LANGUAGES

F

rench and Spanish remain our largest languages, based on the numbers opting to learn them, and in both we have long standing links with European partner schools. Time abroad brings the languages to life, never better illustrated than in the Remove exchange to Lycée Notre-Damede-Bury in the Val d’Oise département in the northern suburbs of Paris. As the Marlborough group arrived in January, the warm welcome and the Union Jack flying from the school flagpole reinforced the strength of this exchange, and over the following two weeks, explorations of Paris and generous family outings gave our Remove group a wonderful experience, which we were able to repay in June when we hosted the return leg. Meanwhile our two Lower Sixth exchanges, the group exchange to Lycée Jules-Verne, Limours (Essonne), and the individual one undertaken over five weeks in January

and February by Nadia Hassan (LI) to Lycée Vauban, Luxembourg, both enabled the senior French students to develop their language skills in a welcoming but distinctly “different” environment. With two Spanish trips last year, for the Hundred to Cuenca (Castilla-La Mancha) and for the Upper Sixth to Colegio Peleteiro, Santiago de Compostela (Galicia), the Hispanists are well looked after too. Both these venues show the rich history of Spain in its full glory, while also providing a lively and active up-to-date experience. Both the schools take care to provide language instruction at the right level, and the afternoon and evening activities allow Spain’s colourful traditions to be experienced and savoured. Meanwhile the Italian trip to Florence opens the eyes and ears of the Italianists to the wonders of this city – morning language lessons in the country villa out of the city are followed by

@MCol_Academic Apr 28 The Remove Russian Set practise their Russian cooking skills, cooking borsch, pirozhki and traditional biscuits.

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afternoons enjoying the breathtaking art and cultural delights of the city known as the birthplace of the Renaissance. German has flourished too this year, with 10 Upper Sixth sitting the Pre-U exam, the largest school cohort for Pre-U German in any school in the country. Our new Remove Exchange to Gute Änger Realschule in Freising (Bavaria) was a great success, with enthusiastic messaging in German and English flying both ways ahead of the Germans’ visit to Marlborough in March, and the Marlburians’ return visit a few weeks later. Another popular initiative was the Sixth Form Study Visit to Berlin in October 2017, where a beautifully reconditioned hotel provided the perfect base for language classes in the nearby GLS language school, followed by afternoons and evenings enjoying Berlin life to the full!


COMMUNITY And this is without mentioning the lessons (those key times of teaching, learning, puzzling over, trying out, making

mistakes, thinking, joking, sharing, comparing and so on) that make learning a foreign language possible, as well as the society meetings, theatre trips, sports events, evenings of reading, song and gastronomic tastings, and the culmination of the Lower Sixth year, the open air Modern Languages Drama Festival, which weave the cultural backdrop to enhance the language learning. Three new events this year stand out: an outreach day to Cheam School with a team of ten Lower Sixth students teaching Arabic, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish taster lessons to the prep school pupils; our open house Chinese Day here in June, with local prep and primary schools visiting for an eyeopening experience of Chinese, including a tea ceremony, a language taster, Chinese calligraphy, a quiz, a Chinese lunch and a chopsticks race; and finally, an invitation from the Chaplain for our Sixth Form

students to be multilingual readers at the Pentecost Chapel Service, speaking in the tongues of the Department and filling the Chapel with six different languages. My thanks to all our pupils for their enthusiasm, perseverance and spirit of adventure in taking up the remarkable challenge of language learning – Marlborough currently has 125 Sixth Formers learning at least one foreign language. Thank you for wanting to defy barriers and bridge divisions. My thanks too to all 28 of my colleagues in the Department, teachers, assistants and our technician, Olga Scott. Their expertise, energy and enthusiasm for languages make the year’s achievements happen. Finally, as 25 of the Class of 2018 move on to read Modern Languages at university we wish them, and all of the year’s Upper Sixth linguists, the very best.

MODERN LANGUAGES

As the summer exams drew ever closer, beaks and pupils alike worked hard to bring everything together for the inevitable reckoning that comes at the end of each school year. 2018 was a year that showed the Modern Languages students performing once again at a very high level of skill and proficiency: at A level/Pre-U across all our 6 main languages (Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish), 93% of our candidates achieved A*–B (D1–M2), while of the 10 Marlburians gaining places at Oxford and Cambridge for October 2018, seven are going up to read Modern Languages or Linguistics. The Hundreds, in the final year of letter grades for the Modern Languages GCSE and IGCSE exams, did magnificently, too, a most impressive 91% gaining A*–B.

AJB

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COMMUNITY

The Combined Cadet Force Challenge and Ceremony

THE COMBINED CADET FORCE

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he first taste of the cadet experience happens for Marlburians in the Remove yeargroup where pupils spend half of the year divided into mixed sections learning about aspects for teamwork and fellowship by engaging in a variety of team-based activities. Whilst this is a most valuable experience for the Remove cadets, it also provides a tremendous opportunity for our Upper Sixth cadets to cut their teeth in command positions: it is always fascinating to watch our NCOs grow in this job as the year progresses. This year’s Remove clearly enjoyed the activities offered as the healthy number that opted to start the Basic Infantry Skills course at the start of the Hundred this year attests. A highlight for the Remove was the Field Day on Perham Down where a round robin of basic fieldcraft skills were delivered with enthusiasm by our Lower Sixth Advanced Infantry Skills (AIS) cadets. The ranks of the Hundred Basic Infantry Skills Cadets (BIS) were increased by a number of cadets from Nova Herod Academy as part of the Cadet Expansion Programme (CEP). The first phase of their training involved dovetailing Skill at Arms training with fieldcraft in preparation for their first overnight exercise. This exercise on Perham Down was in cold but dry conditions and was so well led by a

number of our Upper Sixth cadets that a visiting member of the Nova Herod senior management team assumed the cadet commanding the Nova Herod cadets was a member of our staff. The Hundred’s Advanced Infantry Skills course were further enriched by a visit to the Royal Artillery at Larkhill where cadets were able to clamber over various artillery pieces in the Gun Park. The Lower Sixth Advanced Infantry Skills (AIS) honed their fieldcraft skills under the guidance of Mr Bate and Lt Flatres in order to build the confidence

@MCol_CCF Oct 19 CCF Cadets at I Marine Expeditionary Headquarters at Camp Pendleton, California

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to be able to deliver training to younger cadets. A day hosted by the Army Training Regiment at Pirbright was particularly insightful, the opportunity to compare notes with training soldiers of similar age being a highlight. Just prior to the October half-term saw the Upper Sixth provided a ceremonial guard to signal the start of a charity bicycle ride to commemorate the centenary of the battle of the Somme. Half-term in the Michaelmas Term saw a small group of Upper Sixth cadets fly to San Diego to visit a range of military facilities: this


COMMUNITY on how the Fire Services use hydraulic cutting tools to deal with road traffic accidents. The Lent Term also saw our senior cadets visit Wellington Barracks in London to witness the ceremonial aspects of being in an incremental company of a Guards regiment.

The Biennial Inspection provided plenty of focus for the short Lent Term.

The inspection day was preceded by an exercise in TIBUA training down at a mock up village near Chepstow: this valuable training was delivered by members of the Rifles regiment. The inspecting officer, Major General Christopher Tickell, visited us at College the following day where he was able to observe cadets doing a range of exciting activities, from the Remove who were undergoing leadership training from Major Matt England all the way through to the Lower Sixth who were developing their leadership skills with the Dorset and Wiltshire fire brigade who trained cadets

THE COMBINED CADET FORCE

was a most memorable trip for those of us who went (see Trips page 54). Soon after half-term, our focus was firmly on our main ceremonial activity of the year, Remembrance Day. This involved all top three yeargroups who again did the CCF proud having put a lot of effort into their drill and turnout. Our involvement at both the College Chapel service and the Town’s act of remembrance was concluded by an excellent lunch in the Adderley attended by senior cadets, parents and officers.

At the Annual Dinner in the Summer Term we were delighted to welcome Brigadier Kevin Beaton who provided a most candid and at points harrowing reflection on his career in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He held the Adderley spellbound with his accounts of exploits in various parts of the world including providing help for the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone. Cadet RSM Ibby Lee, who hopes to serve in the RAMC one day followed Brigadier Beaton’s speech with a wellprepared and expertly delivered summary of the journey experienced over three years by the cadets in her year. Just prior to half-term, the Lower Sixth departed for Sennybridge Training Area (SENTA) in Brecon, Wales on EXERCISE CELTIC WARRIOR where over three days the prospective NCOs were put through their paces by taking it in turns to take on command appointments for aspects of the exercise. We were lucky with the weather this year for this demanding exercise and the cadets engaged enthusiastically and gained valuable leadership experience as a result. The final assault on the enemy, provided by the Rifles, was expertly led at platoon and section level and left the directing staff confident that the CCF would be in good hands for the following year.

CCF Summer Camp This year’s post GCSE camp for the Hundred took place at Okehampton on the northern edge of Dartmoor. The larger than usual Marlborough contingent impressed the various sets of directing staff encountered throughout the week which was made all the more challenging by the unusually hot weather. Enforced water breaks throughout taught cadets how to survive in difficult conditions, providing yet another formative experience for the cadets. NJLM, Contingent Commander

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COMMUNITY

House News

HOUSE NEWS

B1 In a year that sees the College celebrate 175 years and 50 years of girls, it is difficult not to be nostalgic. B1 also celebrates a birthday of 170 years and enjoys the privilege of being part of the College’s very early beginnings. Sitting down to write this retrospect, I looked to draw inspiration from past Housemasters and found drawn to an image of Geoffrey Sargeaunt. Sargeaunt, like myself, was a newly appointed HM to B1 some 100 years ago and given this year’s centenary commemorations of the conclusion of the Great War, I wondered what he might have commented on at the end of his first year in charge of the mighty Cross Arrows. A classicist himself, writing at a time when the B1 leavers faced real uncertainty, he drew on the words of the Athenian General Nicias. Nicias, in his speech to his troops at Syracuse said that “men make the city, not walls or ships without men in them”. Whilst B House enjoys a fantastic position at the heart of the College campus, it is its boys, its custodians, that make it such a special place. This resonates today just as strongly as it did under Sargeaunt and I feel sure that the founding Housemaster, John Sowerby, would have shared this view when he received the keys from Blore at the House’s opening back in 1848. Indeed, B1 boys this year have featured in every corner of College life and it has been a real privilege to watch them squeeze the orange of opportunity. The Michaelmas Term took shape under the leadership of Head of House Rhodri Campbell, whose quiet and considered manner was a supportive voice of kindness to those new boys that struggled to settle in the early stages of term. Lachlan Graham, as Head of Sport, by contrast, provided the bluster and encouraged the boys, both new and established, to wear the ‘blue and black’ with pride. A constant voice, resonating loud from pitchside, Lachlan insistence that B1 boys were determined to give their all for the House was unrelenting and brought us success in so many different House events. Ambitious across the spectrum of competition, we made the final of Uppers fives, hockey, football, water polo and House Challenge, and whilst the only trophy that made it into the cabinet was for fives, in

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which College captain and regional champion Arthur Rigg was magnificent, the efforts of the senior boys inspired our younger brethren to exceed their own expectations. Consequently, the lower years were combative, securing the Shell water polo and both Lowers hockey and football. We arguably could have taken the rugby had the event not been cancelled due to inclement weather; the win over Summerfield in the qualifying rounds was a real highlight and will stay in my memory for many years. Impressive individual sporting performances also came from House Prefect Milo Brooks, who was the 1st XI hockey’s player of the season. Tuomas Laakkonen also took honours. Captaining the College’s fencing team, he received the Hurn Cup, awarded to most accomplished foilist. What is particularly impressive about these accomplishments is that both of these boys were academic scholars, so it came as no surprise when Milo was awarded the Dunford Cup, given to the College’s best all-rounder, and Tuomas achieved 4A*s and an A grade at A level.

Poverty Group. Part of the Devizes Foodbank, our initiative was conceived in an effort to ensure that local families that were struggling, could enjoy a slightly better Christmas. Indeed, George matured enormously during his final year at the College and it was a pleasure to see him elevated to the position of Head of House for the final Lent and Summer terms of his school career. George was also pivotal in his support of House Music and Drama, and with stalwart Jack Redmayne of the Lower Sixth leading the charge here, this pair galvanised the boys around the House Shout entry, Hounds of Love by the Futureheads. Melodic and dynamic, it was an effort to be proud of – the collegiality on display that evening was immense. Jack also collaborated brilliantly with new blood Tom Phelps, coordinating impressive entries into the Harmony and Battle of the Bands competitions. Securing a second place in the latter of these, with the Goo Goo dolls’ Iris, Harry Hall-Smith, André Stamp and Todd Benney supported brilliantly to make this an impressive team effort.

George Marshall, as Head of Charity, also impressed in the run-up to Christmas, coordinating the House’s first Takeaway Giveaway. Encouraging B1 boys to pledge the value of their weekly takeaway, B1 bought £407 worth of groceries and George and I delivered 195kg of food to the Marlborough Action

Other highlights, of which there are many more, include; Will Sankey’s Commendation Prize and Sportsmanship Award; Nikita Trotsenko’s dominance in the House water polo competition, always a firm favourite in B1; the CCF annual dinner, at which I very much enjoyed the company of Sergeants


In short, a fantastic year filled with kindness, determination and collegiality. Well done, B1 – Stet Fortuna Domus. DRA

Barton Hill It was clear from the off that an eclectic and genteel Upper Sixth would provide a warm, calming influence on the House. Head of House Sam Fairer-Smith proved a suitable role model not only in promoting good manners, decency and considerate behaviour about the place, but also in sartorial elegance. The annual House photograph will feel his absence – perhaps more so than the iconic Downtown barbers, who never saw much of him. Dan Charnaud championed the jocks amongst us, but sadly, the Beast from the East succeeded in what other Houses could not, and prevented us from wining the House rugby in Michaelmas. Both the Uppers and Lowers matches were pretty much ‘in the bag’ before the inclement weather caused their cancellation. In the Uppers, mercurial Charnaud and Lower Sixth rapier Harry Foster were unplayable at times. Lanre Alli was simply untouchable in the Shell competition and thanks go to Edward Herbert whose unflappability helped keep a hugely talented, if at times lively, Shell in check. The impossibly smart House prefect Jamie Hodgson provided strong leadership by example, along with much amusement upon his return from parlour on a Saturday night. A House – like an army – marches on its stomach, and much gratitude is owed to resident culinary genius, Master Brewer and West Country diamond Tom Elvin. On a personal note, I will miss the company of the Upper Sixth, especially at Captains listening to ’70s rock, often with Sam, Emile Willmott and Rob Smith last men standing,

COMMUNITY was the highlight of my week. Despite a few scares along the way, they all surpassed expectations with their A level performance achieving their preferred place at university, with many exceeding their offers by some distance. It is especially pleasing that a third of the yeargroup chose to study at Edinburgh; a reunion is already in the pipeline. Winning House Shout was probably highlight of the year; a success largely down to the determination of Freddie Elmberg in rehearsals. From the moment the boys lifted their heads for the first line of We Are Young by Fun, beaming ear-to-ear smiles, it was clear they were by some distance the most polished act. Freddie is a hugely talented musician, who leaves us to study popular music at the Royal Northern College. His arrangement of Elton John’s Shine on Through for inter-house Battle of the Bands was a thing of beauty. Young Dukes crooning like a pro, whilst fellow ‘Shellie’ Harry CampbellWalter wowed the crowd (especially the Sixth Form girls) with his trumpet solo. Personal success abounded. Tom Elvin won the Seal Shooting Cup – a suitable achievement for a popular and successful captain of shooting. Harry Powell has grown to become the best fives player in the College by some distance, wining the prestigious Town Challenge trophy. Rob Smith proved a highly successful captain of golf, leading the team to an uncommonly successful season, whilst in the Shell, Lanre Alli demonstrated quite incredible athletic prowess, winning both top try-scorer in the rugby season and the Ed Jackson athletics shield. Lanre has gone on to represent Wiltshire athletics in national competition, with notable success. On the stage, Head of House elect Finn Taylor’s camped it up wonderfully in Deus Dat Incrementum; a compelling celebration of the 50th anniversary of girls joining College. ‘The Hill’ continues to benefit from wonderfully committed and attentive tutors, whose efforts are greatly appreciated by all. Mrs Amanda Woodford was a welcome addition to the team this year, instantly having a positive impact on senior boys’ academic confidence and ambition. As was antipodean whirlwind Terry Gilmour, whose energy and good humour make Tuesday night’s great fun. Towards the end of the year we were joined by old Cotton

boy and poacher-turned-gamekeeper Richard Lalor, whilst the return of Mrs Izzy Dennis – on her first night back in House after maternity leave – was met with spontaneous cheering and a standing ovation which left no doubt about the regard in which ‘Miss D’ is held. Towards the end of Summer Term, as the Upper Sixth said their farewells, the Lower Sixth were already stepping up to the plate, providing strong leadership and energy, and demonstrating encouraging academic ambition. As the boys left at the end of June, the decorators moved in, preparing the place for yet another new cohort, who no doubt will grow to be as fiercely proud of, and loyal towards, their House as those who move on.

HOUSE NEWS

Charles Roché and Christopher LinyardTough; watching Harry Wake receive the Politics Prize from the Master on Prize Day; Piers Tabor’s unquenchable enthusiasm for the Devizes to Westminster Kayak race; Oscar Beattie’s portrayal of a vengeful Valentine in Sharman MacDonald’s After Juliet; Kameron Calvert-Davies athleticism at Babcock and Leo Lambert’s skills with a nerf bow and arrow (disclaimer: no pigeons were harmed during the construction of this list). Harrison Locke was also hilarious as a distressed goat in Carol Ann Duffy’s Grimm Tales and Louis Dessalles, in addition to securing two A* at IGCSE a year early, showed unstinting commitment and organisation, representing the school on no less than 56 occasions at first team level, more than any other pupil in the College. House assemblies have also been a personal highlight and the generous applause on display, as we celebrated the achievements of boys in the House on a weekly basis, has been truly outstanding – I genuinely think that we clapped Star of the Week, Angus Tudsbery, for a full ten minutes.

GJM

C1 This year started with some big changes in C1. It is with great sadness that we said goodbye to two of C1’s longest-serving tutors in Mrs Ford and Mr G Lane. We wish Mrs Ford all the very best for her retirement and Mr Lane good luck as he takes over as Housemaster of C3. In addition to these C1 stalwarts we said goodbye to two super tutors: Mr Pountney, who was much-loved for his humour and energy in House on ‘Astro nights’ and Mr Mortimer, whose thorough approach helped duty evenings to run smoothly. I would like to thank them all for their sterling service to C1. But while these four moved on to pastures new we were fortunate to welcome four outstanding tutors in Mr Keighley, Mr Jones, Mr Birchall and Mr Tanner, all of whom settled seamlessly into House life. We also said goodbye to another fantastic Upper Sixth yeargroup whose excellent A level and Pre-U results, averaging over 70% D1/D2 or A*/A grades meant all eleven leavers achieved their first choice university or post school course. We were delighted that from the new Upper Sixth Matt Hook and Dom Coulson were nominated for the school prefect body, the latter also being appointed Senior Prefect, captain of rugby and captain of cricket. James Wright was also appointed captain of hockey and Arthur Clark captain of beagles.

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HOUSE NEWS

The new academic year started brightly with the addition of eleven new Shell, and Billy James in the Lower Sixth. Community is at the heart of life in C1 and I was delighted to see how quickly the new joiners were welcomed to the House. In the Michaelmas Term success came early for C1 as we won the Lowers crosscountry by some margin with Jamie HarvieWatt coming second overall and Josh Dingley and Kamdi Dozie-Ajaegbu also achieving top 10 places. This was quickly followed by a win at the Lowers ‘Ultimate Frisbee’ competition. All three of our rugby teams – Shell, Lowers and Uppers – comfortably reached the semifinals of each age group, losing only one match between them. Unfortunately, we will never know just how good we might have been as poor weather and frozen ground put paid to the competition before the finals were played. Staying with rugby, special congratulations go to Kamdi on his selection for Harlequins U16 academy, the U15 London Regional Development team and his invitation to train with the England U16 squad. Well done too to Josh Dingley on his inclusion in the Bath Academy programme. In fives Christopher Beswick competed well in the nationals, while in rackets Dom Coulson, Finn Kverndal and Giles Hocking all represented the school in the Queen’s national rackets competition. Also this term the House debating team, consisting of three new Shell: Ollie Longman-Slocombe, Theodore Barton, and Cosmo Middleton, narrowly missed out on victory coming runners up, with Ollie winning the best speaker of the preliminary rounds and achieving a special merit in the final. A combined yeargroup House Challenge team Captained by Matt Hook, supported by Arlie Mahony, Ben Place and Tom Harvie-Watt all impressed to reach the semi-finals. The Michaelmas Term also saw a jaw-dropping House Harmony performance take the winners podium, giving listeners goosebumps and leading to a rousing standing ovation from the 600-strong audience in Chapel. This was led and beautifully crafted by our school head of choir Christopher Beswick, alongside Ben Parker, Finn Kverndal, Ijah Ofon and Edward Beswick. In the Lent Term C1 had success winning the Hundred and Uppers swimming competitions, coming runners-up in the Remove and fourth in the Shell to take overall victory. Our strength as an all-round House was also evident in other competition successes where we may not have won but a host of runner-up positions showed the breadth of skills and depth of commitment the boys in House have shown. These include runners-up in the Lowers House 11s, Uppers 6s and Remove 6s hockey competitions, runnersup in squash, House fives and third place in the water polo. Special mention goes to Giles Hocking on his selection to represent Wessex in the Futures Cup regional team. In the Summer Term the Remove athletics team claimed victory and the Shell secured a

hard-fought runners up position to give C1 overall second place in the House athletics competition. Additional congratulations go to Kamdi Dozie-Ajaegbu and Albie Woolfenden who were selected to compete in the Kennet Wiltshire County Championships. In cricket, C1 just missed out on securing an unprecedented fourth consecutive win losing in the last over of the final. Victory was nearly snatched from the jaws of defeat thanks to a defiant last pair stand by Jamie Harvie-Watt and Henry Di Monaco, the latter scoring a superb 43 off 24 balls facing 1st XI bowlers. The big-hitter of the term though was Harry Cowling who beat the school record for runs scored (a record that was set last year by C1’s Billy Mead) amassing 215 not out. We also celebrated Harry’s continued selection for Hampshire County Cricket. Away from the cricket square Gleb Trotsenko showed he was a master tactician, securing the Uppers interHouse chess championship after a gruelling eight rounds fought over two terms. In Music and Drama, Ijah Ofon ‘trod the boards’ in no less than three school performances this year, while Ollie Longman-Slocombe was outstanding in the Shell play. Chris Beswick was Head of Choir and there were a number of notable Music exam successes including Finn Kverndal achieving a distinction in his grade 8 singing exam, Jon Lam a distinction in his grade 7 singing exam, Gully Weston grade 6 piano, Ijah Ofon grade 5 drum kit, Tom Harvie-Watt grade 5 saxophone, Marcus Hudon grade 3 singing and Edward Beswick grade 3 trumpet. Prize Day celebrations also saw C1 achieve a number of honours with awards going to Christopher Beswick (Music), James Wright (Music and Club Sporting Award), Angus Lorimer (Geography and Biology), Matt Hook (Community Service Award), Matvey Notkin (English), Dom Coulson (Kennett Paul Prize and Club Sporting Award), Tom Sykes (Modern Languages), Jon Lam (Music), Hector Mackellar (EPQ Prize), Ben Place (Maths and Astronomy Prizes), Ijah Ofon (Drama), Jake Price (Progress Prize), and Ishantha Radkevitch (Subject Prize). @MCol_C1 Jul 8 Goodbye to the Leavers of 2018. Thanks for being a super year group and good luck for the future!

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Looking ahead to next year we wish Billy James and Freddie Hazlitt all the best in their new roles as school prefects, and likewise to Finn Kverndal as he takes on the position of new Head of Choir. Finally, the Summer Term also saw C1’s longstanding (and long-suffering!) Dame Eleanor Ross retire after 20 years of service. Eleanor was Dame to four Housemasters and I know I speak for all when I thank her immensely for her incredible service and contribution over the years. It is impossible to put into words how much she has done for the pupils and staff alike and we wish her all the very best for her welldeserved retirement. JPS

C2 Another busy, successful and happy year comes to an end in C2, and it is fair to say that the House of 2017/18 lived up to our high expectations. Milo Sweet started the year off in fabulous style with his organisation and leadership of Spirit in the Sky, our House Shout entry. Original, passionate, full of great humour and sung with tremendous commitment – the House in a nutshell. Not victorious this year, but great fun and a credit to Milo and his team of helpers. Huge congratulations to Tim Finn and his group of committed singers and actors for the House Harmony, the House Band on Super Sunday to kick off the Summer Term, and the House Play at the end of another fulfilling year in Music and Drama. With so many budding Actors (Giles Edwards and Oscar Pownall in particular) and our committed members of the Choir (Jamie Brooks, Freddie Kottler and Ben Chetwood) Drama and Music will continue to play a central role in the life of the House. Rugby was devastated by the weather, it wasn’t a vintage year for football so it looked at one stage like the Trophies would be hard to come by. But with squash (for the third year in succession) secured, and the Individual Squash Cup being retained by Sam Nelson-Piercy, the way was prepared for hockey in the Lent Term. The Lowers lost on shuttles in the semi-finals of the 11-a-side tournament, but managed to gain redemption by winning the 6-a-side


St Andrews and Southampton for Medicine, Sheffield and Oxford Brookes. They led the House with class and distinction and will be sorely missed. We also bade farewell to two much loved tutors, Mr Adamson and Mr Richardson, both of whom leave having supported the boys with genuine care, and we wish them both well on their new adventures beyond these shores. The House would collapse were it not for the tremendous commitment of the House Tutor team and our Housekeeping team, wonderfully led by our Dame, Mrs Teresa Sugden, who once again has made sure that C2 is a happy and homely place. GRP

C3 What a year it has been in C3. As I reflect upon my first year in House, it is with a great sense of pride that I look back upon the pupil achievement. On the academic front, August brought outstanding news for many with 54A* grades shared between the Hundred yeargroup, and our Upper Sixth cohort surpassing all expectations. Special congratulations to Morgan Pollard (A*A*A) who secured a highly competitive place at UCL to read Architecture, and Gabriel Jordan (A*A*A) who will reapply to Oxford this year. Ed Cornish and Zach Murphy (3As a piece) were amongst other notable successes, and the yeargroup as a whole deserve

It did not take long for the new Shell to announce their arrival and collectively they claimed first major House Competition of the year in the form of the Shell steeplechase; George Gerson and Toby Yates scooping first and second place respectively, and Tomos Lewis and Cosmo St John Cooper crossing the line in the top 15. With some outstanding performances in the Junior and Senior House football competitions, the surprise package came from the Senior House rugby team – looking unlikely to raise a side the night before the competition, the boys summoned their energies and progressed through to the semifinals with ease. Under the leadership of Mason Hunt they succeeded in not conceding a point throughout the entire competition. House sport success continued throughout the year with finals appearances for the Lowers in the House hockey, football and cricket. Despite being pipped at the post in all three major Lowers competitions the boys deserve much credit for their spirit and sportsmanship. The Uppers hockey sixes had been targeted from the outset, and in a superb final against C2 which ebbed and flowed, James Ellis scored a thunderbolt of a goal to eventually claim victory. The whole squad under Jack Thistlethwayte’s captaincy thoroughly deserved the win, and it was great to see a number of the Hundred (Charlie Madden, Tom Corfield and James Ruddell) making significant contribution.

HOUSE NEWS

tournament. The Shell lost in the final of the 6-a-side tournament, as did the Uppers, but the senior boys came back with a vengeance to secure the Uppers 11-a-side trophy to bring another memorable and hugely impressive hockey term to a close. With a huge number of boys continuing to represent the College at rugby, football, hockey, swimming and basketball in the winter months, it is fair to say that the C2 boys have lived up to the reputation of the House for producing honest and proud sportsmen – of all standards. Charlie Wright retained his chess trophy, stretching his unbeaten streak to over two years in the process – a wonderful achievement. Oscar Powell played some spectacular golf during the season and was once again rewarded with the trophy for Golfer of the Year. He also led C2 to a shared victory in the Pick Putter, sinking a 7-foot wobbler on the final hole to secure a remarkable tie. With the summer comes cricket, and a good run for the Uppers in the House competition, and a semi-final loss for the Lowers in their competition. Theo Reid managed to win the Individual Tennis Cup this year – a tremendous achievement and a wonderful final, but it was a semi-final loss for the Uppers in the House Tournament, and the same outcome for the Shell. Babcock saw the Remove give their all at the track and to their enormous credit the boys managed to finish third – testament to their graft and team spirit. This was again in evidence in House athletics at the end of the academic year when Shell, remove and L6th compete for the much coveted trophy. Supported by a host of parents the boys gave their all on a sweltering summer morning and managed to win the House Athletics Cup. Captained brilliantly by Oscar Fillingham, special mention must go to Jude Fry and Freddie Coen for their utterly spellbinding and inspirational running. Henry MacphersonPetermann ran with tremendous commitment and breathtaking class to win both 800 and 1,500, and the Remove quietly scored in every event and supported each other brilliantly. It was such a magical day to end a really positive year.

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great credit for the way in which they applied themselves, as well as for their leadership of the House in all respects throughout the year.

Elsewhere James Ruddell, Hugo Mayne and Jack Cartwright saw us through to the finals of the Lowers Maths competition, and we also progressed to finals day for the House Challenge general knowledge showdown (Chris Kirkwood, James Ellis, Gabriel Jordan, James Ruddell and Jack Cartwright all putting in fine efforts here). Henry Gouriet, Oscar Stratton and Jason Kellinger returned silverware in the much coveted clay pigeon Shooting Competition, and a surprise victory in the Lowers House tennis meant a severe dent in the house pizza supply – well done to Zu MacDermot, Domingo Powell, Henry Pritchard, Hugo Mayne, Luke Cave and Wilf Adams for bringing the trophy home.

Once again C2 was led by an impressive Upper 6th who between them managed to secure places to study at Harvard, Babson College, Massachusetts, Hong Kong, Madrid,

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Happy Together by The Turtles was an apt song choice for the House Shout; an epic team effort which to our well-trained ears was a strong contender. Sadly it wasn’t to be, though Jack Thistlethwayte and Zach Murphy worked tirelessly on putting together an excellent performance, and have set a high bar for next year. A lively party in the Link-Room with MM was much deserved and enjoyed by all.

HOUSE NEWS

With WWI commemorations very much in focus at the College, C3 was proud to boast the school’s premiere trumpeters paying tribute to those who gave their lives in both wars; George Nicholson performing the Last Post at the Sunday chapel service superbly, and Jason Kellinger doing similar at Preshute Church. In addition, during the summer half-term, Charles Pearson-Chisman had the Honor of laying a wreath at the Thiepval Memorial on behalf of Marlborough College for the 38 OMs commemorated there – an act which he fulfilled with dignity at a moving occasion, along with the Lloyds and Charterhouse teams also present. George Nicholson and Oscar Stratton gave a charismatic rendition of Cyclone by Sticky Fingers in this year’s Battle of the Bands early in the Summer Term. This was followed with our House Charity day that comprised a concert in the Goodison Hall, a BBQ and a football tournament. Oscar Stratton led the way by organising a varied programme for the concert which included some superb musical contributions as well as some, shall we say, imaginative variety acts – James Ruddell’s Rubik’s Cube skills whist holding his breath was right up there, as was Jasper Lloyd-Hughes and Zu MacDermot’s Tekkerz Squad (!). The little and large body percussion performed by Archie Griffin and Freddie Cornish will live long in the memory. . . ! As well as the team successes within the year there were some notable individual achievements to be celebrated; Archie Griffin achieved his first official Welsh U18 rugby cap in the Six Nations as he came off the bench against England, and he followed this up with some excellent performances against France, Ireland and Italy. Hugo Mayne and Will Pembroke played regularly for the 1st XI cricket in just their Remove year, and Jason impressed both with his target sprint endeavours as well as his Grade 8 distinction in the Trumpet. Gabriel Jordan deserves huge credit for his outstanding performance as Colonel in the school play, Journey’s End, – a role that he played with consummate ease! On Prize Day the following received awards: Jack Cartwright and James Ruddell (Maths), Thomas Cole and Domingo Powell (Mod Lang), Jonny Hammond (PE), Jasper LloydHughes (Community Service), Henry Clark (CCF), Archie Griffin and Mason Hunt (Sport), Chris Kirkwood (DofE), George Nicholson (Music) and Morgan Pollard (Art and History of Art). The House says goodbye and thank you to Mr and Mrs Birkill who leave the RHT position

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after six years of unstinting service – the arrival of Freya this year as a younger sister to Milo, and to add to the C3/MM baby boom was a fitting way for them to bow out! Much thanks as always goes to our wonderful Dame, Eula Gibbs, Houseman, Marcus Lutner, Tutor team and terrific domestic staff who give so generously and make the C3/MM community a special place to be. So, as the curtain falls on an outstanding year, our gratitude and best wishes also goes to the Upper Sixth who’ve done a sterling job under Morgan Pollard and Ed Cornish as Heads of House. We wish them all the very best of success and happiness as they embark on life beyond the College. GDML

Cotton Cotton has had another excellent year across a wide range of curricular and co-curricular activities, with the residents of the House flourishing under the guidance of Mr and Mrs Conlen, Mrs Jamieson, Mr and Mrs Bate and the tutors. Inter-house sporting achievements have reached an all-time high in Cotton history as we took home the awards for Sporting Excellence for Boys having been victorious in House water polo, basketball, shooting and tug of war. The enthusiasm and commitment of the Upper Sixth drove the House towards win after win as Head of Sport, Charlie Keenan, along with Winston Tisdale, Ben Cripwell, Sam Hunt and Sam Cederwell participated in all House sporting events. Special mention must be made of Tristan Root in the Shell who demonstrated his talent in basketball, playing with and against members of the Upper School. Winston Tisdale was honoured with the title of most valuable player in basketball, which was evident in the House championship, and Zharif Shahryn was given the Wilkinson Sword for most accomplished fencer as well as a re-award of College fencing colours. In the arts this year, the number of music scholars within House has certainly played into our favour. Cotton was particularly lively on the last Friday of the first half-term having

brought back the cup for the Mixed House Shout and we are planning to defend our title in the coming months. Head of Music, Luke Smith gained a Diploma in the cello and was subsequently awarded Music Honours by the Music Department. Lower Sixth pupil Nico Fletcher achieved Grade 8 distinction on the trombone. Having performed spectacularly in the annual school play, Charlie Thomas was awarded Drama Honours. Cotton achieved some impressive academic results this summer with the GCSE results being our best yet with the equivalent of 32 A*s grades gained. In the Sixth Form, Molly Gibbins gained three A* grades and a D3 and was awarded a scholarship to Birmingham University to read Theoretical Physics. Other top performers were: Luke Smith A*A*AA, Freddie Boase A*A*D3, Abbey Fawcett A*A*A, Sophie Morelli D1AA and Jamie Hartley A*AA. The Upper Sixth gained places at the following universities, Birmingham, Bristol, Brunel, Durham, Exeter, Edinburgh, Newcastle and Warwick. Academic scholar, Zac Place has shown his talent for the sciences in receiving a Royal Astronomical Society Prize after coming in the top 12 students in the country in his Astronomy GCSE and first in their Astronomy Poster competition. Cotton will remember his enthusiasm of Mr Hawthorn as a tutor for just one year before he went on to run the Hermitage for the Preshute girls ahead of becoming Housemaster in 2019. Special mention goes to Mr Kiggell who left Cotton after 14 years as a tutor. We wish him well in his new residency in Dancy House. This year we have welcomed two new tutors, Mr De Rosa and Mr Norman who are already great assets to the House and Cotton is lucky to have them. Eliza Sinclair & Hugo Rolls

Dancy The academic year began with another refurbishment: Westholme, former residence of MPLB and the Scott family (Music), was taken over in order to house the Dancy Remove girls and our first RHT, Miss Bingham. Whilst the rooms were luxurious, one older brother


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captaining the winners of the Uppers hockey. Fantastic start to the year! Christmas supper saw an end to the term with much singing and fun all around, followed by dancing with Barton Hill later on. Well done to all those who received House colours and prizes and to the House on the whole for such a spectacular term. The Lent Term started on a tasteful note, with Elmhurst and Barton Hill celebrating Burns Night and all things Scottish including haggis and Cullen Skink. Lizzie Hankison and Finn Taylor each gave fantastic speeches to the lads and the lasses. With reeling and Scottish music continuing late into the night, it was quick to become an Elmhurst and Barton Hill tradition.

In notable successes, Sophie Smith won the Individual House Inters Relay and was selected for the South West in football. She continues to delight audiences with her music and she is joined in doing so by our other Music scholars, Isabella Morley and Isla Scott. Izzy Hodgson and Phoebe Munn also represent Dancy regularly in the musical sphere. Amy Beckett has been training with Reading hockey and at the Southampton Performance Centre and played in the Club National Finals. We are hopeful for her progress beyond this next year. There was more sporting success on the lacrosse front, as Allie Kirkwood was selected for the England talent pathway. Sophie Smith and Atti Hue-Williams were competing against each other to see who could break the most school athletics records in one season. In Drama, Lydia Whittaker and Maddie Price starred in beautiful production of Grimm Tales and Taba Reed showed off her talents on the technical side. This year for the first time, Dancy put on its own production in the House Drama competition in which Daniela Davidovich starred as Snow White.

Elmhurst The year started off superbly with Jess Walsh Warring leading the House to victory at House Shout with Adele’s Rolling in the Deep. The risk we took to be the first ever House to sing their House Shout in a cappella, was one worth taking. The House’s enthusiasm and competitiveness soared through the roof and carried on throughout the term within every aspect of school life, whether it be academic, musical or sport related. Special congratulations go to Millie McKelvey, Zoe Combe and Phoebe Westgate for their appointments as prefects and to Cosi Bugel and Ottilie Barns for becoming joint Heads of House. Also to the newly appointed Art scholars, Diddy Stewart and Freya Jones whose work was exhibited in the Mount House Gallery. We wish them all good luck and a big well done in their new roles.

More sporting success came to light in the Lent Term with Rosie Pembroke captaining the Wiltshire Under-18 Girls’ tour to Sri Lanka in February and Shell and Remove both winning water polo competitions. Millie McKelvey also deserves a huge well done for making it to the quarter-finals at the Queen’s Under-18 rackets tournament. Additionally, Mimi Grant and Zoe Combe acted outstandingly in the school play of Deus Dat Incrementum. Parents Day in May saw an array of spectacular musical performances at the House Concert, including a very joyful recital of the House Shout. Libby Goodwin also put together the first ever Art Show for the day, that exhibited art pieces from across all the years. Although the weather was not on our side, the whole day turned out spectacularly.

We say goodbye to Dr Henshaw, who has worked in Elmhurst for eight years and will now perhaps have more time to devote to her busy family life. Miss Brown steps down as our beloved Resident House Tutor but will remain with the House and we also say a sad goodbye to Miss Wolf.

The end of the Summer Term saw Elmhurst take the stage with Gold on the Ceiling by the Black Keys at Battle of the Bands led by Delilah White and Eliza Kearns. Even though we narrowly missed victory, our noodle stand, run by Lizzie Hankison, Grace Hines and Jacqueline Lee, proved to be highly successful in the torrential rain, despite a brief power shortage. A huge collection of Elmhurstians received awards at Prize Day across academic, sporting and co-curriculum achievements.

The Michaelmas Term saw much success for Elmhurst on the sporting front and excellent team spirit, with the House coming first in the Lowers hockey, the Shell winning the swimming competition and Cosi Bugel

Elmhurst triumphed with fantastic results this summer, with the Upper Sixth achieving an extremely impressive array of results. Particular congratulations go to Ottilie Barns, Zoe Combe, Phoebe Westgate and Liv Wilson who

HOUSE NEWS

commenting that although he was in the Upper Sixth, he had ‘never had a room like this’, the House wasn’t designed for boarding and brought with it a few challenges along the way, not least the distance from the ‘Mothership’ – The Hermitage. On the subject of buildings, we were delighted to visit the building site of Dancy on a number of occasions through the year. Watching this amazing project was at once exciting and slightly nerve-racking as we wondered whether it really would be ready on time.

As the Summer Term progressed, we started to feel sad about leaving our beautiful House, so close to town, and so we celebrated with a Garden Party, in unbelievably good weather, for the parents to say goodbye. With the Commendations Cup and victory in the Shell House tug-of-war competition, we feel ready to face the challenges of a brand new House and to welcome two new yeargroups and a new RHT, Mrs Lane to Dancy. KK @MCol_Dancy Jun 22 A hugely enjoyable and exciting look around our future new home!

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all secured A*AA or Pre-U equivalent. The Hundred also achieved outstanding results in their GCSEs, picking up 93 A*s between them. Overall, we have had a very busy, but no less amazing year and look forward for the same next year! Bella Gavin

Ivy House

HOUSE NEWS

The Ivy Girls had another fantastic year, taking a change of HM in their stride and continuing to make the most of all of the opportunities that come their way whether it be academic, sporting, musical or arts, whilst looking after one another and having a lot of fun! Ivy achieved some impressive academic results over the summer with university places being gained at Edinburgh, Warwick, Exeter, Newcastle and Bath. Ella Bennet’s grades of A*AA meant she could pursue her application to study Medicine and has taken up a place at Bristol this summer. The Hundred gained 95 A*s and As between the 10 of them and it was wonderful that both Nell Hargrove and Lara Prideaux were awarded Upper School Art Scholarships. Poppy Bell (Remove) was awarded a Junior Academic Exhibition in recognition of her progress in the academic sphere thus far. Over the course of 2017/18 the Ivy girls were represented by their two prefects, Serena Slatter and Lara Thompson, and it was Serena’s quiet but focused leadership style that led to her becoming Ivy’s first ever Head Girl in the Lent Term – a very proud moment for all! Our Head of House, Salome Northridge, led the House with aplomb throughout the year, ably supported by the Deputy Head of House, (Freya Andreae), Head of Music (Georgia Beattie), Head of Sports (Emily Boom). The new Shell settled in very quickly, in part due to the support of Head of Shell (Amy Vogel), and the older yeargroups continued to work well together under the guidance of the Head of Remove and Hundred (Florrie Rhodes). Maddy Avery supported Dancy as their Head of House in the Lent Term. Whilst traditionally Ivy has not been renowned for its sporting prowess, it has started to turn heads in many sporting spheres. Our team spirit (as well as no uncertain ability) was undoubtedly the deciding factor in Ivy winning the Uppers swimming cup – our first ‘major’ sports cup. Claudie Grainger and Eilidh McCoig represented Ivy brilliantly in the inter-house shooting competition winning by one point. Camille Lauze ran well in the Shell steeplechase coming sixth, with the Shell going on to win the inter-house girls touch rugby competition! Lara Thompson and Emily Boom were awarded College first team colours for their contribution to netball, and Maddy Avery was also awarded school colours for netball, having captained the Open 4th team in an unbeaten season! Amy Vogel and Serena Slatter were also awarded their sports colours for their

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contribution to hockey. Ariana Jones formed part of the U16A netball team that made it through to the National Tournament coming joint ninth in the country. Ivy continues to provide the College lacrosse teams with many of their talented players. Claudie Grainger represented the region in the National Tournament, and was joined by Jemima Money-Kyrle and Olivia Spearpoint on the English Lacrosse Regional Talent Pathway Jemima was awarded Lower School Colours for her contribution to the Open 1st team and went on to be awarded a Junior Sports Scholarship at the end of the Summer Term. On stage many Ivy girls continue to have a strong presence. It was a pleasure to watch Talia Neat, Phoebe Malloch-Brown, Hen Mackenzie and Sophie Powell in the excellent Remove and Hundred production of After Juliet by Sharman MacDonald. In just under five weeks they had produced a very professional and focused piece. The school play this year (Deus Dat Incrementum) celebrated 50 years of Girls at Marlborough College and Nell Hargrove’s polished performance as a reporter linked different sections of the production together seamlessly. Musically, Ivy House continues to go from strength to strength. Georgia Beattie led the House Shout incredibly well, remaining calm and assured when taking on the mammoth task of organising 74 girls (due to us welcoming Dancy to join us) to sing Grace Kelly by Mika and a smaller House Harmony group to sing Move by Little Mix. Both performances were impressive although I suspect the sound in the Memorial Hall would have suited the choice of songs even better! It was wonderful to go to St Paul’s Cathedral to hear the Chapel Choir sing beautifully at the Evensong service. Georgia Beattie and Salome Northridge have been dedicated members of the Chapel Choir for the last four years, and Chamber Choir in their last year. I am delighted that Lola Cracknell and Ottilie Richardson have joined Phoebe Malloch-Brown, Talia Neat and Beth Ransome to continue Ivy’s tradition of having a strong presence in the Chapel Choir. Over the course of the year there were many memorable concerts, but three really stood out.

Anna Powell played beautifully in the fantastic Symphony Orchestra Concert which included five movements from Holst’s The Planets played in the chapel on a very snowy weekend! There were a number of superb performances in the Orchestral and Ensembles Gala Concert, but it finished on a particularly high note (literally and metaphorically!) with Salome Northridge’s superb performance of People will say we’re in Love from Oklahoma. The End-ofYear Showcase Concert included performances by a number of the musical groups that meet throughout the year and it was particularly good to see Flora Birkmyre, Poppy Bell and Ella Beardmore-Gray participating in the Shell and Remove Concert Band, and Issie Raper, Ottilie Richardson and Livvy Spearpoint singing with the Shell Junior Singers. There have been a number of Ivy Girls gaining fantastic results in Music exams with special mention going those who gained their Grade 8 singing: Salome Northridge (Distinction), Georgia Beattie (Merit), Maddy Avery and Serena Slatter. Over the course of the year we held a number of charity events to raise money for our two chosen charities – WATSAN and the Spinal Injuries Association. The Lent Term saw the Ivy Concert develop into a ‘Celebration of the Arts’ which combined and concert and an Art Exhibition. The talent of the girls both artistically and musically was incredibly impressive. The beginning of the Summer Term saw a soggy yet thoroughly enjoyable ‘Super Sunday’. Our House Band made up of Georgia, Salome, Maddy, Izzy, Amelia and Beth played a beautiful rendition of Addicted to You by Avicii and our Sweet and Face Painting Stall, brilliantly run by the girls, made yet more money to go towards our two chosen charities. In addition to this, most of the Shell, Remove and Lower Sixth took part in a 5K Race for Life in Swindon in May to raise money for Cancer Research. Prize Day was a fantastic day with members of Ivy being involved in the wonderful array of musical and sporting events. It was good to see Ivy equalling many of the larger Houses in terms of the number of individual prizes awarded. Huge congratulations to our prize winners: Cordy Ashworth (Form), Flora Birkmyre


Mrs Nelson-Piercy and her team of domestic staff continue their dedicated running of the House and we are truly indebted to them for all that they do. Whilst there has been a bit of a change in Ivy’s hard-working tutors this year we are delighted to have held on to Mrs McKeown, Mrs Hodgson, Miss Woods, Mrs Zainelli and Mr Pembroke! What a fantastic year for Ivy, and I am extremely grateful to everyone who has contributed to making my first year as Housemistress so happy and enjoyable. CNP

Littlefield In a letter written by Donald Wright in 1962 as Housemaster at the time of the fire he spoke of ‘the quality of benevolence and practical idealism being the root of Littlefield’s happiness’. Another year passes and these qualities remain at heart of the House today. The Upper Sixth this year led the House with understated humility but in doing so set an excellent example to the rest of the House. Max Harper deserves especial mention for getting the series of Littlefield Lectures up and running. For the inaugural lecture we welcomed Michael Bentall, a Dunkirk veteran who held us spellbound by his tales of his own evacuation from France. Dr Charles SaumarezSmith came in the Lent Term to speak to us about his life in the Arts, we are grateful to them both for enriching us. The Upper Sixth ended the year with stunning exam results. Peter Corti secured his place to read French at Oxford. Ellie Allan also secured her scholarship place at NYU Abu Dhabi. Seven of the leavers gained straight A*/A grades with Simran Chowdhry a magnificent 5A*s to take her to Imperial. Others who gained particular

success were: Peter Corti (D2D2AA); James Eyles (A*A*AA); Casper Krens (A*AA); Flora MacKenzie (D1D2A*); Oliver Paton (A*D3A) & Veronika Stadnik (AAA). They leave the House in good heart and we are grateful to them for all they have given in their time here. Freddie Hall ended the year by being awarded the Master’s Prize for his wide-ranging contributions to so many aspects of College life. Our thanks from the House goes especially to Max Harper and Veronika Stadnik for all they have done as Heads of House. The new Shell have set themselves high sporting standards from the start. This year they won the Shell hockey sixes and the Shell tennis competition. Josh Tate and Sam Martin Jenkins were 1st Shell pair in the rackets team and Archie Darke captained the Yearlings 1st XV. The Remove retained the House swimming for the second year in a row with Ben Clarke, Jack Elgar and Max King being particularly strong. The Uppers hockey team caused an upset by knocking out the first seeds and made it through to the semi-final, with excellent play from Jamie Krens who played for the Open 1st XI. George Honeyborne and Max Hunter were part of the Junior Colts rugby team who progressed into the last 32 of the NatWest cup. Other individual sporting successes came across the yeargroups with Seb Cutts winning the coveted Golden Boot whilst playing football for the 1st XI despite being in the Hundred! Elyssa Jones joined for the Sixth Form and made an immediate impact being selected for the hockey XI and then being player of the season for the 1st VII netball. Jack White was awarded the Keighley Shield for being the most promising young fencer. Lower School College colours were awarded to Henry Adamson for rugby, Eliot Pears for hockey, Ben Clarke for swimming and Max King for water polo. Max Richards undertook the Devizes to Westminster challenge only to sadly have his effort curtailed due to the Thames being in flood. In the first year of the TED Talk competition Annabel Chessher and Toby Hargrove gave excellent entries. Annabel reached the final with an engaging and quirky performance in

which she argued the case for whether Mozart was the first rock star! Nadia Hassan also gave a brilliant monologue switching between French and English. On the stage Toby Hargrove and Jamie Krens gave very moving performances in the Michaelmas production of Journey’s End. Jamie’s portrayal of Hibbert being particularly poignant. In the Lent Term Toby was alongside Ellie Allan in Deus Dat Incrementum, a production to celebrate the 50th anniversary of girls at the College. Ellie made us all laugh as she played one of the exuberant new intake and Toby was witty alongside his twin sister, Nell, as the Points West television presenters. The Upper Sixth contributed to the musical life of the House. James Eyles led a brilliant House Harmony performance of No Diggity. And Alex Reeve led the whole House in a rousing rendition of Hooked on a Feeling! Throughout their time James, Freddie Hall, Amelia Bentley Simran Chowdhry have made excellent musical contributions, so we thank them for all they have done. Freddie Hall gained a distinction in his Grade 8 singing and James Eyles his singing ABRSM Diploma. Also, Rory Lynas gained his Grade 8 with merit on the trombone.

HOUSE NEWS

The end of the year meant it was time to say farewell to some very special tutors, in particular Jennifer Lane who has been the much loved RHT of Ivy since it started. She has moved on to become RHT of Dancy to share her expertise in the development of a new House. We also said goodbye to Katy Hudson as she takes on a new exciting role as Director of Sport in Benenden School, Annabelle Paterson as she takes on a new role at King’s High in Warwick and to Charlotte Green as she takes some time to focus on the important job of being a ‘Mum’ to her two little boys.

COMMUNITY

(Classics), Eilidh McCoig (Maths), Issie Raper (Form), Ella Beardmore-Gray (Ceramics), Ellie Debs (RE, History, English and Modern Languages), Claudie Grainger (Sports), Lydia Hunt (Art, Community Service), Henrietta Mackenzie (Geography), Beth Ransome (Progress), Lara Prideaux (EPQ), Freya Andreae (Science), Salome Northridge (Music) and Serena Slatter (Kenneth Paul Prize). Ivy Lower School (Shell, Remove and Hundred) were also presented with the Farrell Academic Cup for the best combined PIR and commendation scores.

A wonderful event which epitomizes the Littlefield spirit was ‘Peter’s Charity Pizzeria’. Orders were texted through from around the school and Peter Corti coordinated the kitchen to produce pizzas which were then delivered around the school. This raised money for the nominated charity, the Bembridge RNLI. We sadly bid farewell to our long-serving House chef, Paula Brookman. Her wonderful sticky toffee pudding will be much missed! We wish her well in her retirement after over 10 years of service. We also say goodbye to several tutors: Dr Morrell, Mr Fenton and Mr Border. Our thanks to them for all the have brought to the House. As he come to the end of his first year in Littlefield, I am also very grateful to all Mr Madden has done for us all. Finally, our thanks to our excellent Dame, Mrs Marr, who leads a loyal and supportive team who work so hard for us all. JJLT @MarlboroughCol Dec 13 After successful Christmas suppers across the Houses, today we say farewell to pupils and beaks for the festive break.

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Mill Mead Mill Mead’s ambition and competitive spirit has always led to and a busy and successful Marlborough life, this year was no exception! Under the watchful eye of our inspiring Head of Sport, Ellie Spark, Mill Mead kicked off Michaelmas Term with a win in the Shell steeplechase. Particular mention must go to Tilly Norman, Molly Jones and Emily Marchand who finished first, second and third, respectively. Taking both the Colts and Seniors cross-country events, the House continued with wins in Uppers House hockey, Remove Prize Day Challenge, Uppers water polo, Shell House netball, Shell House football, Uppers tug-of-war, Remove swimming and second places in the Lowers House netball, Remove water polo, Remove Babcock and House ERGO. Such success provided the House with the tally we needed to retain the 1993 Sporting Excellence Trophy for the most successful sporting House in 2017/18.

HOUSE NEWS

We continued our good form at the track at the end of the Summer Term, taking victory in the House athletics after a comprehensive win for the Lower Sixth sealed the trophy; spring boarding our hopes to retain the 1993 cup for the fifth consecutive year. Terrible weather conditions saw the Devizes to Westminster Race cancelled shortly after the outset. Despite not being able to complete the race, it is difficult not to recognise the great sacrifice and commitment made by Hester Bromovsky and Imo Brook and we applaud the dedication needed to ready themselves for such a feat of endurance. Imo later went on to showcase her strength in her first place in the Individual House ERGO competition. On the creative front, Mill Mead put in a strong performance in the Battle of the Bands in the Master’s Garden with their rendition of Amy Winehouse’s You Know I’m No Good fronted by Biba Tarn. The closing of the Summer Term saw the House Play competition, where our ambitious Director Daisy Mitford-Slade took us into the troubling world of Winnie the Pooh; intelligently and sensitively highlighting concerns over youth mental health. Not only did they finish second overall, but the final

saw Olivia Eversfield named as best actor of the competition. Molly Corfield and Katarina Mackaness led this year’s House Harmony and Shout – always a highlight of the year – and rightfully earned their House colours for the leadership and energy they freely gave us. The Hundred produced some of the highest GCSE results on record for the House with 75% of results being graded A* and 91% A*A. Poppy Cripwell topped the results with an incredible 11 A*/9 grades and Miranda Aitchison, Kitty Astor, Helena Barton, Connie Campbell-Gray, Mimi Green and Ella Hall all achieving the equivalent of at least 10 A* grades. In the Upper Sixth, places were won to study at Edinburgh, Durham and Exeter (amongst others) with notable performances from Emily Symington and Amber Shaw. We have been sad this year to also say farewell to Dr Blokland from our Shell tutors and wish her luck in her new post as RHT in New Court. We thank Lily Freeman for her endless positivity and spirit as Head of House and Miss Langdale for her term as acting Housemistress. We have been excited to welcome Ms Gibbs on to the tutor team who, along with the domestic team in House, continues to make Mill Mead into a home for us all. We wish the Leavers well in their life beyond Marlborough and look ahead to whatever this year will bring. Ana Downing

Morris My first year in Morris started well with Helena Mackie and Naomi Weir heading off to Cambridge. The Upper Sixth achieved commendable grades with a total of 15A* grades as well as 15 As in their A levels. This along with the GCSE results where Arabella Harris achieved 12A* grades, Luz Wollocombe achieved 11 A*s, Petra Bigham achieved 10 and in total nine of the girls attained seven or more A* grades, meant that Morris were once again winners of the overall academic prize. I also inherited a very strong Upper Sixth cohort of my own, with Martha Doyne and Celeste Spink as Prefects. Celeste not only balanced her 1st XI hockey and choir commitments but was also an excellent Head Girl for the Michaelmas Term. Alongside all of this she successfully completed a Veterinary application and she will be heading off to RVC next year. Ali Mathison was an excellent Head of House with Anna Pembroke appointed Head of House for Dancy. On the sports field the House went from strength to strength. The year started with a win for the Shell in the sixes competition for hockey and an admirable second in the steeplechase at the start of the Michaelmas Term. We built on this with success in the Uppers netball in the Lent Term and a clean sweep with Shell, Lowers and Senior’s tennis in the summer. Anna Laakkonen was U23 fives national champion with Ibby Lee (NC). Mel Stewart having only just taken up fives this year was plate winner for U14s. This along with Kirsten Bell and Helena Barton (MM) winning the U16 girls doubles meant that Morris was collecting a large amount of silverware for the HM’s office! Miya Scott was both senior and Lowers squash champion and Morris won the Lowers Squash trophy with an outstanding effort from the Hundred. Music as ever plays a large part in the House and we were delighted that one of the new Shell, Emily Ambrose, was invited to join the National Chamber Orchestra with her bassoon. The year finished strongly with Anna Laakkonen achieving her ARSM in singing at distinction level. Violet Mackintosh achieved her grade seven singing after what has been a busy year for her. She, as usual, stage-managed

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the main school play – Deus Dat Incrementum based on the theme of 50 years of girls but also had a large speaking part in the production along with Claudia Vyvyan. The performance was outstanding and a credit to the Drama department. Violet also took charge of the House Drama and modified The History Boys into The History Girls and Morris took home yet another trophy! Claudia continued with her Drama throughout the year and successfully wrote and directed a piece for her EPQ. This not only gained her a very creditable A* grade but also full marks, which is almost unheard of for a performance piece.

With Lara Beckett and Phoebe Kemp as our newly appointed Heads of House and Violet Mackintosh, Arabella Harris and Claudia Vyvyan as prefects we are certainly looking forward to what 2018/2019 has to offer. AJF

New Court

course our traditional Christmas party. The Shout and Harmony were put together by Freya Owen with aplomb. Her choice of If We Ever Meet Again by Justin Timberlake for the Shout and Don’t You Worry Child by Swedish House Mafia for the Harmony was a popular choice and the girls performed superbly on the day. The House Christmas supper has become something of a legend over the years and this year was no exception. The costumes were brilliant, the food amazing (thanks to the House team) and the Captains had decorated the Common Room with style and creative flair. We all had a fabulous evening culminating with a party in the Brad NC style!

New Court has a tradition of academia and this year was no different. The year began with academic success – Lissy Thomas was awarded an Academic Scholarship and Tiggy Lee a Junior Exhibition and join the other 24 Scholarships that New Court girls hold already. It finished with the girls achieving an impressive set of results with 69% A/A* grades and a full house of university places, including Miranda Dibden going to Bristol to read Veterinary Science, Ibby Lee to St George’s to read Medicine, Alice Wright to Cambridge to read Asian and Middle Easter Studies and Islay Stopford Sackville to read Spanish at Oxford. Our Hundred also did exceptionally well getting 94% A/A* grades but particular mention has to go to Peps Haydn Taylor for achieving a clean sweep of 12 GCSEs all at A* or Grade 9.

The Lent Term saw a return to winter weather resulting in numerous jigsaws in the swamp. Helped out by Dr Ryder, the girls demolished a huge variety of puzzles, some more difficult than others but all completed in the end. It was also a term of continued success on many counts. Two of our Lower Sixth got through to the TED Talk final: Harriet Place with a presentation on The Failure of the Body Positive and Sophie Hall-Smith with a presentation on Solipsism. Both girls did exceptionally well with presentations that were of the highest standard; Sophie went on to compete in the grand final against MC Malaysia. February saw proper snow fall and the Remove hosted a ‘Weird, Wacky and Wonderful’ bar which was a great success with some fantastic outfits. This was also the month New Court won the Lowers netball with the Shell coming second, losing by one goal to Mill Mead in a very close final. In the same week, we won the House fives after some superb play by our first pair Ibby Lee and Harriet Place and our second pair Miri Dibden and Scarlett Atkinson. This means we get to keep the cup for a second year running. We also had major success in the House lacrosse. Ably captained by Freya Owen, we won the Uppers competition with some excellent play, sheer determination and true New Court spirit that was also evident in the basketball competition.

Academic it may be but New Court has always been a House where enthusiasm counts for a lot and Art, Music, Drama and Sport have all benefited from the New Court girls ‘can do’ attitude resulting in some great successes. The Michaelmas Term highlights included the House Shout and House Harmony and of

However, a very special mention has to go to Peta Dixon who in some extreme conditions was a contender this year for the DW Devizes to Westminster Canoe Race at Easter. Peta trained long and hard for the race at Easter, which required her to paddle 125 miles and clear 77 portages over four days. A severe test of

New Court continues to have shone throughout the year and Jemima May as Head of House led with skill and flair making this year as successful as ever. Warm, friendly and calm, New Court’s feeling of home provides a welcome break in the middle of a busy day and the girls have certainly made the most of the garden in the glorious sunshine of the Summer Term.

skill, planning and endurance it was devastating for the race to be stopped at Dreadnought Reach due to unprecedented flow rates that were deemed too dangerous to allow the race to continue. The Waterside C race was cancelled due to a frozen canal, the Waterside D cancelled due to heavy snowfall and finally the DW itself due to extreme rain. The Summer Term brought a relief from the rain and snow and was glorious. The girls relaxed playing croquet in the garden and once again we had a successful term. We won the Lowers tug of war, and the House Band competition with a brilliant performance of Florence and the Machine’s You’ve Got the Love. On the sports front Charlotte Longden set a new school record for the 100m and Ibby Lee became National U18 Fives Singles Champion and won the National Championship Fives Doubles.

HOUSE NEWS

For charity the girls raised money with our Carnations for Valentine’s Day, our Krispy Kremes for Super Sunday and also the 5K Race for Life. Whole House events like this are integral to what we stand for and we were proud to raise £3,500. We also helped to collect over 250 tampons and sanitary products to go towards period poverty in Swindon.

We had a fantastic House Concert in the Adderley and May Day saw the sunshine stream across the New Court garden so the whole House could sit outside for our May Day breakfast, accompanied by the Choir singing Madrigals from the Bradleian Arches. This is certainly a New Court highlight that girls remember for many years to come. The sunshine and blue sky continued throughout the term and we made the most of it with garden parties and BBQs. The year ended with New Court celebrating an accumulation of 1st team colours that were awarded across the board for hockey, lacrosse, netball, Music and Drama with several girls receiving multiple awards and on Prize Day, no less than 29 prizes as well as a three individual sporting awards. It has been an excellent year and we finished on a high note: Lissy Thomas and Harriet Place were both made prefects and Aylin Koç was appointed Head of House. However, the pièce de résistance was Harriet being appointed Senior Prefect; we are all extremely proud of her and know that she will be a brilliant ambassador for both New Court and the College. As we look ahead to the next year we wish Miss Taylor the very best of luck as she begins her new role in MC Malaysia and thank her for all that she did as tutor this past year. We said goodbye to Dr Ponsford and Mrs Ponsford in their role

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as RHTs but the good news is that they will remain in New Court as tutor and Dame. We will of course also miss our Upper Sixth enormously; their good humour, positivity and laughter kept everyone smiling. We wish them all the very best as they head off to university and various GAP years and hope all our leavers will stay in touch over the coming year. SAS

Preshute We are delighted to say that the Preshute House spirit is as strong as ever and Preshutians commit to College life with determination and a healthy fighting spirit.

HOUSE NEWS

Both Lower and Upper school pupils enjoyed sporting success with particularly strong participation in a number of areas. For the second time in three years we dominated the Uppers football competition, enthusiastically captained by Ruben Flatischler. The girls won Uppers basketball and other notable achievements came in water polo, netball and tennis. Georgie Henderson captained a fantastic term of 1st VII netball success and Charlie Cooke represented the College, as a member of the Lower Sixth in the 1st XV. A special mention goes to Will Hammersley for representing the 1st XI for Cricket as a Junior Colt and Milo Kennedy who earned a place on the GB junior squad for eventing. The Summer Term brought more success with strong tennis performances from Chris Oh and Luke Tomiak in the 1st VI. As ever the House was competitive in the inter-house athletics (3rd) and particular praise should go to Mike Evloev who represented the South-West at the British School athletics finals for both shot put and discuss at U15. India Jacklin Chatha also performed at a representative level playing for the Isle of Man in an international netball tournament. The House was led by talented musicians Oliver Ordish and Rachel McNeile who were excellent role models for the younger years. We will all miss being serenaded by Oliver’s tunes on the way to Period 1 in the morning. Despite our best efforts, we narrowly missed out on the trophy for House Shout with our performance

of Crocodile Rock and our rendition of Willow Tree, in The Battle of the Bands, was a musical masterpiece. On a sad note, we said goodbye to House tutor Mr Bartlett who leaves the College to continue his career as a music teacher at Ibstock Place School and to Mr Wall who leaves to be head of Strength and Conditioning at ‘Hellcats’. Early in the year we also said goodbye to House Chef, Scott, who left us to follow his dream of becoming a world renowned chef in Australia. Academically, the House thrived with decent GCSE and A level performances and many of the Upper Sixth are now set fair for university with over half of them heading to Bristol. Well-rounded knowledge was on display in the House Challenge it was pleasing to see a good number of the House heading up for rewards on Prize Day. Charlie Cooke & India Jacklin Chatha

Summerfield This year in Summerfield we witnessed a genuinely committed blend of academic, sporting and musical achievements and activity, with one or two very distinguished individual moments to savour. Adam Dalrymple and Georgia Lane Fox led from the front as Heads of House and fostered a notably inclusive and warm community atmosphere. To start the Michaelmas Term Seb Callender and Max Foulds polished the Summerfield rendition of Take That’s Shine for the House Shout competition. In the House Harmony Sacristan Jess McAlpine crafted a highly commended version of Hide and Seek by Amber Run which contained male and female singers from four different yeargroups in Summerfield. House music was excellent all year, as demonstrated at the April ‘Battle of the Bands’ with Max Foulds, Casper Barker, Tallulah and Zak Chukwuemeka, Cleo Bates and Harry Heneage’s punchy performance of Iris. Benjy Parrott, Max Olivier and Mary-Emma Parker offered real direction as Heads of House Sport, with Benjy himself being named as first XV rugby player of the season. In a remarkable equivalent, Jack Cleverly was named as the first XI cricketer of the season – some achievement

@MCol_Summers Jul 1 The leavers of 2018. We will miss this bunch.

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with two seasons left at the College. The Shell posted a highly respectable second place in their first House competition at Marlborough, the steeplechase. Cajoled nicely by Head of Shell Henry Newman, Oscar Shepherd and ‘Adams’ Cripwell and Kiggell were the first three runners home in a strong effort by this excellent group of young men. The Shell reached the final of the debating competition largely through the verbal jousting skills of academic scholar Sam Egerton. Art scholar Jamie Walker exhibited some wonderfully Summerfield-themed pieces as part of the dazzling scholars’ exhibition in March. Adam Kiggell was a nationally recognised ‘Troutmaster’ and a burgeoning group of Beaglers, including ‘Sams’ Powell and Egerton, thrived in their pursuit of country sports. The Summerfield Bar proved to be another resounding success. Thanks to Danijela Antic for her orchestration of the evening. A Bonfire Night extravaganza, a memorable Christmas supper, a beautifully catered Valentine’s supper (thanks to the House chef, Pie) and any number of summertime BBQs were other social highlights enjoyed by the House. The Summer Term brought more success in the form of a brilliant cricket double, with Summerfield winning both the Uppers and Lowers cricket competitions. Will Cook and Ben Spink shared a mesmerising opening partnership of 134 to defeat C1 by 10 wickets in a dominant Uppers final performance. In the Lowers final, in a week when he made his first XI debut, Ollie Cook scored a matchwinning 65* while James Watson took the wickets and our Belgian specialist at point, Melchiorre Compostella, took the catches. Adam Cripwell and Oscar Shepherd combined to secure no fewer than three run-outs in a thrilling one-wicket victory over a strong C3 outfit. Ted Campbell will remember scoring the winning run from the final ball for quite some time! Not to be outdone, our athletes in the Remove secured the Babcock trophy with strong contributions from Seb Horlock and Sam Foulds, while Zak Chukwuemeka achieved maximum scores in every event; quite outstanding. The Shell lapped up the iconic Summerfield sailing week through the balmy temperatures of June 2018 in the company of our new RHT team Ms Jacky Isitt and Mr Mark Ramage. As an assistant team we could not hope for a more dedicated, all-action pair. The Upper Sixth set themselves apart as a yeargroup with a quite exceptional focus and there is not room to list each and every impressive grade here. However, in achieving his place at Corpus Christi, Oxford to read History, Adam Dalrymple was the embodiment of this academic zeal. In a double coup, and capping a fine year as Head of House, Adam was named by his contemporaries as the exceptional Marlburian of his peer group, an honour which will be carved into the departing Master’s stone. Cogit Gloria indeed. CLH


COMMUNITY

several occasions, such as in the final minutes of a superb basketball final. Then the Beast from the East struck our House rugby hopes. With finals not able to be played Turner was the only House to have secured places in all three finals (Upper, Lowers and Seniors) having won the respective league phases in the Uppers and Shell competition. In the Michaelmas Term the Lower School narrowly missed out on securing the academic cup to C2 but deservedly won the coveted cup in the Lent Term. Turner contributions to Art and Photography were many and all were magnificent. The standout thespian performance came in the guise of Robbie MacGuffog’s wonderful portrayal of the schoolboy Brown in Deus Dat Incrementum.

What is it to truly say a heartfelt thank you? Commemoration for the ultimate sacrifice on Remembrance Day and the haunting silence that surrounded the playing of the Last Post, alongside a visit to Verdun. We reflected on the question posed during an HM discussion and as we considered writing this report. We thanked Chris Morris for over two decades of dedicated service as Turner Houseman recognising all that he has done over and above his job for the Turner family. A lunch in House and an evening with the Upper Sixth afforded the opportunity to pass sincere messages of thanks to the Master, Jonathan Leigh and Mrs Leigh. In a beautifully delivered speech, Turner’s Prefect for the year, Jack Kirkwood, captured the sentiment of all those present by the warmth of the message and gratitude for that extraordinary level of care and support they have shown in their six years in post. The next morning Jack flew off to Bolivia for 10 days to assist with the organisation of myriad operations undertaken by Operation Smile for whom he had helped raise requisite monies. Despite A level/Pre-U exams on the horizon Jack found the time, commitment and generosity of spirit to balance charitable giving, alongside his College duties, as well as playing tennis for the Open team. Happily, this did not affect Jack achieving a D1 grade allowing him to take up his place to study aeronautical engineering at Notre Dame.

application and as a result achieved A*/As across the board. With the majority of predictions not simply matched but superseded, 2018 was an academically successful year for Turner candidates. Destinations for the Upper Sixth leavers included Chemistry at Edinburgh (Orlando Meyrick) to Architecture in Shanghai (for the ever resourceful and most supportive of Head of House imaginable – Harry Pantin). Summer feedback flooded in from university leavers confirming that ingrained work habits acquired in Turner continued to bear fruit at university. Three first-class degrees were secured by Turnerites in this academic year, worthy of particular note, Jack Culshaw’s first-class degree in chemical engineering from Imperial College. On the academic front, the GCSE results were simply outstanding. Giacomo Prideaux achieved a full quota of 11/11 A* (/equivalent 9s), which helped secure him an Academic Scholarship. With Max Meyrick, Felix Henderson, Arthur Hardwick and Grisha Belotserkovsky close behind. The Turner Hundred made us proud by securing a tremendously successful set of GCSE results. On the sporting front, the Upper School led the way, winning competitions and retaining the cross-country/steeplechase event for the third year in row. Although the House competed well, we fell just short of glory on

In terms of House staff changes we welcomed Mr Anthony George who has fitted seamlessly into the healthy and yet complex dynamics in Turner. Mr Will Heywood, who maintained extraordinary levels of commitment, deserves special mention and thanks. Our magnificent Dame, Jo Aylward, introduced her wonderfully spirited puppy Bertie to Turner. Although Bertie has been an unmitigated success, his capacity for listening remains dubious and his motivation to outmanoeuvre his owner for treats and seek an opportunity to meet the HMs rabbits who reside in close proximity (Barnaby and Toffee) is perhaps a story that has yet to find a happy resolution. Finally, finally, the boys continue quite simply to rely on, at all times, the House Staff and our wonderful Dame, Jo Aylward and the level of success this year, on so many fronts, comes down in more than just part to her continuing influence.

HOUSE NEWS

Turner

We will miss musical stalwart Ethan Shum (a past winner of junior strings) and member of the Orchestra and Strings as well as Harry Pantin (piano) for his superb impromptu piano recitals to visitors and gathered throngs. Music within the House does though remain in distinctly good hands with standout performers such as Henry Bentley (working towards his Grade 8 on the bassoon and singing), Lucas Hardyment (cello) and Ollie Samuel (drums) to the fore and recent joiners, such as Max Goble (trombone) already playing to an exceptionally high level.

Harry Brooks & Zack Chambers

The Leavers’ Ball was a superb occasion and yet tinged with sadness as Turner said a heartfelt goodbye to a magnificent group of parents, (led so admirably by Kate and Tom Kirkwood who produced the first ever (individually designed) Turner Leavers’ Book). It was moving to say goodbye for now to their incredibly good, kind, honest, hard-working and collaborative sons, who throughout their time at the College represented Turner and themselves with nothing less than distinction. Max Fillingham continued to represent Great Britain at karate. He, alongside other leavers including Freddie Kimber and Finn Gordon, consistently achieved PIR ‘Outstanding’ for

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CLUBS & SOCIETIES

Clubs & Societies Beagles

Beagles

Biology and Natural History

For the first time since we merged with the Palmer Milburn, the Puppy Show was held in the College. On a beautiful day in late June, guests, visitors, College pupils and parents enjoyed a splendid show arranged by kennel huntsman, Danny Allen, and Master-inCharge, Gregor McSkimming.

Clay Pigeon Shooting Fly Fishing Geography Society History And The Arts History Society History of Art Les Amis de Maupassant LGBTQ + Forum Poetry Society Politics and International Society Senior Scholars Science

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The hounds were also in the College on Prize Day when students and parents enjoyed the spectacle of them racing against one another. As usual, the annual Lawn Meet was held in the College in March, followed by trail-hunting at Temple Farm. Thanks to the enthusiasm of Danny Allen, Beagling continues to be a very popular activity, with about 24 students coming out every Tuesday afternoon. This year’s winner of the Dempster Cup for Beagling was Arabella Methuen.

A very successful season involved trips to Wales, Northumberland and Cumbria, attended by current students and OMs. It was great, also, to welcome several young OMs to the annual Dinner in April. During the summer, the hounds were paraded at a variety of shows across the country from Builth Wells to Rydal. As always, I would like to thank all the landowners over whose land we are allowed to hunt. As well as Danny Allen, our indefatigable huntsman, we are indebted to Masters, Max Rumney, Trevor Gore and Julian Chadwick. SMDD

Biology and Natural History Society Last year, the Biology and Natural History Society had the pleasure of hosting three


We then went behind the scenes of a stunning television series with Mr James Honeyborne, executive producer of BBC’s Blue Planet II series, narrated and presented by Sir David Attenborough. The purpose of the show was to film some of the most beautiful and elusive sea creatures in the world and in doing so, raise awareness about the effects of neglect of the oceans. One of the things Mr Honeyborne discussed was how humans are dangerously ruining the ocean and killing its precious organisms through the disposal of plastics. Over time, plastics break down into microplastics which are ingested by corals and other organisms that can’t distinguish between plastic and food. The impact of Blue Planet on reducing plastic pollution in the world was such that the BBC has announced a complete ban on single-use plastic in the organisation by 2020. Finally, heart surgeon Mr Andrew Chukwuemeka gave a talk on the history of operations of the heart. He described in detail the structure and function of the heart and explained why there was very little progress in heart surgery until the twentieth century. Throughout the past, people had been sceptical about operating on such a delicate organ as it was considered impossible to operate on something that was constantly beating. This is why the invention of the heart-lung machine in 1953 was revolutionary; it enabled blood to bypass the heart entirely so that surgeons could work on it more easily. At the post-talk dinner, we learned about the thrilling, fast-paced life of a surgeon and his amazing research into aortic valve replacement, which saw him published in the European Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery.

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Dr Lucy Obolensky gave us an insight into the exciting world of expedition medicine. While certainly not a conventional way to practise medicine, it was remarkable to hear about her work, which involves being part of elite expedition teams as a medic. Dr Obolensky outlined the highlights of her career, which included expeditions across the world with Sir David Attenborough. Her passion for global health began when she set up a clinic in Kenya and she is now the founder of the charity Exploring Global Health Opportunities. The charity has done some amazing work establishing clinics and programmes in rural Maasai villages in Kenya. The experiences she shared about different cultures which were truly fascinating.

Marlborough A came a well-contested 3rd and were winners of the Flush competition, missing just two birds! Marlborough’s top scorer was A team captain Henry Gouriet, ably supported by Ben Barnes, Luke Tomiak, Tom Williams and Sam Henriques. The B team led by Ed Herbert provided the depth to our current shooting and was completed by Archie Griffin, Jonte Catton, Ben Chetwood and Jason Kellinger, whilst our first girls’ team for a long time comprised Alice de Giles (Capt), Celia Case, India Borghese and Georgia Carrs. The event was superbly managed by Huw and the team at Barbury Shooting and very well received by all the schools attending. Some four weeks later the Millfield Invitational Shoot was held in deepest Somerset at the Mendip Shooting Ground, the scene of much development recently. The A team shared first place with Cheltenham A and Millfield A, the B team finished a credible 8th of 28, and the Girls a much improved 4th of 8. Henry Gouriet was the competition High Gun. Special thanks to MBB for covering this match for me whilst I was on another trip. All in all it seems to have been an excellent day out and done well. At E J Churchill’s for the Harrow Fido May Shoot in February, Marlborough A finished runners-up in the main competition (just 2 points out of 300 behind Bradfield) and in the Flush competition (1 point out of 100 behind Eton A), how close to outright victory in both! This shoot completes our season and subsequently 1st team colours were awarded to Henry Gouriet, with College colours going to Luke Tomiak and Edward Herbert. The final event of the year, the House Competitions, were won by C3 and Elmhurst, with the High Guns being coincidentally Oscar Stratton, and Alice de Giles – both regular team members for the College. GBS

Fly Fishing The very late spring and the very hot summer made it a difficult season for many rivers. It took a long time for brown trout to appear in

Fly Fishing any decent number on the College stretch of the Kennet but as the months went on, it was pleasing eventually to witness good numbers of free rising fish. We are, as ever, indebted enormously to Don Harris and Rodney Owen-Jones who have continued to put hours of hard work into building up the banks of the river and improving the condition of the water overall. Lower Sixth pupils have very much enjoyed working alongside and learning from these two stalwarts of the Kennet on Monday afternoons as part of their Outreach programme. They have significantly improved the stream which runs beside Mill Mead above Sawyer’s pool and have recently cleaned up and rehabilitated the inlet stream into the main pond.

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experts in their respective fields to give talks on their areas of interest.

Whilst water levels were aided by the long and wet winter, the condition of the trout ponds remains a major concern. Silt and algae are clogging the water and making them unfishable far too often. Plans are being considered as to how to improve these ponds which are wonderful features of the College and invaluable as environments for teaching pupils how to fish. I am pleased to report that there are encouraging numbers of young fishermen in the Lower

Valentina Malagon

Clay Pigeon Shooting The first event of the season is always our ‘home’ match at Barbury. This year 32 teams from 17 schools (including after much prompting, six girls’ teams) competed for the Marlborough Sporting Clay Shield which was won by Rugby A with Cheltenham A as runners-up.

Fly Fishing

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School. Paul Maslin has continued to run his coaching courses on Tuesday afternoons for Shell and Remove pupils and there has been a good number of eager anglers attending. They have learnt not only how to cast but also about the river itself and, in inclement weather, how to tie flies. There has been an increase in members of the Fly Fishing Club and plans afoot for excursions and trips to widen the pupils’ fishing experiences. NOPG

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Geography Society Our first speaker was James Durie, CEO of the Bristol Chamber of Commerce & Initiative presented an exciting lecture entitled Bristol: City of the Future to over 200 GCSE pupils. This was particularly relevant because Bristol is our GCSE case study and is now the smartest city outside London in the West of England with an economy worth £31 billion. Our field work trips around Bristol compared Stoke Bishop and Henbury and we also took an inner city regeneration walk and docklands boat trip. Our second GCSE field day took us to Studland, Swanage and Durlston Head; the weather was challenging but the coastal landforms remained stunning. Nigel Martin from Wessex Water joined Mark Hitchmough (MD Cognica Ltd) to give Sixth Formers an exceptional presentation on Water Security. In addition to the bigger picture Nigel took us through the issues and considerations facing Wessex Water’s challenge to maintain water supplies to their region. The Upper Sixth also visited the Thames Water visitor centre located on one of their water treatment plants at Didcot. The two lectures Challenge and Survival in the Arctic wilderness given by Alex Hibbert focused on his extraordinary dog sled experiences with the Eskimos for the Shell and the later talk to Hundred and above explored geopolitical and resource exploitation issues. David Edwards gave a trio of stimulating Geography lectures at the start of the Lent Term.

History And The Arts Society The Shell enjoyed a fascinating lecture on Antarctica which was followed by an Upper Sixth presentation on Hawaiian volcanics and threats to Antarctica, including the melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet and the South Georgia invasion and subsequent clearance of Rattus Norvegicus. The final Lower Sixth lecture tackled the issues of energy resource security and the future of the natural environment.

History And The Arts (HATA)

The new format for Sixth Form fieldwork and examined project work has included a one day recce followed by a three day residential field trip to Boscombe, Bournemouth, Studland and Swanage. Boscombe West is a challenging location for the A level individual investigation; it is one of the most deprived wards in the south-west of England but where a regenerated sea front and pier are a short walk from the deprivation and drug issues of the interior. An encouraging 28% of 2018 candidates secured an A* grade in their coursework.

So, week after week, in rain or shine, different Shell groups trudged up to the West Kennet Long Barrow for an introduction to this sort of thing. Meanwhile, the group of 25 senior pupils, which made an exploration every Monday, had a varied diet, visiting hillforts, ancient barns, manor houses (including the family home of one HATA member), fragmentary castles, churches rich in stained glass, old towns and villages, industrial sites and even modern distribution centres in Swindon. There were more distant trips to Caerphilly and Raglan in Wales – and of course the longer expedition to Morocco. I think few school History societies visit so many places!

Geography is now as popular as ever with 134 Remove and 52 Lower Sixth pupils embarking on new exam courses this year. We wish Riccardo de Rosa well as he takes over as Head of Department having run the Repton College Department for the last three years. KDJR

Geography Society

This society meets in some capacity three times a week, and is open to all. There is a weekly seminar and two trips (one for Upper and Lower School). The principle is that everyone should seek to appreciate and understand any/ all of the arts through History, and vice versa.

The other side of HATA consists of weekly evening seminars, topics are generally broad ones that attempt to embrace great themes in HATA, like ‘heroes’, ‘iconoclasm’, the ‘sense of the future’, or the ‘nostalgia for the past’. Some pupils gave rich reviews of books they had read: outstanding were Evie McVeigh, Bella Gavin, Eliza Sinclair, Gabriel Coleman, Zharif Shahryn and Ben Cooper. CAFM

History Society

@MarlboroughCol 20 Jun Geographers pictured on location during the intrepid Skill-Up trip to Iceland

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This year the History Department had an especially vigorous programme, epitomised when we commemorated the centenary of the Russian Revolution in the Garnett Room one November evening. There were many stars in our lively and not wholly representative ‘reenactment’: Mr Molyneux played the suffering peasant, Mr Blossom the disgruntled worker,


Mr Bush the White general, Mr Adamson Kerensky, Mr Hamilton the Tsar, Mr Moule the Holy Fool (the narrator), and Mr Sandall was a superb Lenin. Adam Dalrymple played Stalin and Peter Corti played Trotsky. There were guest appearances from several other staff, including Mr Nelson-Piercy as Bukharin, Mr Gist as the sneaky spy, and Mr Clark as the young and sickly prince Alexei. But the highlight was reckoned to be Mr Wright, who, as Rasputin, did the full ‘Ra Ra Rasputin’ dance. The Garnett Room was packed to the rafters. Perhaps we nearly started a revolution. On quieter occasions 20 pupils did themselves proud speaking at our two Medleys (Upper and Lower School), on topics of their own choosing, far from the main syllabi. It was wonderful to hear of ancient China one moment, post-war popular music in historical context the next, and the Tolpuddle martyrs the next all greeted by responsive audiences. There were large gatherings too for the Junior History Society meetings, the Inter-House Quiz and the Question Time. At the end of the year, a large group of Lower Sixth and Shell attended the Chalke Valley History Festival. Many pupils engaged with the difficult Young Pioneers’ Challenge (which covers the bones of western history over the last thousand years), and a couple of Hundred pupils have at some point been ‘Historians of the Week’ for outstanding work: Lara Bracher, Adam Dalrymple and Luz Wollocombe top the table in this.

pupils from our especially positive and proactive Upper Sixth classes have gone on to read History. CAFM

History of Art Marlborough’s art historians eased into a rich programme of talks and lectures last autumn with a visit from Joël Penkman, best known as the painter of food pictures for Waitrose and a contemporary practitioner of the Still Life genre. She also favours the painstaking and unforgiving process of painting in tempera on gesso, a technique widespread among the artists of the Italian Renaissance. Joël outlined the stages her work undergoes from idea to full realisation; she also brought some delicate examples of her recent work for us to inspect up close, a mouth-watering collection of lollipops, chocolates, and cakes. Students were able to appreciate the fine powers of observation Joël shares with her great antecedents in this distinctive, and living, form. Sophie Birkin (MO 2008–13) former President of the History of Art Society and graduate of

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For pupils preparing for St Valentine’s Day, it was appropriate to welcome Nick Ross, the founder and Director of Art History Abroad, to talk to us about Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence. His approach was anthropological, the study through images of how a society behaves around the formalisation of sexual transactions, specifically courtship and marriage. Nick spoke at some length about Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait, a key curricular painting, noting the doctrinal expectations of marriage enshrined in Catholic orthodoxy. He contrasted these normative conditions with new cultural energies running through Raphael’s portraits of Agnolo Doni and Maddelena Strozzi, in particular the couple’s adjustment to a relaxation of the sumptuary laws introduced a generation earlier by Savonarola. But there was also a concern to restore dignity to the institution of marriage, a recalibration of cultural ideals after the

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History Society

History of Art at Cambridge, with a double starred First in 2017. Part of her work towards this achievement was her dissertation on the socalled ‘Spomeniks’, war memorials raised across the Former Yugoslavia during the regime of Tito, and it was on these astonishing sculptural structures that she addressed the Society. These monuments, generally celebrating heroism and resistance during the Second World War, are remarkably numerous. Equally distinctive is their aesthetic distance from the totalitarian style of monuments in other parts of the Eastern Bloc. As Sophie outlined, Tito wanted to disaffiliate his regime from Stalin and the cultural and political reach of the USSR, and among his strategies was the development of a visual language correspondent with avant garde tendencies in Western art, not the didactic conservatism of Social Realism. The surprising key figure in the fostering of this national style was Henry Moore who was encouraged to exhibit in Zagreb and Belgrade; Barbara Hepworth was also held in high esteem. Sophie illustrated her talk with stunning images of the landscapes of the Former Yugoslavia dotted with otherworldly structures of concrete, steel, and mosaic, utopian flights of fancy that form emotionally powerful places of memory for forgotten outrages or acts of valour.

Spomenik

As usual, we played host to excellent external speakers, including Graham Seel, an expert on King John, and Janine Webber, a Holocaust survivor who has come to us now three times. The Lower Sixth classes had a ‘trip day’, and there was lovely weather: the medievalist crowd visited the great monuments of Winchester, the Evrev (‘every revolution’) group went to Portsmouth docks, and the modernists visited industrial sites in South Wales. Adam Dalrymple did the Department proud by gaining an Oxford place, and many other

@MCol_Academic 6 Oct The History of Art Society pictured with visiting speaker, the artist @joelpenkman

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permissiveness found in works like Botticelli’s Pallas Taming the Centaur that had given initial fuel to Savonarola’s reactionary ideology. Having studied The Arnolfini Portrait in lessons and up close at the National Gallery, pupils were fortunate to hear another account of the painting and its many interpretative riches from perhaps the person in the country best qualified to do so. Dr Jenny Graham, Associate Professor of Art History at Plymouth, has written extensively on Van Eyck and addressed the Society on his painting with energy and charisma in a hugely entertaining lecture about the cultural significance of this painting, not least its influence upon British Art of the last 170 years. Charlie Hall an expert on Italian Renaissance painting and leading guided tours to Italy talked to the society about The Rediscovery of the Classics and the Emergence of the Renaissance. He reflected on how the nineteenth-century appreciation of the Renaissance mirrored the fifteenth-century’s rediscovery of classical antiquity. The practical implications of this new knowledge were demonstrated by reference to the Library of St Mark in Venice, with its classical cleanness standing in contradistinction to the Gothic profiles of neighbouring buildings along the wharves of St Mark’s Square. How new artistic forms could feed upon the ideas of the past was the theme underpinning our last talk of the year, when Dr Madeleine Emerald Theile (Bristol) spoke about the PreRaphaelite influences present in Marlborough College Chapel, above all the 12 panels of Old and New Testament scenes painted by John Roddam Spencer Stanhope between 1875 and 1879. Dr Theile looked at developments in English religious art during the great crisis of faith provoked by Darwin’s publications. Even the Marlborough Chapel paintings were not immune from adverse critical judgement, and Dr Theile emphasised the artistic courage of their commissioning Master, Dr George Bell, in his convictions over choosing an artist who occupied a place close to the leading edge of aesthetic taste.

The art historians, who supported our guests with big attendances, enjoyed richly varied fare ranging across the centuries and cultures wholly supporting the wide spectrum of work they cover in lessons, but adding to it in reach, depth, and colour. FSM

Les Amis de Maupassant This year, Sixth Form French pupils have enjoyed meeting each month in Les Amis de Maupassant to read, watch and discuss French literature and films, as well as enjoy some traditional French cuisine, led by Peter Corti and Jess McAlpine. In our first meeting of the year, we watched extracts from modern film classics Amélie and La Haine, exploring themes, styles and their presentation of modern day French society. In November, we turned our attention to the transient, atmospheric poetry of early twentieth century writer Guillaume Apollinaire, including Le Pont Mirabeau, Marie and Fête, as well as discussing his influence upon later French literature. In the next meeting, we discussed Deux Amis, a short story by the namesake of our society, Guy de Maupassant. Voltaire was our focus in January as we learned about the religious liberty which he championed. In February, in an entirely pupil-led meeting, we discussed the life and work of Absurdist philosopher and writer Albert Camus. In our final meeting of the year we revisited the work of Maupassant with the intriguing short story La Mère Sauvage, a tale of cruel vengeance within the brutalising context of war. This concluded our year nicely, incorporating historical, literary and philosophical ideas which we had explored over the course of the year. It has been so enjoyable reading and sharing our own interpretations and ideas of these French works, as well as strengthening our understanding of the development of the country’s culture. Jess McAlpine (SU)

Each week we begin with a relevant topic, taking inspiration from national news and school affairs. As well as discussing LGBTQ+ issues that pupils face we have also looked at the intentions and ethics of companies who support Pride; gay representation in the media; the compatibility of feminism and transgender rights, to name a few. We welcome suggestions from every facet of the school. We have been overwhelmed by the growing success of the society and feel supported by both staff and pupils alike. The size of the group has rapidly expanded from a select few we now regularly have 15 to 20 attendees and have progressed from fortnightly to weekly meetings. Looking ahead, we have many ideas as to how we may further integrate our society with the Marlborough College Community. We have reached out to other societies and anticipate connecting to share ideas. We also hope to lead celebrations of key LGBTQ+ events such as LGBT History Month, Pride Month and Aids Awareness. ORG

Poetry Society Kayo Chingonyi has been hailed as one of the most exciting poets in recent years. His collection 2017 Kumukanda picked up a host of accolades alongside the prestigious Dylan Thomas Prize, so it was a great pleasure to welcome him to the College as our first guest of the new academic year. His was the opening event of the town’s Literary Festival, and a huge crowd of pupils joined the town to hear a stunning performance. This was more like a gig than a reading: the poems from Kumukanda are infused with influences from contemporary music, specifically garage, grime and hiphop – the route that brought Chingonyi into poetry. His poems tackled subjects as diverse as race, identity, masculinity and belonging with a blend of intelligence and immediacy. Chingonyi was also joined on stage by his longtime collaborator, the dancer Sean Graham,

LGBTQ + Forum The LGBTQ+ Forum is a newly established society that began with a core group of pupils who recognised an opportunity for progress to be made.

Arnolfini Portrait

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We aim to provide a safe, non-judgmental space within the school, for those who identify as LGBTQ+, and their allies. This sentiment is echoed by all members; including one who summed up the experience as follows: “When we come here we are not different. We are with people who have shared experiences and are willing to talk about them”. We can also offer a unique insight for those who have never experienced the LGBTQ+ perspective, as well as providing both advice and support to anyone who might be questioning aspects of their identity.

Kayo Chingonyi


Chingonyi stayed at Marlborough for the following 10 days as poet-in-residence, running workshops, visiting classes and encouraging pupils in their writing. The climax of his visit was the Saturday evening Remove Poetry Festival, held in the Marlburian, with readings from about twenty of the Remove alongside Kayo himself. Mima Fane emerged as the winner for her clear and vividly imagined poem, Estuary.

Our next guest was Charlotte Joel, a friend of Emma Leigh and formally a senior manager in the NHS. She spoke candidly but engagingly on her career and some of the depressing realities of the NHS, a timely presentation in light of the NHS’s 70th anniversary. Having spent her career in a number of high-profile hospitals including University College and Chelsea and Westminster, she was able to shed light on some of the most complex issues which burden the NHS such as the inexorable rise in patient admissions and the need for streamlining management.

In November we were visited by the AngloBreton poet Claire Trévien, who has published two acclaimed volumes: The Shipwrecked House and Astéronymes. The poems in her reading were dense, allusive, playful and linguistically adventurous, and Trévien quickly drew in her audience through the sensitivity and power of her reading. Once again, Poetry Society members had the chance to talk poetry afterwards during a very convivial supper with the poet. The ‘Beast from the East,’ that vicious springtime blizzard, put paid to the final event of the year, a visit by Tara Bergin, who could not escape her northern county: poetry not in motion, but snow-bound, ice-fast. MJP

Politics and International Society The Politics Society began the year by welcoming back Jeremy Hunter the awardwinning photojournalist and documentary maker with experience of North Korea. He provided riveting and unique insights into the daily life of North Korea with a slideshow of high quality photographs taken when he was chaperoned around the country as a VIP. For decades North Korea has been portrayed as a crazy hermit state disconnected from normal global society and this presentation confirmed Jeremy Hunter

In the ever-changing political landscape, Geneva has now become an increasingly important focal point for the major actors in international relations which is why 20 pupils accompanied by three teachers from the politics department made a five day study trip there over the Michaelmas half-term. The aim was to gain a better understanding of the objectives and roles of key supranational institutions like the World Trade Organisation, the World Bank, the International Red Cross, UNICEF and the UN Refugee Agency by touring their headquarters and meeting officials from those organisations. To that end we were extremely fortunate to be hosted by some really engaging and stimulating speakers who challenged and provoked the pupils into looking at the world with fresh eyes and from new perspectives. Baroness Cox was our first guest of the Lent Term who came to share her experiences on the humanitarian work she has carried out for most of her life. Arguing the case for continued intervention in the form of aid to the world’s war zones, she captivated the pupils by her understated courage and the modesty with which she described her work in some of the most dangerous parts of the world including Burma and South Sudan. Our next speaker displayed courage of another sort. James Lucas is an ex-army officer and a former investment banker who one day just decided to completely change his life and become a prison governor. He came to share his experiences of running HMP Guys Marsh and to field questions on penal reform which generated a lot of interest particularly on how to address recidivism and prison overcrowding. Many pupils were inspired by his life story and unique experiences.

Looking back over the year, this review highlights how very fortunate we are to have such an eclectic range of highly stimulating speakers visit the College and enrichen the lives of pupils studying politics.

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many of those assumptions, one of the most startling facts being that nearly 200,000 dissident North Koreans are living in prison camps.

MAG

Senior Scholars The Senior (Sixth Form) Academic Scholars had a richly productive year, and were a gregarious, close-knit Fellowship, eagerly running most of their programme and its various accoutrements themselves. They cheerfully embraced the editorship of the academic journal Inspire (now in its tenth edition), and the editorial team (led by Harriet Place, Sophie Hall-Smith and Jamie Stuart-Smith) was about 10 strong I think. Every fortnight different scholars led seminar discussions, whose subject matter was thoroughly varied, and which were invariably of very high – and sometimes superb – quality. The talks varied from examinations of AI to gun law to submarine design to theatre productions. Lively discussions accompanied each meeting. Some scholars delivered TED talks to a wider audience, and all were involved in mentoring younger scholars. The Senior Scholars researched and drafted a new set of academic guidelines (as proffered by the wider pupil body) and they were super company on the night of the wonderful Upper School Scholars’ Dinner. However, they surpassed their practical achievement here in Za Za Bazaar, Bristol, Great Britain’s largest restaurant, where everyone had even more prodigious quantities of food from all over the world. That occasion followed an excellent sunny day touring the city, in which all gave short lectures about different aspects of the city, including the geology of the Avon Gorge, the architecture of Queen Square, the wine trade, the achievements of Brunel, modern dockside developments, and music from Handel to Bananarama.

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whose mesmerising interpretations provided a thrilling counterpoint to the spoken words. A lucky crowd of sixth-formers joined Kayo and Sean for supper after the performance.

CAFM

The final speaker of the year was Max Stafford, a lecturer from Canterbury University and a former advisor to Gordon Brown. He spoke on Why All Prime Ministers’ Careers End in Failure focusing on Thatcher, Brown, Blair and May. He provided a very accessible and engaging narrative with observations which sparked a lot of discussion both after his talk and in lessons the following week. @MCol_Politics Oct 24 Pupils on the half-term trip outside the UN HQ in Geneva.

Senior Scholars

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Science Throughout this last academic year, the College has had the pleasure of hosting a diverse variety of academic science lectures that have interested, excited and inspired pupils across all yeargroups and from the broader Marlborough community. These lectures help to extend and satisfy the inquisitive demand for knowledge by students outside the classroom and the normal curriculum. They add immense value and importance to the scientific community within the College and to all others who may be interested.

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The series began with a talk given by Professor Nick Evans on Understanding Nothing: The Structure of the Vacuum. Professor Evans began with a brief summary on the historical significance of the void and its changing interpretation across the centuries. The development of the vacuum and its creation by experimentation flourished during the scientific revolution and Professor Evans was able to convey these developments in a concise, accessible way. When our journey led us to the quantum realm, he tried his best to convey an almost incomprehensible idea in a conceivable fashion. Though we all left the talk with our heads aching, we all left just a little bit wiser about “nothing”. The Annual Blackett Science Lecture delivered this year by Professor Katherine Blundell was on the subject of Black Holes, Jets and School Astrophysics Projects. The lecture was attended by a large audience of College pupils and pupils from our neighbouring schools, as well as many from the outreach group “Friends of the Telescope”. The talk explored the topic of black holes and their attributed phenomena, as well as the drive and tenacity of Professor Blundell in establishing a unique network of telescopes in girls’ schools across the world under the Globe Jet Watch project. This inspirational talk showed how even very distant galactic objects could still be force for driving change and improvement back here on Earth. We were fortunate to be visited by Dr Lucy Obolensky who spoke on Medicine – A World of Opportunities to prospective medics within the College. She gave a clear insight into the opportunities that are associated with working in the challenging field of medicine, recounting her experiences gained from working in Global

Dame Athene Donald

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Professor Katherine Blundell Health for over 15 years as well as her work in emergency medicine and general practice. The invigorating energy she brought to her talk truly inspired those wishing to pursue a career in medicine. Later, we were visited by Dr Andrew Chukwuemeka, one of the world’s most experienced, and pioneering, heart surgeons. He began by giving a brief history of the field as well as its potential future due to novel innovations and techniques. Dr Chukwuemeka then spoke of his career and his work within cardiology, where he clearly emphasised the importance of hard work and practice in reaching your goals and aspirations, especially as a surgeon when another person’s life is in your hands and there is no room for failure. This interesting talk proved to be very impactful as the calm, eloquent deliverance left the audience amazed at the inspirational story that demonstrated how hard work and dedication to what you love could achieve so much, not just for your own life but for the lives of those you could help. The Annual Medawar Lecture was presented by Dame Athene Donald DBE, FRS, Master of Churchill College, Cambridge. Titled Not Your Average Physicist, Dame Athene provided a discussion based forum, prior to the talk, to curious scientific pupils from the College where she emphasised the importance of young people talking about the challenges and difficulties that face our generation in the future, and how we can all play a role in finding solutions to them. Dame Athene then delivered a fascinating and informative talk where she began by clearing up common misconceptions surrounding the field of science, such as the idea that science is not a creative subject. She

Professor Nick Evans

drew reference to Medawar’s words “All ideas of scientific understanding at every level, begin with a speculative adventure.” Moving on to her most recent work, she discussed the advanced research she was conducting into the molecular properties of different substances and how this could be applied to a variety of different industries. Having taken on the role of ‘Gender Equality Champion’ at Cambridge between 2010 and 2014, Dame Athene spoke of her efforts to try and include and promote women in the STEM fields by dealing with unconscious bias and discrimination against women. It was a privilege to hear Dame Athene speak so passionately about her involvement in her work and we were all very grateful to be able to listen to such a fantastic role model to scientific and non-scientific pupil alike. The lecture series concluded with a talk by Ed Moore on The Synergistic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) being developed by Reaction Engines. Mr Moore launched into the physics surrounding the engine and conveyed it in a clear, accessible manner which gripped the attention of the packed lecture theatre. The practical demonstration of a mini rocket engine within the lab spoiled the audience with excitement and proved to be a dazzling spectacle. The talk captivated the imagination of everyone in the room as each person considered the prospect of the commercialisation of space and the other novel changes the SABRE engine could bring about. We left the lecture buzzing at the prospect of ourselves possibly pursuing a career in aeronautical engineering. Zachary Place (CO)


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Battle of the Bands Nice Weather for Ducks! ow in its fourth year, the ‘Battle of the Bands’ is firmly established as a co-curricular event of note. The standard is high and a good atmosphere of healthy competitiveness. By kind permission of The Master, this year’s event was held in the picturesque gardens of The Lodge, and to supplement the musical heart there was an array of stalls and other events including tug of war, precision football shooting, and an absurd mass race of plastic yellow ducks down the Kennet. The weather did its very best once again to put the kibosh on proceedings, but on this occasion failed, and despite a rather damp affair there was plenty of sparkle in the air from the bands themselves.

With so many good contributions, judge Russell Carr had the unenviable task of trying to sift out a winner. There were plenty to choose from and in the end New Court ran out winners with B1 a very close second. Congratulations to all, and indeed to Mr Baldrey for meticulously putting on a show in such trying conditions.

BATTLE OF THE BANDS

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There were many highlights to savour throughout the afternoon. One abiding memory will be watching Mr Marvin wading into the River Kennet (literally chest high) to round up the flotilla of yellow ducks as they bobbed and jockeyed for first position, to the delight of the massed ranks of Marlburians on the bank. Mad? Maybe, but great fun. PTD

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NETBALL TOUR TO BARBADOS 44 SWEDISH LAPLAND TRIP 46 GEOGRAPHY TRIP TO CHINA 48 POST GCSE TRIP TO ICELAND 50 POST GCSE TRIP TO BERLIN 50 POST GCSE TRIP TO MILAN 51 POST GCSE OA TRIP TO THE GOWER 51 POST GCSE CREATIVE WRITING IN PEMBROKESHIRE 52 POST GCSE DIVING IN MALAYSIA 52 PHYSICS TRIP TO SWITZERLAND 53 CCF TRIP TO SAN DIEGO 54 Post GCSE OA trip to the Gower

HISTORY OF ART STUDY TRIP TO NORTHERN ITALY ENGLISH DEPARTMENT LITERARY TRIP HISTORY OF ART STUDY TRIP TO PARIS SPORTS PERFORMANCE TOUR TO CALIFORNIA ART SCHOOL TRIP TO VENICE PE TRIP TO SWAZILAND HISTORY AND THE ARTS TRIP TO MOROCCO USA LACROSSE TOUR

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NETBALL TOUR TO BARBADOS

Aspire and Achieve Netball Tour to Barbados

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he netball touring squad flew out of Gatwick in February to begin their 10-day tour of Barbados. The island immediately captured the hearts of the Marlborough team who enjoyed their immersion into Caribbean culture. With the nearby netball court within walking distance of the hotel, the girls had the opportunity to train together with initial sessions focusing on movement, spatial awareness and individual error reduction. St George Secondary School was the location of our first fixture, the St George motto of ‘Be constant, aspire and achieve’ setting an exemplary tone for both matches. The squad acclimatised well throughout this fixture and proved that their netball could rise to the occasion in 30°C heat. Gifts were exchanged at the closing of the match and girls enjoyed a customary Barbadian three cheers, hand in hand with their opposition. The tour continued with some downtime under the shade of the palm trees, with the full squad competing in a Beach Volleyball and Boules tournament. This instilled an early sense of camaraderie, competitiveness and integration, all essential elements for a touring side. Recovery sessions led by James Davies, Lead Strength and Conditioning Coach, kept the girls physically and mentally primed as we entered tournament day. Play began in the blistering sunshine and ended under floodlights, Marlborough once again showing their quality and strength in depth.

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Relaxation came in the form of a trip to the Boatyard where the girls enjoyed each other’s company on the rope swings and ocean trampolines. Almost instantaneously, it was back to business with the squad completing a ‘Beach Blast Team Challenge’ featuring bodyweight exercises, interspersed with team running and swimming. The boundless enthusiasm of the group ensured that sufficient energy remained for physical fixtures versus Lester Vaughan Secondary School. With the winning streak continuing for Marlborough, it was an evening of celebration at the Harbour Lights Dinner and Show, the chocolate fountain being a particular hit! The next morning we embarked on an Island Jeep Safari, the tour squad travelling in convoy and enjoying sights including Gun Hill Signal Station, Morgan Lewis Sugar Mill and Bathsheba beach. For our final fixture, we were privileged to be able to play at ‘The Netball Stadium’ for a fierce encounter with the Barbados U16 National Squad. The girls enjoyed the sense of occasion, rose to the challenge and secured an undefeated tour. The Caribbean experience exposed our sides to a more aerial style of play than we are used to, and learning to counter this will be an essential part of our netball armory moving forward. A catamaran cruise was the perfect way to conclude the tour, a precious experience which I hope will be treasured by the pupils for years to come. SJB

Marlborough A St George Secondary School A

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33:2

Shottas

W

22:6

Galaxy Stars A

W

25:7

Lester Vaughan Secondary School A

W

24:15

Barbados U16A

W

26:12

St George Secondary School B

W

33:2

Bico Delight

W

29:1

Galaxy Stars B

W

34:4

Lester Vaughan Secondary School B

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33:8

Barbados U16B

D

21:21

Marlborough B

SQUAD: E Boom, E Burdett, A Cameron, Z Combe, Y Cooke, A Fawcett, A Green, G Henderson (Co-Capt), A Jones, V Milne, T Oliphant, H Place, E Spark (Co-Capt), L Thompson, S Thompson, G Warner, O Wilson


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

NETBALL TOUR TO BARBADOS

“The girls enjoyed the sense of occasion, rose to the challenge and secured an undefeated tour.” @MCol_Netball Feb 9 The tour squad are ready for A & B fixtures vs St George’s Secondary School #Barbados2018

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Who LetRevolution The Dogs Out? & Anarchy The Erpingham Camp Seventeen students and three teachers touched down in Barcelona, eager to uncover some of the cultural, artistic and architectural treasures of this diverse and spectacular city. The first evening’s visit to a Flamenco Tablau just off Las Ramblas soon had our heads filled with dancers, hauntingly beautiful voices and resplendent outfits.

SWEDISH LAPLAND TRIP

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eventeen students and three teachers touched down in Barcelona, eager to uncover some of the cultural, artistic and architectural treasures of this diverse and spectacular city. The first evening’s visit to a Flamenco Tablau just off Las Ramblas soon had our heads filled with dancers, hauntingly beautiful voices and resplendent something Ioutfits. never thought I would say. TheAtkind of activities take part eight o’clock we onwould Tuesday, we in were snowshoeing, fishing, visiting wandered smudgy-eyedice down to breakfast an iceathotel and of first course dog-sledging, day but and, nine, our culture-packed before any of this we had toAntoni surviveGaudi’s so our began. La Sagrada Familia, daily tasks were to collect four five jerry unfinished masterpiece and or‘Cathedral cans waterhad fromour thejaws lakedropping and chopand up of theofPoor’, wood for heating and cooking. pencils scribbling for over an hour; some of

Swedish Lapland Trip Day 1 On arrival by overnight train to Kiruna in Sweden it was a short bus ride to our camp headquarters where we were welcomed by the barking of at least 150 big huskies. The thick overalls and snow boots we were given we soon called ‘super suits’ because they did such a good job of keeping us warm and toasty in the cold conditions.

Day 2 The campsite was situated 100m from a very large lake where in the evenings there was always picturesque sunset. To our surprise there was no signal, electricity or running water, which was a challenge for most of us, but allowed me to really embrace the local culture. By the end of the week I had forgotten about my phone which is

our more intrepid artists braved the height of the bridge behind the Tree of Life to sketch of the city. Fundramatic and vistas adventure began with snowshoeing. Before our mini-expedition, La Pedrera is another Gaudi building, we had to draw a map with the bearings for magnificent in its sculptural embellishment our journey during which the person that extends to the roof top.lead From the had to break the snow for the others and terrace, we drew giant chimney stacks the person to navigate him.The On thatsecond stand up like had historical warriors. the way we saw some absolutely stunning museum below exhibits some of Gaudi’s views landscapes, as frozen lakes, naturaland forms, modelssuch of his architecture

Day 3

and examples of his other work.

The Picasso Museum, set in the beautiful Gothic quarter, surprised us with some of the artist’s early works (he moved to Barcelona when only fourteen). Huge oil paintings hang next to tiny traditional landscapes, the subjects almost unrecognizable in their exploratory, cubist forms. Our culinary treat that evening was a seafront restaurant followed by a visit to the iMax Cinema where we watched an account of Shackleton’s adventures, and then a documentary in 3D about deep sea sharks. Wednesday brought us Figueres, outside Barcelona, and the birthplace of the surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí. The Teatre-

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Museu Gala Salvador Dalí immersed us in the weird and wacky world of a man whose sanity, at first glance, comes into question. We left struck by the obvious genius of a highly skilled draughtsman. From there, we followed the river to Gerona, Catalonia’s answer to Venice, with its winding cobbled streets and crooked evergreen forests or even snowy houses leaning creakily overathe river.ridge. The most exhausting part of the journey in up Barcelona, we rambled Las wasBack going a steep hill, however,onthere Ramblas and enjoyed supper at the hotel. was a reward at the end of our hard ascent – aParc veryGuell, warming delicious lunch underand a bright February which of making and undisputed eating (and sun onconsisted Thursday, proved the spilling cooking) some hot highlightwhile of our trip. Instead of tomato taking soup and we trying out for toasted the metro, walked about reindeer half an sausages prepared on the fire we had made. hour, mostly uphill, eventually reaching a series of outdoor escalators that took us up a further few hundred metres. From here, wenext hadday notwe only view The hada amagnificent go at ice-fishing of the city but also our first glimpses of on a nearby lake. First we had to dig out an emerald paradise the area roughly 7m inthrough diameterthe andgaps theninstart trees ahead. drilling with a manual spiral drill which required a fair amount of beautiful effort andjeweltime Gaudi’s exceptionally through 1.5m of deep ice. Although we sat like mosaic sculptures, created from shards at the same place for few hours and tried of broken crockery, had us mesmerised.

Day 4

Palm trees, gorgeous cave-like stone arches and parakeets were just a small part of what we saw. For hours, we were content to capture, in drawing, the spectacular architecture and serpentine shapes. Gaudi’s own house, transformed into a museum, is situated within the park.

Not one person was happy to leave such a wonderful place but the Maritime Museum proved a haven of air-conditioned spaces and fantastic naval artefacts. Later, a trip to the aquarium became the second of our underwater experiences and this was followed by an extravagant array of delicious salads, pasta and pizza and a wander through the Gothic Quarter for an evening of soul and fJazz club. Friday dawned and our suitcases were


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Day 5 This was a cultural day but nothing prepared us for the jaw-dropping experience of walking through ice cathedrals and hotel rooms. It was truly incredible how huge blocks of ice had been turned into rooms which each became little kingdoms of fantasy and ice carved differently by international artists. Later in the day, we visited a Sámi village and learned about the Sápmi, traditionally

known as the Lapps. Everything the Sámi people do revolves around reindeer they train them to pull sledges, they milk them, eat them and also use their skins for warmth.

Day 6 The last three days were our favourite, as each day we did small expeditions on the dog-sledges. We all paired up and were given five dogs per group, shown how to ride on the sledges and strap the dogs on safely. We also cared for the dogs feeding them and showing them a lot of love, by patting and hugging these kind and hard-

@MCol_OA Apr 13 Dog sledging expedition to the far north of Sweden. Snowshoeing, ice fishing and a tour to the ice hotel!

SWEDISH LAPLAND TRIP

to draw fish’s attention with delicious bait unfortunately for everyone, we did not catch anything at all. However, we still had a very filling supper, which kept us warm for the rest of the day!

working creatures. In total, I think, we travelled about 60 km or maybe a bit less, seeing spectacular panoramas of frozen lakes and untouched forests which was truly mesmerising because of the natural Swedish beauty and the speed of the dogs. The adventure went far too quickly, we could have easily spent another week or so in Lapland and for all of us it is a trip we will never forget. Nicole Egorova (EL) & Dylan Cameron (BH)

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Spectacular Sichuan Geography Trip to China

Fifteen pupils from the Hundred and Lower Sixth experienced a breath-taking journey through Sichuan Province this summer.

GEOGRAPHY TRIP TO CHINA

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he journey began and ended in Chengdu, a dynamic and fast growing global mega city. Traditional Tang dynasty Du Fu Cottage and Gardens, Kuang-zhai Alley, Han dynasty Jinli town and the mesmerizing Sichuan opera contrasted with ultra-modern, down town Chengdu. This features the New Century Global Centre – the largest building in the world, by floor space, when constructed. 260 of the Fortune 500 companies now have a base in Chengdu. Particularly memorable was our day as Panda volunteers at the Dujiangyan Research Base; there was an opportunity to learn about, look after and feed the pandas. 80% of the world’s 1,500 pandas are found in Sichuan Province. Further highlights were visiting Tibetan Buddhist monasteries, including Anjue and Tagong; the spiritual power, colour and importance of these religious centres were clearly evident. Exploring the Tibetan Danba villages of Jiaju and Suopo – designated as some of the most beautiful villages in China – was a delight, whilst ascending one of the 12th century watch towers of Suopo was particularly intriguing. 80% of the inhabitants of Garze and Abe prefectures, where we travelled, are Tibetan in origin, making this area “more Tibetan” than Tibet itself. It was fascinating to experience

the contrast between Han Chinese and Tibetan cultures and aspirations. Our journeys in Kham Tibet were challenged by the heavy Sichuan monsoon rains. The area was experiencing the most flooding since 1949, and river levels were high and landslides common. We were fortunate to complete our Tibetan itinerary as the areas we visited were closed to tourist groups soon after we left. We enjoyed two days in the “Oriental Alps” in the Geopark of Mt Siguniang where the highest peak rises to 6,250m. We were blessed, one day, with sunny weather which brought out the colours of the Buddhist prayer flags and the valleys grazed by yaks. On the second day, it rained non-stop but with sufficient light to enjoy the waterfalls and mist covered lakes and mountain slopes.

Back in the Sichuan Basin we joined the tourist masses to take in Li Bing’s 256BC Dujiangyan Irrigation Scheme and the ascent up Taoist Mt Qingcheng, 1,260m high. China has 20% of the world’s population and travelling was nearly always intense and busy. The community spirit was evident wherever we went. We felt welcome wherever and whenever we walked around. There is indeed a sense of optimism and energy in Sichuan. Foreigners are very welcome, if closely monitored. The Dalai Lama’s birthday on 9th July meant that the police were keeping a close eye on the foreign presence; few western groups go to this part of Tibet. No less than 12 police cars with flashing lights were patrolling one night in Danba; they were “looking after” their guests. In all locations our hosts looked after us well; smiling, welcoming faces were the norm everywhere. We were captivated by both the traditions and the modernity of China; it is, indeed, a future world as the country moves forward with engineering and technological spectacles of magic and defiance. KDJR


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

GEOGRAPHY TRIP TO CHINA

“We enjoyed two days in the “Oriental Alps” in the Geopark of Mt Siguniang where the highest peak rises to 6,250m.”

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Exhilarating Iceland

Capital of Contradictions

Trip to Iceland

Trip to Berlin

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welve intrepid Hundred pupils undertook an amazing Skill-Up trip to Iceland in June. The first day was a nonstop action tour which included the Gunnuhver hot steam outlets, the Krysuvik hot mud pools, the famous Strokkur Geysir, the majestic Gullfoss (waterfall) – Europe’s largest – and Thingvellir – site of Iceland’s first Viking parliament and where the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates move apart from each other. A soak in the 38-40 degree waters of Iceland’s oldest bathing pool, the (not so) ‘Secret Lagoon’, completed a near perfect day.

POST-GCSE TRIPS

Day two included many highlights, with a walk behind Seljalandsfoss (waterfall) and a ferry ride to Heimaey. Here we undertook an exhilarating hike up the ash slopes of Mt Eldfell, created by the 1973 eruption, a tour of the island and a fun visit to the local geothermal pool, complete with slides. The final day included a climb to the top of Skogafoss waterfall and a hike to the snout of Solheimajokull (glacier), now retreating by up to 100m each year. We were amazed at the futuristic, interactive Lava Volcano and Earthquake Centre which we enjoyed before heading for a late afternoon stroll through Reykjavik on what was their warmest and sunniest day of the year so far. A thank you to all the members of this excellent team and for the exceptional service of Kipling Tours who arranged this trip and Gunner, our wonderful and entertaining guide. KDJR

ariety’ was the name of the game for the Berlin Skill-Up trip. Our gang of twelve eager Hundred pupils underwent emotional rollercoasters each day, as we zoomed rapidly from sombre Cold War sights to high class cabaret, from memorials to the horrors of the Second World War to the delightful brilliance of Frederick II’s Sanssouci palace at Potsdam. The extraordinary and urgent contradictions of Berlin were everywhere examined: this was no mere thano-touristic indulgence, for we examined factories (above all the great AGM turbine complex in Wedding), palaces, churches and museums as well as the wellknown circuit of sad memorials. Everywhere we considered what had happened, over hundreds of years, to the city and its people. In front of the Reichstag building we had a discussion with Max Mueller-Haerlin, a senior civil servant, about the state of Germany, Europe and the world (he was notably more pessimistic than last year). Meanwhile Frau Rainer expostulated upon the image of Berlin in the eyes of Germans from other places. We made long walks through different areas – and what could be more contrasting than Stalin’s colossal triumphal street, the Marxallee (on the one hand), and the Hohenzollerns’ marvellous Baroque and Neo-Classical park at Potsdam (on the other)? One interesting excursion took us past Dutch houses and Russian houses (built in their distinctive styles), built for workers and soldiers from those countries in Potsdam. But our real hub was the enjoyable old district based on Hackesher Markt, with its constant buzz of trams and its courtyards of old stores on the edge of the Jewish Quarter. We returned here repeatedly, and stayed not too far away in rooms above a golden age ballroom, where a plethora of wildly dressed actors and actresses (making a new version of Doeblin’s Alexanderplatz) sat around us at breakfast, quite the most exotic sight in a week full of striking and memorable images. The pupils were interested and engaged throughout, and the winners of our traditional ‘points’ competition were Peps Haydn Taylor and Sam Bucks – both were awarded pieces of the Berlin Wall to take home. CAFM

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Surf ’n’ Turf

Trip to Milan

OA trip to the Gower

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Highlights of the trip include the Pinacoteca di Brera, a guided tour of Milan Cathedral, including a vertiginous turn on the leads of the roof, the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, and the Palazzo Bianco in Genoa. We found Bergamo to be a real gem, with the Accademia Carrara full of magnificent paintings beautifully hung and sensitively lit. It was remarkable that we had the entire place to ourselves, and it was wonderful to be the only pilgrims climbing the Sacro Monte di Varese on a fine June morning, stopping at the 15 little chapels that ascend the hill, and admiring the remarkable tableaux vivant statue groups telling the story of Christ’s life. At little village at the top pupils reflected upon the experiences of viewing art in its context in fresh ways. They were able to see past the fog of religious aura to the essence of humanity within, and some began to see the abstract language of architecture as an expressive form.

he Surf ’n’ Turf post-GCSE trip offers pupils the choice of surfing or climbing. However, with both options being weather dependent a certain amount of adaptability was required. And, with this year’s surf conditions being ‘the worst in ten years’ we introduced a coasteering session on the cliffs close to the famous ‘Worm’s Head’. A group session on Stand Up Paddle Boards (SUPs) was also popular, particularly the Mega SUP, a huge SUP requiring a minimum of six paddlers all coordinated to achieve any forward momentum. Fortunately, the lack of challenging surf compensated for by fantastic weather and glorious sunshine. Both groups were accommodated at Hardingsdown Bunkhouse and the Chuffhouse, located near Llangennith, on the beautiful Gower peninsula and again our warmest thanks go to Allison for her amazing hospitality, delicious afternoon cakes and the BBQ using only locally sourced quality fayre.

POST-GCSE TRIPS

he Skill-Up Trip to Milan was a cultural tonic. Post-exam pupils were free to enjoy the intense sunshine and beautiful surroundings of Milan, with excursions to Genoa, Sacro Monte di Varese, a mountainous pilgrimage site, and the city of Bergamo.

TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Culture-fix

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We considered the use of buildings as vehicles of power, ranging from the Gothic fortress of Castello Sforzesco, to the Romanesque shrine of St Ambrose, and on to the classical revival of Napoleon’s monuments in Milan, and those of Mussolini, not least Milan Station and a 1920s bank. By way of complete contrast, the students also visited the San Siro Stadium, home of Inter Milan and A.C. Milan. The tour included a chance to emerge into the vast bowl of its sweeping stands, and to sit in the changing rooms of the two clubs. Overall, the week combined the modern and the old, and the party saw many things of great beauty and interest. FSM

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Inspired by Adventure

Diving in Malaysia

Creative Writing in Pembrokeshire

PADI Course

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he week began with a visit to Dylan Thomas’s Laugharne, a place he once described as ‘the strangest town in Wales’. We mooched along the tideline beneath the ruined castle, climbed to the town to find the poet’s writing shed, still just as Thomas had left it, with drafts of poems on the tiny desk, screwed up paper flung towards the waste-paper basket. All of which inspired our week of great writing and adventure.

POST-GCSE TRIPS

After reaching St David’s, our home for the week, we strolled down to Caerfai where we set about the serious business of our own writing while enjoying the spectacular seascape, and this set the tone for the following days: sessions of wrestling with words, trying to find the phrase that could best tell our experiences, interspersed among some great adventures. We had a kayaking trip on a boisterous sea around St Non’s and another day enjoyed an adrenaline-pumping coasteering session. The Parc Yr Oriel Art Gallery’s loan exhibit, ‘Le Passeur’ by the impressionist artist, William Stott of Oldham, proved to be a great inspiration for our writing. The pupils responded with great sensitivity to this huge-scale work, which was painted at the artists’ colony at Grez-sur-Loing in the 1880s, imagining the stories of the two young girls waiting for the ferryman to take them across the water. The magnificent cathedral in St David’s, too, provided more inspiration, with a treasure-hunt game leading to some fine descriptive and interpretive writing. The highlight of the week for most, though, was a boat trip out to Ramsey. The water on the east side of the island was vigorous enough, with a vicious tide surging over the reef of the Bitches; but we found sheltered bays and coves, in one of which was an enormous harem of seal basking on the pebbles. As we nudged our way around the island, other seals surfaced to stare with curiosity at us; then, as we rounded the southern tip of Ramsey, we were met with towering waves that seemed to threaten to tumble the boat. There were guillemots on the cliffs, and razorbills in stubby flight, and kittiwakes gliding through the stone arches of the cliffs. We spent other days exploring the coast path, beachcombing and playing wide games on remote beaches, swimming at Caerfai and Traeth Llyfn, and, of course, writing, with a final exercise in observation on the harbourside at Porthgain before a celebratory dinner at the Sloop Inn. MJP

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or the second year running pupils took the opportunity of Skill-Up Week to visit Marlborough College Malaysia (MCM) and learn to scuba dive. The week started with three days at MCM, visiting local cultural sites and learning the basics of scuba in the impressive college pool. The boys had the opportunity to put their swimming skills to the test as they trekked through a local rainforest and swam in the heavenly pools of the waterfalls. The next place on the tour was the idyllic tropical island of Rawa. Here the pupils revelled in the luxury accommodation and perfected their scuba skills to all become qualified PADI Open Water divers. We spent the final two days in Singapore indulging its rich cultural heritage with invaluable insights into Chinese culture from Mrs Li. GCSEs were a distant memory, heads now filled with the wonderful experiences of the last week, not least of all keeping up with England’s progress through the World Cup. SDD


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Accelerating Science

packed but there was still time to soak up the sunshine on our visit to the Joan Miro Foundation, set on the top of the mountain of Montjuic. Tapestries, paintings and Catalan sculptures rubbed shoulders with e began withmost a tourcutting of the pieces by someour of trip China’s United Nations building. Starting edges, contemporary craftsmen. with the United Nations Human Rights A finalRoom, afternoon of shopping gave way Council with its remarkable ceiling to the inevitable and rather emotional trip representing the different points of view back to the airport, compensated, however, that countries can have on the same issue. by souvenirs and memories Next the Council Chamber, the location of At disarmament conferences during the eight o’ clock on Tuesday, we League of smudgy-eyed Nations period, with its iconic wandered down to breakfast images world by José Maria Sert and, at of nine, ourpeace first culture-packed day decorating the walls. ThisAntoni room Gaudi’s is truly began. La Sagrada Familia, inspiring represents everything that unfinishedandmasterpiece and ‘Cathedral the United wasjaws set dropping up to achieve. of the Poor’,Nations had our and Finally, we saw the Assembly Hall, pencils scribbling formain over an hour; some of home of intrepid the World Assembly our more artistsHealth braved the height among other behind groups.the This of the bridge Treeis ofthe Lifetrue to heart the United sketch of dramatic vistas ofNations the city.Office as almost 2,000 people can gather here to La Pedrera is another Gaudi building, discuss the important issues that face their magnificent in its sculptural embellishment organisations and the world. that extends to the roof top. From the On our visited CERN terrace, wesecond drew day, giantwechimney stacks (the European Organisation for Nuclear that stand up like historical warriors. The Research). museum below exhibits some of Gaudi’s natural forms, models ofahis architecture Dr Mario Campanelli, researcher from and examples of his other work. University College London working on the

highly skilled draughtsman.

From there, we followed the river to Gerona, Catalonia’s answer to Venice, with its winding cobbled streets and crooked houses leaning creakily over the river.

Physics Trip to Switzerland

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ATLAS spoke to us The experiment Picasso Museum, setabout in the basics of particle andsurprised the work us at beautiful Gothicphysics quarter, CERN, specifically ATLAS andworks the CMS. with some of the artist’s early (he Afterward we went towhen the Compact Muon moved to Barcelona only fourteen). Solenoid going to Huge oil detector paintings hangunderground next to tiny see the inner workingsthe of subjects the detector as traditional landscapes, almost it was undergoing its yearly maintenance. unrecognizable in their exploratory, cubist The tour was fascinating as it allowed us forms. to see the complexity and mind-blowing Our treat that evening was a scale of culinary the entire experiment. At 100m seafront restaurant followed by a visit to underground we learnt that the CMS the iMax Cinema where we watched an was studying the properties of the Higgs accountdiscovered of Shackleton’s and Boson, in 2012,adventures, supersymmetry then a documentary in 3D about deep and even extra dimensions. We moved sea on sharks. to look at one of the first detectors used at CERN, the Synchrocyclotron, and outside saw an Wednesday brought us Figueres, informative use and creation. Barcelona, video and on theits birthplace of the surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí.toThe We had a short journey theTeatreSwiss Museu Gala Salvador Dalí immersed in Plasma Centre (SPC). The SPC isuson the weird and wacky world of a man whose the front line of fusion research with its sanity, at first glance, comesWe into question. Tokamak fusion reactor. were lucky We left struck by the obvious genius of a enough to see the plasma and were shown

Susie Hetherington

how using different ions changes the properties, and more spectacularly, the colour of the plasma. At the SPC they use extremely powerful magnets to mould the plasma and keep it inside the Tokamak, they are also experimenting with different shapes for the plasma in order to achieve higher efficiency and get closer to fusion as a viable energy source. The Tokamak’s core is at a higher temperature than the sun and we learned that the centre of the reactor in Culham, Oxford, is the hottest point in our solar system! On our final day, we took a short boat ride across Lake Geneva to the Jet d’Eau: a large water fountain that jets water up to 140 metres high and is a prominent and distinct landmark of Geneva. Once there we had a guided tour of the pumping engine room and the history of the iconic fountain. We also gained further insight into the surrounding area of Geneva and the lifestyle and culture. Witnessing the fountain being turned on and seeing the Caption of image above sheer power required to the pump water to create the grand spectacle really was one of the highlights.

of our underwater experiences and this was followed by an extravagant array of delicious salads, pasta and pizza and a wander through the Gothic Quarter for an evening of soul and funk at the Harlem Jazz club. Author’s name

After the Jet d’Eau, we took a tram back to CERN to a laboratory where we were given instruction on how to create our very own cloud chambers to detect different particles. In teams of four, we carefully constructed the detectors and eagerly waited for the first clouds to form. It was fascinating to see how a rather simple contraption could produce such spectacular results as well as being a fun and enjoyable activity to be involved with.

PHYSICS TRIP TO SWITZERLAND

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After the cloud chambers, we took the time to explore some of CERN’s exhibits and learn more about the history of particle physics and about the engineering and technological feats that have occurred as a result of CERN’s endeavours. Everyone was engrossed by the interesting and inspiring details that we were all learnt about CERN and the group left feeling inspired to continue our pursuits into the broad field of Physics. Zac Place (CO), Leo Lambert (B1) & Rhiannon Evans (MO)

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ack in Barcelona, we rambled on Las Ramblas and enjoyed supper at the hotel. Parc Guell, under a bright February sun on Thursday, proved the undisputed highlight of our trip. Instead of taking the metro, we walked for about half an hour, mostly uphill, eventually reaching a series of outdoor escalators that took us up a further few hundred metres. From here, we had not only a magnificent view of the city but also our first glimpses of an emerald paradise through the trees ahead. Not one person was happy to leave such a wonderful place but the Maritime Museum proved a haven of air-conditioned spaces and fantastic naval artefacts. Later, a trip to the aquarium became the second

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Revolution & Anarchy The Erpingham Camp Seventeen students and three teachers touched down in Barcelona, eager to uncover some of the cultural, artistic and architectural treasures of this diverse and spectacular city. The first evening’s visit to a Flamenco Tablau just off Las Ramblas soon had our heads filled with dancers, hauntingly beautiful voices and resplendent outfits.

CCF TRIP TO SAN DIEGO

Exercise Pond Jump Cadet 3 S CCF Trip to San Diego

Museu Gala Salvador Dalí immersed us in the weird and wacky world of a man whose sanity, at first glance, comes into question. We left struck by the obvious genius of a highly skilled draughtsman.

Day 1

From there, we followed the river to Day Gerona,6Catalonia’s answer to Venice, with

Eight Upper Sixth cadets, 4 CCF Officers and the School Staff Instructor set to San Diego for EXERCISE POND JUMP CADET 3.

Day 2 We edged around Downtown San Diego and over to Coronado Island to carry out detailed reconnaissance of locations that we would be visiting in the coming days followed by a dip in the Pacific Ocean at La Jolla.

Day 3 Camp Pendleton, home of the largest US Marine Corps (USMC) base on the west coast was today’s destination. Starting with history of the USMC from the Executive Officer of First Marine Expeditionary Force (1 MEF) this was followed by a tour of the vehicles used by the 6th Amphibious Battalion and an afternoon in an indoor trainer and firing range.

eventeen students and three teachers touched down in Barcelona, eager to uncover some of the cultural, artistic and architectural treasures of this diverse and spectacular city. The first evening’s visit to a Flamenco Tablau just off Las Ramblas soon had our heads filled with dancers, hauntingly beautiful voices and Today weoutfits. drove a short distance to the resplendent Marine Aviation Wing for an overview of eight o’clock on wing Tuesday, we all At US Marine Corps fixed aircraft, wandered smudgy-eyed down to breakfast marine transport, fighter jets and other and, atassets. nine, Then our first culture-packed rotary faced a challenge in day the began. La Sagrada Familia, pilot simulator with their USAntoni MarineGaudi’s Corps unfinished masterpiece ‘Cathedral pilots in two flying fast jets,and helicopters and of the Poor’, had our jaws dropping and the VH 20 Osprey a cross between a plane pencils scribbling for over an hour; some of and a helicopter. Later we headed to the our more intrepid artists braved the height USMC Leatherneck Museum for a guided of the bridge TreeGeneral. of Life to tour from a USbehind Marinethe Major sketch dramatic vistas of the city.

Day 4

Day 5 La Pedrera is another Gaudi building,

magnificent its sculptural embellishment From the in famous San Diego boardwalk thatrode extends to thebikes rooftotop. From the we city cruiser La Jolla taking terrace, we best drewvistas giant stacks in the very of chimney the Californian that stand like historical warriors.south The coast. Thatupafternoon we headed museum below exhibits Gaudi’s to the Mexican border some to theofMall for natural forms, of his architecture shopping and anmodels authentic Chicago pizza. and examples of his other work.

The Picasso Museum, set in the beautiful Gothic quarter, surprised us with some of the artist’s early works (he moved to Barcelona when only fourteen). Huge oil paintings hang next to tiny traditional landscapes, the subjects almost unrecognizable in their exploratory, cubist forms. Our culinary treat that evening was a seafront restaurant followed by a visit to the iMax Cinema where we watched an account of Shackleton’s adventures, and then a documentary in 3D about deep sea sharks. Wednesday brought us Figueres, outside Barcelona, and the birthplace of the surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí. The Teatre-

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its The winding and Warfare crooked US cobbled Naval streets Specialist houses leaning creakily over the river. Command Centre (aka US Navy SEAL Base) our next we visit. Retired US Backwas in Barcelona, rambled on Las Navy SEAL Captain M whisked us Ramblas and enjoyed supper at the hotel.to the Commands briefing room to gain the Guell, brightSEAL February lowParc down on allunder thingsa Navy past sun on Thursday, proved the undisputed and present. After meeting SEAL Team highlight of our trip. Instead taking One we used the indoor range tooftest our the metro, we walked for about half an reaction times and reflexes before seeing hour, mostly uphill, eventually reaching the Special Boat Operators (SWIKS) a series of outdoor escalators us compound where we had a that PT took session up a further few hundred metres. From with huge ropes that reassembled large tree here, we had not only a magnificent view trunks. of the city but also our first glimpses of an emerald paradise through the gaps in the trees ahead. Finally, we visited the Midway museum Gaudi’s exceptionally beautiful jewela huge Aircraft Carrier situated on the sea like mosaic sculptures, from shards front. Dressed in our created CCF uniforms we of broken crockery, hadposing us mesmerised. enjoyed celebrity status for photos Palm Japanese trees, gorgeous cave-like stone with tourists prior to ourarches short and to parakeets were just the a small part of trip San Diego Airport next day. what we saw. For hours, we were content S J Bate to capture, in drawing, the spectacular School Staff Instructor CCF architecture and serpentine shapes. Gaudi’s own house, transformed into a museum, is situated within the park.

Day 7

Not one person was happy to leave such a wonderful place but the Maritime Museum proved a haven of air-conditioned spaces and fantastic naval artefacts. Later, a trip to the aquarium became the second of our underwater experiences and this was followed by an extravagant array of delicious salads, pasta and pizza and a wander through the Gothic Quarter for an evening of soul and fJazz club. Friday dawned and our suitcases were


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Travelling Through Time History of Art Study Trip to Northern Italy

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ur first night was spent in the exquisite city of Mantua, and we enjoyed an early evening visit to Palazzo Te, the eccentric pleasure palace of the Gonzaga dukes, famous for the quirky and risqué frescoes by Giulio Romano. Of soberer mien was the Palazzo Ducale, with its stately and serene frescoes by Andrea Mantegna. His strict discipline cleansed our palates for the Palladian delights of the Teatro Olimpico and Villa Rotonda at Vicenza, and the students enjoyed some stolen moments of otium stretched out on the grass sketching the symmetrical perfections of the greatest farmhouse ever built. Our base for the next three nights was Padua; from there, we visited the unsurpassed Scrovegni Chapel with Giotto’s remarkably moving cycles of the Life of the Virgin and the Life of Christ, made all the more evocative by our evening time-slot. We moved forwards a couple of centuries on our excursion to Venice the next day, where we visited key sites of the Venetian Renaissance, including the Scuole Grande di San Rocco to admire the powerful scenes of suffering and redemption by Tintoretto, and the Church of the Frari to stand stupefied by the enormous Titians and Bellinis. On the next morning the party enjoyed the comparatively light and

accessible modern works in the Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, before engaging with the wonders in the Accademia. From there we moved to the marshes south of La Serenissima, and on to the ancient Gothic capital of Ravenna. It was a revelation to the students to see the vibrancy and power of the sixth-century mosaics displayed in the Basilica of San Vitale, and the smaller, more intimate décor in the same medium in the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia, and the Basilica of San Apollinare some miles outside the city. Our journey drew us on through dramatic twisting roads and rising altitudes to the hilltop city of Urbino, seat of the mighty Della Rovere family, and accessed by a lift bored through the cliff. Once up in the citadel, we took our rooms in a monastery facing the Ducal Palace. Inside, we found Piero della Francesca’s Flagellation; outside, at night, the empty streets and squares were like a Surrealist scene from the imagination of Delvaux. After the altitude and remoteness of Urbino, our stay in Bologna felt like a reconnection with the modern world, even in the midst of this deeply historic city. We stayed close to Achille Bocchi’s remarkable palace, and made a beeline for the National Gallery of Art, built upon the site of the Carracci drawing academy, a cradle of the Baroque. It was fitting then to find therein

HISTORY OF ART TRIP TO ITALY

The six-day study trip to Italy took in many of the most important city-states and centres of culture of the Renaissance era. Our route took us through Mantua, Vicenza, Padua, Venice, Ravenna, Urbino, and ended in Bologna. In our crammed itinerary, we found time to enjoy the delightful sights of each city and its unique environment, from the lapping quaysides of Venice, to the steep hilltop precincts of Urbino. We travelled through vast stretches of time, too, from the ancient Roman theatre at Padua, through the Early Christian site at Ravenna, to the Romanesque in Bologna, and to the Renaissance and Baroque everywhere.

not only the work of the Carracci family, but that of their famous students, such as Guido Reni, Domenichino, Il Guercino, and the rest. Other marvels in Bologna were the Basilica di San Petronio, and the harrowing terracotta statues of the Lamentation in the church of Santa Maria della Vita made by Niccolò dell’Arca in the later 1400s. These remarkable statues added to the long list of incredible works, buildings, and spectacles we had witnessed in just a few densely packed and deeply cultured days. FSM

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

ENGLISH TRIP TO DUBLIN & HISTORY OF ART TO PARIS

The Dubliners

Revision Raid

English Department Literary Trip

History of Art Study Trip to Paris

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he English Department’s literary trip to Dublin was a hugely enjoyable and rewarding visit, characterised by cultural riches and pupils who engaged wholeheartedly with the intellectual experiences on offer, as well as with the wholesome Irish hospitality. Over the course of three days the pupils were able to immerse themselves in the rich literary life and heritage of Dublin. This began with a visit to the famous Long Room library in Trinity College Dublin and a chance to see the Book of Kells. We were then hosted handsomely by the university who took time to address us on the merits of studying at Trinty College Dublin (TCD). Emeritus Professor Nicholas Green spoke to the pupils about how English courses are structured at the university. In between, we were able to catch up with a few OMs who had just begun their studies at Trinity College.

The trip was fortunate to coincide with the Dublin Theatre Festival and we saw two excellent plays which were theatrically very different but contained many similar themes that lie at the heart of Irish literature. King of the Castle by the Druid production company was a gritty dramatisation of rural Irish life. After the show, we were able to sit in on a discussion with the cast and director which illuminated how the production had come together. Ulysses at the Abbey Theatre was a spectacular and wild version of Joyce’s famous novel performed with song, dance, puppets and even kazoos. We had a superb backstage tour ahead of the production which illustrated the significance of the Abbey’s role in the history of Irish literature, as well as preparing us for this extraordinary performance. The stage had been set up in cabaret style with audience members sitting amongst and interacting with the cast. Other highlights of the trip were a visit to Sweny’s Pharmacy, preserved as it was on Bloomsday (June 16th 1904), a visit to our old friends at Marsh’s Library where we were shown some fascinating rare books, as well as a visit to the Yeats exhibition in the National Library of Ireland. On Sunday morning, a Dubliners Walking Tour took us to key places in Joyce’s life as well as parts of the city mentioned in the short story collection. As Dubliners is a set text for many of our pupils they were able to engage with the postgraduate tour guide, Niels (doing his PhD on Joyce) and to experience reading Joyce’s prose in the actual locations he was describing. Niels commented on the excellent knowledge our pupils had of the text and how well they reacted to the readings and the tour. NOPG

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he History of Art Department is used to embarking on epic tours of art-historical centres, but knows that there is sometimes equal beauty to be found in the miniature painted on vellum as on the giant wall-sized canvas. Accordingly, at the very end of the Easter holidays, we led 21 students on a small but exquisite 36-hour raid upon the artistic gems of Paris, our aim to catch a last-minute top-up of revision ahead of the examination season. In the tight confines of our schedule, we achieved much, with visits to the Louvre, Musée d’Orsay, Musée Rodin, Centre Pompidou, and the Eiffel Tower. We were very busy in the time available, addressing such key curricular paintings as Giorgione’s La Fête Champêtre, Caravaggio’s Death of the Virgin, Manet’s Olympia, and the whole gamut of Impressionists, Post-Impressionists, Expressionists, Fauvists, Futurists, and Dadaists. In certain rooms of the d’Orsay, the students greeted almost every painting as a familiar friend. Particularly delightful was a visiting exhibition of Symbolist painting from Estonia, a rare chance to see little-known works from that exceptionally interesting cultural centre. In all, it was a richly rewarding way to squeeze the last hours of goodness out of the Easter break. FSM


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

SPORTS PERFORMANCE TOUR TO CALIFORNIA

Hopping Off a Plane at LAX Sports Performance Tour to California 12 pupils visited EXOS a world-class sports performance facility in California that offers the very best in training to elite athletes across the world.

Day 1 – LAX Bound

Day 5 – Fast and Furious

Day 7 & 8

After a long flight to Los Angeles, the group were excited to see the hustle and bustle and with the sun still shining managed to catch a glimpse of the famous Hollywood sign.

All things speed. The day focused on running mechanics, one of the key factors to help improve on field sporting performance. Sleds, harnesses, medicine balls were all used to help pupils create the best optimal position to develop speed.

These days focused on fundamental movement and creating marginal gains in the pupil’s own sports that they were eager to learn.

Day 2 – San Diego Sightseeing We walked off our jet leg by sightseeing on the Mexican border at Las America and visiting the famous Gas Lamp district and Naval Port in downtown San Diego.

Day 3 – Paddleboarding,

Orange County and BBQ

We spent an exciting day paddle­ boarding at Dana-Point, before heading back to the home of Joanna Dillion and Peter Burberry in San Clemente for a delicious BBQ.

Day 6 – NFL Combine Even though the day was designed for recovery we made the most of a once in a lifetime experience of playing dodge ball with some of the best NFL athletes on the planet. Afterwards Coach Homes talked about ‘What it takes to be the best in the world’. The afternoon consisted of self-massage and foam rolling to relax and repair muscle.

Day 9 & 10 – Universal

Studios, Venice Beach

The rest of the trip was designed for recuperation and sightseeing. Exploring the film sets of the world-famous Universal Studios, surfing and body boarding at Carlsbad beach and a visit to the worldfamous Muscle Beach in Venice to round off a truly memorable experience. JWD

Day 4 – EXOS Day As we entered EXOS the pupils were totally awestruck by the phenomenal facilities. After a tour and introduction by Director of Performance Coach Roy Holmes, the morning was spent undergoing screening and testing reserved for elite athletes. Having received the very best in sports science and performance training, individual performance nutrition packs replenished energy levels. Cold and hot tub therapy was used to reduce soreness at the end of the session.

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Rich Inspiration Art School Trip to Venice

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ive days in March at the beginning of the Easter holidays saw sixteen art and photography pupils off exploring aspects of the incomparable city of Venice on foot and by boat fortified with blue skies for the duration of our visit. After the long winter in Wiltshire, this was like a revelation and on arrival one pupil exclaimed: “This Grand Canal is SO seriously awesome! I’m in Heaven!” The days that immediately followed saw the treasures in Galleria d’Academia, Ca’d Oro, the Scuda San Rocco, Ca’ Rezzonico and the Peggie Guggenheim Museum unfold.

ART SCHOOL TRIP TO VENICE

Our visits to churches included San Zaccaria containing a Giovanni Bernini masterpiece, The San Zaccaria Alterpiece, the Frari, containing Titan’s majestic Assumption of the Virgin appropriately on a Sunday.

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San Giorgio Maggiore and its Campanile, Santa Maria della Salute and the Redentore, all eagerly sought out and explored from an architectural as well as aesthetic perspective. An exhibition of 100 of John Ruskin’s Venetian drawings – The Englishman who saved Venice – at the Doge’s Palace in “Ruskin in Venice” (pictured above) was certainly a highlight amongst a necklace of treats. Drawing and painting on location were interspersed with a picnic on the beach at the Lido, a walk to Arsenale, a visit to Murano island, tea/coffee and ice-cream stops and in the evening, sampling dishes at Venetian very off-the-tourist-trail restaurants. For the 16 pupils and two staff this time in Venice saw art and life happily become one. EFJT


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

SKRUM Exercise and Sport Sciences Trip to Swaziland n October half-term a group of 12 Remove and Hundred boys travelled to Swaziland in Southern Africa, to spend five days working with SKRUM (Swai Kids Rugby Mission). SKRUM is a charity founded by Michael Collinson, BEM (British Empire Medal) that Marlborough has been working with since 2008. SKRUM educates young Swazis about HIV and AIDS and gender violence through using the core values of rugby, teamwork, respect and sportsmanship. When the party arrived in Swaziland there was an immediately tangible sense of something unique. This was underlined by the staggering setting of Mphini Primary School, well off the beaten track into the mountains, where we would be working for the duration of our visit. The boys fixed over 50 desks, varnishing the tops and painting the bases; planted 39 fruit trees in the school’s top field; removed over 30 broken windows, which were replaced with new glass by a glazier and re-painted 15 chalk boards in classrooms. Not to mention impromptu games of tag,

rugby, chasing the resident goose, or lineout practice during playtimes! All of the work we completed was made possible by the group’s fundraising efforts prior to the tour, which made the boys’ hard work feel very real. After emotional goodbyes with Mphini Primary and SKRUM, the party travelled back west to Johannesburg. A visit to Ellis Park, the site of the 1995 World Cup final between South Africa and New Zealand, quickly helped raise spirits – with the Golden Lions’ club shop officially raided by the boys! The following day we visited the superb Apartheid Museum and Gold Reef City theme park. The final three days were spent north of Pretoria at Mabula Game Lodge and Reserve – 12,000 acres of beautiful picturesque African bushland populated by the Big Five, and many more.

PE TRIP TO SWAZILAND

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This was a truly humbling and immeasurably rewarding trip made even more so as we were able to present Michael with a final fundraising cheque for SKRUM when he visited the College for the Festival of Sport. MJS

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

The Last Storytellers (HATA) History And The Arts Trip to Morocco

HISTORY AND THE ARTS TRIP TO MOROCCO

Morocco’s extravagant beauty, its very colourful history, and the fact that its exoticism is accessible and ‘friendly’ (it’s nothing like so inaccessible as most exotic places), means that one can have very remarkable experiences here, even on a school trip.

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS o it was that we chanced upon the ancient library of a Sufi holy man, completely absent from any appearance on Google search, from guidebooks or Tripadvisor, high in the Atlas Mountains. I trust that our group of 12 intellectuallyengaged (and generally wowed) SixthFormers will remember this for the rest of their lives. We were mid-trip, staying in a brand new (though already collapsing) little stone-and-mud hotel at the end of a newly tarmacked road, very high in the High Atlas. There were shelves of irrigated fields and rows of fruit trees, and snow-melt filled the channels that fed the fledgling River Ziz. On the little hills, beneath the great peaks, lay antique mud fortresses, still inhabited and governed by eight elders. Our host summoned the local musicians, old men who played cracked violins with a rather ferocious vigour (and we danced) in a room hung with brilliant local rugs: outside, a wind howled through the valley throughout the night and banged doors shut. In the morning, after we’d seen the waterwheel that still ground the grain for the villagers and walked along paths amid the ‘sinuous rills’ (it was all a bit Kubla Khan), our host took us to the library. We had to ford a stream and enter an old

fortress: we waited outside a giant studded door while he went to find the hereditary guardian, who eventually turned up with giant keys, unlocked three great sets of doors and led us into the dusty heart of an old keep. In a little upstairs room, he passed round several ancient texts, all written in beautiful calligraphy, including scientific and mathematical treatises as well as Koranic commentaries. Perhaps they were 18th century – I don’t really know – and there’s no information anywhere. Perhaps it was all a dream (but I have the photos). The pupils, rising to the occasion, discussed their socks (we were shoeless in there).

“The pupils were in high spirits throughout and engaged fully with their surroundings, even to the extent of dressing up in the traditional robes of the chieftains of Sijilmassa.” This remarkable excursion was one of many highlights in an extraordinary trip which embraced the ancient walled cities of Fez, Marrakesh and Meknes, the Roman ruins of Volubilis, the great

palmery of the Draa, and the open dunes of Merzouga. There were too many really grand moments to enumerate them all: of course the sunrise, seen from our desert camp above the sand dunes was one, as was the sunset view over muezzin-loud Fez, which some of us watched from the ruins of Merenid tombs on the rocks outside the walls. But I have especially fond memories of an early morning walk from our delightful hotel in the Draa Valley: we followed ancient paths deep into the palm groves and came upon a venerable ruined village, rose red in the early light and full of bird song (all bird song was easily identified by the trip twitcher, Mr Hamilton). After all this, there was a certain amount of bathos about our visit to the Atlas Studios (which hosted many a classic Hollywood set): little could be more fantastical than the sights we were seeing.

HISTORY AND THE ARTS TRIP TO MOROCCO

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The pupils were in high spirits throughout and engaged fully with their surroundings, even to the extent of dressing up in the traditional robes of the chieftains of Sijilmassa. Every evening we’d sit and tell tales from the Arabian nights or from the story-tellers of Marrakesh. CAFM

@MCol_Academic Mar 28 Upper School pupils visiting Fes, Volubilis and Meknes

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Stateside Scoop USA Lacrosse Tour

The 2018 USA tour squad set out to the Big Apple with a fantastic itinerary ahead of us. We were stepping into unfamiliar territory, playing in soaring temperatures, adhering to stateside lacrosse rules, all as a mixed age group team.

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USA LACROSSE TOUR

efore the hard work began, we managed to see as much of New York as possible in 24 hours, including the Rockefeller Centre, Times Square and our new favourite American food place, Chipotle! The next morning, we also visited the 9/11 Memorial and Museum which was enlightening and definitely worth seeing. In Pennsylvania, we were hosted by T3 Lacrosse Club. Over the next two days, we became part of their families and learnt so much from them: even though they were technically the opposition during match play. Daisy Mitford-Slade may have overheated in her goalie kit, but she was well supported by the defence, especially in the clears and transitions by Honor Mills. Sara Kirkwood was resilient in her approach to taking the draw, and as a result she had a fantastic tour. After our matches, we were rewarded with a pool party and BBQ, which was welcomed by all in these hot conditions.

We continued our travels south on Independence Day, stopping off at the King of Prussia Mall. We finally arrived just outside Baltimore where we met our next host families at Uproar Lacrosse Club. After spending the morning with them, we played a challenging and closely contested match that evening. The highlight of the match was Sophie Powell’s perfectly executed goal and subsequent celebration!

“The tournament was a huge learning curve for us as a team and a fantastic opportunity to play some top-level lacrosse.” One of the highlights of the tour, was the coaching clinic at Towson University led by England Defence coach Mike Molster, and Baltimore Brave attacker Brooke Griffin, who we later watched in the WPLL match that evening. The whole experience was unbelievable. The Women’s Professional Lacrosse League (WPLL) match certainly

got the team excited and in a great mindset for the upcoming tournament. At the Capital Lacrosse Tournament we played three high level matches. We got off to a good start against Lax Factory, but were then tested against the Yellow Jackets and had to pull together for the final match of the day against Madlax. This match was a real tournament highlight and some of the best lacrosse we had played all tour. On day two of the tournament, we had the opportunity to play the Yellow Jackets again. Our positive approach and subsequently better lacrosse skills, took our opposition by surprise resulting in a close and exciting final match. Tournament highlights also include Claudie Grainger’s constant commitment in the midfield and Molly Marvin’s numerous goals. The tournament was a huge learning curve for us as a team and a fantastic opportunity to play some top-level lacrosse. Washington was our final stop of the tour where we enjoyed our last day together sightseeing and paddling on the Potomac River. We celebrated all of our achievements with a final supper and awards night. It was difficult to single out players on this tour, but Daisy MitfordSlade was awarded players’ player, Allie Kirkwood coaches’ player and Sophie Kirkwood Captains’ player. This incredible tour would not have been possible without the care, support and passion of the coaches Miss Hudson, Mr Hodgson and Mr Wall. We are looking forward to implementing all that we have learnt from the states, and bringing it across to the ever-growing lacrosse programme at Marlborough College. Nell Hargrove & Violet Mackintosh (Tour Captains)

@MCol_Lacrosse July 19 The famous sights of Washington

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SQUAD: P Bell, C Case, L Cracknell, N Egorova, C Grainger, S Hall-Smith, E Hargrove (Capt.), C Hutchinson, A Kirkwood, S Kirkwood, V Mackintosh (Capt.), M Marvin, H Mills, D Mitford Slade, S Powell, P Redfern, T Reed, C Southgate


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USA LACROSSE TOUR

TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS


A RT S & R E VI EW S


THE SCHOOL PLAY 66 LOWER SCHOOL PLAY 68 ILLUMINATION 69 THE PENNY READING 70 EXAM SEASON PLAYS 72 THE SHELL PLAY 74 THE MUSICAL YEAR 76 175TH/50TH ANNIVERSARY GALA CONCERT 82 SHOWCASE CONCERT 83 ORCHESTRA AND ENSEMBLES 84 MCCS 86 A LEVEL FINE ART EXAMINATION 88 The School Play – Journey’s End

A LEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW A LEVEL FINE ART VISUAL ARTS WEEK HUNDRED FINE ART EXAM WORK REMOVE CERAMICS PROJECT THE ART OF DRAWING MOUNT HOUSE GALLERY EXHIBITIONS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE ART SCHOLARS’ YEAR REVIEW GCSE STORAGE GCSE ELECTRONIC PROJECTS A2 PRODUCT DESIGN

90 92 94 96 98 99 100 103 104 106 107 108


ARTS & R EV IEWS

The School Play Journey’s End

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avid Kenworthy’s haunting production of RC Sherriff ’s Journey’s End earned a central place in the College Armistice commemoration. An exceptionally committed group of boys had worked tirelessly throughout the term to transform themselves into a credible company of front-line soldiers. For two hours, we sat enthralled as the intensity and naturalism of these actors’ performances gave us a privileged insight into Sherriff ’s memories – humorous, harrowing and every level between.

THE SCHOOL PLAY

Despite working seamlessly as a company, the boys also created finely tuned individual characters. A proficient use of the pace, rhythm and idioms of the language supported their impeccable attention to details of boredom, shellshock and a humbling sense of duty. Jack Redmayne gave an engaging opening through the cheery optimism of Hardy which later became something of a survival mechanism for the other officers. Counteracting this was the outstanding central performance of Max Foulds as Stanhope. A meticulous level of skill and observation was evident here as Foulds guided the character from trained war machine to reckless alcoholic and whimpering child, all within the confines of the dug-out. He was expertly supported by Virat Talwar as the indomitable Osborne and Finn Taylor as Raleigh, the young idealist, whose uplifting faith in humanity built such poignant foundations for his inevitable fate. The humour with which Sherriff imbues the daily routine and its focus on meals was brilliantly exposed by Charlie Thomas as Trotter, paradigm of the insatiable appetite, and Toby Hargrove as Mason, the cook, ever bereft of vital ingredients. The earnest approach adopted by both actors in applying gourmet standards to the most

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

“For two hours, we sat enthralled as the intensity and naturalism of these actors’ performances gave us a privileged insight into Sherriff ’s memories.”

basic of supplies showed an impressive understanding of comedic technique. The final pair of working opposites showed Gabriel Jordan and Ben Hall representing the gentlemanly Colonel and the bullish Sergeant-Major respectively – a timely reminder of the class conflict present within the trench.

THE SCHOOL PLAY

The soldiers’ personal fear seemed, at first, to be buried far below the surface in its customary position of shame. However, as the action unfolded, we became increasingly aware of Jamie Krens’ masterful performance as the shellshocked Hibbert – tragic and ghost-like in an otherwise boisterous environment. A comparable desperation was presented in the brief but arresting appearance of Harry Scupham as the captured German soldier, while the enthusiastic commitment to duty displayed in Robbie MacGuffog’s portrayal of Broughton seemed to encapsulate the respect for military service shared by soldiers of both sides. Violet Mackintosh once again proved herself to be an outstanding and indispensable Stage Manager as she valiantly kept the endless supply of meals moving on and off the stage exactly on cue. Paul Cox’s lifelike recreation of a dug-out and the No-Man’s Land beyond with its barbed wire, abandoned helmets and weapons showed a perceptive attention to detail, as did the realism of Jamie Fenton’s lighting design and the costume design by Dale Armitage. Alex Arkwright’s stark trumpet variations on the Last Post sustained the continuity of the action through the transitions, and by the time the piece reached its harrowing conclusion many a tear had been shed. This was a credit to all involved and a most worthy component of the Armistice weekend. JD

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Lower School Play After Juliet by Sharman Macdonald

The Lower School play was Macdonald’s clever sequel to Shakespeare’s classic tale of star-crossed lovers. In this modern, humid Verona the Capulet and Montague feud stews in the Mediterranean heat, as those left behind by the couple’s tragic loss tussle with the consequences. Jane Darby’s riveting production was simmering with all the violence and passion the play demands. A very committed group of Remove and Hundred pupils produced this piece in little over four weeks and it was delivered with great professionalism and focus.

LOWER SCHOOL PLAY

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rom the outset we were greeted by a theatre transformed into a cross between a junk yard and children’s playground. Rusty metal objects, an old cooker and car tyres were mixed with swings, flowers and toy boxes. This was an immediate assault on the spectator and felt like walking into the aftermath of an apocalypse; the perfect setting for a city after a riot and on the cusp of war. The childhood innocence of the swing and climbing rope seemed far more threatening in this context and – rather like the thrashing snare drum and cymbals that punctuated the action – it demanded our attention.

This was a total ensemble piece of theatre. The characters remained on stage throughout observing the action, making the ground feel like it had ears. The lack of privacy this created gave the hushed, tense conversations a beautiful sense of pace and urgency. It would be wrong to single out any one performance here – this was a complete team effort. It is remarkable to witness a group of pupils take on such a challenging piece and face it head on. This production did not pull its punches; it whirled with all the energy and violence of youth, whilst never allowing us to forget the tragic consequences it can lead to. DK

“It is remarkable to witness a group of pupils take on such a challenging piece and face it head on.” 68


ARTS & R EV IEWS

Illumination A Talented Bunch Biba Tarn (MM)

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he Michaelmas Illumination kicked off with an original piece by lyrical genius Freddie Elmberg whose heartwarming original song called Teddy and Tilly described a couple he met at an old people’s home. His soulful vocals and talent as a pianist held the audience in awed silence. I reckon we’ve found our generation’s Ed Sheeran.

Ellis-Bextor-esque together with David’s keyboards and harmonising vocals made for a very stylish performance. Next up Tom Cook roused the audience with his amusing but risqué, rap. This act was aptly summed up by the words of Head Boy, Virat Talwar, ‘that will probably be a caution’! No doubt this one will be the talk of the Common Room for a while, but move aside Eminem!

Freddie was followed by a stand-up comedy routine on life as a Muslim in 2017 by Mohammed Sheikh. His clever, if politically incorrect, insight and wit won much laughter from the audience. Next up was Biba Tarn on vocals accompanied by Charlie Stafford on the guitar. These two Remove girls definitely proved their worth with their performance of Stronger Than Me which gave Amy Winehouse a run for her money.

Sophie Morelli (CO)

ILLUMINATION

Peta Dixon and David Poole sang a very melodic duet of See you Again by Tyler, The Creator. Their voices complemented each other perfectly. Peta sounding very Sophie

The crowd hushed again as Jess Walsh Waring, Georgia Beattie and Maddy Avery came onto the stage. The trio sang Stay by Rihanna, exhibiting the melodic combination of their different but equally euphonious voices. Sophie Morelli concluded the night with an extremely impressive solo performance of All I Ask by Adele. Many thanks to chief organisers Millie McKelvey and Martha Doyne, and hosts Virat Talwar and Jamie Hartley. Jess Davy (MM)

Charlotte Stafford (MM)

David Poole (B1)

Tom Cook (C1)

“His soulful vocals and talent as a pianist held the audience in awed silence.” Freddie Elmberg (BH)

Virat Talwar (C2)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

The Penny Reading Deus Dat Incrementum

THE PENNY READING

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he Ellis Theatre was home to a fascinating new project this term – Jane Darby’s production of Deus Dat Incrementum. This original work was created to celebrate 50 years of girls at Marlborough College and was inspired by the BBC Points West feature that aired in 1968. The work was a brilliant fusion of verbatim interviews juxtaposed with highly comedic first encounters between the boys and the brave first cohort of girls. A highly talented ensemble executed this in performance demonstrating enormous ability in working in a number of different styles; ‘mocumentary’, rehearsal room chaos and an early school production of Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost. The challenge of working in these conflicting styles was brilliantly realised by a team of very committed actors producing an evening that was both highly entertaining and very poignant. Zoe Combe’s boisterous Nell was full of the fire and ambition necessary for these pioneering girls and was beautifully contrasted with by Violet Mackintosh’s sharp Catherine and Claudia Vyvyan’s politically driven Meg. Equally as dynamic was the comedic passion of Ellie Allan’s Sybil along with Mimi Grant’s reserved and romantic Rose.

Isabella Forshaw’s thoughtful shyness was both hilarious and moving in her interpretation of Miss Garnston-Smith providing a really good cross-section of Marlborough’s first female students. The girls revealing interviews were equally as shocking as they were familiar. Whilst many things have changed we were reminded of the pioneering spirit of these students and in turn the forward thinking ethos of the college. The TV presenting duo, Nell and Jeremy, were brilliantly portrayed by Nell and Toby Hargrove, hosting the interviews and framing the whole evening with their dated wit and gender-shocked antics. Equally up to the task were the boys led by Max Foulds as the beleaguered ‘Drama Captain’, Killigrew. Finn Taylor’s feminine wyles were put to the test as the outrageous Kynaston frustrated with the limited talents of Jack Redmayne’s brilliant Dryden. The romantic elements of the evening belonged to both Nell and Ijah Ofon’s Hart; his lessons in acting proving to be a wonderful excuse for a blossoming flirtation. Slapstick, schoolboy comedy was provided in buckets by Oscar Beattie’s Brown and Robbie Macguffog’s Waldow,

who in the final attempt to stage Act V of Love’s Labour’s Lost involved a vast array of alarmingly unsafe props. This was Marlborough Drama at its best; creative, original, entertaining and beautifully detailed. It was very clear the high level of work that had gone into this production both in terms of the carefully crafted characters and the wonderful array of period costumes. The incredibly effective and accurate set design provided an exciting playground for these characters to interact, conflict and ultimately come together in the final after show ‘bar’ (involving, perhaps, a new ‘twist’ on the Twist). The fusion of music, comedy and finely tuned characters led to many wonderful moments – including the TV crew that intervened, observed and judged the action throughout. Backstage was deftly managed by Helena Barton and Violet Mackintosh keeping control over this high energy farce of education, love, theatre and ambition. Congratulations to all involved in what was a highly memorable production; a very fitting tribute to 50 years of co-education and the invaluable contribution that girls have made to the College.

“A highly talented ensemble executed this in performance demonstrating enormous ability in working in a number of different styles.”

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THE PENNY READING

“The incredibly effective and accurate set design provided an exciting playground for these characters to interact.”

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Breaking Boundaries Exam Season Plays Each year the Bradleian hosts a diverse array of theatre projects that push the boundaries of performance and the limitations of our oldest studio space. The Brad has been home to some spectacular experiments this year.

EXAM SEASON PLAYS

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he Upper Sixth produced a vibrant and confronting production of Martin Crimp’s Attempts on Her Life which explore the nature of identity in a world connected by fantasy and fear. This was a fine example of episodic, ensemble driven drama that was performed with enormous maturity and detail. The range of technical and artistic skills on display culminated in a very memorable theatrical event. The Remove drama students produced a diverse season of four original shows that explored a range of subjects from international human rights violations to criminal injustice, self-help and identity. These were the product of an intensive devising process and our youngest dramatists produced some complex and highly engaging work. There was some outstanding performances that hold immense potential for the future of drama at Marlborough.


ARTS & R EV IEWS The Lower Sixth were similarly charged with creating a new work and produced the deliciously dark Flindermouse, an exploration of the fine line between love and abuse. Framed as a science lecture and infused with the devices of Complicite, this group put together a powerful, intoxicating mix of true stories drawn from different time periods and cultures. The detailed characters and impressive physical work added to the impact which left audiences highly disturbed and with a lot to debate.

EXAM SEASON PLAYS

DK

“...this group put together a powerful, intoxicating mix of true stories drawn from different time periods and cultures.�

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The Shell Play The Grimm Tales

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ebecca Thomas and Owen Elton’s production of The Grimm Tales was a feast of storytelling magic framed in the familiar surroundings of a Shell dorm – albeit with rather more silk pyjamas than usual. The driving impulse of these stories as an essential part of growing up was very evident – and it wasn’t afraid of being as painful and dark as it was comical and entertaining. The large ensemble of Shell actors and technicians approached this collection of familiar stories with a fresh energy finding a playful delivery style that moved fluidly between dark forests, dimly lit castles and shameless farmyard antics. The Ellis theatre audience, within Paul Cox’s deceptive set design, could celebrate the important role these stories have played in all children’s lives – stories that have

stood the test of time and been recycled by each generation. This cast attacked each story with a high-octane sense of purpose – these stories were not just merely fantasy, they became weapons to ward off the dark, to delay sleep and imprison the morning. There were lots of impressive performances that presented a colourful range of characters; from a bony witch who was evil beyond all reason to an abusive tailor who wrestled with his wayward goat. The joyful energy was underscored throughout with live music adding to the sense of spontaneous creativity, driving the action towards its inevitable ‘happy ever after’. Congratulations to the whole cast and crew of this impressive, slick and inventive production. DK


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ARTS & R EV IEWS

THE MUSICAL YEAR

The Musical Year A Review by Philip Dukes

Pupils’ Autumn Recital

application and courage in Messiaen’s demanding Theme and Variations.

To open proceedings some delightfully structured and elegant string playing in a Sonata of Scots Tunes by Rose Olver, Hector Scott, Isla Scott, Isabella Morley and Sophie Smith were followed by an accomplished and purposeful performance from new Shell Music Scholar Monty Pretor-Pinney on marimba. Annabel Hannan, Isla Scott and Sophie Smith produced some beautifully expressive lines in the Tchaikovsky trio and Emily Ambrose, bassoon, offered a sophisticated, classy and beautifully crafted rendition of Bozza’s Fantaisie.

To conclude proceedings, Luke Smith, performed Martinu’s Variations on a Slovakian theme with terrific panache and desire ending a fabulous recital that brimmed with huge talent, potential and heartfelt musicianship. Bravo!

Pia Von Wersebe’s performance was brimming with energy and passion, George Nicholson delivered a fearless and engaging rendition of Hindemith’s Trumpet Sonata, with James Eyles restoring calm in a reflective Bach solo movement on flute. Jess Faber demonstrated superb facility and dexterity in a musical and persuasive performance of Chopin’s Revolutionary Study, whilst Shona Scott showed terrific

Sophie Smith (DA)

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Calne Festival Recital The performances of our Music Scholars at this Annual Festival confirmed that we are rich in talent, depth and variety. A Lower School string ensemble playing a Sonata of Scots Tunes provided a spirited, cultured and effective overture to what followed. Annabel Hannan (piano) produced a performance of excellent dexterity and nimbleness, whilst Shona Scott (violin) delivered a sincere and brave account of Beethoven’s Spring Sonata. Darcey Goble’s

performance of Madrigal by Massenet was both enchanting and delicate. Isla Scott, Sophie Smith and Annabel Hannan showed admirable composure and true lyricism in Tchaikovsky’s Chant D’Automne. Jess Faber (piano) produced some sumptuous phrasing and class beyond her years in Mozart’s Adagio in B minor – this was truly magical and profoundly moving. Pia Von Wersebe (violin) showed terrific flair and just the right swagger to ensure her performance of De Falla’s Danse Espagnole was brimming with exuberance and passion, and Salome Northridge was irresistible in Mozart’s Ach Ich Fühls: glorious top B flats, impeccable intonation, excellent rubato and a pleasing stylistic awareness throughout. The concert closed with Luke Smith and James Wright and ensemble performing Vivaldi’s Double Cello Concerto: two ideally matched soloists producing a sophisticated, well-articulated and sensitively shaped performance. A treat indeed from start to finish. PTD


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Royal Over-Seas League Gala Concert This year’s Gala Recital in The Princess Alexandra Hall, at London’s Royal OverSeas began with a regal and splendid display from the 10-piece brass ensemble with excellent contrast to follow from Annabel Chessher in a sophisticated and intricate performance of some solo Bach on guitar. Anna Laakkonen produced a sincere and pure performance of Handel’s Farewell ye limpid springs, accompanied by a sensitive string ensemble, and a brave and well-projected performance from the woodwind quartet. The first half closed with two contrasting but equally committed performances from both the piano duet, Jon Lam and Finn Kverndal and the Chamber Choir, coaxed and moulded with precision by Choirmaster, Adam Staines. The Schulhoff string quartet produced a performance of terrific spirit and energy followed by an excellent percussion duo from Molly Corfield and Florence Tuckey before James Eyles excelled in a performance of Samuel Barber’s Dover Beach accompanied by a fine string quartet. The rousing finale featured Pia Von Wersebe, Luke Smith and Jess Faber’s highly commendable and musical

Emily Ambrose (MO)

Monty Pretor Pinney (B1)

Anna Laakkonen (MO)

performance of Mendelssohn’s D Minor Piano Trio. Altogether, a most persuasive and memorable occasion. PTD

Advent Carol Service An exquisite Service heralded the advent of two important things: one of the most beautiful seasons in the Christian year and the dawn of a new era for the choir under the direction of recently appointed Choirmaster Adam Staines. The Chapel never looks better than the moment when hundreds of hand-held candles are lit and that magical atmosphere of darkness to light is so perfectly and visibly portrayed. Adding music to that experience can be overwhelming. The choir were on terrific form, and there were many highlights: O Magnum Mysterium by Morten Lauridsen was particularly special, with Mr Staines coaxing a beautiful velvety sound from within the ranks, and the opening of the service (sung from the Narthex) of Staines’s own version of Unto Us a Child is Born was a gem. Well done to all involved!

Advent Celebration The annual cross-departmental collaboration between the Modern Languages and Music departments celebrates the season of Advent and the expectation of Christmas through readings in eight languages, interspersed with musical interludes. It provides time to reflect on the messages of hope that this season brings, as well as on the worldwide reach of Christianity through languages and music. The evening was characterised by clear, confident readings and beautiful and thrilling musical performances. All the foreign language readers took up the challenge magnificently, and the sequence, taking us from the prophecy of Isaiah in Italian through to the coming of the Wise Men in German, together with other readings in French, Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Arabic and Japanese, conveyed with care and sincerity the sense and spirit of the texts. The singers and instrumentalists were excellent, expressing the mood of the different songs with skill, sensitivity and fine musicianship. Many congratulations to all on an outstanding and memorable evening.

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Carol Service Trumpets

THE MUSICAL YEAR

Pia Von Wersebe (CO)

AJB & PTD

@MCol_Music Percussionist’s-eye-view…

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and it was entertaining as much as it was revealing. We had singers, haggis stabbing, bagpipes, comedy, crooners, amateur brass ensembles, elephants (in the form of a double bass solo) and a good old fashion rock band.

Bobby Cox

THE MUSICAL YEAR

Bobby’s 24-hour Music Marathon In spectacular style and with an extraordinary team effort the College presented a 24-hour music marathon in memory of Bobby Cox and in support of Bobby’s Fund, which in turn supports The Brain Tumour Charity and the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. Some 300 performers took part, presenting over 250 different pieces of music and raising over £7,500. There were all manner of events in this live music extravaganza: they ranged from the serious to the fun and from the intimate to the downright absurd! Starting in the sanctuary of the Chapel with a reflective and peaceful performance from the Chamber Choir by candlelight that contrasted perfectly in style and content by Big Band who followed on from them in the Goodison. Next came a bespoke one hour of Music Scholar performances with particular congratulations to Shona Scott, James Wright and Christopher Beswick for some delightful music making. The Common Room cabaret was an opportunity to hear some of the hidden talents of Marlborough College staff

Minnie Feather (MM)

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‘Through the Night’ amounted to full-time music staff and friends each grabbing an hour to ensure a continuous chain, bringing us into the daylight of the ‘Breakfast Club’ which was presented by Sinfonia Strings’ and a whole array of individual junior performances. Next came the sung Eucharist in Chapel, book-ended by extended organ voluntaries from Ian Crabbe, and thereafter half-anhour of very special music making from the Prep School pupils of St Francis. The Master then delighted the assembled company with some Handel (tenor and piano) before the visiting music teachers entertained with a musical potpourri leading into a two-hour Choral Society workshop of Advent Carols with Adam Staines. In preparation for the grand finale, there then followed an open orchestral rehearsal in the Ellis Theatre, and as the audience gathered in the Ellis Foyer they were treated to some fabulous informal music making from the Funk and Soul Band, Freddie Elmberg and the Saxophone Quartet. PTD

Orchestral Concert The 24-hour Music Marathon weekend culminated in a tutti forza concert featuring the Chamber Orchestra and Symphony Orchestra who played as though the weekend had only just begun, it was an incredible spectacle. The Chamber Orchestra, beginning with Górecki’s Three Pieces in Old Style

Freddie Elmberg (BH)

Darth Vader conducts theme to Star Wars

opened with modal wistfulness before developing into a much broader sound, punctuated by some percussive bell-like string playing. An exciting and jaunty sound for the second movement, before a more mournful and darker timbre resonates through the final movement. Fiddlers’ Farewell opens with a poignant melody that unravels through beautiful harmonic sequence before concluding with a spritely reel, drawing the piece to a sparkling conclusion. As the Symphony Orchestra took to the stage, it was fortuitous that Darth Vader appeared to conduct the Theme from Star Wars by John Williams. This was a particularly special moment as this piece honoured the memory of Bobby Cox as one of his favourite pieces of music. Following this, The Planets (Mars, Saturn, Jupiter) by Holst gave a rousing conclusion to the finale of the Music Marathon, depicting the vast scale of the solar system with such a colossal sound. It was a pleasure to hear the original and fully orchestrated Thaxted theme on which I Vow to Thee My Country is based. The overriding experience was one of terrific energy, a sense of community, and one of hope. Precious ingredients for life. AOJS

Molly Corfield (MM)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Miya Scott (MO)

Carol Services The Christmas Carol Services under the expert direction of new Choirmaster, Mr Adam Staines followed the format of the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols as pioneered by Bishop Benson at Truro Cathedral in 1880. Four very brave choristers had the honour of commencing the service with the famous solo verse of Once in Royal David’s City. Anna Laakkonen, Georgia Beattie, Jessica Walsh-Waring, and Francesca Hamilton all produced a beautifully atmospheric opening and their high standard was maintained and amplified by the Chapel Choir from thereon. The variety of music was eclectic, ranging from sixteenth-century counterpoint to the so-called ‘vertical minimalism’ of contemporary America. Of course, it wouldn’t be Christmas without John Rutter, whose vibrant Star Carol perfectly captured the celebratory tone. A personal highlight was an anthem by British composer: Will Todd’s sublime My Lord Has Come. The expansive choral writing atop a low bass drone allowed the choir’s talents to shine, with many a tear shed in the congregation. The beautiful was not at the expense of the bombastic, however, as the traditional descants were complemented by a new fanfare and three trumpets that threatened to blow the roof off the chapel.

group of young musicians. For the 2018 performance the Adderley again provided the perfect setting, with particular praise and thanks to Mr Mattinson and Miss Toomer for their detailed preparation and, in Miss Toomer’s case, sensitive piano accompaniment at the event. PTD

Spring Pupils’ Recital With so much to admire in age, stage and the variety of programme – from solos to chamber, through to larger ensemble works, this recital worked quite beautifully. Sophie Smith led from the front with a sophisticated and refined performance, followed by some spirited, brave and well prepared performances from Monty Pretor-Pinney, Poppy Evans, Sasha Hewett, Isla Scott, Rose Olver and Sophie Smith (again). Emily Ambrose mesmerised the assembled company with some astonishingly virtuosic recorder playing (including playing two recorders at the same time!) followed by a sumptuous Chanson de nuit from Isla Scott. Brandenburg 6 is a tricky work indeed, but huge credit to Sophie Smith (again), Miya Scott, Issy Haynes, Luke Smith, James Wright and Mr Bartlett for a really commendable and buoyant performance here.

Next up was the talented Tate Oliphant with a spot of well-crafted Brahms, then a fragrant and mellifluous display from the Saxophone Quartet, followed by the delicate and intricate tones of Annabel Chessher on guitar (mobile ring tones and all contained within the actual piece). Pia Von Wersebe sprinkled some magic on proceedings, ably assisted by Miya Scott and Jess Faber in Shostakovich’s haunting Prelude whilst Nico Fletcher’s brooding trombone solo from Mahler Symphony no.3 offered superb contrast indeed.

THE MUSICAL YEAR

Carol Services

James Eyles provided yet further colour and charm in Fauré’s gorgeous Fantaisie and Checkie Hamilton delivered a moving and poignant rendition of Purcell’s exquisite Dido’s Lament (bravo) after which Jess Faber presented an impressive (and seemingly effortless) performance of Poulenc’s tricky Toccata. The penultimate work in this altogether wonderful concert came in the form of Beethoven’s A Major Cello Sonata, delivered here with panache and charisma by Luke Smith. Freddie Elmberg was recently awarded a place at the RNCM on the Popular Music course and it’s easy to see why after his performance Winter (composed by Freddie himself). This was a heartfelt and passionate end to this fabulous concert. PTD

James Bartlett

Liederabend Perhaps one of the most anticipated and most enjoyable recitals of the year is that of the Liederabend which promotes a wonderful line up of French, German and Italian songs in a collaboration between the Music and Modern Languages departments. A team of talented linguists translate the text of the songs which are in turn performed by an equally talented

Hester Bromovsky (MM)

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Choral Society Concert A new era, a new dawn and certainly a bright one. Enter Adam Staines, Marlborough College’s new Choirmaster and conductor of Choral Society. Staines chose an interesting programme. The opening work was Bruckner’s powerful Te Deum in which he coaxed a majestic response, brimming with drama, pathos and passion, ably supported by the choir, orchestra and soloists alike. It has depth, a rich and varied harmonic language and with a full orchestration it packs a punch, choir top Cs and all.

Jess Faber (CO)

Jazz Evening

THE MUSICAL YEAR

One of the more informal occasions of the musical year is the highly popular Jazz Evening. After a whirlwind Lent Term of musical events, this is a chance for parents, staff and pupils to enjoy a convivial evening and relax, to the tune of some inclusive, but high-quality music making. All yeargroups are represented, and regular solo spotlights offer individual chances to shine, alongside the massed forces of the Big Band and the Jazz Ensemble expertly prepared and presented by Mr Arkwright and Miss Lambert. The Marlburian lends itself very well as the venue, both as a visual spectacle and acoustically: you can literally hear every detail, and with audience seated at tables (café style) and performers on stage risers, it really is a most congenial evening. Congratulations, then, to all the performers for producing such a fine conclusion to the term. PTD

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Chamber Orchestra Concert A perfect concert that featured Brandenburg 3, a world première and a guitar concerto by Vivaldi in a beautiful church with a lush acoustic. Head of Strings, Hector Scott, is developing something very special with this group, and in this, the latest foray into local churches for performances within our community, the large audience was treated to a feast of high quality string playing which would sit comfortably alongside any specialist music school ensemble of the same nature. The Brandenburg was excellent, with great discipline in articulation, shape and rhythm throughout. This really

Evensong at St Paul’s St Paul’s: it’s vast, it’s spectacular, and it’s had a cathedral on the site since 604AD. Every time I go I stand in awe at the infrastructure, the detail, the acoustic – the overwhelming sense of something beyond ‘the every-day’. Imagine, then, the impact on a young Marlburian to have the experience and privilege of singing Evensong – perhaps the most soothing and inspirational moment in the Christian week – in such a place. I doubt they’ll ever forget it and in the end, that’s actually what a great education is all about: an experience for life. PTD

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By contrast, Mozart’s Requiem which followed seems, at times, almost intimate. That’s not to say it didn’t have drama too, but of a different kind. Joe Arkwright’s (SU 2010–15) stunning trombone solo in Tuba Mirum was just sublime and with each of the excellent soloists, Michael Bundy, James Oxley, Susanna Spicer (SU 1979– 81) and Mary Bevan, all contributing with some ravishingly expressive lyricism, this proved to be a dynamic and engaging performance throughout.

Annabel Chessher (LI)

set the scene for Edward McGuire’s world première of his Wiltshire Serenade that followed. Shona Scott and Anna Laakkonen were the persuasive soloists with generous support offered from the orchestra throughout. The concert concluded with Vivaldi’s delightful Guitar Concerto in D major. Here, Annabel Chessher produced a performance of class and sophistication (the slow movement was just ravishing) with Hector Scott coaxing a thoroughly sympathetic sound from the accompanying strings. In summary, this was a magical concert brimming with all the necessary discipline from the rhythm and articulation to the musical shape, a combination of which is essential for high quality string playing. Bravo indeed. PTD

Vocal Masterclass The annual Vocal Masterclass is always a special occasion especially when welcoming such a distinguished vocalist as Theresa Goble, Professor of Vocal Studies at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. The event that allows the more seasoned Upper School singers and the younger yeargroups (right down to Shell) to get involved and learn some additional skills. Masterclasses are both tricky and good fun. Tricky because the performers perform knowing what follows is a public (but constructive) dissection – and that’s not easy, good fun because once the barriers are down the ‘masterclass’ experience promotes tremendous improvement, which is both immediate and tangible. The class was initiated by Head of Vocal Studies, David Mattinson and Head of Keyboard, Clare Toomer whose energy and professionalism is indelibly stamped on proceedings. Watching Miss Toomer accompany Tallulah Chukwuemeka in Maybe this Time with such passion and charisma was truly amazing and overwhelming. PTD

Henry Dukes (BH) in the vocal masterclass


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THE MUSICAL YEAR Choral Society Concert

@MCol_Music Apr 18 Congratulations to our Chapel Choir on a wonderful evensong yesterday. Thanks for having us, @StPaulsLondon!

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Heavenly Music 175th/50th Anniversary Gala Concert

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featuring the hymn tune Thaxted (a favourite of Marlborough College Chapel).

175th/50th ANNIVERSARY GALA CONCERT

olst’s Planets Suite is not an easy piece to play. The occasion was the culmination of a six-month project, welcoming our professional orchestra in partnership, the Southbank Sinfonia, and tying in with the College’s commemoration of 175 years since foundation, and 50 years of girls. Unfortunately, thwarted by the snow, the Beast from the East prevented our guests going west.

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Uranus, the Magician contrasts the playful with the fearsome – an interesting cocktail which was very much exemplified in the low brass. Molly Corfield is to be commended for her fearless and heroic timpani playing – it was the thread which held the entire orchestra together. The piece is written for two timpani players. She played both parts simultaneously.

The pupils, led by Shona Scott played like heroes throughout the entire process in the face of severe meteorological punishment – without the slightest hint of complaint. Marlborough College phoned in its friends to plug the gaps left by the absent Southbank, and we are grateful to all those who jumped at the chance to help us out.

ensemble, with appropriately apocalyptic percussion. This very much set the tone for the rest of the concert.

Framed by some stunning creative writing by Anna Pembroke and Emily Symington, sometimes forming a prelude to the music, sometimes a reflection on it, the five movements performed electrified a chapel packed to the rafters.

Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age followed. An incredibly sensitive mediation, interspersed with energetic flourishes, the movement showcased the expressive cello section, topped by Darcey Goble’s delicate harp playing.

Mars, the Bringer of War opened proceedings with some remarkably committed playing from the entire

Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity is perhaps the best-known section of the work, crowned by the woodwind section, and

@MCol_Music 21 Feb How many musicians can you fit in one room? Putting Neptune together ahead of our collaboration with @ SouthbankSinf

Holst resists the temptation to end bombastically, instead opting for Neptune, the Mystic’s dainty and ethereal timbres. Alice Wood played divinely, with a stratospheric oboe line. An offstage choir, admirably negotiating Holst’s swirling tonality and fading away into the distance, drew the concert to a close. Such astonishing playing was justly met with a standing ovation. This was a very special occasion which will stay with the performers throughout their musical lives. They ought to be extremely proud of themselves; the school is certainly very proud of them. James Bartlett


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Acoustic Excellence End-of-Term Showcase Concert

t the end of a long Summer Term, in the glorious summer heat, the youngest two years at the College gave a concert of an incredibly diverse and eclectic programme in the newly refurbished and recently opened Memorial Hall. The range of pieces was astounding, from the opening Concert Band pieces to the intimacy and mastery of a loop pedal by Tom Phelps, and even a well-known Disney favourite from The Lion King; expertly played on the steel pan by Phoebe Munn.

Joe Oliver’s rendition of Havana by Cabello was fiery and had a sense of flair; Henry Bentley and Isla Scott’s rendition of Bach/Gounod’s Ave Maria demonstrated a beautiful sensitivity and understanding; and Henry Dukes singing Coldplay’s Everglow accompanied by Oliver Samuel on the cajon with MJB and SJ playing the piano and shaker respectively brought the hall to an attentive silence.

concert; the Shell Singers (all 47 of them) ‘en masse’ performed Toto’s Africa to rousing applause. It was an absolute joy to witness all the students involved this evening, and it truly goes to show the Marlburian spirit – rising to the occasion. Congratulations on a wonderful concert! AOJS

It wasn’t just the individual performers that stood out this evening but also the number of students involved in the

END OF TERM SHOWCASE CONCERT

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ORCHESTRA AND ENSEMBLES GALA CONCERT

A Feast of Music Orchestra and Ensembles Gala Concert

Freddie Elmberg (BH)

With the Saxophone Quartet providing a spirited introduction in the foyer of the Ellis Theatre, a capacity audience gathered for this summer’s Gala Concert, and what a feast of music was enjoyed!

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longside beautiful playing, other impressive musical skills, including conducting and composing, added to a memorable celebration of style and musicianship from so many pupils. The concert opened with Brasser playing John Williams’s Olympic Fanfare & Theme, conducted by Checkie Hamilton, whose direction drew a clear, bright tone and excellent dynamics from a well-controlled ensemble. Southern Hymn (Samuel Hazo) and Choreography (Robert Sheldon) which followed provided memorable contrasts, the first sonorous and haunting, the second fast paced and with the full range of percussion in action. An extra item, The Final Countdown, added a tongue-in-cheek reference for Brasser’s Upper Sixth leavers.

With the stage re-set, the audience was treated to Bach’s 3rd Brandenburg Concerto, performed by the Chamber Orchestra. This was an absolute delight, with the pulse of the music well maintained and the driving energy all the stronger through the tight control: a great choice for this talented group of string players. This was followed by Edward McGuire’s Wiltshire Serenade, specially written for the Chamber Orchestra, which allowed the warm string tone to pour out, with Shona Scott (violin) and Anna Laakkonen (viola) adding their interweaving solo lines. We were honoured to have the composer in the audience: he stepped forward at the end to join in the much-deserved applause.

This was followed by the Symphony Orchestra, beginning with Freddie Elmberg singing and playing (piano) his own composition, Enamoured. The opening, with piano, voice and cello, was magical, and the piece built as wind, brass and strings were added. This was a wonderful song of warmth and depth, and the warmth and depth of the audience’s response was entirely heartfelt. The first movement of the Elgar Cello Concerto, performed from memory by soloist Luke Smith, was magnificent. The balance was immaculately judged, with the solo cello at times singing out, at times blending in: moreover, his control of the music inspired the orchestra, with some beautiful conversations between strings and woodwind. Elgar’s Nimrod was majestic, and as poignant as ever, epitomising the control that was a hallmark of the evening. The concert ended on a high, as Salome Northridge (soprano) and Christopher Beswick (tenor) performed the duet People Will Say We’re in Love from Oklahoma! They captured the mood of the song brilliantly, as it moves from shyness to confidence, and once again the audience went on its way marvelling at the skill, talent and versatility of everyone who had been involved in another outstanding concert. Many congratulations to all on a superb evening! AJB

Salome Northridge (IH)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS James Wright (C1)

ORCHESTRA AND ENSEMBLES GALA CONCERT

Christopher Beswick (C1)

Shona Scott (NC)

Checkie Hamilton (MO)

Luke Smith (CO)

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Marlborough College Concert Series Stephen Hough

Stephen Hough

MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE CONCERT SERIES

The opening recital of the 2017/18 series was a sell out to a capacity audience who were treated to some extraordinary artistry from the eminent pianist Stephen Hough. The concert took place in the Ellis and whilst the acoustic is a little on the dry side it is crystal-clear. That clarity further enhanced Hough’s meticulous approach: technical brilliance with some fine articulation, matched by immaculate voicing and colouring, and with that, came the magical sense of witnessing an artist of the finest quality at work. His programme was particularly well chosen. Both halves commenced with a splash of Debussy, and finished with heavyweight works by Schumann and Beethoven respectively. The Schumann Fantasie was particularly persuasive as Hough negotiated some of the notoriously tricky passage work with consummate ease and a lightness of touch, ensuring the music was never heavy or over pedalled. This was a superb start to the new season. PTD

Southbank Sinfonia

Photo: Matt Belcher

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Photo: Sim Canetty-Clarke

Southbank Sinfonia Our Professional Orchestra in Partnership, the Southbank Sinfonia, performed a stunning selection of repertoire which sought to redefine the way one thinks about chamber music. The first half, Grieg’s String Quartet was a revelation. One expects with Grieg to hear traditional Scandi-noir, thick woollen jumpers, hygge, and trolls. Instead, the audience met with an astonishingly modern sonority presented with remarkable power by the small group of musicians. It is a difficult piece indeed – its publication originally delayed as C. F. Peters deemed

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S E A S O N

it too hard to be played by a normal string quartet and insisted on adding a piano part. Grieg simply found another publisher. The demands were obvious, but served to ramp up the intensity with the tiny ensemble filling the cavernous acoustic. After the interval, the main event: an arrangement of Mahler’s Symphony No.1 for chamber orchestra by Iain Farrington. Mahler is renowned for the sheer sense of scale in his symphonies: metaphysically as well as logistically. He wrote for enormous forces (his Symphony No.8 is nicknamed the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and aspired to produce ‘weltanschauungsmusik’: music which reflects the whole universe. What an immense challenge, then, for the orchestra. The orchestration was remarkably nifty: with a horn, a bassoon, and clarinet combining and blending to produce the horn calls so evocative of the romantic idiom, and some fearless onstage-offstage trumpet playing. It was a masterclass in instrumental efficiency, with a full range of colours drawn from so few players. The symphony, nicknamed the Titan, is expansive, dramatic, and heart-rending, and the Southbank Sinfonia more than did it justice. An absolute treat. James Bartlett


ARTS & R EV IEWS

The Sixteen The recital in Chapel given by the illustrious and eminent vocal group The Sixteen was a much anticipated and eagerly awaited occasion. They performed an exquisite programme entitled ‘Poetry in Music’ featuring both well-known and lessfamiliar composers playing versions of the same text which made a fascinating collage.

The Sixteen are renowned for many fine things, but perhaps what was most striking about this performance was the richness of tone, balance (particularly in the larger scale works), and the precision and attention to detail which allowed for a good variety of tonal colour. Such artistry left the audience spellbound. PTD

Craig Ogden The fourth concert was given by virtuoso guitarist, Craig Ogden. ‘Virtuoso’ is a big word, and often overused but in this case, entirely justified. The precision with which Ogden plays is electrifying – in fact if you factor into that the balance, voicing, intonation, rubato and consummate command of the instrument one is left, quite simply, mesmerised. The cleanness of the playing is also worth noting, alongside dexterity and

Craig Ogden

facility, allowing the listener to be drawn to the musical aspect without restriction. The choice of programme was also perfectly presented: a pleasing blend of Bach, a splash of Dowland, the inevitable (but utterly refreshing) Spanish influences and some bucking broncos to spice it up still further. Ogden is also a fine communicator. Expert and intriguing verbal introductions puncture the performance offering a fascinating insight into the complex world of the guitar. Hardly surprising, then, that the packed Ellis Theatre thoroughly enjoyed this intimate yet varied recital, which offered so much in a musical, technical and truly virtuosic capacity. PTD

Ksenija Sidorova Hearing a solo virtuoso performance of the classical accordion in concert was a refreshing, fascinating and, at times, breath-taking experience.

Miss Sidorova is a master craftsman at work both in her complete technical mastery and her characterisation of the music. The programme was predominantly Russian based but hugely varied with a blend of the contemporary and the traditional providing superb contrast throughout. Her charming and informative introductions offered a marvellous insight into the world of the accordion with all its quirks and curious idiosyncrasies – particularly her ability to change the tone with ‘stops’ operated by her chin! What was perhaps most enthralling was her facility, precision and dexterity in the right hand keyboard. Nowhere was this more evident than in Moszkowski’s Caprice Espagnol where Ksenija absolutely dazzled.

MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE CONCERT SERIES

The programme was entirely English with notable highlights being William Harris. The performance opened with his sumptuous anthem Faire is the Heaven, with his penchant for the warmth of D Flat major to the fore), Benjamin Britten, with his masterpiece Hymn to Saint Cecilia to start the second half, some very persuasive music from Jonathan Dove and an absolute gem from Robert Pearsall in his heartfelt arrangement of Lay a Garland.

As we closed the season with this extraordinary concert, we can reflect on hearing some astonishing artistry – and none more so than Ksenija Sidorova and her beautiful world of the accordion. PTD

The Sixteen

Ksenija Sidorova

Photo: Arnaud Stephenson

Photo: SL Chai

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Sustained Endeavour A Level Fine Art – Examination Review

The final section of the Sixth Form syllabus component in the Art School is the examination project. This project tests our A level artist’s ability to develop a theme, refine ideas and plan and prepare for a finished piece or pieces created in a set 15-hour time span under examination conditions. No mean feat!

A LEVEL FINE ART – EXAMINATION REVIEW

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nce the paper issued by the Examination Board was handed out in early February, pupils began exploring their chosen title in earnest. Gathering information like an intense “visual magpie” followed by drawing from first-hand sources based on the chosen topic and close lines to the techniques and ideas of various artists, preoccupied the second month of the year. Our inaugural Visual Arts Week helped hugely, particularly with the initial inspiration. The second half of the short Lent term was taken up with exploring and refining ideas specifically focused in preparation for the examination piece. This is where our Marlburian Artists flourish as their personalities shine though their exploratory work in bringing this project to fruition. Thus well prepared, pupils began with refinement and skill, their final art examination in secondary education. I have no wish to single out pupils as each Upper Sixth artist, last year, gave their best and more than a handful excelled; a fitting conclusion to this course. It’s so pleasing that many are pursing Art or Architecture at university. EFJT

Serena Slatter (IH)

Alex Reeve (LI)

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Lilla Campbell (PR)

Max Money-Kyrle (PR)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Serena Slatter (IH)

A LEVEL FINE ART – EXAMINATION REVIEW

End-of-Year Exhibition Display

Lydia Dickens (NC)

Morgan Pollard (C3)

Emily Symington (MM)

Nikita Trotsenko (C1)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Through the Lens A Level Photography Review

Finn Gordon (TU)

“The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.� Dorothea Lange

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hotography is a growing department within the Art School, offering excellent opportunities to pupils who wish to develop a focused set of creative and analytical skills in lens-based media. The collection of images shown here demonstrate the diverse range of creative endeavours undertaken by the 2017/18 Upper Sixth cohort.

A LEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW

IAW

Arthur Rigg (B1)

Luke Tomiak (PR)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS Sophie Morelli (CO)

Henry Gouriet (C3)

A LEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW

Milo Kicks (C2)

Shona Scott (NC)

Milo Kicks (C2)

Arthur Rigg (B1)

Henry Gouriet (C3)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Creative Expression A Level Fine Art

Lara Thompson (IH)

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hile the Art Department offers a rich and simulating environment in which a versatile range of Art practices flourish, painting remains a favoured approach for many students. Experimental mark-making, colour workshops, observational drawing and developing critical awareness of the techniques of

professional artists all contribute to empowering students with the necessary confidence and ability to confidently manipulate paint. Students have realised increasingly ambitious artistic intentions. The collection of images show a range of students’ diverse painting from within the Personal Investigation unit. JJD

A LEVEL FINE ART

Lydia Dickens (NC)

Florrie Rhodes (IH)

Danijela Antic (SU)

Nikita Trotsenko (B1)

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Serena Slatter (IH)

Lara Thompson (IH)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Lilla Campbell (PR)

A LEVEL FINE ART

Alex Reeve (LI)

Emily Symington (MM)

Lydia Dickens (NC)

Honor Northridge (NC)

Serena Slatter (IH)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Immersive Experience Visual Arts Week Our pupils and visitors were treated to an energetic and highly immersive programme of creative events at Marlborough College, combining workshops, talks and a new exhibition ‘Extraordinary Sketchbooks’ involving invited visiting artists and Art beaks.

VISUAL ARTS WEEK

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o open our inaugural Visual Arts Week, highly regarded printmaker and author, Jane Stobart RE, inspired guests, students and staff with an in-depth, illustrated talk regarding Jane’s fascinating printmaking career. Jane discussed her dedication to drawing and printmaking, showing how her techniques aptly convey contemporary British industrial environments and those who work within them. Students and visitors were also able to talk with Jane and view her keenly observed sketches, etchings and woodcut prints. Fine Art pupil Morgan Pollard (C3 U6) commented:

“Jane Stobart’s ability to transfer her preliminary sketches into more sustained prints, which in themselves had an intensely detailed quality to them, fascinated me from the offset of her talk, through the way in which she was able to capture moving life within her sketches.” GCSE and A level students attended two workshops by Fine Artist, Michael Angove, who initially discussed his art techniques used within Michael’s exquisitely detailed colour pencil drawings. GCSE Hundred pupils were then creatively challenged

Jane Stobart

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with an expressive concertina mixed-media drawing task. Our 6th form undertook a demanding workshop, drawing hidden objects via touch only, and successfully tackled a further task in conveying weight and texture of forms purely by the weight of pencil line. Michael added:

“For the enigmatic subject of art, I believe introducing students to practising artists and designers to be vital. To be a part of this introduction was both thrilling and illuminating, for me and hopefully for the art students. I met many eager pupils who were inquisitive, questioning, coherent and polite. They responded well to the sketchbook tasks and quickly took up the drawing challenges with gusto.” Each morning, painter Martin Beek braved the cold, but bright February days, to create canvases outside, around the College campus, whilst intermittently chatting with many pupils who were eager to see his progress. Martin provided a new approach to observing architecture, for his workshop with our Art scholars, via studying local buildings from the Art School windows.

Michael Angove workshop

The challenge to capture structure and detail, despite an increasingly darkening February sky, encouraged our pupils to introduce a form of problem-solving that involved adding mixed media to their process. Within the morning Chapel services, Revd Tim Novis and Edward Twohig provided three thought-provoking discussions that revealed the narrative contained within a selection of the historical paintings created by PreRaphaelite artist, Spencer Stanhope, which gloriously illuminate the Chapel. We closed our much-valued week, with a thoroughly enjoyable talk held within the Garnett Room, by Martin Beek, Edward Twohig and Jonathan Parnham. Our theme focused on our enduring commitment to working ‘plein-air’, rather than studying nature via photography. Illustrated talks and live examples of work provided rich detail for this memorable event. We would like to thank all the artists who have so kindly contributed to Visual Arts Week and provided such richly influential works for our ‘Extraordinary Sketchbooks’ exhibition. JHP


ARTS & R EV IEWS Pupil Sketches

Martin Beek workshop

VISUAL ARTS WEEK

Martin Beek

Michael Angove workshop

Gallery

Sketchbooks Exhibition

Jane Stobart

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

A Personal Response Hundred Fine Art Exam Work

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nce again, an impressive variety of work was created for the Art GCSE exam.

Working with independence, flair and dexterity, each pupil created an individual project recording their ideas, exploring materials and developing personal responses to their chosen starting points. From ‘In the news’ and ‘Personal histories’ to ‘Light and dark ‘ we were delighted with the breadth of creativity and rigour that was evident. Final pieces included an impressive Installation alongside highly detailed paintings, relief prints and etchings, as well as a range of mixed media pieces exploring innovative combinations of materials and techniques.

HUNDRED FINE ART EXAM WORK

RLTB Kit Speirs (B1)

Harry Lack (CO)

Bella Bullen (EL)

Tom Williams (BH)

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Jessica Reeve (NC)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Oscar Tosh (B1)

Lila Greenwood (NC)

Poppy Hughes (MM)

HUNDRED FINE ART EXAM WORK

Francesco Faccini (CO)

Fred Booth (B1)

Georgina Cowen (MM)

Poppy Cripwell (MM)

Jamie lawrence (PR)

Lydia Hunt (IH)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Meal for One Remove Ceramics Project

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upils were set the challenge of accurately making a favourite meal entirely out of clay. Maquettes were used as a means of testing visual ideas alongside learning the various technical skills needed. A faithful replication of shape, texture and colour became important formal qualities to consider. This project required each student to carefully observe and experiment in their approaches to manipulating clay and the resulting outcomes are a testament to their playful but purposeful endeavours.

REMOVE CERAMICS PROJECT

IAW

Charlotte Stafford (MM)

Chikamdili Dozie Ajaegbu (C1)

Guy Robertson (BH)

Poppy Evans (MM)

Ella Beardmore-Gray (IH)

Marina Bokhari (DA)

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Luci Imi (EL)


ARTS & R EV IEWS

The Art of Drawing Upper Sixth and Lower Sixth Art

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rawing can be utilised as more than recording with pencil on paper; mark making is necessary for many approaches to image creation, from investigative composition planning, exploring the structure of the human form, to becoming a key component of an overall mixed media resolution.

“Drawing is the artist’s most direct and spontaneous expression, a species of writing. . .”

Edgar Degas

The works provided within this presentation have been carefully selected to convey the importance of drawing as part of the creative process, and specifically, within a Fine Art context.

Lara Prendergast (IH)

Lilla Campbell (PR)

Max Money-Kyrle (PR)

Florrie Rhodes (IH)

THE ART OF DRAWING

JHP

Diddy Stewart (EL)

Samuel Spark (TU)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

MOUNT HOUSE GALLERY EXHIBITIONS REVIEW

Creative Encounters Mount House Gallery Exhibitions Jazz, a portfolio collection of all 20 prints by world renowned artist, Henri Matisse, brought exquisite design and brilliant colour palettes to our opening exhibition of the academic year. These now classic works were created initially by Matisse as original paper cut-outs depicting joyful circus and theatre themes. Fine art prints from the artworks were subsequently produced to be enjoyed within a limited edition publication. Jazz has now become one of the most celebrated artists’ books in the history of 20th-century art. The title Jazz was chosen, as Matisse approved of the suggested connection between art and musical improvisation. English composer, Vaughan Williams, mentioned;

“The dark rhythms, rolling counterpoint, happy staccatos, and jolting dissonances of this “Jazz” will sound for ever. Matisse has taught the eye to hear…” In October, Julia Schuster our 2017/18 Artist-in-Residence, introduced our community to a thought-provoking multidisciplinary collection of artworks titled Kontakt. Through transforming the familiar Victorian gallery space at the Mount House, Julia presented a highly contemporary show to complement her perceptive art, which questions human awareness, connectivity, touch and identity. Visitors gained an insight into the breadth of Julia’s creative practice which includes

Julia Schuster

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Julia Schuster

Jazz by Matisse

examples in ceramics, film, photography and the written word. Myriad artworks by Edward Twohig, Head of Art at Marlborough College, graced the Mount House Gallery walls to close the Michaelmas Term. Edward creates fluent observational ‘plein-air’ drawings of the natural world. His lyrical etchings and dry-points convey passion in capturing locations which resonate with him, whilst acknowledging the influence of William

Edward Twohig

Blake and Samuel Palmer, in particular. Within this in-depth exhibition, visitors were able to further view a selection of works undertaken in Azerbaijan. The visually informative Print REbel: 50 Prints by Francis Seymour Haden opened for the new year and term. Extraordinarily intricate etchings by the eminent Victorian surgeon, Sir Francis Seymour Haden, were available to study and celebrate for the bi-centenary of his birth. Haden was


ARTS & R EV IEWS surgeon to Queen Victoria as well as Revd George Cotton and Revd George Bradley (two successive Masters of Marlborough College) amongst others. Haden practised drawing to steady his hand for incisions at the operating theatre. His precision is mesmerising. Prints from this memorable display were included in the comprehensive show Print REbels: Haden, Palmer, Whistler and the Origins of the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers curated by Edward Twohig, which opened at Bankside Gallery, London, in June.

Extraordinary Sketchbooks Exhibition

Extraordinary Sketchbooks Exhibition

To coincide with our inaugural Visual Arts Week, printmaker and exhibitor, Jane Stobart, officially opened Extraordinary Sketchbooks. The detailed exhibition presented an extensive collection by 14 highly accomplished artists, ranging from large-scale expressive paintings and ink brush studies, to intricately drawn resolutions, works in silver, collagraphs and etchings. Uniquely, the resolved art on display were able to be seen alongside the original sketchbooks by the exhibiting artists. The show provided a richly informative diary of specialist working techniques. Various paintings and sketchbook studies were created on location by Martin Beak, Tyga Helme, Olivia Lomenech-Gill, Jonathan Parnham, Nick Pollard, Sadie Tierney and Edward Twohig; whilst experimental sculptural relief works using

Extraordinary Sketchbooks Exhibition

plaster and silver were adeptly originated by Meryl Ainslie. Insightful parallels were realised in the exquisite drawings and investigative compositional design within the works of Michael Angove and Katherine Jones, accompanied by abstract explorations from Melanie Russell. Jonathan Parnham, through his curation, communicated the importance of artists’ visual notes and working explorations being presented alongside resolved art. Jane Stobart and many visitors have regarded the exhibition as inspiring in conveying the close links between sketchbooks and final works, which have not previously been seen within a gallery context.

MOUNT HOUSE GALLERY EXHIBITIONS REVIEW

Print REbel: 50 Prints by Francis Seymour Haden

The theme for this year’s annual Art Scholars’ Exhibition was ‘175/50’; a reflection on the 175th anniversary of the opening of the College for boys, as well as 50 years since girls first joined. The Scholars’ group were asked to interpret the theme as they wished, with many expressing personal insights and experiences in being a Marlburian. This also included a focus on the history of girls studying at Marlborough College. Valuable reference was found in the College archives in relation to the first girls who joined the College.

Extraordinary Sketchbooks Exhibition

To brighten the inclement spring days, Rose Shorrock created an invigorating collection of new and recent paintings. An abstract colourist, Rose inspired all, with

Extraordinary Sketchbooks Exhibition

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Rose Shorrock

OM 175/50: New Contemporaries

MOUNT HOUSE GALLERY EXHIBITIONS REVIEW

This intriguing work was surprising upon closer examination. What appeared to be gravel was actually hand-made ceramic pieces, imprinted with corn leaves, leaving a beautiful imprint on the clay.

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Our 2017/18 exhibition programme concluded with Full Circle Half Knowledge, the culmination of Julia Schuster’s artist residency at the College. This show brought together new work that aligned her deep fascination involving the human condition, nature and the written word with inspiration from the College and local environment. Emily Symmington stated:

OM 175/50: New Contemporaries

OM 175/50: New Contemporaries

her flair for manipulating high key colour, combined with visual influences from sounds, sights and memories of the local landscape, in particular the Pewsey Vale in Wiltshire. Rose, who works on a number of her vibrant paintings simultaneously, builds up a layered and richly expressive surface using acrylic, which visitors to the show highly enjoyed. OM 175/50: New Contemporaries, provided a fascinating collection of art from eight recent Old Marlburians. Each young artist presented investigative and unique work from both university and exhibitions. A diverse variety of techniques were on show; Chloe Campbell (MO 2005–10) created beautiful paper cut works describing the city of London, whereas India Dewar (NC 2002–07)

painted a series of dreamlike blue teddy bears on to linen. Further explorations included intricately layered paintings on canvas suggesting dilapidated architectural forms by Jonathan Small (SU 2002–07), accompanied by delicate, elegantly textured etchings and screen prints of interiors by London based artist, Rose Electra Harris (NC 2005–10). Freya Wood (NC 2001– 06) has recently created a series of richly coloured mixed media paintings depicting scenes from Freya’s favourite Wiltshire landscapes. Superb finesse has been achieved within the plein-air pencil studies by Laura Jardine Paterson (LI 2009–11) and expressive pastels from India, by Tyga Helme (MM 2003–08). Gravel by Emilie Atkinson (LI 2007–09) seemed at first glance to be a simple, small pile of stones.

This exhibition – video and vessels alike – fused the delicate and the rustic, the artist and the objects, to provoke a stimulating conceptual, as well as visual, experience.

OM 175/50: New Contemporaries

OM 175/50: New Contemporaries

Julia Schuster

“When walking around Julia Schuster’s ethereal collection of vessels, I could not help but reach out to touch the glazed, sanded and raw surfaces of these strangely beautiful, or rather beautifully strange, pieces.”

Thank you to all our exhibitors and many visitors to the Mount House Gallery this past year. Compiled and edited by JHP, from original articles by Freya Jones, Petra Bigham, Emily Symington, EFJT, JHP and Morgan Pollard.


ARTS & R EV IEWS

A Year as Artistin-Residence Julia Schuster

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to three sustained works. A variety of media, such as painting, drawing, film, installation, photography, ceramics and textiles, demonstrated the diverse artistic ability of Marlborough College pupils.

ulia quickly became engaged with the creative and busy academic life at Marlborough College. As a multidisciplinary artist, who recently graduated in Ceramics and Glass from the Royal College of Art, Julia appreciated being provided with two working studio spaces; the Art School for research, drawing and planning of her projects and the Ceramics Room for her experimental sculptural practice.

Julia was awarded the prestigious ‘Future Light in Ceramics’ prize for 2017/18, becoming an ambassador for innovative art across Europe. A number of works displayed in her initial Mount House Gallery exhibition were part of Julia’s winning submission.

Visitors were welcome to join Julia at her studio spaces to discuss her current research and experiments. Students often commented on appreciating the many discussion-based sessions Julia offered to classes and the Art Scholars and the experimental nature of her practice, where risk-taking and exploration with local materials became a focus within her residency. Julia’s dedication to reading and research could also be appreciated, as each week she chose a different, inspirational quote for the Art School notice board.

For further details of Julia’s art works, you may visit her website: juliaschuster.net JHP

ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE

Two thought-provoking, highly contemporary exhibitions presenting Julia’s recent and current creativity were held in the Mount House Gallery at the opening and close of the College year. Many lively discussions resulted between our Shell, GCSE and A level students and Julia, regarding her artistic process. Often this led to our students reflecting on extending their own working methods. All yeargroups engaged with the breadth of Julia’s art practice, whether through her ceramic forms constructed from clay discovered and excavated in Wiltshire, or sensitively composed short films and textbased works.

Creating a new collection of artworks and exhibiting in Berlin and Slovenia also provided Julia with an absorbing schedule during her residency at Marlborough. It has been a pleasure to have Julia working within the College and we look forward to hearing news of her continued success.

Our Scholars were pleased to visit the British Ceramics Biennial in Stoke-onTrent, which selected fine examples of Julia’s art works. The Art Scholars were joined weekly by Julia, who also brought her creative support of our annual Art Scholars’ group exhibition. For the 2018 show, each student displayed at least two

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Diversity of Disciplines Art Scholars’ Year Review

T

ART SCHOLARS’ YEAR REVIEW

hursday afternoons between 4.30pm and 6.30pm is a sacrosanct time for Scholars’ Art in the Art School. Activities range across a diversity of disciplines from ceramics, collage, to delicate and vigorous painting – out of which a torrent of creation results. This is work made outside the examination syllabus and sees pupils from the five school years come together and share ideas. The overarching theme across, last year, was ‘175/50’, celebrating 175 years of boys and 50 years of girls studying at Marlborough College. The Scholars’ Exhibition in The Mount House Gallery, held to great acclaim, included at least two works by each of the 22 Art Scholars. Throughout the school year, Art Scholars attended the Ceramics Biennial in Stoke-on-Trent, the opening of Print REbels at the Bankside Gallery, in London, and the Art Scholars’ Supper on the launch evening of ‘Visual Arts Week’ at Marlborough College last February. EFJT Emily Symington (MM)

Morgan Pollard (C3)

Serena Slatter (IH)

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Serena Slatter (IH)


ARTS & R EV IEWS

ART SCHOLARS’ YEAR REVIEW Art Scholars’ Ceramics Trip to Stoke-on-Trent

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Storage GCSE: Product Design Sam Bucks (CO)

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upils produced a wide range of individual projects under the theme of storage. Pupils are required to identify a client and design a storage project that will closely meet their specific needs. These images show the ingenuity pupils have shown as they work with their client in enabling these ideas to become a reality. Algie Lyster-Binns (SU)

GCSE STORAGE

PRA

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Anna Tchen (NC)

Jasper Lloyd-Hughes (C3)

Freddie Cracknell (PR)

Eliot Pears (LI)

Lotte Quinn (IH)

James Ruddell (C3)

Ben Ruoss (BH)

Nicole Egorova (EL)

Max Dyer (PR)


ARTS & R EV IEWS

Integrated Circuits GCSE: Electronic Products

Andrew Jenkin (CO)

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wide range of electronic products were produced this year, including a bike alarm, a display for use in a Ferrari showroom, marketing displays for a computer game and a computer mouse, and a motion sensing illuminated stand for a Burberry scarf.

Programmable integrated circuits are at the heart of our projects and these enable the use of a wide range of sensors and output devices. Pupils gain a wide variety of skills including software programming and electronic circuit building.

Gregory Allin (C3)

GCSE ELECTRONIC PROJECTS

MC

Edward Robinson (B1)

Andrey Sevenyuk (PR)

Alexander Sevenyuk (BH) Ivan Morozov (C3)

Benedict Low (TU)

Domingo Powell (C3)

Olivia Gregory (MO)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Commercial Design

Lara Bracher (MO)

A2 Coursework Sophie Wheeler (EL)

A2 PRODUCT DESIGN

Together with the supporting folio this honey extractor scored a rare 100% at A level. The attention to detail throughout showed an in-depth understanding of the issues concerned with extracting honey from frames.

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Zach Murphy (C3)

Sophie was tasked with a storage unit for gardening equipment that would endure the elements but provide a mobile solution for a large patioed area surrounded by flower beds. She included holders for hanging plants to fit with the theme of the landscaping at her client’s residence.

Zach created a bespoke paint storage unit for a London artist. The unique resin table top was created to act as a mixing table and a visually striking centrepiece.

Sophie Morelli (CO)

Honor Northridge (NC)

Sophie produced a plant display stand to be used outside on the patio of her home in Monaco. She made proficient use of 3D printing to produce the ‘water wheels’ that helped direct water on to the plants.

Honor created a desk chair that was inspired by the architectural work of Zaha Hadid. Her client was a key part and accompanied her on trip to the V&A museum as part of her research and was instrumental in testing the iterative prototypes.


ARTS & R EV IEWS

Harry Pantin (TU)

Tom Elvin (BH)

Harry produced a specialist gun storage unit for securing and transporting a marksman rifle between the armoury and shooting range. He made extensive use of wood veneer and laminates to help form the curved surfaces.

Frank Meehan (C3)

James Isaacson (CO)

A2 PRODUCT DESIGN

Frank created a modular storage prototype to improve the efficiency of drill storage in the DT workshop. He used very precise metalworking processes to create an adjustable, pivoting rack system which can be expanded as required.

As a leading member of the College shooting team Tom was keen to develop a stand that could be used to help support a spotting scope. Hoping to achieve one handed operation Tom used a pre-pressurised pneumatic cylinder to provide the vertical lift.

Max Money-Kyrle (PR)

Max created a range of unique 3D printed components to create a storage device for a local framing business. He was required to store various tools in a way that prevented damage to the current framing job so created a wall mounted prototype with secure housing.

Emily Boom (IH)

Changing the office water bottle is not easy as they are heavy and can put a considerable strain on the user’s back. James produced a platform, which by turning a series of pulleys, was able to raise the bottle high enough to enable it to be slid across and on to the dispenser.

This design of a wine cooler demonstrated an iterative approach in constructing a storage solution which covered a wide range of technically challenging manufacturing methods. It used a cooling unit from an existing portable cool box to provide the necessary temperature drop.

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S P O RT S RUGBY 112 CRICKET 118 FOOTBALL 124 GIRLS’ HOCKEY 128 BOYS’ HOCKEY 132 LACROSSE 136 GIRLS’ TENNIS 138 140 BOYS’ TENNIS NETBALL 142 ATHLETICS 147 BASKETBALL 148 Archie Griffin (C3) 1st XV v Sherborne

CROSS-COUNTRY 148 FENCING 148 FIVES 149 GOLF 149 POLO 150 RACKETS 150 SHOOTING 151 SQUASH 151 SWIMMING 152 WATER POLO 152


SPORTS

Hart which ensured we had momentum whilst Angus Lorimer proved that defence is in the blood. Whilst Mason Hunt shored up our lineout and back row our X-factor came from Tom Hunt.

RUGBY

There were many memorable moments across the term, with the team often scoring more tries than their opposition – giving the squad belief in our principles of play and a platform to launch a proactive year ahead. TPG

Rugby XL P:11; W:4; D:1; L:6

Rugby XV

RUGBY

P:12; W:2; D:1; L:9 Stowe

L

17:19

St Paul’s

L

6:15

Cheltenham

L

14:22

Kingswood

L

3:22

Sherborne

L

28:31

Clifton

L

29:30

Canford

L

20:30

Radley

L

19:31

Downside

W

20:10

Bishop Wordsworth’s

D

28:28

Abingdon

W

17:10

Cranleigh

L

12:43

SQUAD: D Coulson (Capt), H Brooks, H Bunn, R Campbell, D Charnaud, L Clarke, L Cloves, W Cook, C Cooke, T Elvin, J Fellowes, H Foster, J Fry, A Griffin, B Hall, T Hargrove, M Hart, H Heneage, J Hodgskin, M Hook, M Hunt, T Hunt, B James, A Lorimer, M Olivier, B Parrott, O Paton, Z Sharyn, M Staples, C Thomas, J Wright

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The 2017 rugby programme started within the latter stages of the summer holidays where a squad of 30 boys moved into Summerfield to start the pre-season campaign and also start a new era for Marlborough College. There was a glorious start to the term as we invited Colston’s to Hamersley, where the teams joined forces to create a healthy development programme for both squads to prepare for the term – and what a term it proved to be. The season started with a calamity of errors resulting in a penalty to Stowe to sneak a win against the XV and this was the beginning of what can only be described as a term of near misses. Within one game, we had lost our main axis point of Will Cook at nine and Billy James at fly-half, although with a depth in ability in the College many players were more than happy to put on an XV shirt. On many occasions the team toiled to get in front of their opposition to be denied by some controllable situations, yet it took an immense amount of resilience to overcome such adversity. The determination of the squad was led by our imperious leader Dom Coulson who showed an immense work ethic and direction for the team. His defence and place kicking often kept the XV in the game. There were consistent solid performances from Benjy Parrot and Myles

It has been a great season for the XL. The early season saw a convincing win at Stowe which included the likes of Angus Lorimer, James Hodgskin and Harry Foster, all quickly stepping into the XV set-up. Injuries in the XV saw both the captain (Oliver Paton) and vice-captain ( James Wright) called into the XV squad, as well as Harry Heneage leading into half-term. Heneage led the attack as the team’s fly-half with maturity and poise throughout the season. These significant losses of personnel told on the squad in the latter stages of the first half of the season. However, half-term was welcomed following arguably the best performance and victory of the season away at rivals Clifton, where some Herculean defence saw the boys hold out for a narrow win. The introduction of Jack and Oscar Waters, the former ending the season as the top points scorer after such a successful run of games with the ever-reliable left boot (28 points), and welcome return of personnel galvanised the squad for the second half of the season, typified by the win against Bishops, draw with Abingdon and epic curtain-closing battle with Cranleigh. A special mention must also go to Ben Hall, whose ferocious defence and reliability in attack made a telling difference to the side. Congratulations to our Upper Sixth leavers: front-rows Matt Hook, Tom Elvin, James Isaacson, Rhodri Campbell; second rows Alex Roe and Jack Kirkwood; scrum-half James Wright; wingers Ben Hall and Freddie Hall; and our monumental leader and captain Paton. MJS/BHM


SPORTS

The win against Bishop Wordsworth’s 3rd XV was the highlight, but there were a number of fine performances. The nucleus of the side was from the U6 (many in their second year with the team) – indeed 17 out of 18 members of the last squad were in their final year. They have contributed really well to Marlburian rugby over the years and deserve the success they achieved. RDW

Rugby Colts 1st XV P:10; W:3; D:0; L:7

P:9; W:7; D:0; L:2 The 3rd XV can boast yet another outstanding season. A 78% win record is always something to be proud of, but for a relatively inexperienced team with only three Upper Sixth in it this was particularly impressive, especially with the team doing its customary job of providing players to the upper echelons. The win ratio and points record speak for themselves and reflect the graft and team spirit. This was especially epitomised by the outstanding example of Dylan Cameron, Oli Wilson and Nick Ruddell whose attitude at training was mirrored in the way they gave their all on the pitch. The forward pack led the way and these players were further backed up by the ceaseless efforts of Louis Longfield and the hard hitting Jack O’Hara, glacier-like unstoppable force of James Barnes and the tackling, turnover machine that was Hector Mackellar. The back three rotated through Marcus Redpath, Alfie Fisher, Marlowe Turner and Will Millar, fed by the superb centre partnership of Oli Plaistowe and Oscar Fillingham, with Freddie Pank providing the linchpin between pack and backline. Any good team needs solid leadership and while small in number the three

Upper Sixth of Alex Reeve, vice-captain Henry Newman and captain Ruben Flatischler set the tone. A strong sense of camaraderie is always the cornerstone of 3rd XV rugby and this team had it in bucket loads. They were a joy to spend time with, and Mr Lauze and I thank them for the enjoyment they provided. JPS/TCML

Rugby Open 4th XV P:9; W:5; D:0; L:4

W

13:5

St Paul’s

L

7:35

Cheltenham

L

5:27

Sherborne

L

14:55

Warminster

W

55:0

Clifton

L

5:26

Canford

L

8:12

Sherborne

Cancelled

Radley

L

12:15

Downside

W

29:24

Bishop Wordsworth’s

L

5:36

Cranleigh

Cancelled

SQUAD: W Ackerley, A Hardwick, F Henderson, C Freeman, S Henriques, A Lyster-Binns, A Palangat, B Spink, D Murray, M Wimbush, H Adamson, G Geach, E Abbott, E Corfield, R Milne, H Di Monaco, M Hudson, H Hart

As I put together the invitee list for the endof-season curry I realised that 37 boys had represented the 4th XV this year. Add in the handful who only turned out for the sole 5th  XV game of the year on the term’s first weekend and the number of was in excess of 40. While the constant re-jigging of line-ups and the obligatory search for a fit, willing and mildly capable team every Friday were persistent annoyances for SJD and me, the number can actually be seen as a positive. 40-plus boys were prepared to keep going with rugby when they had the chance to do something else less stressful and less risky.

Well, what to say? I mean, it started well enough, and there was enough talent on show to warrant optimism. We had it all: brawn, a brain or two, some tans, some running lines and passing acumen, a couple of dodgy haircuts, some mild psychotic tendencies once we’d stepped across the whitewash, and the grandson of a renowned philosopher in the front row. What could possibly go wrong?

Those who made that choice were rewarded by being part of a committed and able team who, at times, played some impressive rugby.

Perhaps the most telling statistic of the whole year was this: of the 74 boys in the yeargroup who began the season only 21 remained by

RUGBY

Rugby Open 3rd XV

Stowe

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the antepenultimate week of the season. The few who lasted the course deserve special mention: Henry Grant, Ed Abbott and Marcus Hudson were rocks. Henry and Ed were pillars of strength; Marcus was honesty and integrity incarnate. Di Monaco, Milne and Murray nearly went all the way through the season. Murray grew and grew, showing real potential at hooker, while Di Monaco flatlined at just very, very scary. Milne was the anchor, a defensive titan. Hart was a mouth on legs, but made himself indispensable through grit and sweat. Ackerley puts his head where I wouldn’t put dynamite; but had a great season.

RUGBY

Some outstanding players had desperate luck: Spink was a magician, but too brave and too breakable. Had he played all year, a talented backline would have woven tendrils of beauteous gossamer. As it was, his wrists turned out to be made of gossamer, so that was that! Henderson and Hardwick showed real premiership quality, running up huge physio bills and playing for only 11 minutes each, which was plenty of time for them to drag the team back into the mid-80s with their mullets, while Henry Adamson side-stepped everything in sight, including the second half of our season! Our mountain of a captain was inspirational in all things, but spent more time with the physio than on the pitch. With the calamity of a season wrecked by injury, the boys were fantastic fun and have much, much more to offer than the statistics suggest. Many will play for the XV and XL; all will, I hope, have some memories for life, to go with the lumps and bumps. SCC/TGRM

Rugby Colts 2nd XV P:7; W:6; D:0; L:1 The team entered the season bursting with confidence; the side had gone unbeaten in the JCs, winning the Turner Cup in the process, and contained a cadre of players that were knocking on the door of the 1st team. The side showed real grit to come from behind and win the opener against Stowe, before a terrific performance against a talented St Paul’s side where two sublime tries from Alex Sevenyuk

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tipped the balance. Forwards Bruno Espinosa De Los Monteros, Arthur Davies, Andre Stamp and Freddie Booth, were particularly impressive with bone-crunching tackles and hard yards in attack. Some consistency in the backline was soon achieved in time for the match against Clifton, and the boys ran riot. Max Meyrick bamboozled defenders with his footwork and pace, while Jamie Harvie-Watt and Harry Alexander ran aggressive lines that kept the opposition on the back foot.

Rugby Colts 3rd XV P:6; W:5; D:0; L:1 In the longest term of the year, it was frustrating to play only six matches, with two others cancelled.

The boys were once again deserved winners of the Turner Cup and I congratulate them on this incredible achievement and hope they enjoy their rugby next year.

We had a squad of impressive depth, a squad that needed to be kept busy. Alas, fixtures, let alone competitive ones, are increasingly hard to come by. As such, this season essentially boiled down to two cracking contests, each against a major boys’ school. St Paul’s visited us on the second Saturday of the year. Mighty they were, but we had 22 players to draw on and were no minnows ourselves. In as fine a performance as NJLM and I could recall at this level, we humbled the foe, 26–17. Every facet of the game impressed, from a set piece remarkably clinical after five training sessions, to scintillating play from the backs. It really was a joy to behold. The same could not be said for the Radley match, but only because rarely has a Marlborough side so dominated our great rival and lost. Radley resorted to a kick-and-hope game, and one chance came off. We were majestic across the pitch, except for the final five metres. Woe, woe to this 5–7 blow.

HEBJ

RAS

While the season ultimately fizzled out due to cancellations, the team’s final performance was memorable. The 15–0 score against Radley does not reflect the complete dominance shown – with the ‘Blue Wall’ effectively shutting down the Radley attack. Having weathered the storm, the backs scored two tries that were truly stunning; the first a deft kick from Hugo Thompson that was gathered by Meyrick, and the second an outrageous piece of skill from Kirkman, who took on two defenders and gave a no-look, out-the-back pass to the supporting Ben Ruoss, who dotted down for the score.


Rugby Junior Colts 1st XV W

33:7

St Paul’s

L

5:20

Cheltenham

L

0:12

Dauntsey’s

W

41:10

Sherborne

L

7:17

Clifton

L

21:26

Abingdon

W

12:8

Canford

W

24:0

Radley

W

50:0

Beechen Cliff

L

7:10

Reading Blue Coat

W

17:3

Bishop Wordsworth’s

W

52:7

RGS High Wycombe

W

27:10

Abingdon

L

5:12

Cranleigh

W

29:19

Hampton

L

5:36

SQUAD: M McCullin, A Brink, G Honeyborne, M Bonfiglio, H Mayne, M Hunter, O Claxton-Newman, S Horlock, J Dingley, O Cook, L Dessalles, K Dozie-Ajaegbu, W Hammersley, Z Chukwuemeka, G Robertson, O Phillips, L Cooke, R Plaistowe A measure of the talent this group of players possess is that their season extended through to a fabulous day on 16th January playing for a place in the last 16 of the NatWest Cup. They met a very talented Hampton School side who, on the day deserved the win. Back in September, the term started positively with a win against Stowe. Although Josh Dingley and Oliver Claxton-Newman scored powerful tries, it was clear there was too much reliance on individuals. Losses to St Paul’s and Cheltenham followed and was the start of numerous injuries, which saw others step up under difficult circumstances with one more victory secured in the first half of term, against Dauntsey’s that got us in to round two of the NatWest. A hard-fought win against Abingdon on Hamersley kept us in the NatWest Cup, where Seb Horlock scored a fabulous try using his side step and pace. Fittingly, Will Hammersley was coming into his own as a powerful centre with Zak Chukwuemeka and Kamdi Dozie-Ajaegbu adding pace and power outside him. Strong displays against Canford and Radley followed, not conceding a try in either match. Ollie Cook’s service to Louis Dessalles at 10 was immaculate and his box-kicking a potent weapon. A narrow loss to Beechen Cliff slowed progress but the team bounced back against Reading Blue Coat in the Cup. A fantastic win against Bishop Wordsworth’s saw Hammersley and Dingley running in three tries each and Max McCullin at the heart of the forwards’ action. The biggest game of the season followed: the fourth round of the NatWest Cup against RGS High Wycombe. Excellent defence during a ferocious encounter resulted in a 27–10 win. George

Honeyborne’s final try running the length of the pitch and breaking five tackles is a lasting memory! A defeat at Abingdon followed before the final match of the term against Cranleigh, with a tense display resulting in a 29–19 win and it was a fitting game to end the regular season. We have enjoyed coaching a talented group who are motivated and ambitious. Finally, to the parents who travelled far and wide throughout the season – your support is much appreciated – thank you. TAB/JJLT

Rugby Junior Colts 2nd XV P:11; W:4; D:0; L:7 It soon became apparent that what this group lacked in physicality, they would more than make up for with heart. The season began with a win against Stowe, although this was unfortunately followed by the promotion of key individuals! As always, this presented the opportunity for others and a major success of the season was the unearthing of talents such as Charlie (Sonny Bill) Wright and Henry Drew. Whilst the team suffered several defeats, a measure of their improvement can be seen against superior opposition when the score was kept under control. When facing opposition of a similar stature, this group competed with skill

and tenacity. The victory against a Canford was probably the season’s highlight, as the boys kept the ball alive and moved it quickly. Key players included half-backs Cameron Heyring and Giles Hocking, who controlled the pattern of play with skill. Jasper Laidlaw was a rock in midfield and it was exciting to see the talents of Oliver Munn and Jamie Brooks out wide. Up front, Conor Wall led the forwards and was deservedly named player of the season. The 29 boys who represented the team were a pleasure to coach. JH/JPC

Rugby Junior Colts 3rd XV

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Stowe

SPORTS

P:16; W:9; D:0; L:7

P:11; W:7; D:0; L:4 The JC3s played with passion and considerable skill, eclipsing classy opponents such as Radley, Sherborne and Abingdon. The side made it to the middle of November with an enviable record of played six, lost one, including a compelling 36–0 victory away against the old enemy Radley. The boys favoured a loose style of play, with support runners looking for an off-load. This led to some exciting rugby and the try of the season was scored against Cheltenham from well within our own half by Giles Edwards, flyhacking the ball and careering across Sloping Broadleaze. The top try scorer was Max Davis,

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whose powerful runs made the role of inside centre his own. Max King at prop was voted players’ player and is surely one to watch for the future with his bullocking runs in the loose. Captain Rory Mackellar, tough as anyone in the tackle, won player of the season. PNMF

Rugby Junior Colts 4th XV P:6; W:1; D:0; L:5

RUGBY

This season proved challenging for the boys of the Junior Colts 4th XV, yet their total physical commitment impressed throughout the season. While match results may never quite have reached the highs of our first game with a 40–0 victory over Prior Park, the boys battled through illness and injury to produce some very promising rugby, with a particularly nailbiting match against Malvern which finished in a 21–24 loss. Captaincy was shared between George Chancellor, whose vision and organisation from the fly-half position created some lovely passages of play, and Gabriel Devereux, whose bellowed instructions and support proved crucial at the breakdown. Other stalwart players included Hugh Pender, who made some inspiring runs through opposition lines, while the consistent dedication and work ethic of Guy Mitchell and Hugo Manley led the team throughout the season. Attie de Waal, who tackled anything that moved, was deserving recipient of players’ player of the season. AJH

Rugby Yearlings 1st XV P:11; W:7; D:1; L:3 Marlborough

W

40:14

St Paul’s

L

0:43

Cheltenham

L

0:38

Sherborne

D

17:17

Clifton

L

12:27

Canford

W

24:0

Radley

W

24:0

Beechen Cliff

W

29:21

Bishop Wordsworth’s

W

35:19

Abingdon

W

14:12

Cranleigh

W

29:26

SQUAD: A Darke (Capt), H Dukes, J Hammond, J Walker, A Norberry, A Woolfenden, O Samuel, J Mackinlay, G Gerson, A Summers, W Freeman, T Stephenson-Green, H Cowling, W Hentenaar, D Russell, T Campbell, F Pepper, T Lewis, S Baines, L Alli, S Martin-Jenkins With 30 seconds remaining of the last fixture (a two-hour journey to Cranleigh) the boys were drawing 26–26. In the final play, they forced a penalty; full back Dom Russell stepped up and – as he had done all season – slotted the points sparking scenes of celebration. It was a wonderfully fitting finale for a team whose progress rendered them unrecognisable from

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Rugby Yearlings 2nd XV

the team that had lost by 43 points to St Paul’s in September. Indeed the second half of term saw them go six games undefeated on fortress Polloi, a run that was started by beating Canford 24–0 on the Festival of Sport weekend. Captain and players’ player Archie Darke led by example with ample support coming from leading try scorer (12) Lanre Alli and crash ball specialist George Gerson. Players of the season Harry Cowling and Adam Summers scored 10 tries between them but also came to epitomise the spirit and desire to improve that characterised this team. A turning point was a thrilling 28–20 victory over an unbeaten Radley side with a heroic rush defence led by Will Freeman and George Hentenaar. Most improved player Arthur Norbury stepped his way up from the Bs alongside Tom Stephenson-Green and Ted Campbell while the sparkling feet of Tomos Lewis and Jake Mackinlay terrorised defences. Jonny Hammond was one of six players to play every game of the season and was partnered in the front row by the hard-hitting Henry Dukes and the ever-smiling Jamie Walker. Ollie Samuel and Albie Woolfenden made up the engine room of the second row in a team that quickly learned how much can be achieved when the team comes first.

A win/loss ratio is never a fair measure of a team’s success at this level. It smacks of elitism and the importance of outcome, rather than a focus on process and development. It doesn’t reflect the hours of effort put in at training; a boy’s want to work on his pass off his left hand, his confidence in contact or his drive to improve rucking technique. If these yardsticks were the measure, then this could be regarded as a strong season from this merry band of Yearlings 2. Captained brilliantly throughout by Atticus Adams, he showed great determination and integrity. He was a quiet voice in a referee’s ear and encouraged his team-mates to wear the shirt with pride; a much harder task in the face of defeat. The spine of the team came from Alex Tsereteli, who was tenacious in defence and Sam Elviss, whose work rate was almost superhuman. The glimpses of attack we enjoyed came from the creativity of Oscar Shepherd and hard lines of centres Adam Cripwell and Hugh Goldsbrough. James Watson was also outstanding and typifies what rugby should be about at this level. Working on improving his game awareness and basic skill development, he moved seamlessly from prop to fly-half; amazing.

HLRT/CLH

DRA

P:11; W:1; D:2; L:8


SPORTS P:11; W:7; D:0; L:4 Players in this team have made huge progress in learning to communicate well with one another and play as a team, rather than individuals. They developed an attractive style of running rugby often admired by visiting parents. Passing the ball out of contact to speedy, elusive runners, they scored good-looking tries against weaker teams. They comfortably beat Cheltenham (46–0), Clifton (54–5), Canford (43–0), Millfield (50–7) and Cranleigh (47–10). There were good wins against more competitive sides from Sherborne (38–7) and Abingdon (10–0) – the latter a genuine contest of equals. The boys lost a game against Radley (10–22) which they know they could have won. Sadly, stronger teams with bigger forwards who relished the rough and tumble of rucking exposed the team’s weaknesses. St Paul’s (lost 0–50) was an unwinnable whitewash. More lessons were learnt from closer losses to Pangbourne 1st XV (20–45) and Beechen Cliff 2nd XV (14– 22) and the boys played bravely in defence. At their best, they were imaginative, even thrilling in attack. Young men with especially

bright prospects include Marcus May, Harry Campbell-Walter, Oscar Pownall and Luke Doyne.

Jones also look like players for the future. An excellent team spirit was developed making the experience very enjoyable for all involved.

MBB

COS

Rugby Yearlings 4th XV

Rugby Yearlings 5th XV

P:11; W:6; D:1; L:4

P:4; W:0; D:1; L:3

The Yearlings 4th XV once again showed the depth of talent that we have at Marlborough.

A tough season for the Yearlings 5th XV as many of their scheduled matches were cancelled, but despite this they managed to maintain good continuity and focus. Training sessions were approached with much enthusiasm and steady technical progress was made throughout the season. The results sheet doesn’t do justice to the amount of determination and discipline that the boys played with. Always showing a healthy respect for their opposition – even when the chips were down.

Results through the season would be a reflection of boys with the ability to do the basics well and to play the game at pace. The Yearlings 4s are rarely the biggest team on our circuit, and this year’s team understood this quickly, realising that the key to results would be to get the ball wide, using the speed and guile of our backs. There were emphatic victories against Sherborne, Cranleigh and Teddies, and in difficult games against Radley and St Paul’s the team, while losing, certainly was able to exhibit those core skills. Harry Campbell-Walter, at scrum-half, and Gus Whittaker in the second row, helped the team get off to a winning start against Sherborne, before progressing to higher things. Victor Simpson and Jago Dale-

@MCol_Rugby Jun 5 A review and gallery of a memorable tournament in Paris for the Yearlings at @SFParisRugby

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Rugby Yearlings 3rd XV

It’s great to see that the college has an increasing depth in rugby, and always rewarding to watch these 5th squad boys progress through the ranks as they move up through the school. Many thanks to all their supported who turned out to cheer them on. GB

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CRICKET

Cricket XI

CRICKET

P:16; W:1; D:1; L:12 (Abandoned: 2) Wiltshire U17s (H)

Cancelled – Rain

Marlborough Blues (H)

Cancelled – Rain

Dauntsey’s (H T20)

Lost by 5 wkts

Eton (A)

Lost by 71 runs

Portsmouth GS (H T20)

Lost by 6 wkts

Magdalen CS (H T20)

Lost by 4 wkts

MCC (H)

Lost by 107 runs

Sherborne (A)

Lost by 63 runs

Winchester (H)

Lost by 10 wkts

Wellington (A)

Abandoned – Rain

Radley (H)

Lost by 3 runs

Clifton (H T20)

Abandoned – Rain

Lord’s Taverners (H T20)

Won by 4 wkts

St Edward’s (H)

Lost by 404 runs

Bradfield (A)

Lost by 13 runs

Cheltenham (H)

Lost by 8 wkts

Aitchison, Lahore (H)

Lost by 43 runs

Rugby (A 2 Day)

Match Drawn

SQUAD: D Coulson (Captain), O Mace, W Cook, H Brooks, T Hargrove, F Coen, J Cleverly, B Spink, W Hammersley, F Kottler, W Pembroke, H Mayne ALSO PLAYED: M Brooks, C Freeman, N Corfield, O Waters, J Hodgskin, J Thistlethwayte, O Cook

After a notable exodus of players, an inexperienced side fronted the challenge of the demanding Marlborough circuit stoically and with growing strength of character. The inevitable tough days came in the form of Sherborne, MCC, Winchester and a very strong St Edward’s side. Elsewhere there were agonising defeats to Portsmouth GS, Dauntsey’s (both T20s with 1 ball to spare), Bradfield and in particular Radley. Most cruelly, rain interrupted proceedings when in strong positions at Wellington (169–2) and at home to Clifton (112–4 off 12 in a T20) to deny the opportunity of potential victories. In the batting department, Will Cook topped the averages (307 runs at 34.11) and his excellent century against Cheltenham was an individual highlight. Ben Spink (351 runs at 31.9) displayed plenty of ability including 64* at Sherborne. Harry Brooks made impressive contributions including 63* v PGS, and Toby Hargrove worked exceptionally hard in training and produced some gutsy innings, most notably his 52 versus Pakistani touring side Aitchison. Hard-hitting skipper Dominic Coulson played some powerful knocks, including 65 versus Radley, at a strike rate of 95% for the season. Freddie Kottler caught the eye behind the stumps and his batting pedigree was also in evidence, nowhere more so than at Wellington where, like Spink, the weather left him stranded on 46*. Will Pembroke occupied the crease valiantly, carrying out important duties at the top of the order and Will Hammersley showed snippets of his enormous potential with some powerful ball striking. Greater consistency will be the challenge for this young trio, which no doubt they will look forward to in 2019. The bowling was spearheaded by Orlando Mace who, when on song, was a match for any opponent. He caught the eye at Rugby in particular, dismissing two of the leading opposition batsmen with deliveries that moved away and clipped the top of off stump. Jack Cleverly swung the ball skilfully and was a consistent performer with 14 wickets, his 5–7 against the Lord’s Taverners on Prize day @MCol_Cricket May 23 Happy 50th Birthday to Cricket Pro Mr Alleyne – a presentation given by the captain before XI training this afternoon

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securing a much-needed victory. Hugo Mayne bowled intelligently and reliably and Freddie Coen developed an important knack of taking wickets. Captain Coulson completed the seam attack taking 13 wickets over the course of the campaign. In the spin department Brooks, Spink and Hammersley all showed glimpses of their skill, but greater perseverance will be required next year. The end of the season saw an enthralling two-day match in the heat at Rugby. After restricting the hosts to 202 all out (Hammersley 3–30, Brooks 2–21, Mace 2–32, Coulson 2–37) important contributions from Spink 79, Brooks 52 and Cook 31 earned a 1st innings lead of 32. Despite making early inroads and a phenomenal one-handed catch by Cook at short leg, Rugby fought their way to 176–6 (Mace 2–29) in the 2nd innings. A late declaration left Marlborough 14 overs to make an improbable 145 and the match was drawn. With a spirited performance, the side grew visibly during the two days and developed a healthy camaraderie which will be very important next season. As usual a special thanks to MWA, JPC, the grounds staff, umpires, caterers and scorers for all their hard work. A special mention to captain Dominic Coulson for his admirable leadership and completing three years in the XI. Through difficult times, he remained an inspiration and role model to younger players. He has made a colossal contribution to Marlborough sport over five years and carried himself with the utmost modesty and integrity. MPLB

Cricket 2nd XI P:8; W:2; D:1; L:4 (Abandoned: 1) To the superficial reader, the record is grim. Yes, and no. For a start, that is two more wins than last year, and one of the victories offsets all other defeats: beating Radley on their XI. The post-match photo showed just what this meant: relief, incredulity, ecstasy. One understood why the U6 used this as their farewell. Long shall we remember the outstanding performances of Jamie Hodgskin, Orlando Mace, Ben Hall and Jack Waters. We should also reflect on the tie


RAS

Cricket 3rd XI P:8; W:2; D:1; L:3 (Abandoned: 2) A defeat at the hands of Dauntsey’s 2nd XI kicked off the season in a T20. Eton beckoned two days later and whilst in a winning position (three wickets apiece for Max Staples, George Hentenaar and Mohammed Sheikh) with Eton 139 all out an opposition player suffered a serious injury in the field and the game was abandoned (thankfully, no long-term damage). Having restricted the Sherborne batsmen to 91, all looked well. However, in typical fashion, the 3rd XI brought some surprises. After a promising start, wickets began to tumble and we were left hardly standing on 79–9 with two overs left. Enter Xander Pugh and Staples. With a flash of gusto and heavily reliant on the edge of the bat, they polished off the runs in three balls. Seven days later, the boys bowled well to restrict Winchester to 132 off 25. After a wonderful opening partnership from Leo Lambert and Jack Waters, putting us 101–0, sadly we didn’t finish strongly enough, losing three quick wickets. The game, astonishingly, was tied on the last ball – cricket the winner. The first Molyneux Jnr v Molyneux Snr match reminiscent of a Roses clash of old with both teams bringing their best to Level Broadleaze under blue sky. A fine batting performance from Harry Heneage (52*) allowed Marlborough to post a respectable 121–2 off 25. However, some indifferent bowling, excellent batting,

WJM

Cricket 4th XI P:6; W:3; D:0; L:3 Dauntsey’s gifted us an easy win putting us into bat first on a glorious April afternoon. Despite the fall of some early wickets, James Dowling 25 batted sensibly and provided George Hentenaar with the ballast he needed to notch up a very respectable 55* and set Dauntsey’s a target of 124 to win. But it was Hentenaar this time with cunning sleight of hand (5–11) which completely discombobulated our opponents and saw them crumple to 81 all out. Eton, our next opponents were an altogether different prospect. On a gloomy and humid afternoon, they put us into bat and the top order batsmen were skittled out barely troubling the scorers except for Piers Tabor who grafted out a respectable 22 and then Ali Sheldon 26 arrived at the crease and smashed four sixes in rapid succession, one of which punctured a new sightscreen rather neatly. Needless to say, Eton reached our measly target of 59 in six overs. Keen to make up for this bruising defeat we travelled to Winchester. Batting first again, a strong performance by Sheldon 50 and Harry Wake 47 set our opponents 152 to win. Excellent fielding and some brilliant seam bowling from Nic Ruddell 3–10 saw Winchester fold at 76. Rain interrupted our next match against Wellington so much that we had to abandon at tea. Our final match against Radley pitted us once again against stronger team and only Sheldon 45* showed any resistance. Radley dispatched our rather tame bowling attack to all points of the compass and won by eight wickets. Despite the losses this was a very enjoyable team to coach not least because they thoroughly enjoyed playing cricket whatever the outcome! MAG

@MCol_Cricket May 19 Christmas will be tense in the Molyneux household as father beats son in the battle of the 3rd XI coaches v @ RadleyCricket

Cricket Colts 1st XI P: 8; W: 4; D: 0; L: 4 Eton (H)

Lost by 60 runs

Sherborne (H)

Lost by 7 wkts

Wellington (H)

Won by 2 wkts

Radley (A)

Lost by 8 wkts

St Edward’s (A)

Won by 6 wkts

Bradfield (H)

Won by 4 runs

Harrow (H)

Lost by 133 runs

Cheltenham (A)

Won by 2 wkts

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and odd umpiring from an ageing Radleian beak meant the visitors polished off the runs in the last over, winning by six wickets. The boys bounced back, however, ending the season with an authoritative nine wicket victory over St Edward’s in the final game. A special mention must be made to the departing 3rd XI captain, a stalwart of the team, Henry Gouriet.

SQUAD: H Norman (Captain), J White, C Freeman, B Baker, E Pears, D Murray, F Henderson, N Corfield, H Perry, L D’Oelsnitz, R Pembroke, A Hardwick, J Warner This was a team whose strength lay predominantly in their bowling and this was highlighted by some early season batting collapses with the first two games being lost as a result. The turning point came on the XI against Wellington who were bowled out for 115. Debutant Lucas D’Oelsnitz took 3–17 with keeper Felix Henderson taking 5 catches. Marlborough, however, were quickly reduced to 30–6 with Rosie Pembroke breaking a finger in the process. Captain Hugh Norman came to the crease and steadied the ship alongside Dylan Murray, but when two more wickets fell the skipper decided to attack. Ably supported by Josh ‘the wall’ Warner, the total was reached in front of a packed pavilion with just nine balls to spare with Norman finishing unbeaten on 48. Further victories followed with leading wicket taker Hector Perry consistently beating the defences of opening batsman. Poor weather reduced the Bradfield game to 20 overs and again the team held their nerve to defend 125. Henderson 59 and Jack White 34 shared an 84 run partnership with wickets shared between Perry, Norman, Ned Corfield and Pembroke. Bradfield needed 12 runs off the final over and fell just 4 runs short after outstanding bowling from D’Oelsnitz and flawless captaincy from Norman. Post exams the squad played two 50over games against Harrow and Cheltenham. They also travelled to Trent Bridge to see England play Australia and set a new ODI world record score (481–6), and then visited the ECB Performance Centre in Loughborough. Against Harrow the early season batting collapse returned and things looked set to repeat themselves against Cheltenham. Despite 42 from Christian Freeman, the team found themselves with still nearly 100 runs to score and just 2 wickets remaining. But with 16 overs left, Arthur Hardwick 41* and Corfield 33* came together and slowly shifted the pressure back on to the fielding side. An incredible

CRICKET

with Winchester and two of the four losses, to Sherborne by 5 runs and Cheltenham by 1 run, both away. In each case the team was depleted by absences. These results were gutting precisely because they could so easily have been in our favour. In each there were eye-catching displays: runs from Oscar Waters, Captain Arlie Mahony, Will Millar’s reverse swipes and the unforgettable innings of Henry Gouriet. The economy and deadliness of the bowlers, Luke Smith and Sam Farndale, Oscar and Harry Powell, put us in with a chance. The cricketing zeal of Leo Lambert and Jack Redmayne made an unquantifiable boost, as did the remarkable coach: TPG. To all, my thanks.

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hour later and the pair had won the game with an unbeaten 87-run partnership and 8 balls to spare. It was a fantastic end to a highly enjoyable season with a bunch of players whose enthusiasm, energy and love for the game was great to see. HLRT & CLH

Cricket Colts 2nd XI P:5; W:2; D:0; L:3 A strong performance resulting in a narrow loss versus Eton was followed by a lamentable display against Sherborne. The reaction to this defeat was superb. Training remained fun but toughened up, catches were held and ground fielding improved considerably. Field positions in matches became more creative and effective. The loss against Winchester’s Colts A showed genuine grit and it was no surprise that from here we went on to thump Wellington and Radley. These wins contained some sharp running between the wickets, tighter spells by the seamers and much needed variation from the three spinners. Perhaps most memorable was the powerful striking of the ball by some of the batters. A short but fun season. Congratulations to all the players who maintained their commitment throughout and approached training with enthusiasm and intent to improve.

CRICKET

BHM

Cricket Colts 3rd XI P:2; W:0; D:0; L:2 Colts 3rds seasons are not long; once we reach half-term there aren’t enough players around (here or in other schools) due to public exams. Even before half-term it seems that many schools can’t raise three sides so our fixture list is seldom overcrowded. This year was another typical affair, though enlivened by having sufficient players. We batted well against Eton putting on 175 in our 30 overs and had them 8 wickets down in their 28th before capitulating. Our match against Radley was a rather less successful affair and we lost by 8 wickets having only posted 105. George Geach captained the side well throughout. I’ve enjoyed their company and the boys seem to enjoy it and that is always the main thing – keep playing cricket! GBS

Cricket Junior Colts 1st XI P:21; W:10; D:0; L:10 (Abandoned: 1) Eton (H)

Lost by 6 wkts

Clifton (H) T20 Cup

Won by 8 wkts

Sherborne (H)

Lost by 29 runs

Tonbridge (A) Cup

Lost by 6 wkts

Churcher’s (A) Cup

Won by 10 wkts

Cheltenham (H) T20

Lost by 6 wkts

Winchester (A)

Lost by 11 runs

Sir Thomas Rich (H) T20 Cup

Won by 28 runs

Royal Wootton Bassett Academy (H) T20 Cup

Won by 104 runs

Shrewbury (Eton) Festival

Lost by 106 runs

Wellington (A)

Abandoned Rain

Uppingham (Eton) Festival

Won by 130 runs

King’s Taunton (H) Cup

Won by 1 wkt

Eton (A) Festival

Lost by 30 runs

Radley (A)

Lost by 83 runs

Clifton (A) T20

Won by 36 runs

Warminster (H) T20 Cup

Won by 10 wkts

Canford (A) Cup

Won by 108 runs

St Edward’s (A)

Lost by 39 runs

Dauntsey’s (A) T20 Cup

Won by 140 runs

Bradfield (H)

Lost by 17 runs

REGULAR SQUAD: A Olver (Captain), J Brooks, G Robertson, O Phillips, O Cook, G Hocking, H Pritchard, O Light, C Peck, G Oliver, L Cotterell, T Harvie-Watt CUP/FESTIVAL SQUAD (additional Junior Colts players) F Kottler (Captain), W Hammersley, H Mayne, W Pembroke, (additional Yearlings players) D Corbett, H Cowling, S Baines, T Stephenson-Green, J Watson With 21 fixtures played over an 11-week period, this has been a particularly busy season for the JC1 squad. In the regular College fixtures, it was difficult to replicate the successes of the Cup squad on a weekly basis with four of the Junior Colts playing for the XI in these fixtures (a wonderful opportunity for them to develop as cricketers), and the Yearlings competing in their own age group. Although the boys competed in every fixture, we were regularly 30 or so runs too light on the batting front and leaked 20 or so in the field. On a positive note, however, this has given other players the opportunity to shine, and with this in mind, mention should be made of Oliver Light, Henry Pritchard and George Oliver who stepped up admirably with some excellent performances.

@MCol_Cricket May 13 A captain’s knock from Hugh Norman scoring 48* to see the Colts 1 home by 2 wkts – well batted

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SPORTS The next round, away to Canford, proved to be far easier and the boys came out on top as convincing victors by a margin of 108 runs (Oliver Phillips 40* and Will Pembroke 39) thereby progressing to the national semi-finals. Drawn away to Tonbridge, we knew this would be a tough encounter. With four excellent spinners and a strong fielding unit, they restricted us to 147, probably 40 runs short of a competitive total, and although we had them under pressure at 65–4, a difficult droppedcatch opportunity, which would have reduced them to 67–5, proved costly, and they eased home from this point. Although a disappointing finish to a long campaign, nothing should be taken from the boys for a truly magnificent run in this competition; finishing as one of the top four schoolboy teams in the country is certainly an achievement to relish.

The boys thoroughly enjoyed playing in the T20 Cup, and it was a shame that, having qualified for the Regional Finals day at Millfield, we were forced to withdraw due to a clash with the Eton Festival. Significant performances in this competition included wins against Royal Wootton Bassett Academy (Hammersley 111*, Corbett 84*), Warminster (Light 4–7, Pritchard 21*, Louis Cotterell 21*), Dauntsey’s, (Cook 61*, Hocking 50, Hammersley 49, Pembroke 38*, Pritchard 4–15), Clifton (Light 4–30, Hammersley 78*, Cook 41*) and Sir Thomas Rich’s School (Corbett 86, Tom StephensonGreen 30, Ali Olver 4–21, Pritchard 2–11, Del Mar 2–29). At the end-of-term festival hosted by Eton, a fantastic 100 against Uppingham from Kottler 128, splendid bowling performances across all three days by Hugo Mayne and Del Mar and some dogged and determined batting against hostile opening attacks by Pembroke were the highlights of the Festival and, although we missed out on what would have been a wonderful victory against Eton on the final day, it was an enjoyable and productive three days. At this point, I would like to congratulate the Yearlings players whose faultless attitude and determination to succeed have been secondto-none. They have come on leaps and bounds, exemplified by James Watson’s three-wicket haul against Eton, which bodes well for next season. Finally, thanks and credit must go to Mr Macmillan, Mr Heywood and Mr Alleyne, under whose experience and professionalism the boys have been fortunate enough to develop and grow as cricketers and individuals. Thanks also to Mr Bush for his unwavering support and guidance; his passion for the game and desire for the boys to succeed and enjoy their cricket is infectious. JHB

Cricket Junior Colts 2nd XI P:7; W:2; D:0; L:4 (Abandoned: 1) This was always going to be a difficult season for the JC2, with four of the yeargroup’s cricketers promoted to the XI. Despite that, however, there were encouraging wins against Winchester and Teddies and as the season developed the batting became much improved – with Cameron Heyring, Harry Hall-Smith and Louis Cotterell standing out. Jack Sweeney and Harry Drew were accurate and sometimes penetrating seamers and there were a number of strong performances from those, such as Tom Harvie-Watt and Henry Pritchard, who were in and out of the side. They should all look forward with confidence to the Colts.

CRICKET

Having progressed as county champions in the Yearlings, the lads got off to a convincing start in the Regional stages of the ESCA National 40 over competition with a 10-wicket victory over the Hampshire winners, Churcher’s (Archie Del Mar 3–16, Donald Corbett 51*, Will Hammersley 36*). Buoyed by this strong performance, we approached the next round, home against King’s Taunton, with a quiet confidence that was to materialise in what proved to be one of the most memorable College victories in recent times. Some tight bowling, excellent ground-fielding (from Giles Hocking in particular) and a timely fall of wickets enabled the boys to restrict King’s to an achievable total, and with our strong batting line-up, chasing a victory target of 182 seemed plausible. We set off at a slow pace and quickly fell behind the required rate, but an explosive 31 from Hammersley and a masterclass in wellconstructed run accumulation from Freddie Kottler 56, placed the team in a strong position. Inevitably King’s fought back; four quick wickets saw them regain control, and although the rate was no longer a problem, wickets in hand was. Up to the crease stepped heroic tailenders, Ollie Cook 25* and Archie Del Mar 4*, whose nerveless composure, tenacity and excellent shot selection saw the team home with a couple of overs to spare – what a day!

RDW

Cricket Junior Colts 3rd XI P:7; W:4; D:0; L:3 It would be easy to blame the first match defeat away to Eton on the desperately cold weather, but there was a definite turnaround in performance afterwards. The team, captained by the very able Ben Chetwood, went on to conclude convincing victories against Sherborne, Teddies and Winchester. A narrow defeat away at Radley, in a match that could have gone either way, also reflected a very strong team. Performances that will be remembered were Finn Dowling’s 5 for 21 at Winchester and Ollie Clayton’s 55 at Teddies. It was a very enjoyable season, mostly due to the excellent collective spirit that the team developed through the course of the season. COS

Cricket Junior Colts 4th XI P:3; W:1; D:0; L:2 This year’s talented JC4 squad reminded me of a Scottish summer in that from training to fixtures, you never knew what to expect. In our first fixture against a disciplined Eton team, our

@MCol_Cricket May 15 Today’s scores from U15 ESCA Cup 3rd Round: Kings Taunton 181/7 off 40 overs (Baines 2/18, Cowling 2/28, 1 each for Mayne, Hammersley & Stephenson-Green) JC1 184/9 off 37.4 overs (Kottler 56, Hammersley 31, Cook 25*) – win by 1 wkt

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bowling was good and excellent performances from Charlie Hutchison and James Wheatley restricted our visitors to 135 runs from 30 overs. However, a poor batting performance in the face of controlled bowling and fine fielding saw the team all out for 35. Radley were our next opposition and again the team showed its fine bowling potential by restricting our target to 97. These runs were easily achieved thanks to some attacking batting from Ben Chetwood and Henry Drew. In the subsequent return fixture at Radley our opposition had their revenge in large part due to their captain hitting 97. Chasing 238, the team made 183–6 in an excellent effort that saw fine attacking innings from James Wheatley, Andrew Brink and Luke Wimbush. While losing may seem disappointing, what pleased me was that the whole team contributed with bat and ball, leaving a sense of optimism for next season. Well done to Charlie Hines and Hugo Manley who shared the captaincy. HMHS

Yearlings 1st XI

CRICKET

P:11; W:8; D:0; L:2 (Abandoned: 1) Eton (A)

Lost by 13 runs

Sherborne (A)

Won by 30 runs

Winchester (H)

Won by 81 runs

Wellington (H)

Won by 35 runs

Radley (H)

Lost by 1 run

Clifton (H)

Abandoned Rain

Royal Wootton Bassett Academy (H) Cup

Won by 347 runs

St Edward’s (H)

Won by 3 wickets

Bradfield (A)

Won by 2 runs

St Laurence (H) Cup

Won by 51 runs

Cheltenham (A)

Won by 5 wickets

SQUAD: D Corbett (Capt), S Baines, B Campbell, A Cornell, H Cowling, A Darke, W Freeman, R Lamplugh, Z Malik, S Martin-Jenkins, T Stephenson-Green, J Watson Beginning their campaign away to Eton they showed their potential yet came up short in the run chase. The boys then recorded their first win away to Sherborne, thanks largely to a run-a-ball 62 from Sam Baines. Momentum began to pick up with convincing victories at home against Winchester and Wellington; the latter success down to Sam Martin-Jenkins stabilising the innings with 53* after the side had collapsed to 41/5, and then taking 3–15

alongside Harry Cowling; a devastating newball attack throughout the season. The team had a below par performance versus Radley and despite the best efforts of Will Freeman scoring 32, got exactly what they deserved on the day. The second half of term began with Cowling bludgeoning the ball around A House to score 215* against RWB Academy. Baines was back to his best with bat scoring 55* and guiding the side to their first successful run chase versus St Edward’s. Shell OA week traditionally affects performance, but at Bradfield the boys battled hard to post a score of 117 with Tom Stephenson-Green scoring 38 and MartinJenkins ending up on 26*. Cowling then led the way with the ball, ripping through their impressive top order with 4 wickets to leave Bradfield 38–6. Despite a resurgence from the home side, Marlborough held their nerve with Stephenson-Green bowling the all-important last over and ending Bradfield’s hopes of an unbeaten season. St Laurence proved to be a tricky test and the victory was largely down to James Watson’s mature and steady 62 before Baines and Watson dried up the runs to swing the game in Marlborough’s favour. Travelling to a postage stamp at Cheltenham, we started well in the field before Cowling dislocated his finger, and Stephenson-Green had to leave the field with a split finger-end. With emotions high on the field and overs lost from key bowlers, Cheltenham managed to get up to 158 off their 30 overs. Up stepped captain Donald Corbett who led from the front despatching anything short to the boundary and then playing out scenes of an Atherton versus Donald encounter against Cheltenham’s fast bowler. Ducking and swaying, Donald gave his team-mates confidence scoring 52 before Stephenson-Green and Arthur Cornell came together to put on a match-winning partnership of 55 to get over the line. With nobody scoring a century or picking up 5 wickets, the success of this side was down to the ‘team’ and their work ethic in training. The side will compete in the ESCA U15 National Cup next year. Congratulations on winning @MCol_Cricket Apr 25 Yearlings 1 technical session playing spin & front foot work

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the Turner Cup and for a thoroughly enjoyable season. WGH & GDML

Cricket Yearlings 2nd XI P:9; W:4; D:0; L:5 It was a mixed season with a heavy defeat to Eton and close losses to Radley, Wellington, Bradfield and Swindon Schools. However, victories included a narrow 10-run win against Sherborne, in which Rupert Lloyd-Hughes scored 38 and took 3–16, a strong performance against Winchester with Archie Darke’s 58 and Atticus Adams’s 3–5 securing a 139-run win and another convincing win against St Edward’s by 107 runs with contributions from Max Russell 66, Adam Summers 53, Adams 3–13 and Josh McCaldin 3–7. The boys finished the season on a high against Cheltenham with three people reaching half centuries; Harry CampbellWalter 59, Oscar Shephard 63* and Toby Yates 50* contributing to a 109-run win. The boys should be proud of their first season and use it as a stepping stone to push on and work hard on all aspects of their game. Lastly, I’d like to thank all the parents who came to support the team. Well done on an enjoyable season. JWGR

Cricket Yearlings 3rd XI P:8; W:5; D:0; L:3 The Yearlings 3rd XI enjoyed a season full of spirit and low-scoring but exciting matches, under the dual leadership of Harry Knight and Jago Dale-Jones. Despite being outgunned by the considerably stronger Eton and Wellington, the team worked hard at improving technique, particularly defensive batting and earned impressive victories against Radley, Winchester, Sherborne, Cheltenham and St Edward’s. Notable performers with the ball were Adam Cripwell, Jack Cartwright, Dale-Jones and Edward Beswick with Cripwell’s match winning triple wicket maiden against Sherborne being the highlight. The batting was more of a struggle but there were some strong performances from Luke Doyne and Kit Codrington at the top of the order whilst Oscar Pownall and Harry Campbell-Walker piled on


SPORTS

the runs lower down. A mixture of uncovered wickets and injudicious shot selection meant that batting collapses were a characteristic of the season but the team’s enthusiasm and desire to perform meant they repeatedly won from difficult positions. They were a pleasure to coach throughout. NOPG

Cricket Yearlings 4th XI P:7; W:5; D:0; L:2

DTC

Girls’ Cricket P:8; W:7; D:0; L:1 Wellington (A) Bradfield (A) St Edward’s (A) Cheltenham (H)

Cricket Yearlings 5th XI

Westonbirt (H)

P:6; W:4; D:0; L:2

Rugby (H)

After a difficult start to the season at Eton the team bounced back in impressive style away at Radley. Special mentions must go to Hugo Lawson for his all-round performance that included two wickets, two catches, an outstanding run out and scoring the winning runs, as well as Marcus May for his 23 at a critical time in the run chase. A tough match away at Farleigh was soon forgotten with the Yearlings 5 winning all three of their remaining three fixtures against Wellington, Radley again and Swindon Academy. Highlights from these matches included Joey Kennedy’s skilful swing bowling, some stunning dismissals from wicket keeper Ben Phelps and the exceptional captaincy of Thomas Cole. Throughout the term the team played and trained with a great attitude, making the cricket term thoroughly enjoyable for all involved. JSMB

Westonbirt (A) Bradfield (H)

Won by 6 wkts Won by 28 runs Won by 15 runs Won by 14 runs Won by 76 runs Won by 8 wkts Won by 35 runs Lost by 1 run

SQUAD: R Pembroke (Captain), C Stafford (vice-Captain), R Curtis, R Sykes, P Bell, R Evans, E Sharp, T Baker, V Milne, C Grainger, C Bamforth, M Marvin, J Money-Kyrle, F White, K Agnew, M Hornby, L Bunn The Girls’ XI came within a single run of a third successive unbeaten season, but this disappointment could not spoil another historic season as they won seven out of eight fixtures including beating Rugby on the XI on Prize Day. As public exams deprived us of our more established players for much of the season it was time for a younger generation to carry the team forward and they did not disappoint. Charlotte

@MCol_Cricket May 26 Girls’ Cricket set to take on @ RugbySchool1567 as part of today’s 175th anniversary celebrations on the XI

Stafford stood in as captain for much of the season and led from the front. Her batting was consistently productive and she made unbeaten contributions on all but three occasions. The highlights were a maiden half-century against Cheltenham College and a match-winning 33* versus Rugby. With over 200 runs at an average of 60 – it was a season to remember. Not far behind was Rose Curtis who announced her arrival with a cool-headed 35* to guide us to victory at Wellington. She went on to record her maiden half-century scoring 55* in one of two victories over Westonbirt. Other notable contributions came from Rosie Pembroke (30 from 15 balls against Bradfield), Poppy Bell (27* at Westonbirt) and Rhiannon Evans (18) in a low scoring game versus St Edward’s.

CRICKET

A strong season for this positive side got off to a tentative but promising start with a 37-run loss to a strong Eton side, with Ollie PhillipsonStow’s 21 the first of 162 runs for the season as top batsman. Rafe Stratton showed the danger of his looping spin against Radley, with two wickets the first of nine for the season. He was only bettered by William Sankey, whose remarkable season figures of 9–25 were sealed with a 4-wicket haul in the final game of the season away at Bradfield, where Hugo Lawson made his mark with a season-high 47. Steady performances at the crease from Ewan Hunter and vice-captain Olly Haggard being the foundation of several game-winning partnerships.

The bowling attack was spear-headed by Tallulah Baker whose spells of 3–5 versus St Edward’s and 3–15 against Westonbirt were match winning and she finished the season as the leading wicket-taker. There were other key performances with the ball through the season including Emma Sharp dismantling the Bradfield top order (3–18) and Jemima MoneyKyrle ripping out the Westonbirt middle order (3–16). Molly Marvin took up the gloves early in the season and despite no previous experience provided a remarkably reliable and tidy service. There were many highlights over the summer but perhaps Money-Kyrle’s stunning onehanded catch versus Rugby in front of a large crowd was the most memorable. RP

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FOOTBALL

Football Open 1st XI P:10; W:2; D:0; L:8 (Michaelmas Term) P:10; W:2; D:0; L:8 (Lent Term)

FOOTBALL

Michaelmas Term

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Old Marlburians

L

1:3

St John’s Marlborough

L

1:4

Bedales School

W

4:1

St Ignatius

L

1:2

Commonweal

L

3:5

Eton

L

0:3

Winchester

L

1:4

Charterhouse

W

3:2

Bristol Grammar

L

0:4

Commonweal

L

1:3

Bristol Grammar

L

0:3

Malvern

L

2:4

Radley

L

3:7

Winchester

W

4:1

Monmouth

L

2:3

Dauntsey’s

L

3:4

RGS Worcester

L

1:3

Beechen Cliff

L

2:3

Clifton

L

1:2

St Edward’s

W

4:3

Lent Term

SQUAD: O Meyrick, T Sykes, M Sweet, J Ellis, E Cornish, G Marshall, B Cooper, J Redmayne, J Hayeem, S Cutts, H Macpherson-Peterman, F Coen, O Powell, L Smith, S Clément De L’Epine, L Graham, M Redpath, O Mace, F Pank, N Litvin, O Powell

Michaelmas Term Orlando Meyrick, was appointed captain of football at the beginning of term and led a team that lacked obvious leadership or experience. Results in the first half of term reflected this in the starkest terms and early defeats against OMs and local rivals St John’s were characterised by errors from poor communication or from lapsed concentration. Having said that, both fixtures were feisty and combative, with Seb Cutts and Jack Redmayne emerging as players with potential. George Marshall and Luke Smith showed some cohesion working as the striking pair up front and in our next fixture away at Bedales, Marshall scored twice to secure a 4–1 win. Having a glut of midfielders – including Jamie Hayeem, Milo Sweet and James Ellis made selection problematic but only one had real steel; Oscar Powell a player with a strong tackle and great timing. Freddie Coen also emerged as a real talent and was man of the match against Eton for his pace and tireless work ethic although we lost that game 3–0. Henry Macpherson-Petermann is an

unbelievable talent who is only in the Remove. He was superb against St Ignatius, a touring team from Australia, who last visited us two years ago. They provided us with an exhilarating and entertaining end-to-end match, which they deservedly won 2–1. Against Winchester we were outmuscled and beaten for pace with only a late penalty from Cutts as consolation in a game where there was only ever going to be one winner. The highlight of the term came against Charterhouse in a match where we found a fighting spirit previously untapped. Despite going behind twice, a lucky deflection from a shot by Cornish and then a brilliant 20yard pile driver from Powell saw us win 3–2 – a rare victory! Sadly, we were not able to harness the positive momentum and further poor performances saw us lose our last two matches against Bristol Grammar and Commonweal respectively.

Lent Term The term’s results may not look too impressive but this is all about perspective. For the first time in a long time, the Open 1st XI was made up of entirely Lower Sixth players with the exception of Lachlan Graham who replaced the injured captain (Meyrick) in goal. This time next year the results will look very different as this young side gains experience and accumulates wisdom. At the moment, the ability is there but remains latent because


SPORTS Our only victory so far this term had come against Winchester whom we dominated because of much better positional discipline at the back especially from Jack Redmayne and the addition of George Hentenaar who added more energy and dynamism to the midfield. At home, we cultivated a strong passing game on the hallowed Athletics Track pitch but on lesser surfaces we struggled to adapt and against Monmouth we found ourselves behind once again. A passionate half-time talk from the Swindon Town professionals led to a spirited rally but it was not enough to save us from yet another defeat. It was very much the same story against Dauntsey’s – a poor first half followed by a dominant second half with good goals coming from Powell and Mace but again it was too little too late. RGS Worcester were the

best organised side we played so far this term and the outcome of this could have been very embarrassing if it hadn’t been for the brilliant defending of the newly promoted Sam Sparks. This was actually a good team performance and if we had shown more clinically finishing up front, the result might have been different. Football in the second half of term was seriously curtailed by the impact of the cold weather that saw three fixtures cancelled. However, we were able to play some strong opponents and put on some better performances. Beechen Cliff were disciplined and well organised and should have scored more if it hadn’t been for the brilliant goalkeeping from Graham and some good individual performances by Cutts and Farquhar. Arguably, the best game of the season was against our next opponents Clifton who passed and moved the ball effectively from the outset. However, we were equal to this especially in midfield where Powell and Coen dominated for long periods of play. Despite Cutts slotting away a well-placed penalty, Clifton scored late on to win 2–1. Our next match against St Edward’s was certainly the most entertaining of the term. Despite taking an early two-goal lead with both coming from excellent long-range shots from Powell (who could have had a hat-trick), we allowed Teddies to claw their way back into the game and then take the lead. In an exciting

second half, Cutts scored the goal of the season from 30-yards to draw level, and then in the final minutes Hayeem scored the winner. It was disappointing that just as we found some momentum and confidence, the Beast from the East arrived to bring our season to a shivering end. The good news is that this team will all be here next year, so there is every reason to see the disappointing results as part of their apprenticeship. Coen was awarded player of the season for his phenomenal work rate and commitment in every match and Cutts won Golden Boot.

FOOTBALL

of a lack of concentration and application in match conditions. In our first outing against Bristol Grammar, we were slow to press and gave their midfield too much space and time to create chances which they did. Only Coen and Cutts put in decent shifts. Against Malvern, we again lacked concentration from the outset and were two down before we knew it. Goals from Hayeem and Orlando Mace were not enough to rescue us from a 4–2 drubbing. Radley also scented blood from the kick off and by halftime we had literally been over run. It took a very spirited rear-guard action in the second half for us to salvage some pride.

MAG

Football Open 2nd XI P:16; W:7; D:4; L:5 This was a great season overall, which began with a defeat at Bristol Grammar who came from behind to seal a 2–1 victory. A smart header from Gabriel Jordan had put us in front, but a missed penalty and a dip in second half performance levels saw the hosts capitalise. Next up was a 3–3 draw with Malvern, with some entertaining football and perhaps more importantly, great sportsmanship from both sides. A 25-yard strike from Leo Lambert, an emphatic volley from Freddie Kimber and a wonderful finish from Seb Webb saw honours even. Radley at home was a tough game and having gone in 1–1 at the break, the visitors won 3–1. Next up was a 6–1 win over Winchester in what was a magnificent team performance. Louis de Hennin de Boussu Walcourt made an immediate impact on his debut, with two goals, with further efforts from Kimber, Webb and a 25-yard screamer from Bassano Compostella. Goalkeeper Hendy di Monaco made crucial saves too, not only in this fixture, but throughout the five fixtures he played. That win spurred the team on to back-toback away wins at Monmouth (3–1) and Dauntsey’s (2–0). We then lost 4–2 against RGS Worcester, despite leading twice, but in fairness, the opposition were outstanding on the day. Winning ways returned with a 5–1 win against Beechen Cliff and then a draw with

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Clifton prior to a 5–0 win against St Edward’s. Lachlan Graham returned and kept a clean sheet, helped by some fantastic defending from Arthur Colquhoun who was outstanding. This was a successful season and all the players can be congratulated for their contributions throughout. Raoul Terry was the most improved player whilst Bassano Compostella, Oscar Fillingham and Louis de Hennin de Boussu Walcourt showed excellent commitment in every game.

FOOTBALL

SJB

Football Open 3rd XI P:5; W:1; D:0; L:4 This was a roller-coaster season, characterised by highs and lows, with not much in between. The season began with a full fixture list, several of which cancelled due to the ‘Beast from the East’ and the state of the pitches after biblical amounts of rain. Our first game was played just days after New Year, and we gave a good account of ourselves against a strong Bristol Grammar side, with goals from Oscar Fillingham, Frank Meehan and our special import, Billy James. Our next game, against Malvern, was closely contested, and we were only narrowly defeated: the referee regretted not awarding Marlborough a penalty. Oscar Fillingham scored again (this was before his inevitable promotion to the Open 2nd squad), and captain Joseph O’Connor also opened his

account. Most of us wish we could forget our ‘educational’ time hosting Radley, although to their credit, our men kept their spirits up right to the bitter end! We contended well against Clifton, although they proved stronger, and then finished our season in style with a strong win against St Edward’s. Marlowe Turner scored a hat-trick, as did another special import, Harry Foster. I would like to thank the gentlemen of the Open 3rd. BRA

Football Colts 1st XI P:13; W:8; D:4; L:1 St John’s

W

10:5

Commonweal

D

3:3

Eton

W

6:2

Winchester

L

2:3

Commonweal

W

3:1

Bristol Grammar

W

7:1

Malvern

W

2:1

Radley

D

2:2

Winchester

W

4:0

Monmouth

W

5:2

Beechen Cliff

D

3:3

RGS Worcester

W

7:0

Clifton

D

0:0

SQUAD: R Milne, T Benney, H Grant, H Thompson, J Harvie-Watt, T Williams, F Smith, A Clark (c), A Probert, I Ofon, B White, G Belotserkovsky, F Hall, F MacDermot, M Meyrick, H Di Monaco, H Beckwith-Moore It was a tremendous season for the Colts 1st XI, who went unbeaten throughout the Lent Term to finish as ‘Team of the Year’. With a midfieldheavy squad, the team adapted quickly to a diamond formation through the middle featuring Aubrey Clark as the team’s charismatic captain; the goalscoring credentials, of Zu MacDermot; skilful attack-minded ability of Henry Grant; ability to deliver consistently testing forward passes from Archie Probert; and perfect embodiment of the roaming number 10 in Max Meyrick. The squad also benefited from the depth of goalkeeping talent from Robbie

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Milne and Henry Di Monaco. At the back Hugo Thompson was superb all season – a real ball playing centre half and Jamie Harvie-Watt was the most improved player in the squad at centre half. Tom Williams offered athleticism in that position, too. For the team’s formation to work, with a lack of width in midfield to accommodate our talents, it was important that full-backs Freddie Hall, Todd Benney and Freddie Smith all offered genuine attacking threats in wide positions, something all three achieved with numerous assists. All great teams need great finishers, and Billy White, Ijah Ofon and Grisha Belotserkovsky provided a hatful of goals and earned opportunities to play Open 1st XI football. Highlights include the 2–2 draw at Radley with a late brace from Billy White, the freak match at Clifton where the team drew 0–0 in the single most one-sided football match coach Mr Sharrad has ever seen, the dominant win at RGS Worcester featuring a Zu MacDermot hattrick, and the 3–3 draw against a highly rated Beechen Cliff side. This group of players will combine with the talent in the year above to form an exciting squad at 1st and 2nd Open XI level next season. Do not be surprised to see many members of this squad make an immediate impact in the Open 1st XI side. MJS


Football Colts 2nd XI SPORTS

P:3; W:1; D:0; L:2 After a rocky start against at Radley (Greg Allin scoring) and at home against Beechen Cliff, the Colts 2nd XI pulled it back at the end of the term with a resounding 3–1 victory against Clifton. The excellent performance made even more impressive after a particularly arduous coach journey! Francesco Faccini opened the scoring, this was followed by a long-range freekick from Ivan Morozov, who was then ably assisted by Francesco Faccini for the final goal.

MCJL & JSMB

Football Junior Colts 1st XI P:7; W:1; D:2; L:4 Bristol Grammar

W

2:1

Malvern

L

1:5

Radley

L

1:2

Monmouth

L

1:5

Beechen Cliff

L

0:7

RGS Worcester

D

3:3

Clifton

D

1:1

SQUAD: O Claxton-Newman (Capt), A Ershov, H McCammon, J di Monaco, Z Chukwuemeka, M Davis, A Olver, L Cooke, K Calvert-Davies, C Hines, M Losantos Marquez, K Dozie-Ajaegbu, L Cave, B Farley, J Laidlaw A term of serious talent and unfortunate circumstances, the early formation of the Junior Colts saw success at the beginning of term with strong aggressive play and a steady influx of goals and pressure from Kamdi Dozie-Ajaegbu and Kameron Calvert-Davies. The team came together very early on to secure us our first and only win against BGS.

Next came the challenges of Malvern, Radley and Monmouth with all matches lost but many lessons learnt. With a number of players missing due to injuries and trips, those remaining did well to develop and keep themselves in the games. Notable appearances in the 1st team included Hugo McCammon with his excellent and intelligent defensive play as well as Mario Losantos Marquez coming in fresh on the wing and forcing many an exhausted player in the opposition. The final two matches against RGS Worcester and Clifton saw the best play from a complete first team. Some game altering plays include Charlie Hines, setting up excellent potential and assisted goals with his devastating and aggressive play on the wing and the heroic last minute goal from team staple Ali Olver in the hard fought match against Clifton. Throughout the term, the team was led by the committed and passionate captain Olly Claxton-Newman who, despite injury, came all the way to Worcester to give the team much needed moral support for that tight game. This term has seen a lot of hardships for the but also a great deal of development in each of the players. Many of them have a strong foundation and a serious potential to perform with excellence in future terms of football.

Football Junior Colts 2nd XI P:5; W:1; D:0; L:4 This was a challenging term but the team kept their spirits high and worked hard all the way to the final match against Clifton. Their first match against Malvern saw a somewhat choppy start with the team still settling. Next was a trip to Radley, who edged the encounter by the odd goal and the key striker for the second team appearing in the form of the speedy and committed Conor Wall. With some more unfortunate score lines, it took the JC2 to their finest match yet against RGS Worcester where they significantly triumphed against the opposition with memorable play from the consistent and talented George Oliver, going on to score or assist many other goals that season.

FOOTBALL

Unfortunately, due to the unseasonable weather conditions the final game of the term was cancelled, meaning the Colts 2nd XI were unable to build upon this success. Despite this they approached the season with good humour and a positive energy throughout. There were particularly outstanding contributions made by Freddie Booth at centre back, Hector Perry in goal and captain Ivan Morozov.

Throughout the term, with competent leadership from Massimo Bonfiglio and a strengthening in the defence with occasional visits from JC1 player Jasper Laidlaw, the group showed resilience and should see many of its players performing well in future seasons. GB

MM

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Girls’ Hockey Open 2nd XI SPORTS

P:11; W:4; D:3; L:4 While results suggest this was not a vintage season in terms of hockey, the 2017 cohort were enormous fun and between the large periods of animated discussion, they actually managed to play some great stuff.

GIRLS’ HOCKEY Girls’ Hockey Open 1st XI

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

P:17; W:9; D:3; L:5 Bryanston

W

4:3

Clifton

D

0:0

Dauntsey’s

W

2:0

Dean Close

L

1:2

Cheltenham

W

3:2

Dean Close

L

1:3

Bristol Grammar

D

1:1

St Edwards

W

3:0

Millfield

L

0:3

Exeter College

W

2:1

Cheltenham

W

3:0

Kings School Bruton

L

0:6

Millfield

L

0:2

Bradfield

W

3:2

Bromsgrove

W

5:1

Wellington

W

5:2

Canford

D

2:2

SQUAD: C Spink (Capt), M Dibden (Vice-Capt), S Atkinson (Vice-Capt), O Good (GK), E Burdett, P Westgate, S Hewett, I Shakespeare, E Jones, A Cameron, V Milne, M Scott, H Eyles, H Place, M McKelvey, L Hankinson This season saw a renewed squad selection with a number of younger players stepping up to 1st XI hockey. Valentina Milne, Miya Scott, Harriet Eyles, and Allie Cameron slotted into the squad with ease, embracing the challenge of playing with older, more experienced players and making an extremely positive impact. The opener against Bryanston was hard fought with India Shakespeare proving her worth by netting two goals, securing the win (4–3) and being named player of the match for her tight ball control and dominance in attack. Captain Celeste Spink led her team to victory in the Wiltshire County Cup securing a 2–0 win against Dauntsey’s which earned qualification to the pre-regional finals. In an end-to-end battle, Miranda Dibden broke the deadlock and Shakespeare converted the second goal, but the best performance of the day came

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from ’keeper Olivia Good who was the rock behind an unwavering defensive line. The pre-regional finals saw the girls take on some tough opposition from Dean Close and Bristol Grammar, the girls played some of their best hockey of the season and deservedly earned themselves a place at the regional finals. The regional finals resulted in two wins and two losses where Shakespeare scored four goals in four games, Sasha Hewett, Spink and Phoebe Westgate worked tirelessly in defence soaking up sustained pressure. The girls finished the tournament needing just one more victory to secure qualification for the national finals, so missed out by the narrowest of margins. The latter half of the season saw both attacking and defensive set plays become a key aspect of the game, enabling the girls to dominate most of their fixtures and secure the ISHL league title. Wins at Bradfield (3–2) and Bromsgrove (5–1) were followed by a home win over Wellington (5–2) to round off a thrilling season, with the league title just reward for the girls’ hard work and commitment throughout. Player of the season went to Miranda Dibden, the most improved player was Sasha Hewett and India Shakespeare finished top goalscorer. Thank you to Mrs Horton for her support and encouragement throughout the season. MSR

Captain Phoebe Burdett set the perfect tone of relaxed engagement and led from the front on and off the pitch and her reverse side touch and strength at left-back was the cornerstone of our defensive unit. At right-back Katerina Mackaness best demonstrated the team’s ability to talk for England off the pitch and then play for England on it – as she produced a series of first class performances. Jess Davy was probably our most consistent player – her naturally modest manner belies a talented player who, along with Luz Wollocombe, fully deserved their experience of 1st XI hockey towards the end of the season. Centre forward Amelia Tracey didn’t quite match her goalscoring heroics of last season but it was a mark of her value that when she did score the team invariably won. Ellie Sparks battled injury but when she was fit we were an infinitely better side with her ball carrying power on the right. Jess Walsh-Waring maintained her impressive development and her blistering pace and howitzer shots gave us real menace in attack. Vice-captain Cosi Bugel’s deft touch and positional intelligence were second to none and Lara Thompson’s superb goal against Wellington a season highlight. Next year mercurial centreback Lucy Constable, gutsy and quick learning ’keeper Lara Beckett, gamebreaker Lucy O’Donald and Luz Wollocombe will provide the heart of a very decent side. Many thanks to assistant coach Harriet Cox and all the girls for a hugely enjoyable term. RP/HAMC

Girls’ Hockey Open 3rd XI P:12; W:11; D:0; L:1 This was a magnificent season as we beat every open third team we played, and even one first


JW

Girls’ Hockey Open 4th XI P:10; W:9; D:1; L:0 A wonderful season again for the 4th XI Girls hockey squad. Unbeaten and conceding only two goals all term just about sums up the quality the College has at this level. Highly convincing victories of five goals or more against Clifton, Dean Close, Cheltenham, St Edward’s, Bradfield and Downe House meant

WJM

Girls’ Hockey Open 5th XI P:4; W:1; D:0; L:3 The 5th XI team had a rather short season, with four fixtures in total. They nevertheless enjoyed weekly training and made the most of the games they had throughout the term. This was also an opportunity for some students to try hockey as a new sport or to get back into the game after a few years. Annabel Chessher, Alana Clements and Ashley Miao made a very positive start in the sport, and will want to have another go next season. Poppy Miles, Maddie Cotterell, Cleo Bates and Chloe Knight enjoyed training and have made some excellent progress across the season. Anastasia Kapkin joined the team at the end of the season, but made a very good impression and was very enthusiastic and keen to take part. Hannah Wilson was an excellent captain and demonstrated great communication skills on the pitch and was very happy to take the lead during training. Along with Arabella Harris, she showed some very good skills and they were both able to also join the 4th XI for some of their fixtures. Overall, it has been a pleasure to coach such a positive group, and I hope to see them again in the Michaelmas Term. VGMD/SAS

Girls’ Hockey U16A P:18; W:16; D:1; L:1 Clifton

W

2:1

St Johns

W

1:0

Sheldon

W

6:0

Godolphin

W

3:0

St Mary’s Calne

W

2:0

Dean Close

W

3:0

Cheltenham

W

4:1

St Edward’s

W

3:0

Hereford Cathedral

W

3:0

Dean Close

W

3:0

Red Maids

W

3:0

St Mary’s Calne

W

3:0

Blundell’s

W

2:1

Maynard School

W

2:0

Clifton

W

1:0

Canford

L

0:2

Bromsgrove

W

4:0

Wellington

D

1:1

SPORTS

We were ably served by our old guard – Stella Smith was probably the best finisher on the circuit and she repeatedly ran through defence. As well as captaining the side Ottilie Barnes gave structure to the midfield, recycled the ball and shot from the top of the circle, once surprising the opposition with a stupendous reverse sweep. Amy Vogel was a force of nature, tackling with ferocity and playing with passion. After so much commitment I was delighted that she scored in the dying seconds of her final match for the school. Serena Slatter ran the defence where she remained calm under the most tremendous pressure. Georgie Henderson provided our pace and fitness. She managed to cover amazing distances, despite her frictionless shoes. Alexandra Mathison developed into a ferocious tackler. By the end of the season she would tackle our own midfield, if they got too close. The team was strengthened by some excellent new signings. India Jacklin Chatha provided flair and speed on the right wing while Scarlett Thompson played on the left and was out top scorer. Tash Cowling provided skill and vision in the midfield and she was even seen to run once. Nell Hargrove was our sweeper but this did not stop her scoring an outrageous reverse goal. Alana Robertson and Milly Lankester played as our backs but they pushed high, keeping the pressure on our opposition. The dependable Emily Place was a key feature of the back line, often thwarting opposition attackers.

the team were easily champions of the ISHL 4th XI league. A 1–1 draw against Dauntsey’s 2nd XI was the only reason the girls didn’t win the Ellis Cup. This year sees the departure of many stalwarts of the team: Sophie Wheeler, Maddy Avery, Anna Pembroke, and Ibby Lee have made a solid defence for two years now. Phoebe LysterBinns, Tara Pusinelli and Jemima Feather have been the engines of the midfield, working tirelessly to gain possession and counter – a creative force that few teams could match. With too many goals between them to count, Jemima May and Eliza Cameron have been ruthless in attack. Each of them (accompanied by next year’s captain Lissy Thomas) have been fantastic representatives of College sport and deserve every bit of credit for their endeavours on the hockey pitch.

SQUAD: R Sykes (Capt), A Dunlop (Vice-Capt), R Pembroke (Vice-Capt), L Quinn, T Oliphant, K Astor, L Greenwood, P Cripwell, S Stewart, J Reeve, E Hall, L Pilkington, M Aitchison, E Grant, H Mackenzie,

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

team. We only lost to a strong Downe House 1st XI, where we just couldn’t score against an excellent ’keeper. We saved our best game to last, where we beat an undefeated Canford side 2–1.

The Girls’ U16A team had an outstanding and unbeaten season, other than one defeat in the semi-finals of the Regional Cup competition. The appointed leadership team included Rosie Sykes as captain and Rosie Pembroke and Alex Dunlop as vice-captains. The team gelled quickly and committed to working hard both in training and with great intensity in matches. Within this ‘team’ ethos, players including Nina Stewart and Ella Hall, who had been B team players at U15 level, came through as consistent performers. Through the season and with an accumulation of significant match wins, the girls developed both their confidence and their skills that enabled them to dominate the qualifying round of the cup competition, taking them through to the Regional Finals. Throughout the season, Tate Oliphant and Rosie Sykes provided the team with a ‘brick wall’ of a defence and alongside Rosie Pembroke and Alex Dunlop – they totally deserved their reward of half-colours for outstanding seasons and contributions to Marlborough sport. RS

Girls’ Hockey U16B P:5; W:3; D:1; L:1 This was rather a short season, nevertheless the girls always put in a tremendous amount of effort in every weekly training session. They should be congratulated for their team spirit in sharing the goalkeeping responsibilities; several were brave enough to try this position for the first time. Overall it has been a pleasure to coach such a positive group of girls. Player of

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SPORTS

the season went to Talia Neat and Alice Wood finished as top scorer, scoring a whopping nine goals in only five games! RC

Girls’ Hockey U15A P:12; W:7; D:2; L:3 Bryanston

W

6:1

Wycliffe

L

2:3

Clifton

D

1:1

Dauntsey’s

W

8:0

Dean Close

D

1:1

Cheltenham

W

5:0

St Edward’s

W

5:0

Millfield

L

2:4

Bradfield

W

5:0

Bromsgrove

W

2:0

Wellington

W

2:0

Canford

L

0:1

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

SQUAD: A Jones (Capt), F Armytage (Vice-Capt), C Longden (GK), A Beckett, E Warner, I Koe, G Chambers, B Tarn, E Fanshawe, R Olver, F White, C Case, B Middleton, C Stafford, S Smith, F Coles I cannot fault the girls’ work rate this season; right from the start, they were determined to train well and take on the opposition. They played some very positive hockey across all their fixtures, some of which were comfortable wins and others much more competitive. The side always started games well and this helped in a bright start to the season that saw wins over Bryanston (6–1), Dauntsey’s (8–0), Cheltenham (5–0) and St Edward’s (5–0). The girls won all of their ISHL matches, with four wins from four and 17 goals scored without reply. In the National Cup were unfortunate not to put together a run in the competition, with a slow start seeing the girls 2–0 down against Wycliffe but despite a second half rally, the game was lost (2–3). Overall, this was a very enjoyable season with

plenty of positives and every member of the squad contributed to a successful campaign. I thoroughly enjoyed coaching them and wish them every success for the following season. I would also like to thank all those parents who came along to cheer on the team, it made a massive difference and I know all the girls appreciated it. JWGR

Girls’ Hockey U15B P:11; W:9; D:1; L:1 Led by captain Alicia Pearson-Chisman, the girls came agonisingly close to recording an unbeaten season with the only loss recorded in the final match against Canford. The girls scored an impressive 72 goals in 11 games, conceding just five. Bella Brown, Molly Marvin and Alice De Giles were on the scoresheet 45 times between them with Bella netting a notable 17 goals to finish as the top scorer in the College. Particular highlights include resounding wins over Dean Close (12–0), Millfield (9–0) and Cheltenham (10–0). Midfielders Clara Hutchinson, Lucia Imi, Alicia PearsonChisman and Minnie Feather worked tirelessly to feed the ball through to the forwards who calmly converted with almost every attack. The 1–1 draw against Wellington was a real test, with goalkeeper Izzy Hodgson and defenders Sophie Harris and Scarlett Longfield on top form whilst Brown found the net once again. Lucia Imi’s athleticism and diligence saw her named player of the season with Alice De Giles the most improved player for her feisty and courageous attitude in attack, whilst cool, calm and collected Molly Marvin was voted players’ player by her peers. JCI & SJW

Girls’ Hockey U15C

loss. Without strong opposition, some of the most exciting play took place in training when the girls held their own against the U15Bs. The best was saved for last and the girls were relieved to be challenged properly with fixtures against Wellington and Canford. These two matches were fast-paced and very exciting for the spectators as the momentum switched constantly. The players, especially the defence, had to up their game considerably in order to keep the scores to 2–2 draws. The girls should be congratulated for their team spirit in sharing the goalkeeping responsibilities; several were brave enough to try this position for the first time. Player of the season was Sophia Hamilton. JMCC/EKR

Girls’ Hockey U14A P:21; W:13; D:2; L:6 Bryanston School

W

3:0

Clifton College

L

0:3

Godolphin School

W

2:0

St Mary’s Calne

W

4:0

Dauntsey’s School

W

1:0

St John’s School

W

2:0

St Mary’s Calne

W

2:0

Dean Close School

L

2:4

Cheltenham College

D

3:3

St Edward’s School, Oxford

W

4:1

Lucton School

W

5:0

The Ladies’ College, Guernsey

W

9:0

Cheltenham College

W

3:1

Blundells School

W

1:0

Canford School

W

1:1 (5:4 on penalty strokes)

Dean Close School

L

1:2

Millfield School

L

0:5

Bradfield College

W

5:1

Bromsgrove School

D

1:1

Wellington College

L

3:4

Canford School

L

1:4

P:8; W:5; D:2; L:1 The 6–0 defeat of Clifton at the start of the season gave a taste of what was to follow; for the next five matches the team only conceded one goal when a momentary lapse of focus allowed a Dauntsey’s goal to slip in resulting in the only

SQUAD: A Beckett (Capt), T Baker (Vice-Capt), T. Mobley (Vice-Capt), I Christian, R Curtis, S Dunlop, A Evans, A Gregory, M Hornby, A Hue-Williams, D Krens, E Marchand, J Money-Kyrle, P Munn, E Rogers, M Smith It took some time for the group to adjust to the 11-a-side version of the game from their prep school experiences. However, despite some tough opening matches, the girls were competing and working hard which would hold them in good stead. The turning point in the season came away at Cheltenham where the girls showed a refreshing intensity and urgency to draw level after trailing 1–3 at half-time. From then on, momentum picked up and the

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This group of girls were without a doubt the most coachable and improved team I have taken at Marlborough. Particular mention to Amy Beckett scoring 15 goals in the season and demonstrating such immense potential as a drag flicker, Tilly Mobley for running the show on several occasions and deservedly picking up player of the season; Jemima Money-Kyrle and Sophie Dunlop for picking up coach’s and players’ most improved player of the season respectively. WGH

Girls’ Hockey U14B P:13; W:10; D:1; L:2 It was a promising start to the U14B’s first season at Marlborough. An impressive 5–0 win over Bryanston, followed by a 4–0 victory over Clifton, saw captain Louise Bunn, Lissy Tomacelli Filomarino and Maddie Price top of the score sheets. The team’s resolve was tested in a difficult match against Millfield without our star goalkeeper, Pippa Blossom, and the defensive line of Eilidh McCoig, Flossie Robinson, Molly Jones and Isla Scott, worked immensely hard throughout. The season drew to a close with forcefully fought games against Wellington and Canford, where ‘intensity’ became the focus. The relentless defence shown

SPORTS by all players in both games was formidable, and eventually the girls wore down the strong opposition to walk away victorious. The girls should be congratulated on such a tenacious and promising start to hockey at Marlborough. HLM

Girls’ Hockey U14C P:9; W:9; D:0; L:0 It was a season to be proud of for the 17-strong squad who came away undefeated after nine fixtures (the tenth sadly the victim of freezing temperatures), scoring 67 goals and conceding just two. The girls were rewarded for their sterling efforts, deservedly coming away as winners of the Michaelmas Term sportsmanship award and the illustrious Ellis Cup. Imogen Davis and Tabitha Eliot, as captain and vice-captain, led the squad proficiently and were exemplary role models throughout. Emily Edgington also deserves an honourable mention for scoring a tremendous 18 goals; she is one to watch for the future! Particular highlights included a 7–0 win at Millfield, always a tough encounter, as well as 5–0 victories over Bromsgrove and Wellington. Willow Smiley was tenacious and dominant in defence, providing constant support to

courageous goalkeeper Freya Høgevold. A fantastic opening campaign for these Shell girls who should be thrilled with what they have achieved. SHB/RCT

Girls’ Hockey U14D P:6; W:5; D:1; L:0 A brilliant unbeaten season by the U14Ds was made all the better due to excellent team spirit and fantastic attitude in training. Despite a couple of cancellations, the girls preserved and played some excellent hockey – with some brilliant wins! Cheltenham proved a tricky draw, but we were playing the Cs! Lily Eadie, Cordy Ashworth, Honor Aspbury and Natasha Newington were outstanding, demonstrating grit, strength and determination throughout the season. A particular highlight of the season was the last match against Canford which highlighted the progress and excellent team spirit developed by the team, especially given the challenging nature of the match.

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

squad was ready to peak at the Regional Finals. The girls played some of the best tournament hockey I have seen from a Marlborough side running in 18 goals in their four group games to top the group. As is becoming a habit, Canford awaited us in the quarter-finals where some excellent goalkeeping from Phoebe Munn and true grit from the girls saw the game end 1–1 and go to penalty strokes. The girls had prepared well for this eventuality impressively converting all five strokes to progress. Dean Close halted our progress in the semi-final with a 2–1 loss. However, the girls performed above expectations to be one game away from reaching the national finals. The season ended with losses against highly reputable opposition, but put in two of the best performances of the term despite injury and illness, demonstrating just how much they had improved since September.

Well done, girls! VDH/RLJ

@MCol_Hockey Dec 11 Well done to @MCol_Morris who beat @MCol_Elm on goal difference to win Shell House 6s competition in Arctic conditions!

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SPORTS

BOYS’ HOCKEY

Brooks (player of the season) and Edward Cornish playing a big part in a 2–2 draw. Thistlethwayte and Hazlitt ended the season as joint top scorers. Thank you to Mr James Lyon-Taylor for all his support and encouragement throughout the season. MSR

Boys’ Hockey Open 2nd XI P:9; W:2; D:4; L:3

Boys’ Hockey Open 1st XI

BOYS’ HOCKEY

P:11; W:6; D:1; L:4 Radley

L

1:4

St George’s

W

3:3 (W 6:5 Pens)

Abingdon

L

1:2

Taunton

W

4:3

Wellington

W

4:0

Dean Close

L

0:1

Bradfield

W

4:1

King’s Bruton

W

1:1 (W 2:0 Pens)

St Edward’s

W

3:0

Hurstpierpoint

L

0:2

Canford

D

2:2

SQUAD: J Wright (Captain), M Brooks (Vice-Capt), E Cornish, D Coulson, T Hunt, S Nelson-Piercy, L Smith, J Fry, J Thistlethwayte, H Brooks, F Hazlitt, N Rusinov, J Krens, J Ellis, B Spink The season began with some competitive ISHL fixtures, as Radley College and Abingdon School provided us with some tough matches and set the standard high for the season ahead. Dom Coulson’s work rate and strength on the ball was earned him MOTM in

both these fixtures. The second half of the ISHL saw a different outcome with the boys securing comfortable victories against both Wellington and Bradfield. The electric speed of both Jude Fry and Nick Rusinov tore the Wellington defence apart – allowing Coulson, Jack Thistlethwayte and Freddie Hazlitt to score. The ‘beast from the east’ forced the cancellation of the penultimate league fixture against Cheltenham, leaving just only one fixture remaining. The final game saw an endto-end battle against St Edward’s, where solid defence from Luke Smith and James Wright and goalkeeper Sam Nelson-Piercy helped us to a 3–0 win and secure third position in the ISHL. The Boarding Schools’ Cup saw some fantastic fixtures and the first round saw an exciting match against St George’s College, with the scores level at 3–3 after normal time. A penalty stroke competition went to sudden death, with Hazlitt, Thistlethwayte and Hunt calmly converting whilst Nelson-Piercy making an outstanding save to secure a 9–8 win. The second round saw a 4–3 win over Taunton and a place in the last 16. Unfortunately, a place in the top eight just wasn’t meant to be with the boys eventually losing out to the eventual runners-up, Hurstpierpoint College. The season ended against an unbeaten Canford side, where the boys played some excellent hockey with dominant midfield duo Milo

The season opened with a tough encounter against a well-drilled Radley side, which was followed by a narrow defeat to Eton. Both of these were played away from home – but the boys soon gathered momentum and resilience. This was built upon the performances of a solid and consistent back line of Toby Hargrove, Zac Place and Jack Kirkwood. This strength in defence, allowed a more flamboyant mid combination of Milo Sweet and George Nicholson to build up the middle of the field and create a host of goalscoring opportunities. Sweet and Hargrove both led the 2nd XI team in their roles as captain and vice-captain respectively, but also as the most consistent and high performing team members, whilst Nicholson contributed significantly when he wasn’t playing up for the 1st XI. The team’s standout performance was in a close and hard fought away 1–1 draw against a strong Dean Close team. Other significant results included a 6–0 home win over Wellington and a 5–0 triumph over Bradfield. RS

Boys’ Hockey Open 3rd XI P:8; W:4; D:2; L:2 It was a pleasing season as the boys developed as a team and the quality of the hockey increased dramatically; by half-term some of the players were even talking to each other during matches! We hit a purple patch in the middle of the season and strong sides like Bradfield and Dean Close were brushed aside. Freddie Moorhead scored five goals in one match, beaten only by a double hat-trick from captain Harry Foster. The most spectacular goal was scored by Zack Chambers, who retrieved his own rebound and thwacked it into the top left corner! Goalkeeper Edward Abbott was ever dependable and resourceful, ably supported by a defence that only occasionally passed a 16 straight to the opposition’s centre forward. The number of times that Oliver Plaistowe and Harry Powell won player of the match showed how well our defence supported the team. Luke Tomiak was our most skilful and adaptable player, slotting into any position with flair if not always with pace. Freddie Cornish provided the skill and intelligence in midfield that kept the team together. The last match was played in the bitter cold and we drew with a strong, but certainly beatable Canford side. Winning the league was a fitting reflection of the boys’ effort and ability. JW

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Boys’ Hockey Open 4th XI SPORTS

P:4; W:1; D:0; L:3 This was a tough season for the 4th XI and due to some unfortunate cancellations, we only managed to play four games.

A thoroughly enjoyable term of sport – I can’t credit the boys enough for their enthusiasm! WJM

Boys’ Hockey Colts 1st XI P:11; W:4; D:2; L:5

fitting clothes and haircuts. His pre-match reveal of the shaven-sided mullet certainly a highlight of the season. Up front, Lucas D’Oelsnitz scored some screamers and in the nets, Eliot Pears did a lot of screaming but also made countless stunning saves. We let ourselves down badly only once in a painful 4–0 drubbing at Wellington. The ‘Come on Welly’ refrain getting louder and more painful with every rattle of our backboard. Not fun, but in the main, this was a squad that tackled adversity and limitation with huge charm and humour. There was much self-deprecation but never lack of commitment. A pleasure to coach.

Radley

W

4:2

Eton

D

1:1

Abingdon

L

0:2

Wellington

L

0:4

Dean Close

L

1:2

Boys’ Hockey Colts 2nd XI

King Bruton

D

3:3

P:8; W:5; D:3; L:0

Colstons

W

3:1

Dean Close (Cup)

L

1:3

Bradfield

W

3:1

St Edward’s

W

3:2

Canford

L

0:1

SQUAD: M Brousse (Capt), B Baker, E Pears, B Place, A Hardwick, H Norman, J White, A Palengat, M Ten Nijenhuis, C Madden, J Cleverly, N Corfield, L D’Oelsnitz

RP

This Colts B team was very special and had the most amazing hockey season. Do we judge success by the number of wins or by the progress players make from one year to another? Well, for this team, it is both. The previous year, they had lost five games and conceded 18. So, at the start of the season, it was important to make them believe that they had the potential to become excellent hockey

players. The first test was against Bradfield where thanks to determination and motivation, they won 2–0. The tone was set and in the third match at Abingdon, they won 3–1 whereas the previous year, they had lost 1–7. It was an epic game and it would be unfair to single any player out in an outstanding team display. The season went from strength to strength as they did not lose a single match! A remarkable performance from a great team! TCML

Boys’ Hockey Colts 3rd XI

BOYS’ HOCKEY

A heavy 6–2 defeat at the hands of Radley, 4–1 defeat to Dauntsey’s and a narrow 1–0 loss against Bradfield highlighted defence as the priority in training. As such, with a month of training until the final game against Canford, the boys worked tirelessly to ensure a winning end to the campaign. Led passionately by cocaptains Angus Lorimer and Charlie Thomas, a clean sheet and two goals against Canford meant at least one victory on the season summary. Morgan Pollard was wonderfully creative in the centre of midfield, with Freddie Peppiatt being an accomplished and hardworking central defender. The forward line of Robert Smith, Henry Gouriet and Angus Lorimer, whilst not scoring many goals, were certainly entertaining to watch.

P:6; W:2; D:0; L:4 An encouraging Colts 3 hockey season, the highlight was how driven the squad were to learn and develop every week through the bitterly cold Lent Term. I must admire their motivation to get up for the five fixtures against Bradfield, which was rebranded by the boys ‘The Ashes.’ However, even with four losses the boys were a pleasure to coach, also played excellent hockey throughout the season and their attitude was exemplary throughout in particular; Theo Dixon, Jonny Gondzic and Felix Henderson. JMQ

This was by no means a stellar season with a squad that might best be described as an honest semi-pro rather than Premier League. However, hope sprung eternal and when we turned over the much-fancied Radley side in a stunning 4–2 demolition on Maples in the opening game of the season it begged the question, had they been criminally underestimated? The answer was an emphatic no as we failed to record another win until after half-term. There was some quality: Jack White, skipper Max Brousse and Ned Corfield providing intermittent but genuine class. Hugh Norman became increasingly important as he showed that intelligent, natural ball-playing ability can more than compensate for raw athleticism. Arthur Hardwick was a fascinating mix of real pace and touch wrapped in a shambles of ill-

@MCol_Sport Mar 20 Strong effort from the @MarlboroughCol grounds team to clear the astros for house hockey today!

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SPORTS

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 1st XI P:12; W:10; D:1; L:1 Radley

W

3:1

Eton

W

3:1

Charterhouse

W

5:1

Abingdon

W

3:1

Dauntsey’s

W

8:0

Wellington

W

7:0

Millfield

W

4:2

Dean Close

D

2:2

Whitgift

L

0:8

Bradfield

W

7:1

St Edward’s

W

6:0

Canford

W

5:1

BOYS’ HOCKEY

SQUAD: S Horlock (C), F Kottler (GK), W Hammersley (VC), J Brooks, O Munn, S Cadbury, L Dessalles, O Clayton, G Hocking, M Stevenson, C Tubbs, H Pritchard, O Cook, O Phillips, A Seton This was an outstanding season thanks to the drive and determination of a fantastic group of players; they were a pleasure to coach, with such efforts reflected in a great set of results. The boys won their opening seven games on the spin, with a 5–1 win at Charterhouse in the National Cup complemented by wins over Radley, Eton, Abingdon and Wellington. The cup run was a good one, with a 4–2 win over Millfield sending us into the last 16, although we were knocked out by an impressive Whitgift side. Wins followed in our final two ISHL matches against Bradfield and St Edward’s. The cancellation of the Cheltenham game proved costly, as it stopped a league title win, but the boys can be proud of a progressive season where every member of the squad made a real contribution. Thank you to all the parents who travelled to support the side on matchdays, both at home and away. Such support made a big difference and also thanks to Mr Muir for his assistance both on and off the pitch. JWGR/AJWM

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 2nd XI

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 3rd XI

P:9; W:6; D:0; L:3

P:7; W:5; D:0; L:2

Marlborough’s JC2 hockey players had to overcome many challenges last season, not the least of which being a dizzying array of coaches. My great thanks go to Mr Pembroke, Mr Lane, Mr Bush, Mr Richardson and of course Mr Ramage for all the support they provided – and to what effect! This was a successful season indeed, with wins over major foes, none more satisfying than in the opening fixture against Radley. Last-gasp victories over Winchester’s JC1 and Bradfield also deserve special mention.

This has been a challenging but successful season. We started with a hard-fought match at home to Radley. This was followed by similar encounters against Abingdon and Wellington. The players were able to combine some good individual skills with a strong passing game which proved to be very effective. Our first away match produced our best result of the season with a comfortable win against Dean Close. Next up was the big challenge of Bradfield away, on a very cold day at the end of the afternoon. The boys really impressed with a never-say-die attitude and an impressive work rate. Unfortunately it was not quite enough to beat a very well-drilled Bradfield side: the boys should be proud of their attitude and effort though. We played St Edward’s 2nd XI for our next match. It was a frustrating game where we dominated for large parts but could not get the ball in the back of the net and lost 2–1. Our last match of the season was away to Canford in which some great play led to a good win.

We can have few complaints about the defeats; indeed, the only reasonable gripe is that two ISHL matches were cancelled, including the top-of-the-table clash against Cheltenham. More fitting it is, however, to focus on the joys, for joy was abundant. So stringent is the word limit, so large was the squad, it is unfair to mention names. It must suffice to record that we scored many goals, conceded very few, and entertained the crowd with energy and flair. The players will long remember this season with smiles. So shall I. RAS

TAB

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 4th XI P:4; W:1; D:1; L:2 The weather clipped our fixtures to leave us with just four games. The opening game was a thrilling draw against Radley. The team worked very hard as the game ebbed and flowed and on balance it was a fair result. Bradfield were put to the sword 6–1 first time round but the return fixture went 4-0 against us! After the big freeze, we lost heavily to Teddies. However, enjoyment was high and the skills of the boys progressed well – the grill challenge achieved by some! Many will continue to rise through the ranks into the Open teams. The attitude of the boys was tremendous especially when waiting for the final push back times of the day. Thanks to Mr Richardson for his help and the players for their commitment. BHM

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SPORTS

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 1st XI P:12; W:3; D:1; L:8 L

0:4

Eton College

L

3:8

Warminster School

W

5:2

Abingdon School

W

3:2

Dauntsey’s School

W

3:2

Wellington College

L

2:3

Dean Close School

L

0:4

Bradfield College

L

0:7

Dean Close School

L

1:5

Bristol Grammar School

L

1:2

St. Edward’s School, Oxford

D

0:0

Canford School

L

0:1

SQUAD: J Watson (Capt), M PretorPinney (Vice-Capt), S Baines, A Darke, S Elviss, J Hatrick, W Hentenaar, R Lamplugh, O Longman-Slocombe, S Martin-Jenkins, F Pepper, D Russell, O Shepherd, T Stephenson-Green, T Yates The Yearlings 1st XI endured a tough first term of hockey at Marlborough. Unfortunately for the boys, they seem to be pitted against some ‘golden yeargroups’ from schools on the circuit and will need to work hard to close the margins if they are to reach the Regional Finals in two years’ time. Notable performances came against Wellington where the boys played some superb counter-attacking hockey to go two goals up but could not prevail the skill of an individual talent in the opposition ranks. The other standout match came in the last game of the season away to Canford. In Arctic conditions and a pushback of 5pm, the boys showed a solidity and structure that had not been evident before and a sign that they will improve given how coachable the group has been. Particular mention must go to James Watson for his admirable leadership throughout a difficult season and for his high level of performance consistently demonstrated at left-half. WGH

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 2nd XI P:9; W:4; D:2; L:3 This was a season of two halves; a slow start saw us lose our opening three matches, beginning with a 2–1 reverse to Radley with goalkeeper Arthur Cornell impressing. The boys were unable to turn chances into goals against Eton, despite notable midfield performances from Harry Campbell-Walter and Oscar Pownell and a fine goal from Tomos Lewis. The turning point came in the fourth match of the season in an exciting home match against Dauntsey’s. Hugo Flowers, Matthew Mairs and Adam Kiggell defended well and a hat-trick from captain Tom Stephenson-Green, a double from Oscar Peters, and another from Josh Tate secured a 6–1 win

– our first victory of the season. More of the same followed as confidence grew and the team went unbeaten in the next six games. This run included wins over Wellington (3–0), Dean Close (5–0) and St Edward’s (4–0). An enjoyable season of hockey was had by all. JCI

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 3rd XI P:8; W:5; D:0; L:3 The U14Cs had overall a positive season, despite many reshuffles throughout the season the boys nevertheless always gave 100% which was spurred on by captain Arthur Norbury pregame and half-time team talks. The boys really impressed with their fine sportsmanship and an impressive work rate, during every training session and on matchdays. Overall they have been a pleasure to coach such a positive group of boys and I look forward to seeing this talented group continue to improve as they progress into their Remove year. Player of the season was Arthur Norbury and Harry Cowling finished top goalscorer. RC

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 4th XI

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 5th XI P:5; W:3; D:2; L:0 A fabulous unbeaten season for the 5ths. Many of whom started in January with either rather mixed or no previous experience of hockey. The cheer from the boys at the final whistle following a win against Bradfield in the driving snow said so much for their attitude and their improvement over the months. Unbeaten in matches and hard-working during training they were ably captained by Albie Woolfenden with Angus Whitaker and Matthew Litvin in the Vice-Captain role – Ned Finney the indomitable ’keeper, Arthur Caddy, canny and hard-working in defence. Kit Codrington swift on the wing and Adam Summers spectacularly (over)committed to tackles. Max Russell (highest goal scorer 4) with real pace, ensured the scoreboard accumulated. Over the season 21 boys represented the team and were all excellent ambassadors for the College. Most importantly, I would hope they now have the foundation of skills to continue with hockey in the Remove. Based upon their improvement trajectory, the 1st XI would not be an unreasonable future target – should this happen, I would watch on with great interest and a wry smile.

BOYS’ HOCKEY

Radley College

ACL

P:5; W:5; D:0; L:0 The Yearlings 4th XI enjoyed a successful first term of hockey at Marlborough. An undefeated performance can look easy but there were times in matches where the boys had to rally and show a high degree of grit and determination, all guided by the excellent communication of sweeper and captain Bill Campbell. Notable performance of the group came from Youssef Glover, a consistent scorer who secured goals on every appearance this season. The boys were immensely coachable and picked up on the key aspects of gamesmanship with shouts of “Bowties” & “Magnets” raining upon bewildered opposition players. DJM & AJH

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SPORTS

LACROSSE

did manage one last match play slot, against a strong St Mary’s Calne 1st team. The end-of-season dinner rounded off the season in great style, celebrating and reflecting upon a range of achievements. A huge thank you to our U6 leavers Freya Owen, Imogen Mitchell, Georgia Lane Fox and Lara Bracher. Thank you to all the coaches and players for what has been an incredibly successful season of lacrosse. AFH

Lacrosse 2nd XII P: 20; W: 3; D: 1; L: 16

Lacrosse 1st XII

LACROSSE

P:23; W:11; D:1; L:11 St Mary’s Calne

L

3:13

Godolphin School

L

3:7

Sherborne Girls

L

6:9

St Bartholomew’s School

W

13:12

Westonbirt School

W

12:7

St George’s School Ascot

W

7:2

Cheltenham Ladies College

W

5:0

St Swithun’s School

D

2:2

Downe House

L

0:5

St Helen & St Katharine

L

0:6

Queen Anne’s School

L

1:6

Sherborne Girls

L

6:15

Cheltenham Ladies College

W

10:6

Charterhouse

W

20:3

St George’s School Ascot

W

11:3

Tudor Hall

W

11:7

Downe House Cs

W

12:5

St Swithun’s School

L

3:10

Claremont Fan Court School

L

5:6

Canford School

W

5:3

Rendcomb College

W

9:4

St Mary’s Calne

L

3:13

St Mary’s Calne Bs

L

5:9

SQUAD: F Owen (Captain), L Bracher, L Cracknell, C Grainger, S Hall-Smith, E Hargrove, L Hunt, C Irwin, S Irwin, S Kirkwood, G Lane Fox, K Lee, V Mackintosh, C Middleton, H Mills, I Mitchell, J Money-Kyrle, D MitfordSlade, L Prideaux, A Tchen, E Winter Captained by Freya Owen, the 1st XII team began the term with some tough matches at the annual County Lacrosse Tournament. The girls put together some encouraging performances returning with plenty to build on. Back to back wins against St Bartholomew’s and Westonbirt provided the team with some much needed confidence. At the South West

136

Rally, wins were recorded against Cheltenham Ladies (5–0), St George’s Ascot (7–2) with a nail-biting draw against the hosts, St Swithun’s (2–2), the team qualified for the Championship Division. This was a notable achievement, and provided valuable playing experience against some of the top lacrosse schools in the country. The highlight of the Michaelmas Term, was a 10–6 win over Cheltenham Ladies’ College where Claudie Grainger and Georgia Lane Fox both impressed. The term was rounded off with convincing wins against Charterhouse (20–3), St George’s Ascot (11–3) and Tudor Hall (11–7). The Lent Term began with competitive, closely fought, but victorious, fixtures against Downe House Cs and Canford. The team were reaping the benefits of their athletic development sessions, focusing on cardiovascular endurance, speed and power. These benefits were probably evident during the 9–4 win over Rendcomb. Sophie Kirkwood, on her return from injury, made a real impact on this game. Unfortunately the Beast from the East got the better of the last few matches of the term and as a result, we were unable to compete in the National Schools Tournament and the St Patrick’s Day invitational tournament was cancelled. We

Captained by Lucy Storer, the 2nd XII began the Michaelmas Term with some tough matches at the annual County Lacrosse Tournament. It was great to see girls from the Hundred playing alongside Upper School pupils, gaining experience and working as a cohesive unit. The girls then drew against St Swithun’s, skilled hosts of the South West Rally, where defensively and offensively our girls impressed. The highlight of the Michaelmas Term was our first win against Tudor Hall School. The girls battled the elements and as snow settled on the ground, beat the opposition 6–5. New captains Poppy Redfern and Valerie Poulden led the charge going into the Lent Term, and hard work in training reworking formations and building unit play soon paid off. Wins followed against Canford (6–5) and Rendcomb (8–1) which concluded the season due to the adverse weather conditions towards the back end of the term. At the end of season dinner, we reflected on the progress made across the two terms and said farewell to Upper Sixth leavers Georgia Beattie, Emily Boom, Amy Vogel, Serena Slatter, Amelia Bentley and Lucy Storer. Many thanks goes to Mr Border and Miss Hudson for their support and development of this flourishing team. BLW/CNP


Lacrosse U15 XII SPORTS

P:23; W:10; D:1; L:12 SQUAD: S Kirkwood (Captain), D Atkinson, E Beardmore-Gray, P Bell, I Borghese, C Case, A Corbett, A Dinckok, C Gow, I Hodgson, S Hosier, N Howard, C Hutchinson, I Jeveons, L Jordan-Willis, A Kirkwood (Vice-Capt), T Lee, S Long field, M Marvin (Vice-Capt), C Meadon, S Michaelis, I Mitford, D Panchenko, S Powell, T Reed, W Rowan-Hamilton, M Ruoss, E Sharp, L Southgate, E Stuart, L Staples, L Thomas

After some tough opening fixtures in the Michaelmas Term, things really came together with victory over Westonbirt with a fine team display that gave the girls some much-needed confidence. This rolled over into a good win over St Mary’s Calne B and a closely contested double header against Sherborne. Defeat against Cheltenham Ladies didn’t deter the girls, who returned with battling displays in two further close contests against St Mary’s Calne and St George’s Ascot.

the fixture programme, but the girls kept their spirits up and trained hard to the end of term. I wish them all luck in their transition to senior lacrosse next year and congratulate them on a fantastic season. JRW/OFG

Lacrosse U14 XII P:27; W:3; D:2; L:22

The determination to convert close matches into wins was shown at the start of the Lent Term, with the squad boosted by the return of several talented lacrosse players from hockey. The term opened with a 7–7 draw against Tudor Hall before wins over Westonbirt, Downe House and Claremont Fan Court.

SQUAD: O Spearpoint (Captain), M Pia Rubinelli (Vice-Captain), J Kastner, F Shorthouse, T Elliot, K Agnew, C Brebbia, P Blossom, T Norman, L Eadie, A Fuchs, F Høegevld, N Newington, P Pilkington, Ella Rogers, Flossie Robinson, Z Blakey, C Chancellor, D Davidovich, E Kirkwood (Vice-Captain), S Lack, C Lauze, A Pugh, M Jones, J Ackerley, B Poloniecka, I Morley, I Raper, S Bankes, A Dean-Smith, L Whittaker, E Davies, O Richardson, C Ashworth

At the South West Rally, wins were recorded against St. Mary’s B (4–0), Westonbirt (4–1) and then producing the shock of the day, beating Godolphin (2–0). The winning streak ended narrowly against Downe House (2–3), a top-tier side and St Helen & St Katharine (0– 1). The weather postponed much of the rest of

This was a fantastic year of learning for the U14s. Participation was key with 31 members of the squad having never played the game going into the Michaelmas Term. The girls acquired new skills, training three times per week with matches on a Saturday. This in itself required tenacity and resilience from all.

The Michaelmas Term began with a 5–5 draw against Westonbirt, which was followed by tough encounters with Sherborne, St Mary’s Calne and Cheltenham Ladies’ College. The final match of the term against Tudor Hall brought mixed emotions, as the girls raced into a 5–2 lead only to lose the game 6–5. A topsyturvy game but a valuable experience. The Lent Term brought new players, and the season opener against Westonbirt saw a number of positives. Ten out of the 16 players selected were new to the game and to score five goals against established opposition provided a lot of optimism. Testing matches against Downe House and St Swithun’s followed but the girls continued to play with smiles on their faces with 29 players representing Marlborough across these double-header fixtures. The SouthWest Rally was a real test of character against skilled opposition but this did not deter the girls, who returned to end the season with a hattrick of wins against Rendcomb to put the seal on months of hard work.

LACROSSE

This was a fantastic year of learning and progression for the girls, who seemed to enjoy the added responsibility and ownership of their own development. This afforded the more experienced girls and chance to develop their leadership skills – something that would serve the squad well across the two terms.

A huge thank you to all parents who supported the girls throughout the two terms. Thanks also to Mr Hodgson and Miss Lewis who travelled, listened and supported the Under-14 teams. CJB/JH

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SPORTS

GIRLS’ TENNIS

represented the Open 1st team and were able to perform well despite the step up in quality. I look forward to seeing many of them back next year when I am sure this year’s experience will have made them a lot more competitive. TAB

Girls’ Tennis Open 3rd VI P:5; W:5; D:0; L:0

Girls’ Tennis Open 1st VI

GIRLS’ TENNIS

P:7; W:2; D:0; L:5 Downe House

L

0:10

Wellington

L

2:7

Cheltenham Ladies

L

3:6

Bradfield

W

7:2

St Mary’s Calne

W

5:4

Bryanston

L

3:6

Downe House

L

4:5

SQUAD: J Davy, L Beckett, O Wilson, A Mathison, A Cameron, H Smith, L Wollocombe, L Constable The season started with a tough Aegon match on the road at Downe House. The girls battled hard under hot conditions but our hosts proved to be a little too strong on the day. Our first block fixture of the term came next against a strong Wellington side. We went in to the last round of sets needing a win in all three. It proved too much of an ask despite the girls working hard for every point. Next was a fixture at Cheltenham Ladies’ College which proved equally as tough with difficult weather conditions to contend with. The first pair of Jess Davy and Lara Beckett produced some great tennis but as a team we fell short of the win. These tough matches no doubt helped us in our next two fixtures though. We beat

Bradfield away 7–2 and then went on to win a tight match against St Mary’s Calne 5–4. In the second half of term, we travelled to Bryanston with a determined but inexperienced side. It proved a stretch too far for us but the girls acquitted themselves admirably against stronger opposition. We also played in a mixed match against Wellington which proved to be a great success, with both pupils and spectators thoroughly enjoying the experience. Downe House rounded off the season and was a fantastic match. The first pair of Lara Beckett and Luz Wollocombe played some great tennis to win all three of their sets. We narrowly lost the fixture 5–4 but the girls again worked hard for every point. The Lower Sixth have had some invaluable experience this year – which will no doubt put them in a strong position next year. TAB

Girls’ Tennis Open 2nd VI P:6; W:0; D:0; L:6 A lot of credit goes to the girls who have stepped up to the Open 2nd VI team this season. It has been a tough season and at times, the rub of the green has not gone our way, missing out narrowly in close sets which has made the fixtures difficult to win. It has been great to see the girls develop their tennis though and be competitive throughout the season. All of the girls in this team have at one point also

@MCol_Tennis Mar 26 Congratulations to our Player of the Tour, Fleur! Thanks to @5StarTennis for another amazing trip

138

What a fantastic unbeaten season these Open 3rd VI girls have had. They began with convincing wins against Wellington, Cheltenham and Bradfield. These initial fixtures were certainly a highlight and the girls should be proud of their achievements here. Unfortunately, due to bad weather, our annual and highly competitive fixture against Wycombe Abbey was cancelled. Towards the end of the season, a selection of other players had the chance to step up and represent the College in the Open 3rd team. They did this considerably well and achieved a win in their final match against St Mary’s Calne. Congratulations to Morris who won the girls Uppers House tennis and to all those U18C team players involved. This event is always a great one to round off the season. Well done to all players who represented the U18C team squad this year, you have a lot to be proud of with this unbeaten season. AFH

Girls’ Tennis Open 4th VI P:3; W:1; D:0; L:2 It was a challenging season for the Open 4th team this year. The girls started with narrow 4–5 loss to Wellington College. However, this was followed by a fantastic 7–2 win against Cheltenham Ladies’ College. Again, our annual and highly competitive fixture against Wycombe Abbey was cancelled. In the final fixture of the year, non-team players were invited to represent the College in the match against St Mary’s Calne. This was a tough fixture and unfortunately, it was not meant to be. The girls have learnt a considerable amount and should take this forward to next season. AFH


SPORTS

that their game had improved and they had been challenged throughout the weeks. ACL

Girls’ Tennis U14A P:7; W:5; D:0; L:2

P:9; W:8; D:0; L:1 Wellington

W

6:3

Cheltenham Ladies

W

9:0

South Wilts

W

10:2

Bradfield

W

6:3

St Mary’s Calne

L

4:5

Godolphin

W

11:1

Dauntsey’s

W

10:2

Bryanston

W

7:2

Downe House

W

8:1

SQUAD: S Harris (capt), A Beckett, P Evans, E Fanshawe, M Feather, M Marvin, L May, L Staples The early loss of Lara Staples due to injury was quite a blow, but the depth within the U15 squad proved to be as impressive as ever. Captained ably by Sophie Harris, with strong wins against all the major foe including Wellington, CLC, Bradfield, Bryanston and Downe House. Rain (storms) caused us to abandon the usually highly competitive Wycombe fixture. The girls were undone only by St Mary’s Calne highlighting the dominance of Alicia Beckett who was injured that day. The way one plays tennis can reflect character traits. It is always so rewarding to see the flamboyant players,

but almost more so to watch the grafters, those who are simply so hard to beat because as a pair, they bring the best out of each other. This was a theme for the U15A squad, Liliana May and Sophie Harris would wear down opponents. The teamwork and grit of Poppy Evans and Molly Marvin bringing in weekly wins was especially satisfying. I look forward to seeing how these girls progress through the school. ACL

Girls’ Tennis U15 B/C/D P:17; W:14; D:0; L:3 Every coach and sports beak looks for ‘coachability’. This bright and committed group had that in spades and from the off we felt sure we would have a strong season. The score sheets were positive and this always brings smiles, but in addition the nature of the tennis the girls were prepared to play improved over the season. Consistency and teamwork combined with some flair and risk-taking. These are challenges to this age-group where ‘not messing up’ can dominate in the early stages. Towards the end of the season confidence and belief was high and no opposition stood a chance. We often say that the Marlborough girls would fill other schools’ first teams, where our depth means really good tennis players will represent our B, C and D teams. This was true again but each girl could end the season with the feeling

L

2:7

Cheltenham Ladies

W

9:0

Bradfield

W

6:3

Wycombe Abbey

L

4:5

St Mary’s Calne

W

6:3

Bryanston

W

7:2

Downe House

W

7:2

SQUAD: Z Blakey, E Marchand, C Chauveau, M Hornby, S Dunlop, L Cleverly

U14B: P:7; W:6; D:0; L:1 U14C: P:6; W:6; D:0; L:0 U14D: P:5; W:3; D:0; L:2 The U14 girls’ tennis teams had a strong season, winning the majority of their matches; the U14C team had an unbeaten season. The squad was large with a great depth of talent, which meant that most girls played on a rotational basis. The A team won five of their seven matches, with a particularly impressive score of 9–0 against Cheltenham Ladies’ College. Another highlight of the season was a competitive mixed-double away match against Wellington, which was narrowly won 5–3. Zara Blakey and Emily Marchand played an exceptionally good season as First Pair, showing perseverance and dedication in their training and matches. Olivia Spearpoint and Ottilie Richardson proved to be a strong pair also, achieving an impressive number of wellfought wins.

GIRLS’ TENNIS

Girls’ Tennis U15A

Wellington

Overall, the U14s had an excellent season in which they developed their serving, volleying and ground stroke skills and played each match with a positive attitude and great sportsmanship. VRB/JB

@MCol_Tennis Jun 25 U15A girls enjoying the sunshine as the end of term draws near. Fantastic group – well done all!

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BOYS’ TENNIS

as well as strength of will and consistent concentration on court. Schoolboy players with the whole package are rare but several of these boys have the potential to join their number, they should be looking forward to next season. TAK

Boys’ Tennis 3rd VI P:1; W:0; D:0; L:1

Boys’ Tennis 1st & 2nd VI P:19; W:7; D:0; L:12

BOYS’ TENNIS

SQUAD: S Hunt (Capt), J Kirkwood, E Willmott, M Olivier, L Tomiak, M Brousse, J Childe, N Tsyganov, T Reid, M Redpath, Z Chambers, O Burrowes, L Bayley, C Oh The first half of the season was a success, thanks in no small measure to the contributions of the Upper Sixth contingent Jack Kirkwood, Emile Willmott, Max Olivier, Luke Tomiak and especially captain Sam Hunt. Spurred on by his fine example, the squad trained well, not least at the Bisham Abbey masterclass in week one, and they approached match days with focus. The 1st VI beat Wellington, Cokethorpe and Sherborne; the 2nd VI did the same, as well as dispatching an under-strength Eton VI. The young bloods Max Brousse & Julius Childe were playing well, contributing to big wins and pushing the 6th-formers hard. N Tsyganov was unleashing his smooth strokes to great effect. This all felt like real progress; winning an extraordinary six tie-breaks in one afternoon (against Wellington) was great for the confidence. The only disappointment was that in fact we left some victories out there: the 1st VI led 4–2 against Eton, but lost 4–5; the same was to happen again at Winchester in June. The 2nd VI led at Bradfield, but again lost 4–5. The pattern of these games showed the need for all

three pairs in the team to contribute something if victory was to be secured. We enjoyed two new fixtures, a mixed doubles at Wellington, and then a match against a local adult all-star side. Both of these games demonstrated to our players that different rallying is needed against different sorts of opposition; thinking our way to victory was beyond us this time around, but all should be wiser for having their eyes opened to the need for intelligent shot selection and tactical analysis of the strengths of the opposition. Of the Lower Sixth, Theo Reid and Marcus Redpath were mainstays of the 1st team all season, winning more than their fair share of games against older boys, and banking valuable experience for next season. Zack Chambers & Oscar Burrowes offered sterling support – some of their serves and groundstrokes left the spectators catching their breath and their opponents swinging at thin air. Spurred on by the motivational work of SJB, the talented Lytton Bayley got into his stride in the final fortnight of term too. Newcomer Christopher Oh was a welcome addition to the squad, and made a valuable contribution with some pedigree stroke play. Stroke play on its own is not enough, of course – winning teams are built on sound habits (looking after kit, good match-day nutrition, building a relationship with your partner)

The 3rd team had few fixtures, unfortunately. Term dates and a crowded fixture timetable meant few good games – the trips to Dauntsey’s and Radley were disappointingly one-sided. However, there were some impressive cameos: Sebastian Webb and Theo Cadier came back from a poor start to win well at Winchester. Patrick Pereira battled valiantly more than once. He lost, but it was clear that it hurt to lose, and he set a good example of not going down without a fight. TAK

Boys’ Tennis Junior Colts 1st VI P:9; W:6; D:0; L:3 SQUAD: L Sassow, J Porter, L Dessalles, O Munn, J Laidlaw, O Claxton-Newman The top six boys showed real talent and commitment throughout the season and, barring a match or two when injuries deprived the team of one player or another, they were a consistent group who benefitted from playing together regularly. Highlights of the season included narrow wins against Eton and Radley (both 5–4); second place in the RHWM competition (where they beat Radley and Wellington for a second time, finishing just behind Harrow); and two wins to one loss in the ISL competition. The first pair, Jamie Porter and Luca Sassow, were coolness personified. Their style of play was elegant and effective; they seldom forced the point, allowing their opponents to blast and bluster their way to eventual defeat and, as the season progressed and their volleying improved, opposition pairs were treated to flashes of classic doubles play. Perhaps their finest hour came on the grass courts at Sherborne where they bounced back to win the second set against a talented first pair and ultimately win the entire match for Marlborough. There is no shortage of talent in Louis Dessalles and Oliver Munn – again, at their best, they could play with a style that was seldom matched by their opponents – although, as a pair, their Achilles heel was more psychology than sinew. When they can master their emotions a little more, they will be devastating on court. Playing third pair, Oliver Claxton-Newman and Jasper Laidlaw often faced their opponents’ first pair in the first set – a stern test. However, their fortitude and resilience were unwavering; the single set they won against Radley, for example, was a crucial one that swung the match in Marlborough’s favour.

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ADHT

Boys’ Tennis Junior Colts 2nd VI P:7; W:4; D:0; L:3 Reflecting the tenor of practice sessions for the entire yeargroup, the 2nd VI boys were full of good cheer and positivity from start to finish of what was, on balance, a good season. The team’s first pair for the majority of matches comprised Sholto Bayley and Jules Gaillard, whose consistency and ever-increasing strength when hitting the ball made them a tricky challenge for any opponents. Although they may have faded faster than some in the heat, their craft and raw talent will see them win many more matches in future seasons. At second and third pair, there was less consistency in terms of personnel: Mario Losantos Marquez, Sebastian White, Adriaan De Waal, Luke Cave and Jonte Catton were regular features of the team, but players such as Cosmo Vereker, William Sandbach, Charles Northcott and Casper Tubbs also made valuable contributions across the matches. There is no shortage of talent here, sharpened by competition for places, and as a group of boys, their sense of fun and good sportsmanship made this a thoroughly enjoyable season. AHDT

Boys’ Tennis Junior Colts 3rd VI

Wellington and Sherborne and a long, gutsy series of matches in a four schools tournament at Radley. It has been particularly pleasing to watch players’ improvements across the season, with stalwarts such as Angus Whittaker, Ollie Samuel and Sam Egerton particularly noticeable for improving their power, skill and teamwork thanks to enthusiastic training.

The undoubted highlight of the season was a 9–0 victory against Radley, but this is to gloss over the effort that was shown in their losses. With a bit more maturity and court-craft during close matches, in future seasons these boys will undoubtedly swing the balance of victories in their favour.

P:4; W:1; D:0; L:3

AHDT

Boys’ Tennis Yearlings 1st VI P:6; W:3; D:0; L:3 SQUAD: J Tate, M Pretor-Pinney, D Russell, T Root, A Gardner, A Kiggell The Yearling A Boys’ Tennis team, captained by Josh Tate, played some outstanding tennis – showing significant improvement week after week. The boys faced some tough fixtures against Eton, Radley and Bradfield but found their form towards the end of the season with dominant performances against Wellington, Sherborne and Winchester College. The number one pairing of Tate and Monty PretorPinney played with consistency and precision producing some close and exciting tennis throughout the season. Dom Russell, Tristan Root, Alex Gardner and Adam Kiggell showed plenty of promise in mastering the tactics and skills involved with doubles play.

P:4; W:1; D:0; L:3 The ratio of wins to losses takes a different complexion when considered in light of sets played: a plucky and hard-working group of boys won 17 sets and lost 19, showing determination and no lack of skill across the four matches. Alongside some of those who eventually competed for the 2nd VI, there were

MSR/RHW

Boys’ Tennis Yearlings B P:7; W:4; D:0; L:3

SPORTS

appearances for Kai Jackson, Theodore Turner, Caspar Blackett-Ord, Conor Wall, Finlay Stuart and Alastair Chua. This depth of talent, and the internal competition for places that it generated, created a spirited atmosphere in weekly practices, where singles competitions enabled us to determine whose skills were developing as the season progressed. Should some of the top players be promoted to Open ranks next year, there will be no shortage of gifted players to fill their shoes.

MSR/RHW

Boys’ Tennis Yearlings C The Yearlings C Boys’ tennis team have had a good season, winning matches against Wellington and Bradfield comfortably, drawing to Winchester, and losing 5–4 to a competitive Dauntsey’s side after some hard-fought points. The C squad has been ever changing in terms of personnel: more experienced and confident tennis players such as Jonny Hammond and Henri Gafsi combined with some less experienced, but no less enthusiastic, players such as Jamie Clément De l’Epine and Hugh de Sausmarez. All boys approached training in a relaxed yet enthusiastic manner, and their evident enjoyment of the season’s training and matches has been a pleasure to witness. AJH

Boys’ Tennis Yearlings D P:2; W:1; D:0; L:1

BOYS’ TENNIS

Across the season, week in and week out, the six were ably supported by MM and RHW, and benefited most weekends from the support of at least four sets of parents. As their strength and technique improve in years to come, they will be a force to reckon with.

Despite only two fixtures, the Yearlings D Boys’ tennis team have impressed throughout the term with their willingness to listen, eagerness to learn, and in some cases their huge progress from complete novices to comfortable doubles players with a good understanding of the game. Undoubtedly, the highlight of the term was a masterful 8–1 victory against Dauntsey’s, where the boys’ tireless energy and good movement around the court won them the day in style. AJH

The Yearlings B Boys’ tennis team have had a solid season. Despite much movement between teams and changes of partner across the season, the boys have played in good spirits with highlights including dominant victories against

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SPORTS

NETBALL

Netball Open 1st VII

NETBALL

P:9; W:6; D:0; L:3 The King’s School, Worcester

W

38:23

Millfield School

L

17:42

St Edward’s School

W

24:14

Bradfield College

W

27:13

Canford School

W

40:23

Clifton College

W

21:17

Dauntsey’s School

W

36:29

Bryanston School

L

28:30

Wycliffe College

L

33:40

SQUAD: G Henderson (Co-Capt), E Spark (Co-Capt), L Beckett, E Boom, Z Combe, M Doyne, A Fawcett, E Jones, L Thompson, G Warner It has been a marvellous season for the 1st VII who opened their account in early January with a focused period of pre-season training. With seven members of the Upper Sixth in this squad, their maturity and experience was influential. The girls gelled quickly and enjoyed competing for one another. Having triumphed as County Champions in the Michaelmas Term, the team went forward to represent Wiltshire at the Regional Schools Competition in Bournemouth. Here they finished a credible joint seventh, beating Petroc, Canford and Truro on the day but succumbing to the accomplished Hartpury, KES Bath and Millfield sides. The undoubted highlight of the season came in February in the form of winning the Bradfield College Invitational Tournament. Finishing runners-up to Wellington in 2017, the girls were determined to go one better and bring home the silverware. Finishing second in a well-contested group, we went on to meet Wellington in the semis. All square at halftime, the girls dug deep to secure a 14–11 win. However, the job was not yet done. Facing St Mary’s Ascot in the final, Marlborough edged a thrilling and merited 6–5 win. Player of the season went to goal keeper Elyssa Jones who made a real impact; hunting for ball with tenacity, she has been a stalwart of our

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Netball Open 2nd VII P:11; W:7; D:1; L:3 The 2nd VII had an impressive start to the season with strong wins against King’s Worcester, Millfield, and St Edward’s. As the season progressed, the team were put to the test in matches against 1st VII teams from St Mary’s Calne and St Helen & St Katharine School. Here our defenders Harriet Place, Scarlett Thompson, and Amelia Tracey shone under pressure.

defensive line up. Joined by Georgie Henderson, Emily Boom and Abbey Fawcett, the defensive unit were a formidable force who worked hard to shut down our opponents. The centre court unit of Ellie Spark, Lara Beckett and Zoe Combe linked with skill and were the real engine behind many of our performances. Huge credit must go to our shooters Lara Thompson, Martha Doyne and Ella Warner for thriving under the pressure associated with this crucial role. Conversion rates were consistently sound across the season, giving heart and motivation to the whole squad. Ella also represents Team Bath U17 and has enjoyed much success in their fixtures against Manchester Thunder, Wasps and Hertfordshire Mavericks, amongst others. She is a truly exciting ambassador for Marlborough netball and we look forward to supporting her continued progress. Many thanks also go to Millie Burdett, Scarlett Thompson, Harriet Place and India Jacklin Chatha for their appearances in the 1st VII this season. We wish our seven Upper Sixth leavers every happiness for the future, in the safe knowledge that they will continue to develop and, most importantly, enjoy their netball. SHB & RFH

In our highest scoring game against Canford, our shooters Olivia Wilson (captain), Eliza Kearns and Freya Jones demonstrated brilliant accuracy and confidence as a unit in our attacking end. The centre court line-up included Ana Downing, Millie Burdett and India Jacklin Chatha, who provided a smooth transition from the defence to attack with some exciting interceptions made at those critical moments in the game. It was pleasing to see Thompson and Burdett selected to play for the 1st VII in a number of matches throughout the season, making way for strong performances from a number of players from the 3rd VII. The end of the Lent Term saw the team face Bryanston in challenging weather conditions, yet the players’ resilience was exhibited in true Marlborough fashion and they did not appear affected by the snow and freezing winds. The final minutes saw all of our Upper Sixth girls fighting the elements on the court to secure a successful end to their netball at Marlborough. We wish them the very best for their next step and hope that they continue to enjoy netball in the future. Well done to all! HLM & DRA

Netball Open 3rd VII P:10; W:8; D:0; L:2 This has been a fantastic season for the Open 3rd VII team. With eight wins and only two losses, the girls played well from start to finish, never giving up or letting the standard slip.


Netball Open 5th VII SPORTS

P:6; W:3; D:0; L:3 The cancellation of matches against Westonbirt, Cheltenham College and Clifton did not dampen the spirits as the side trained hard and played well in some tense matches, in all kinds of weather!

The most memorable match of the term though was our final one against Bryanston. Having two weeks prior been forced to cancel the match against Cheltenham College, as a result of adverse weather conditions, the girls were determined to let nothing stand in their way, and they managed a 46–8 win despite the constant snowfall throughout – the shooters merely blinked the snow out of their eyes and kept aiming, and all of the players ran constantly to keep themselves warm and keep the edge over the opposition. It could have been the sheer effort, or it could have been the nostalgia for many years of play together that had all faces glowing by the end, and the leavers went out on a high. Even the season’s losses – against Wellington and Dauntsey’s – offered silver linings in that the matches were close, with the final score difference between teams being four and two goals respectively. Thanks

must go to Jessica for her superb captaincy, but also in general to the team for their cohesive play, high spirits and determination to succeed and play their best possible netball. RCT & HEBJ

Netball Open 4th VII P:9; W:8; D:1; L:0 From the very start of the season (in what still felt like December), there was a good deal of hugely impressive netball played and some stellar performances. On several occasions, the girls played up against higher-graded opposition and each time they did so they were worthy winners. Highlights were the one-point win against St Mary’s Calne 2nd VII and an aggressive performance against a strong side from Clifton. There were a number of standout players – captain Maddy Avery was tenacious in the centre court, Tallulah Chukwuemeka showed excellent shooting skills throughout and Ali Mathison, Daisy Head, India Shakespeare, Trixie Thurner, Arabella Harris and Alana Robertson were similarly impressive throughout the season. The girls ended up as Ellis Cup winners and were undefeated – though the draw against Dauntsey’s from a position of strength in the last game of the season was the only slight disappointment. RDW

Rosie Bennett and Arabella Hall excelled in defence, with speed and tenacity that exemplified the spirit of this squad. Lizzie Hankinson and Mary-Emma Parker made a real impact with their quick thinking in attacking positions, and ensured the fast-paced movement of the ball towards the shooters. Congratulations to all of the girls on a positive and enjoyable season. VRB

NETBALL

The early start to term provided us with an opportunity to play King’s Worcester, where we won with a respectable 25–13 scoreline. This was quickly eclipsed by a smashing win against Millfield of 57–5, which saw the addition of Luz Wollocombe who was MVP for her consistently accurate shooting. Another highlight was a 35–16 win against Canford in cold conditions, in which Scarlett Atkinson stepped up to the mark as captain, filling Jessica Davy’s responsible shoes well.

There was a great deal of talent amongst the girls, which was demonstrated in their flexibility of position – they were keen to take opportunities to try out different roles on the court, and used this to their advantage in match play. Our shooters Poppy Miles, Evie McVeigh and Scarlett Bryant performed well under pressure, developing their tactics in the circle and communicating well. In centre court there was some excellent development in both defensive and attacking positions, with Martha Rutherford, Natasha Cowling and Natasha Moore taking the centre bib on various occasions as the linchpins of the action.

Netball Open 6th VII P:2; W:1; D:0; L:1 The Open 6th VII enjoyed their netball across the season and progress was evident, particularly for those beginners amongst the squad. The season began with an unfortunate 5–19 loss away to Sherborne but the shooters found more success in their next contest, which came in the form of a 40–7 victory at home to Bradfield College. Poor weather, namely the ‘Beast from the East’ unfortunately caused multiple cancellations elsewhere in the fixture calendar. Nevertheless, the girls continued to train, enjoy their sessions and improve. Well done to Martha Rutherford and Melissa

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SPORTS

Bowyer-Knight for their leadership over the past season. SHB

Netball U16A VII P:8; W:6; D:0; L:2 Sherborne Girls’

W

33:25

Millfield School

L

40:44

St Edward’s School

W

34:3

Bradfield College

W

28:19

Canford School

L

30:40

St Mary’s Calne

W

27:25

Wellington College

W

32:25

Holyport College

W

33:10

NETBALL

SQUAD: M Aitchison, A Cameron, P Cripwell (Vice Capt), H Eyles (Capt), A Green, L Greenwood, T Oliphant, R Sykes, Y Cooke This very successful season began with a narrow defeat at home to Millfield, with some wonderful netball played. The girls then put in some good performances with wins over Sherborne, St Edward’s and Bradfield. We came up against a Canford side that had just been crowned South-West Regional Schools Winners in February and again it was a very competitive match. After half-term, the girls remained unbeaten with the outstanding match of the season coming against Wellington where we led from start to finish and remained calm despite sustained pressure in the last quarter. We were patient with the ball, defended as a team and our shooters were calm and accurate.

National Schools Finals SQUAD: A Beckett, A Cameron, P Cripwell, H Eyles (Capt), A Green, L Imi, A Jones (Vice Capt), L May, V Milne, T Oliphant, B Tarn This squad won the Area Schools competition in September going on to represent MidWiltshire at the County Finals. The girls played superbly against strong school teams with club netball players, winning all of their games and becoming Wiltshire U16 Champions. From here we claimed our place in the Regional Schools Tournament in Bournemouth. In wet conditions, the tournament started well with a couple of wins but after a draw and a loss, it seemed our chances of making the semi-final stage had gone. We knew we had to win against Talbot Heath and a school from Cheltenham. No easy thing to do as both teams included talented franchise players. Our girls continued to work as a squad to support each other and it paid off as we won both matches convincingly. The semi-final saw opposition in the form of Royal High School Bath, who stood in the way of a place in the final. At 4–0 down at halftime, the dream appeared to have vanished, but Marlborough claimed a deserved win after extra-time! The girls had given their all and went into the final totally drained but ecstatic. The final against Canford proved too much and we lost by five goals, but progressed to Nationals as the second-best South-West side.

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As the first U16 Marlborough side to appear at the National Finals, the girls travelled to Hertfordshire and came up against the very best in the country. A tough quartet of opening fixtures followed before the girls got into their stride and finished joint ninth overall – which was a tremendous achievement. TJW

Netball U16 B VII P:7; W:3; D:0; L:4 This was a very competitive season with seven matches in total with one cancellation due to adverse weather conditions. The season began strongly with wins against Sherborne, St Edward’s and Bradfield. Beth Ransome won player of the match on two occasions thanks to pinpoint shooting, helped by Jess Reeve and Connie Campbell-Gray. Challenging fixtures followed against Canford, St Mary’s, Wellington and a narrow defeat against Bryanston’s U16A (19–22), that included some fantastic defensive work. Captain Alex Dunlop, a strong centre court player, led by example bringing positivity to every match and training session. The girls worked closely alongside the U16As in training, gaining valuable knowledge and skills from Tracy Watt. Everyone in the team played

a vital role this season, meeting every challenge with endless energy and fun, giving their all. They were a dedicated team who I had the pleasure of coaching, they should be proud of their achievements this year. NLA

Netball U15A VII P:9; W:5; D:0; L:4 King’s Worcester

L

26:28

Millfield School

W

43:27

St Edward’s School

W

37:10

Bradfield College

L

23:30

Canford School

L

24:35

St Mary’s Calne

W

44:22

Wellington College

W

28:23

Clifton College

W

21:13

Bryanston School

L

27:35

SQUAD: A Jones (Capt), A Beckett (Vice-Capt), F Armytage, G Chambers, L Imi, C Longden, L May, V Milne, B Tarn, F White The U15A squad had an extremely positive season winning over half of their matches. Liliana May was a great find at the start of the season as she proved to be a great goal


SPORTS

opposition from Millfield, Canford, Bryanston and Wycliffe. The indisputable highlight was the match against Bryanston, in which the girls weathered extremely adverse conditions to play with an exemplary attitude, working tirelessly until the final whistle blew and adapting their play to the fearsome wind and snow. The player of the season was Emma Moore, who countless times won the ball back in her position as goal defence, and consistently showed grace in defeat as well as victory. The most improved player was Sophie Harris, who showed a strong versatility in both attacking and defensive positions. Well done to all girls – they have been a pleasure to coach and should be proud of their commitment and hard work. VDH

Strong performances came against St Edward’s, St Mary’s Calne, Clifton and especially Wellington. Alicia Beckett played extremely well against Wellington, making several interceptions allowing her to be named player of the match. Fleur White and Charlotte Longden were adaptable and versatile having to play in unfamiliar positions when players were absent. A special mention goes to six of the girls who were asked to play up for the U16A squad and play at National Schools. The success of the season was a whole team effort and was led exceptionally well by Ariana Jones. After reflecting on the season, Alicia Beckett was player of the season, Liliana May was most improved and Valentina Milne was voted players’ player. Well done to all the girls, they have been delightful to coach and we are very proud of their achievements. SEW & HAMC

Netball U15D VII

Netball U15B VII

P:7; W:6; D:0; L:1

P:10; W:6; D:0; L:4 This was a successful season, full of positives with six wins from 10 matches played. Xanthe Smith was the most improved player, able to adapt to new positions including centre, wing attack and goal defence. Georgia Carss made an impressive start and became a very good goalkeeper along with Francesca Aitchison who played as goal defence and Sophia Hamilton as wing defence. Poppy Evans, Izzy Dundas and Amber Phillips had a great term as attacking players, improving their shooting skills throughout the term. Charlotte Southgate and Minnie Feather demonstrated excellent skills in the positions of wing attack and centre. Olivia Eversfield has been an exemplary captain with excellent leadership and communication skills on court. She has been an outstanding goal attack and a key player for the team and this is why she won nominated player of the season. It has been a great pleasure to coach the U15Bs and they should be proud of their efforts. VGMD & JM

The U15Ds enjoyed a very successful season with six wins and only one loss. Highlights include a convincing 50–14 win against St Edward’s and a very exciting and closely fought 27–26 win against Canford. This match brought out the best in the players as they showed excellent teamwork and determination. The loss against Wellington is one the girls would probably prefer to forget; the opposition players took advantage of their superior average height and there was little our defence could do to interrupt their goalscoring rhythm. To their credit, the girls remained very good-humoured in defeat. The most improved player award went to Sasha Hosier and Tabitha Surtees won player of the season for her cheerful nature and willingness to play in several positions. JMCC

Netball U14A VII P:13; W:10; D:0; L:3 Sherborne School

W

37:4

Millfield School

L

15:28

P:10; W:4; D:0; L:6

Dauntsey’s School

W

23:17

The U15Cs faced strong opposition across the term, playing ten matches and beating tough

St Edward’s School

W

33:11

Downe House

W

20:9

Bradfield College

W

51:16

Canford School

L

23:27

Cheltenham Ladies’ College

W

33:17

King Edward’s Bath

L

21:24

St Mary’s Calne

W

17:7

Wellington College

W

19:16

Clifton College

W

33:15

Bryanston School

W

49:25

Netball U15C VII

NETBALL

keeper and asset to the squad, improving with every game. One of the highlights was beating Millfield away with Gigi Chambers shooting exceptionally well under pressure, meaning we brought home an impressive win. Canford was a tough fixture with lots of height in the opposition. The girls played their hearts out but Canford came out on top.

SQUAD: M Hornby (Capt), L Greenwood, E McCoig, A Gregory, R Curtis, T Baker, T Mobley, O King, I Christian, S Thurner The U14A squad made an excellent start to their netball careers at Marlborough. A versatile group, all of the squad have played at least two different positions on the court, with Tallulah Baker setting the ‘versatility’ record by playing five different positions throughout the season!

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SPORTS

During the Michaelmas Term the squad had a very limited number of practices and successfully qualified for the regional tournament, held in January. Marlborough performed well in this competition; needing a top-two finish in their group to progress to the semis, they fell just short and finished third, cementing a top six finish in the SouthWest. Following a run of slightly inconsistent performances in early February, the group then found their rhythm and started to link really well with each other. As a result, strong performances and wins against Bradfield, Wellington, Clifton and Bryanston followed, with the standard of netball improving week by week. A highlight of the season was the opportunity to play against KES Bath at the same stadium that Team Bath play their Super League matches – players and coaches were able to imagine (for 45 minutes) the lofty heights of top tier netball! Congratulations to Rose Curtis and Scarlet Thurner for being asked to join the County training programme. Scarlet also represents the Surrey Storm age-group team. The success of the season was, without doubt, the result of a full team effort. Two individuals were singled out for particularly special contributions: Madeleine Hornby was named most improved player and Scarlet Thurner was player of the season.

NETBALL

KMH

Netball U14B VII P:10; W:6; D:1; L:3 The U14B team had a consistently strong season, with a great variety of players who gelled well on court together. Thrown in at the deep end in terms of testing fixtures, the girls managed to come out with a victory against rivals Millfield, clutching a 10–9 finish. Standout performances came from the defensive end as Alicia Tomacelli Filomarino in goal defence as she helped fuel the offensive attack

of the team. As the season continued, the team remained strong despite a loss to Bradfield away. They finished with a 16–6 win over Bryanston despite the cold weather. Special mentions to Louise Bunn for excellent shooting throughout the season as well as Christabel Chauveau, for being flexible in her playing position on court and always putting in 100% effort.

match of the season did not deter the girls from displaying some excellent netball. The team played with tenacity, dominance & accuracy to out-play their opposition for another big win. Special mention should go to most improved player Isabella Morley and player of the season, Ophelia Light. Well done to everyone for another successful season.

PCA

TMH

Netball U14C VII

Netball U14D VII

P:12; W:11; D:1; L:0

P:9; W:8; D:0; L:1

2018 began with a dominant display resulting in a 33–7 victory over Sherborne, with Ophelia Light named player of the match. Millfield were next up and provided more of a stern test with Emily Tubbs and Ophelia standing out. More victories followed through the term against St Edward’s (21–1), Downe House (13–2), Bradfield (36–8), Cheam (18–4), Canford (34–3), St Mary’s (28–8) and Wellington (18–7). The penultimate fixture was played at Holyport, against their A team on a slippery Astro surface. A determined performance resulted in a 19–19 draw. The cold Siberian weather conditions at Bryanston for the final

The U14Ds won all but one of their matches with a clear lead – 35–1 against Canford was a particular triumph! They faced strong competition in their home match against Cheam – the only match they lost by just one goal. All girls demonstrated excellent sportsmanship this term, especially when representing Marlborough at away matches. Particular mention must go to Willow Smiley, who was always willing to step into any position to support the team and led the team as captain for a number of matches. Octavia Case was our most improved player – she really took on board the skills learnt in drills to get the ball moving up the court and Sophie Dunlop, our player of the season, was deservedly promoted to the C team for a couple of matches later in the season for her excellent shooting. Very well done to all. EKR

Netball U14E VII P:5; W:4; D:0; L:1 It was a great start for the U14E team with the girls showing plenty of potential in their debut netball season at Marlborough. In particular, Maddie Price, who was our player of the season for her positive attitude and her willingness to play in a number of different positions as required. Bee Poloniecka must also be mentioned for being selected as most valuable player in many of our fixtures. Both Maddie and Bee also progressed to play in the next team for a number of matches later in the season. Other notable players include Alys Evans for her work in attack and Atalanta Hue-Williams who was most improved. OG & RLJ

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The Wiltshire Schools’ Athletics Association Pentathlon, held on Monday 14th May, again provided an opportunity for our pupils to test themselves and they returned with a series of achievements. There were 1st place finishes for Lanre Alli and Tallulah Baker in their respective individual races, with Charlotte Longden finishing 2nd in the Remove event. In the Shell team event, Lanre Alli, Albie Woolfenden and Mike Evloev won the boys’ race and Tilly Norman, Jemima Money-Kyrle and Tallulah Baker topped the girls’ event. There was also success at Remove level, where Charlotte Longen, Tiggy Lee and Ariana Jones also emerged victorious. Lanre, Albie, Charlotte and Tallulah also travelled down to Yeovil in June for the South West multi-events Championships. Marlborough played host to the Kennet Area Trials, a prerequisite for entry to the Wiltshire Athletics Association County Championships, held in Swindon on Saturday 9th June. Jemima Money-Kyrle (1st), Charlotte Longden (1st) and Kamdi Dozie-Ajaegbu (2nd) finished well in the 100m and in the 200m, Lanre Alli finished 1st with Tallulah Baker 2nd in

the girls’ event. Stepping up for the 300m was Arthur Norbury who was also a winner and in the 800m, there were 1sts for Imogen Davis, Albie Woolfenden and George Gerson with Luca Cooke in second. The testing 1,500m distance also yielded success with Tilly Norman and Sophie Smith both winners of their events. Atalanta Hue-Williams won the 75m hurdles with Sebastian Horlock finishing 2nd in the 100m Hurdles. Winners of the high jump were Zak Chukwuemeka, Lanre Alli and Scarlet Thurner in their respective events with Tiggy Lee a notable second. The long jump saw first place finishes for Tallulah Baker and a second for Charlotte Longden. There was also success in the shot put and discus – with 1st place finishes for Mike Evloev and Lucia Imi, with Alice Gregory second in the discus. Some of the aforementioned athletes became Wiltshire Schools County Champions with some fantastic achievements on the day. Sophie Smith re-broke her own intermediate girls’ 1,500m record with a time of 4 minutes and 57 seconds, Zak Chukwuemeka jumped 1.80 metres to win the intermediate boys’ high jump, Lanre Alli won the junior boys’ 200m and Mike Evloev won the junior boys’ discus and shot put. Both Lanre (200m) and Mike (shot put) were selected to represent Wiltshire at the English Schools’ Athletic Association National Championships at the Alexandra Stadium

in Birmingham in July. This is the second successive year that the College have had two athletes selected for the Championships.

ATHLETICS

It has been a busy and successful season for the Marlborough College Athletics Club. Once again, our athletes have competed against some of the most celebrated opponents on the circuit, and with considerable success.

SPORTS

ATHLETICS

The Marlborough College Athletics Club has also seen a number of College records fall this season, an indication of the strength and depth within the ranks. I would like to take the opportunity to thank all of my athletics staff for their considerable efforts throughout the season. Most schools will host no more than two fixtures in a season; the fact that we host weekly is testament to the team behind me as the Master i/c Athletics. A special mention also to Keith Donkin, Julie Alexander, Sonya Ellis and Deborah Bray as external coaches whose expertise and rapport with the pupils have made a significant impact on the club this season. MJS

@MCol_Sport Jun 6 @MarlboroughCol retained the Mayor’s Cup yesterday, with the trophy presented by our very own Mayor Lisa Farrell.

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FENCING

SPORTS

P:11; W:2; D:2; L:7

Michaelmas Term Wellington

L

1:3

Bradfield

L

17:19

Winchester

L

1:3

RGS

L

31:5

Clifton

L

33:17

Dauntsey’s

D

8:8

Winchester

L

1:17

RGS

L

26:10

Wellington

W

11:7

Bradfield

D

2:2

Dauntsey’s

W

8:10

Lent Term

OTHER SPORTS

BASKETBALL

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Basketball performance has been most encouraging throughout this year. Michaelmas training saw plenty of scrimmage games and a few dedicated fixtures, followed by a full set of fixtures in Lent that included Wellington, Eton, Bradfield, Dauntsey’s, Sherborne and Winchester. With a 50% success rate, the College team can be proud of their achievements. In particular, great performance against Dauntsey’s (49–44) and Sherborne (40–23); fixtures in which we’ve struggled to get a result in the past. Notable performances throughout the year from the team Captain Winston Tisdale, extremely well supported by some of our senior players Theo Reid, Jonny Gondzic, Harry Si, Nick Ruddell, James Barns and Jack Kirkwood.

CROSSCOUNTRY

Southern Region Foil Competition Zharif Shahryn

3rd

School Cups

In many of our fixtures we fielded a mix of senior and junior squad members and some of the younger players coming through showed great promise for the future; these include Kamdi Dozie-Ajaegbu, Albie Woolfenden, Tristan Root, Youssef Glover, Charlie Wright, Giles Edwards, Mike Evloev, Oscar Peters, Olanrewaju Alli and Ben Phelps with Josh Dingley joining following recovery from his rugby injury.

There were strong performances in the first half of term from some of the girls. At the County Championships in January Molly Gibbins finished second in the Senior Girls race, Tilda Norman fourth and Molly Jones finished tenth in the Junior Girls race. They all qualified for the South-West Championships in February, where Norman was 37th and Jones 40th out of 62 runners. Sadly, we lost some College fixtures in the second half of term due to poor weather. William Ackerley was eighth out of 35 Inter Boys in the Kingswood Trophy race, while Zach Murphy captained the senior team and fully deserved College colours.

M Shaw

JFL

The Wilkinson sword

Zharif Shahryn

The Hurn Cup

Tuom Laakkonen

The Keighley Shield

Jack White

It was certainly a challenging season with some inexperienced fencers but still most ably led by Tuom Laakkonen. Tuom shone in the Wellington match where he won all his foil bouts to help us clinch that victory. Zharif Shahryn’s expertise helped us qualify for the National Finals and win a ranking of 14 in the Open Foil at the Public Schools’, only losing two school bouts in the Lent Term. Despite being plagued by injury Dylan Cameron only lost one bout. Ben Nuttall helped us win the home Wellington match by ensuring victory in two out of his three épée bouts. Seb Whipps not only represented the first team on a number of occasions helping us win the away Dauntsey’s match scoring two out of three victories. Toby Watson only joined us this year and crucially secured our draw against Bradfield. Giacomo Prideaux made a superb guest appearance in the Lent Term by winning two out of three against RGS. Sam Bucks only


SPORTS

joined us in the last few weeks but still won an impressive bout against Dauntsey’s. My most sincere thanks go to our Olympic coach, Tristan Parris. My thanks too for our captain, Tuom Laakkonen for a most enjoyable season and Fencing Club dinner. PNK

FIVES

P:16; W:10; D:0; L:6

Arthur Rigg and Harry Powell made sure that the boys team chipped in with some silverware; together, they won the plate at the Winchester Championships, and Arthur took the silver medal in the SW singles trophy. Being pushed hard in training by Luca Conte, Chris Beswick and Milo Martin helped them reach the standard needed to win. All these players have impressed with the way they have worked at their game and turned from middle-ranking Colts into more skilful, canny and resilient U18 competitors. This was never more obvious than in the final match of the season against the Jesters, when every member of the team rose above that Sunday morning feeling to fight out a series of incredibly close singles matches. These seniors also played their part in encouraging the juniors. Kirsten Bell and Lena Barton absorbed the lessons of games against Malvern and Rugby to storm to an emotional victory in the National Doubles final in very fine style. What a time they chose to play their best ever Fives! Freddie Kottler, Conrad Peck & Oliver Light benefited from the U18s’ example to develop their game significantly. Peck in particular, with his big right hand, had a great match against Rugby U16s.

The full flowering of the talent of the U14 boys was hampered by a lack of competitive fixtures and the timing of the Nationals. Nevertheless, a good squad emerged, with Arthur Cornell and Oliver Lamont to the fore. The U14 girls were a vibrant collective, with an admirable readiness to use their intelligence as well as their athleticism, to hit the ball hard and generally have fun on court. In common with all our players, they have coach Tim Brown to thank for this. Like me, he enjoyed watching them grow through each round of the Nationals, where Maddy Smith and Maddy Hornby were runners-up in the doubles, and Rose Curtis reached the last four of the singles. Melissa Stewart won the plate singles and Issey Price the plate doubles. B1 & New Court won the senior House matches; Morris & C2 the juniors. TAK

GOLF It was a cracking year for golfers at Marlborough College who turned out across all age groups to show that enthusiasm for the sport is alive and well at the school. The team was given a welcome boost with the arrival of Shell pupil Tom Stephenson-Green who slotted straight in as the College’s number one player with a handicap of five. Alongside him captain Robert Smith and Spanish tyro Bruno Espinosa de los Monteros, Harry Bunn and Ben Cooper, Oscar Powell, Oliver Plaistowe

and Joe O’Connor formed a formidable nucleus for the Senior Team; the strongest side the school has produced in recent years. As well as winning the majority of their regular school fixtures they reached the last two of the West of England Championships at Burnham and Berrow, pushing Radley all the way in the final. Junior Team success stories included the emergence of talented Remove pupils Jamie Porter, Jake Price, Archie del Mar and Rupert Plaistowe as well as new Shell recruits Rupert Lloyd-Hughes, Ewan Hunter and Sam MartinJenkins (Littlefield). The boys enjoyed away wins versus Bradfield and valuable experiencebuilding fixtures at Radley’s nine-hole course.

OTHER SPORTS

A fine crop of Upper Sixth leave us after a very enjoyable and successful final year. Ibby Lee and Anna Laakkonen have enjoyed an extraordinary 12 months, starting and ending with victory at the National U18 Championships, taking in the plate trophies at the National U23 event and at the Open Winchester Doubles Championships. Already ranked 7 & 12 in the country, they have it in them to reach the very top of the adult game, just as they have done at school level.

In addition, there were the green shoots of a girls’ team with Eilidh McCoig and Isabella Thompson leading the charge. Although the College has produced many fine girl golfers in recent years, the time is surely right for an allfemale team to emerge in 2018–19. My thanks go to beaks Nick Gordon, Neil Moore and Hannah Meehan for their tireless enthusiasm in encouraging our golfers and to professionals Simon Amor and Claire Waite for their excellent coaching. With such a fine team around them golfers at Marlborough College are fortunate indeed. Here’s to their ongoing success in 2018–19 when Oscar Powell will captain the school team. JTWL

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SPORTS

Sunscreen warnings and a cold biting wind greeted us at Longdole for the SUPAs. Ben Barnes, Will Millar, Lucy Burgess and Eloise Fanshawe came a credible third in their section as did Gus Nathan with his team of Jessica Kastner, Issey Price and Maria Pia Rubinelli making their debut with great parental support. Jessica then went on to represent Marlborough at the Girls Nationals at Ascot in a combined SUPA team winning the Novice section ending the year on the note we had wanted.

POLO

OTHER SPORTS

Lent Term Combined Sherborne/ Wellington Druids Youth

L

8:10

Sherborne / Druids University players

L

12:14

Millfield

L

12:10

Druids Inter Schools Tournament

four teams

Summer Term Eton at Guards

L

4:7

Harrow

L

6:3.5

The newcomers course in the Michaelmas Term was by far the best group of starter players we had seen for a while. Then with Benedict Nott’s enthusiasm to lead the Arena Polo in the Lent Term and Milo Sweet as Captain in the Summer Term we felt very well placed as a sport. Little did we know then that both captains were going to have to show great fortitude and amazing resilience to cope with the weather conditions during both seasons. As the weather took hold in the Lent Term snow led to cancellations of matches against Eton, two other dates and both the Nationals

150

SUPA Tournaments. Sadly, the Arena season saw great sportsmanship and good worthwhile play during adversity that is not reflected in the results. Re-scheduling became the name of the game with Druids Polo Club doing an amazing job finding new dates and challenges. At the Druids Inter-Schools Tournament we boasted four teams. The first two seeing fast riding, good communication and exciting sport in our girl-power SUPA team including Lucy Burgess and Emmeline Hughes. The two other teams used a mix of experienced and novice players moving around with two last-minute Druids substitutes to make the mix.

Despite the results score sheet this has been a good year. Milo Sweet did not get the play or matches that we had planned or deserved but always made an outstanding effort and had great playing talent. He has been a true sportsman throughout his time at Marlborough and always made his best effort to play in every game. I thank him and his connections for this and their commitment and hope our current promising set of pupils will follow his lead. FMAOS

RACKETS

In a pre-match to start the Summer Term Milo Sweet picked the less experienced players of Lucy Burgess (Capt), Eloise Fanshawe and Harry Alexander to play against Benedict Nott, Will Miller and a strong outside player, resulting in a 7–5 win. Milo Sweet took this same team to play against Eton at Guards. Improving chukkas against a higher handicapped saw much praised tenacity and a narrowly missed victory.

At the start of the year, two-time Public Schools champion Dominic Coulson returned to action after a 12-month absence following a serious leg fracture. He was partnered by Milo Brooks, a very fine ball striker who put up an impressive display in the Renny Cup at Queen’s, beating the No. 3 seed and eventually losing a fine match in the fourth round. A handful of victories were recorded by the 1st pair, the most impressive being a very close encounter (3/2) away at Radley. Coulson was seeded No.1 for the Foster Cup and showed enormous dedication and commitment in preparation for the December tournament. However, he just failed in his quest to win a third singles title, losing the semi-final to the Eton No. 1. Remarkably, he had come back from 0/2 and 9/14 down in the first round saving a match point.

The weather once again took its toll as Ben Barnes led a side of Lizzie Hankinson, Lucy Burgess and Eloise Fanshawe in the wettest of conditions at Harrow. It also a pity that we found ourselves without a viable full team for the Copenhagen Cup.

In the girls’ singles at Easter, captain Millie McKelvey put up a great fight, losing a close semi-final to the eventual winner and No.1 seed from Cheltenham. Boys 2nd pair Adrian Ma and Sam Hunt fought valiantly throughout the year. At Colts level, Arthur Hardwick improved


SPORTS There were several promising performances from the Junior Colts. Louis Dessalles, Jamie Porter, Giles Hocking and Olly Munn had an impressive record winning most of their matches and seemed to peak towards the end of the season. They were unfortunate to face one another in the 2nd round at Queen’s with Dessalles and Porter just coming through as victors. Dessalles was agonisingly close to reaching the U15 singles semi-final, being within two points of victory. Archie Del Mar and Oliver Light also made significant progress, and a crop of Yearlings including Josh Tate, Monty Pretor-Pinney and Sam Martin-Jenkins started their Rackets careers promisingly. MPLB & RHW

SHOOTING The Marlborough College small-bore team shot in 12 matches across the September to March season, winning 10 and losing two matches. In November, the team shot in the English 50m Schools competition at Bisley and again in December at the British Schools having to fire 40 rounds where they performed well shooting

against the top schools in the country. At the end of the Lent Term, the team went to Bisley for pre-season training for three days, where despite inclement weather some excellent preparation work was undertaken. In the summer holidays, the rifle team went to Bisley to attend the Schools Meet. Our team of four competed in the Ashburton 4 competition and finished third. Well done to Tom Elvin, Harry Vaughan-Johnson, Jason Keller and Ed Robinson. Wilf Adams, our reserve, shot really well, and won the reserve 300m. Harry was in the Cadet 100, placed 51st and he also finished second in the Cadet McQueens Competition, which was the first time Marlborough College has entered. After the schools finished Tom, Jason and Ed stayed on and shot in the Imperial (an international rifle competition) where about 750 fires including top international shooters from all around the world come and shoot. All three shot really well and were part of the team who shot for Wiltshire. Ed had the highest score for the team and got through to the Queens 2, which was the top 300 fires. This was a fantastic achievement especially given it was his first Imperial. Well done to all! Nicky Watts

SQUASH

P:37; W:16; D:0; L:21 Both of the squads entered into the National Schools Competition, the U15 and U17 boys, gave a good account of themselves; the U17s reached the final 16 stage, playing some good squash in the process. They eventually lost to Kenilworth School and Sports College, who went on to finish in fourth position nationwide. Thanks and credit to the players Theo Cadier, Ben Spink, Hugh Norman, Ned Corfield and Miya Scott for finding time in their very busy schedules to commit to the process. The U15s failed to progress beyond the initial Pool Stage (against Wycliffe and Millfield) by the narrowest of margins; an extremely tense encounter against Millfield really could have gone either way – two apiece in matches, two games each in the deciding match, and 9–11 in the fifth and deciding game. Close! Alas, sporting highs and lows, but what a fantastic learning experience for the boys.

OTHER SPORTS

significantly during the season, while Ben Spink displayed glimpses of considerable potential when not side-lined through injury. Colts 2nd pair Casper Barker and Hugh Norman enjoyed steady success throughout the season.

As ever, the girls acquitted themselves admirably and went on to record another unbeaten season, the second in a row. Strong performances against Bryanston and Cheltenham College would go down as the highlights, as well as Miya Scott’s selection for the Boys U17 team – very well done, Miya! Thanks and best wishes to the departing captain, Scarlett Atkinson, and

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SPORTS

Jemima Feather; their dedication to the team and willingness to practice during their ‘free’ time has been exemplary.

OTHER SPORTS

On a representative level, congratulations to Angus Macmillan, Joshua Tate and Isla Scott for their re-selection into the County Academy Programme. They have worked hard at their games throughout the season and continue to make excellent progress in their development as players. Finally, farewell and ‘adieu’ to Sam NelsonPiercy who leaves us to pursue a career in medicine. He has been a fantastic role model to the younger players during the last couple of years, always giving of his very best in training and matches, as well as being ever-willing to assist with their coaching. As number one string, he has put in some epic performances and recorded an unusual number of 3–2 victories in the process, testament to his dogged determination and ‘never say die’ attitude. As ever, a huge thank you to Marius Baldrey and Andrew Gist for all their assistance; their enthusiasm and love for the game is infectious, and their excellent rapport with the pupils makes for a very happy environment indeed. Well done to all! JHB

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SWIMMING

Boys – P:23; W:12; D:0; L:11

Girls – P:24; W:14; D:0; L:10 For the boys, the main swimming highlight was the U16 team winning first place in a multi schools invitational gala hosted by Sherborne Girls’ School. The U16 team competed against five other schools and the team of Ben Place, Tom Corfield, Alex Ershov, Ben Clarke won every individual event they raced and both relays. The U18 team competed well and most swimmers swam their personal best. The main event for the girls was the Girls’ Independent Schools Swimming Relay Championships hosted by Downe House. Both U18 and U16 teams swam very well. A number of girls swam competitively for the first time and achieved their personal best. This is looks very promising for next year. Overall, the 2017–18 season has been an extremely competitive one for both swimming teams with a number of close fixtures (Eton and St Paul’s at home and Bradfield away).

Bath Cup The swimming team competed in the 2018 Bath Cup, which is the pinnacle of the independent schools swimming calendar. This

event was held at the London Aquatics Centre in Stratford in early March against the top 60 independent schools swimming teams in the country. The girls’ team of Tallulah Chukwuemeka, Millie Burdett, Lily Freeman and Zara Blakey competed extremely well, but failed to progress beyond the prelims of each relay competition. Special mention and thanks go to Zara Blakey for agreeing to step in at the last moment to swim for the College at the Bath Cup. The boys’ team of Andrey Gabestro, Ben Place, Zac Place and Tom Corfield were also competitive and like the girls team did not progress through to the finals in either relay events. PJOS

WATER POLO

P:7; W:2; D:1; L:4

These results do not accurately reflect the incremental skill and gamesmanship improvements the team is making year on year. Areas for improvement for the 2018–19 season includes raising the accuracy of shooting and improving concentration and discipline throughout each match. Nikita Trotsenko has led the team well throughout the year. PJOS


Siegfried Sassoon (CO 1901–4) and Charles Hamilton-Sorley (C1 1908–13) two celebrated pupils at Marlborough College wrote some of the most powerful and moving literature of the First World War. Whilst Sassoon survived, Sorley was killed at the Battle of Loos, just two years after leaving school. Sassoon went on to campaign against the war, despite winning the Military Cross, being wounded and volunteering to return to the Western Front.

Have you forgotten yet?… For the world’s events have rumbled on since those gagged days, Like traffic checked while at the crossing of city-ways: And the haunted gap in your mind has filled with thoughts that flow Like clouds in the lit heaven of life; and you’re a man reprieved to go, Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare. But the past is just the same – and War’s a bloody game…

The Memorial Hall was re-opened in June by HRH Princess Eugenie of York (MM 2003 – 2008). Following a £6.5 million refurbishment it is now a world-class performance venue. With the names of the 749 now brilliantly illuminated inside, the completion of the restoration also brings to a close the commemoration of the First World War centenary at the College.

Have you forgotten yet?… Look down, and swear by the slain of the War that you’ ll never forget. Do you remember the dark months you held the sector at Mametz – The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled sandbags on parapets? Do you remember the rats; and the stench Of corpses rotting in front of the front-line trench – And dawn coming, dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless rain? Do you ever stop and ask, ‘Is it all going to happen again?’ Do you remember that hour of din before the attack – And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and shook you then As you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of your men? Do you remember the stretcher-cases lurching back With dying eyes and lolling heads – those ashen-grey Masks of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?

C ove r i m a g e : Sie g f r ie d S a s s o on (C O 19 0 2 – 0 4)

Have you forgotten yet?…

P u bl i s he d by M a rl b orou g h C o l le g e , Wi lt s h i re S N 8 1PA E d itor : Ja ne G re en

Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you’ ll never forget.

Wit h s p e c i a l t h a n k s f or t he photo g r a ph s of Pe t e D av ie s , I a n L e on a rd a nd M a t t B row n a nd to C h r i s Ta n ne r f or c ompi l i n g t he s p or t s s e c t ion .

Aftermath by Siegfried Sassoon written in 1919

D e s i g n by S u n hou s e Cre a t i ve

©Andy Matthews


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