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NUMBER 117

WINTER 2016

T H E M A R L B U R I A N C LU B M A G A Z I N E

The Marlburian Club Magazine

WINTER 2016

Cover story: Philosophy, through the lens Nick Shoolingin-Jordan, award-winning cameraman, producer and director


Peter Page DESIGNER • GOLDSMITH

4 The Square, Ramsbury, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 2PE Telephone: 01672 520428 www.peterpage.co.uk info@peterpage.co.uk


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Contents Features 07

09

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43

My House

OM Entrepreneurs

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The London Residents Club, Caroline Senley Designs, Troffle

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Behind the Mask Grace Jackson describes two years in Sierra Leone working with the Ebola Response Team

Creative Connections James Waldron talks to Ottilie Windsor about helping establish the Nevill Holt Opera

Philosophy, through the lens Nick Shoolingin-Jordan – cameraman, producer and director – is interviewed by Clementine Simon

Ginny Light writes about New Court 25 years after it opened

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Brothers in Arms Red and Roley Finer in discussion with Niall Hamilton about running a family antique-arms business

I’ll never forget… The kennels of the Marlborough College Beagles

Spirit, strategy, service Alexandra Jackson talks to Richard Fleck about the many roles he is involved in

Totally Inspirational The wonderful woodworking man Dave Rawlings

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Marlburians in Racing: A turf education

Regulars

Richard Corbett talks to champion racehorse trainer Ralph Beckett

VIEW

Powered by Coffee Arthur Kay makes bio fuels out of used coffee beans – and it’s a huge success

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Matthew Wilkinson and the Rebellion In the run up to the 175th anniversary of the College, the Magazine starts a three-part series on Marlborough’s first Master

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Humanitarian by Design HMS Bulwark on operations Nick Cooke-Priest’s fascinating account of rescuing migrants from the Mediterranean

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WW1 in Memoriam 1916 The OMs who gave their lives 100 years ago

The Equality Portfolio: Seeking fair opportunities for women in business Caroline Hitch talks to Naomi Kerbel about her route to the top of one of the world’s largest banks

Marlburian VCs: 1915 Captain Charles C Foss, V.C., C.B., D.S.O.

#NotGuilty After being attacked outside her home, Ione Wells draws attention to the unspoken shame and blame felt by victims of sexual assault

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Professional Groups OMs can mentor and guide College leavers and help other OMs already established in business

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Upfront From the Chair This year Letters to the Editor

THE CLUB 12 Club Events 63 OM News 73 Engagements, Marriages & Births 74 Deaths 75 Obituaries 100 Sports & Club Reports THE COLLEGE 85 Looking ahead 86 The Master’s Review (UK) 87 College Admissions and Results 88 The Master’s Review (Malaysia) 91 Valete 93 Development Focus 95 Legacy for Life Campaign 98 1843 Society 99 Development Events LITERARY 107 On the Shelves 114 Crossword

The Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire SN8 1PA Telephone +44 (0)1672 892 384 marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org www.marlboroughcollege.org Twitter: @OldMarlburians facebook.com/TheMarlburianClub Editorial and advertising enquiries: +44 (0)1672 892 385 Editor: Catherine Brumwell (NC 1991-96). Editor Emeritus: Martin Evans (CR 1968-). Editorial Board: Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81), Charlie Corbett (C1 1990-95), Jane Green (B3 1982-84, Communications Manager), Kate Goodwin (Alumni Relations Manager), Alexandra Jackson (CO 1974-76), Harriett Jagger (PR 1976-78), Tom Mucklow (CO 2003-08). Design: Andy Rawlings. © The Marlburian Club 2016 The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Upfront “Marlburians really are the most ridiculous overachievers,” decided my husband after reading last year’s magazine. Once I realised how genuinely impressed he was, I relaxed, and have spent the last year being able to see through new eyes quite how amazing OMs are. What a privilege for me and what a source of pride. In his piece, the Master observes this same phenomenon: Marlburians reaching very different destinations than suggested by their early paths, both in terms of career and of geography. Do I regret the path I took at MC? Not one bit. And many Marlburians I’ve spoken to feel the same. They studied one thing at school and have ended up in wildly diverse professions, many miles away from where they started. The common theme seemingly that Marlborough had given them skills, ideas and confidence to pursue success. While on the subject of success, it is now time I pay tribute to Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81), our outgoing Editor who truly did the most remarkable job and handed over to me a really exceptional publication, one that does justice to the proud tradition of excellence that Marlborough fosters. Susanna, thank you from us all, you have done yourself and the College proud.

glimpse through the pages of this year’s magazine quickly shows the diversity of achievements OMs can claim: from expertise in fine armour to the multi-talented lawyer; from the stage to the turf. And you need only scan the OM News section to be humbled by the broad spread of talent on display.

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I believe – and I hope you’ll agree – that the journalism is as impressive as the content. This year we are fortunate enough to have had several professional journalists interviewing and writing for the magazine. I think they have done the job brilliantly; I’m sincerely grateful, and also hopeful, that more skilled wordsmiths will step forward in the future. I’m scouting for photographers too! 4

The Marlburian Club Magazine

Keen to create the impact that can only be achieved by hearing a personal account of a unique story, I asked both Nick Cooke-Priest (LI 1983-85) and Grace Jackson (LI 2007-09) to give their own accounts of responding to a major crisis, respectively saving migrants from the Mediterranean and working in an Ebola camp. Both received OBEs for their work; high acclaim indeed, especially as Grace is so young. And now, a little reflection on my own diverse life as I sit writing this from my home in Zagreb. When I left Marlborough, I never imagined my science A-levels (and subsequent Biology degree) would lead me into publishing and later editing, nor from London to Croatia, via Cyprus, Russia and Austria.

A look at other leading schools’ magazines suggests Marlborough is again ahead of the pack. I do hope I can serve the magazine as well as possible, maintaining Susanna’s high standards along the way. I will continue to rely on the stream of great achievements for source material and upon the generosity and skill of all OM contributors. Please stay engaged, listen out for me and, if you hear of anything that might be of interest, do get in touch. Ευχαριστώ, cпасибо, danke, hvala, thank you and enjoy 2016’s Magazine.

Catherine Brumwell, née Redpath (NC 1991-96) Editor, The Marlburian Club Magazine catherine@theommagazine.co.uk


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From the Chair I have been in the job for around 18 months now and whilst the Development Office continues to progress the more administrative aspects of the Marlburian Club duties, my key goal has been to improve OM networking. n a perfect world I would prefer to see a more seamless transition for College pupils into the Marlburian Club, and a much stronger participation in the Club across all age groups. We have such a powerful group of resources at our fingertips with tremendously talented OMs in so many different fields of work, we would be foolish not to put it to good use.

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For pupils, the College has no doubt done a great job in helping you achieve your required grades to take the next step in your career. However, this is just the start of your career and your development doesn’t stop there. We aim to provide access to a professional network that will enhance your prospects of finding the right career opportunity and optimise your performance once in that role. For OMs, battling through the turbulent world we now live in is tough enough, so let’s try and make it a little easier by helping each other out. We have set up 18 professional groups and will host a series of events that will provide opportunities for us all. See page 90 for a more detailed piece on the Professional Groups. As well as the professional groups, we have also tried to enhance the network via the following: • • • •

Summer drinks parties A dinner every three years An annual carol service Regional and international dinners and events • Year group reunions (the first being five years after leaving Marlborough) • Sports groups • Choral events The summer drinks party has been particularly successful as it gives OMs a better opportunity to move around and network than some of the more static events. The Carol Service, held for the first

time last December, was oversubscribed and generated a very warm, festive spirit as we ran into Christmas. The five-year reunion has replaced the two-year preuniversity event and was held for the first time in September 2015. It was very popular and there were over 100 ex-pupils from the class of 2010 attending. It was also very good to see so many from the class of 1991 attending their 25-year reunion in June at a wonderful event held at Marlborough. Looking to the future, we are discussing the idea of setting up an angel-investors scheme to invest in OM Entrepreneurs, taking the old-school network to a whole new level. We are also bringing in the concept of year-group ambassadors, who will help plan and promote year-group reunions. If you would like to become an ambassador for your year group, please get in touch with the Club Office. The Club Office is also always happy to hear your news, be it a new role or venture; an engagement, marriage or birth; a charity event; or any achievement. You can also log into the members’ area of the website and update your details.

“We aim to provide access to a professional network that will enhance your prospects...”

We will continue to explore opportunities to improve our alumni network. As always, if you have any ideas or suggestions, we would be pleased to hear from you. It just leaves me to say a huge thank you for all the support and work that so many have put into the Marlburian Club.

Chris Carpmael (C1 1980-84) Chairman of The Marlburian Club The Marlburian Club Magazine

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This Year It is an honour to be invited to be President of the OM Club, a post held by my father, Dennis, in 1975, and so sadly denied to my wonderful and talented brother, Christopher. I am acutely aware of Democratic vice-president candidate Lloyd Bentsen’s put down of Dan Quale in 1988, that, “Senator, you are no Jack Kennedy.” Well, I am no Bobby Kennedy either! come to this role as a grateful OM. When, as a prospective parent, I reviewed the admissions literature and started to re-visit Marlborough, I realised that there was no other school to which I aspired to send my children: I loved the words that “values, place, endeavour, community and contribution are more important than academic statistics.” I find that I am as proud to tell people that I have a child at Marlborough, and another accepted for 2017, as I have always been to say that I went to Marlborough. I was also lucky enough to attend Cambridge and Harvard Business School and I feel very comfortable bracketing Marlborough with such institutions.

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So as President of the OM Club, I will be committed to encouraging a culture that recognises the great benefits received at Marlborough, which supports the wonderful initiatives now very much part of the OM Club that aim to help OMs stay in touch with each other and provide support throughout their lives, through mentoring and career groups.

“The Development office, my predecessors and the new Club Chairmen have done exceptional work to ensure that the OM Club has become much more than the annual dinner...” As I am also Chairman of Marlborough’s fundraising board, without being intrusive, I hope that my year as your Club President will help to promote the thought that we who have benefited should in time, according to means, do everything possible to enable others from 6

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all backgrounds to be given chances to enjoy the same advantage. The Development office, my predecessors and the new Club Chairmen have done exceptional work to ensure that the OM Club has become much more than the annual dinner and an occasional visit back to the school on Club Day, where we’re never sure how many of our own age group will be attending. Along with area dinners, the sports and other activitybased societies, which continue to thrive, the number of opportunities to engage and learn from other OMs has expanded at an admirable pace. The Club intends to continue this effort. The planned programme to hold alumni reunions every five years has commenced and the Club and Development office will continue to look for year group organisers and house ‘shepherds’ to ensure good support and turnout for these events. The current plan is to hold 25th, 40th, 50th and 55th and over reunions at the college, with all other five-year reunions to be held at exciting venues, selected by the appropriate year group organisers. The few reunions of this type already held have proved a great success. With its glorious and comfortable campus set at the top of a beautiful market town, Marlborough is without doubt one of the world’s leading co-educational boarding schools. The OM community will continue to develop along with the school, to ensure it stays in the top ranks of the premier league.

Tim Martin-Jenkins (B3 1961-65) President of The Marlburian Club


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Totally Inspirational: Beaks who hit the spot David Rawlings (CR 1975-98), now aged 83, and his workshop are remembered by Edward Stancliffe (C1 1988-93) nyone who spent any time in Dave Rawlings’ workshop will recall what a special place it was.

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The carved sign outside read ‘Woodcrafts’. Upon entering the workshop, which was always a hive of activity, one would instantly smell the pleasant aroma of sawdust, wood glue and polish; and jazz could often be heard playing in the background. The room was full, machines on one side, work benches in the middle. A guitar hung from a beam, antiques lay awaiting repair. Puppets covered in sawdust hung motionless above a tool bench. Old coffee jars contained french polish, while a catering-size tin of Nescafé sat near the list of how all workshop-goers liked their tea and coffee. Boys and girls from all years would be happily working away. Dave, with his wild hair, would be kindly and patiently guiding each in turn, perhaps with a steadying hand at the lathe or describing the next step. Mistakes were never criticised and encouragement was always given. Pencils, when needed, were always produced from the seemingly endless supply in his apron. Doll’s house furniture made by James Dallas (BH 1977-82)

games pitch dreadful, the workshop was a blissful refuge. Second, at a time when a boarding school could be a harsh place, the atmosphere that Dave created was a homefrom-home for many. Whenever the workshop was open, tea, coffee, stories, laughter and M&Ms were always on offer. It was such a nice atmosphere that one boy was always there, but never made a thing! Dave was completely approachable and trustworthy and somehow knew when one was under the weather. One could share any issue with him and be certain of sound advice and complete discretion. Visitors to the workshop were constant. Beaks would appear with something to mend, while recent (and not so recent) OMs would visit regularly; such was their affection for Dave.

David Rawlings (CR 1975-98), in his perpetual calm and encouraging manner, helping a pupil

“The workshop was much more than just somewhere where pupils created things from wood...” He treated everyone as he expected to be treated and this rubbed off on many pupils. One parent asked Dave, “What have you done to my son?” After a pause he then added, “He’s so nice now”. He had a great sense of humour and told wonderful stories: the tank that bumpstarted itself and drove across Salisbury Plain; and Dr Cliffe, a surgeon, who during the war had turned the bearings for the bouncing bomb and later invented the artificial shoulder joint. Dave had worked with wood since childhood and was a gifted craftsman. Beautiful items were therefore created that were displayed on Prize Day. These included chessboards, guitars, desks, furniture, games and dolls houses. One boy even made a violin. However, the workshop was much more than just somewhere where pupils created things from wood, and it was one of the College’s best kept secrets. First, if one was practical and found the thought of spending the afternoon on a

Today, Dave is happily retired and is President of the Marlborough Bowls Club. OMs still pop in to see him and Judy; and postcards sent from around the world sit on their mantelpiece. For some, time spent in Dave’s workshop will be the highlight of their school years. For many others it will have had a significant impact on their future (some of today’s surgeons started their practical training with him). Whichever one you might recognise, it is all down to the man who created a magical atmosphere that hundreds of pupils enjoyed over 23 years. “In loco parentis” was never more apt. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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I’ll never forget... Kennels Oliver Nicholson (B2 1964-68) We did not have dogs, or horses, at home, but I had escaped from a peculiarly brutal Bournemouth prep school, long since defunct (there is some justice in the world), by reading the novels of R.S. Surtees. t was therefore with a head full of Jorrocks, James Pigg and Mr Soapey Sponge that I made my way up field to the small whitewashed building nestled between the XI and the barbed-wire fence bordering Barton Bottom. Barton Bottom was originally built as stables for the ponies that pulled the lawnmowers across the games fields, but from 1952 onwards it became the kennels of the Marlborough College Beagles.

Marlborough was unique in that everything (except for the bank account and the long-term breeding policy) was managed by the boys. We swiftly learned to clear dog mess; to apply Snowcem and bituminous paint to scrubbed brick walls; to build a bonfire and unblock drains; to know the farmers whose land we crossed; to heave straw bales; and to skin blown sheep and stillborn calves.

The other four schools that had their own pack of beagles in those days, employed a kennel huntsman to do the dirty work.

In return, we had 20 couple of friends – hounds are counted in couples, therefore 40 hounds in total. They formed an amicably steaming heap as we sat in their straw litter in the Tilley Lamp-lit gloom after hunting – the College begrudged us electricity; however, it was eventually installed through the kindness of a supporter called Lt Col Hayward (C1 1896-1901). There was liver-and-white Neatness, whose ears rotated forward when she ran, like a swimmer doing

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“I lounged luxuriously with Gadfly and her brood in the puppy run, reading sequentially through all the Sherlock Holmes short stories...”

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the butterfly. There was the omnifutuant Nightly whose athleticism constantly obliged our elders to modify the longterm breeding policy. There were Badger and Whistler whose companions rallied to them as soon as they heard their authoritative whimper indicate that they were on the line of the hare. While other Marlburians spent the summer CCF Field Day in uncomfortable circumstances on Salisbury Plain, I lounged luxuriously with Gadfly and her brood in the puppy run, reading sequentially through all the Sherlock Holmes short stories – I gloat, I gloat. Other former Masters of the Marlborough Beagles have become great men in the hunting world, including Master of the Heythrop, Stephen Lambert (C3 196367), and Director of the Masters of Fox Hounds Association, Alastair Jackson (PR 1958-63). I have remained an occasional foot follower, but one glad to recall walking back downfield after opening up the kennels for breakfast, and hearing, about halfway back to school, the hound voices start the crooning, which seemed to say that they looked forward to seeing us again after lunch.


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My House: New Court Ginny Light (NC 1991-96) Joining New Court was less a jump in at the deep end and more a tentative descent down the swimming ladder. Far from initiation and intimidation, we Shell babies had a somewhat gentle introduction. It was 1991 and New Court was the new kid on the block.

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After prep we were limited to the confines of the house doormat while the older girls swanned off to dalliances in court. The sense of pecking order was maintained outside of House. We did not share a table, let alone eye contact, in Norwood Hall, but behind closed doors we were a big family, bonded by being part of something new. While B House, our neighbours, had their well, New Court had its courtyard. Interlopers could only peek into our little sanctuary through the glass corridors connecting the various parts of the building. Our little patch of grass

Though named after the Duke of Marlborough’s battles – Schellenberg, Blenheim and so on – the dormitories were rarely the scene of skirmish. The most lively parts of House were the tiny kitchens, where we gossiped over toast and Nesquik, and the affectionately named ‘Swamp’, a large, green, sky-lit room near the entrance that had perhaps gained this name due to Miss Lockton’s choice of earthy tones. It was here that you could have your star signs read out and earwig on gossip from the Lower Sixth. Community spirit extended across our endeavours. Though awarded with mixed success in house sports, everyone mucked in. During one goalless netball match against the mighty Elmhurst, a decidedly sporty house with a games mistress at the helm, a desperate Miss Lockton promised us a Polly Tea Rooms tea if we scored just one goal. It was, apparently, just what was needed. The goal was scored and we duly jogged down the high street for cakes and hot chocolate while the Elmhurst girls went home, somehow feeling the underdogs.

New Court

here were just three year groups with some new girls in the Remove and Lower Sixth as well as us wide-eyed Shell. There was a separate upper-school common room but, such was our shared love of Neighbours and the easy-going nature of the upper-school girls, we all gathered in the main common room for our twice-daily screening from Ramsay Street. However, the older girls got the seats and us the bean bags: we knew our place.

house) and she dished out the croissants as a reward for getting out of bed to watch the May Day Madrigals, a choral group who sang, in the Old English tradition, from the Bradleian Arches at dawn.

for sunbathing, revising and thwarted attempts at doing both together was also the setting for some of New Court’s most idiosyncratic customs. Alongside deciding on the interior design (green and brown earth colours, probably to help hide the dirt) and emblem (Pegasus to acknowledge New Court’s former role as the stable block), the inaugural housemistress, Fiona Lockton (CR 1991-95), also came up with the al fresco May Day breakfast. I remember the first year. I sat at one of the long trestle tables headed by our dame, Jane Stafford-Wood (Dame 1991-2011). She was wearing one of her trademark printed dresses (no doubt also designed to hide the wear and tear of life in a boarding

This camaraderie has survived two and a half decades. New Court girls from three year groups are still my closest friends, bonded by fond memories of life around that courtyard. We were the beginnings of an institution that would become part of Marlborough’s fabric and history forevermore.

Ginny Light (NC 1991-96) The Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM Entrepreneurs The London Residents Club The Founder: Thomas Archer (C3 2002-07) The Business: We offer a comprehensive short-term letting solution using the Airbnb platform, increasing rental yields whilst providing greater flexibility. We aim to deliver all the benefits of the short-term letting market without any of the hassle. With our service you would expect to make between 150%-200% of a traditional rental yield.

yields with the flexibility of staying in their properties from time to time. The Dough: We have grown this business organically with no investment. The Key to Success: There is nothing wrong with starting small and growing slowly. By ensuring our supply is always ahead of our demand, we have been able to learn as we go whilst minimising errors and delivering exceptional service to our clients.

properties, predominantly in London but we have recently begun to offer a holidayhome service that has proved very popular. Our turnover has been over £100,000 in six months. The Future: We are continuing to grow but in order to maintain our high level, personal service we have capped our portfolio at 30 London properties. We are looking to expand our holiday homes portfolio.

The Present: We currently have three fulltime and six part-time employees in an office off the King’s Road. We look after 25

The Nitty-Gritty: www.thelondonresidentsclub.com thomas@thelondonresidentsclub.com 020 3096 6057

Caroline Senley Designs Ltd

I knew I had to surround myself with such structures and work within magnificent buildings.

The Founder: Caroline Senley (NC 1991-96)

The Key to Success: Passion for what you do and letting every adventure inspire you to create beauty and practical luxury. Many clients return with further commissions, so the long-term working relationship and friendship is paramount.

The Eureka Moment: About a year ago my business partner and I travelled to Hong Kong equipped with some gold-leaf business cards, high hopes and not much else. After talking to the right people we realised that our flawless business model might need some adjustments. Back in London one of our clients asked if we could assist in letting their property on a shortterm basis and we quickly found that our clients could increase their traditional rental

The Business: High-end luxury bespoke interior design and consultancy including bespoke-furniture commissions for complete individuality within projects. We also undertake personal property developments and to build clients’ portfolios. Our area of expertise is usually in Grade II listed London townhouses, villas and apartments abroad. The Dough: Self funded. I began working on my own private projects whilst I worked for other established designers (there were some very early morning and late evening appointments to meet conveniently with clients and keep the day job!) The Eureka Moment: My absolute passion for architecture came at Marlborough whilst studying History of Art with the extraordinary Dr Niall Hamilton; 10

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The Present: I am delighted to be working on a stunning 1710 Georgian vestry in Dorset as well as a magnificent home in the South of France that is still under construction. I have recently finished work in Los Angeles and Paris for a London-based client. The Future: The future is to continue working on stunning properties around the UK. The challenges of working abroad are absolutely delightful and always very welcome. The Nitty Gritty: www.carolinesenleydesigns.com cs@carolinesenleydesigns.com 020 7244 6223 & 07785 340 730


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Thinking of visiting MC? OMs are more than welcome to visit the College but, for security reasons, we ask that you call ahead to arrange your visit on:

01672 892385 or email marlburianclub@ marlboroughcollege.org We will always try and accommodate you if you turn up at the last minute but please be aware that there will be times when this is not possible.

Troffle The Founder: Verity Macdonald (MO 2002-07). Co-founded with Christopher Bloor and Jonny Day (non-Marlburians!) The Business: Troffle is an online service for sending the gift of awardwinning, handmade chocolates through the post. Our letterbox-sized boxes mean they are as easy to send as a letter and much tastier! For birthdays, thank you gifts and any occasion, you can choose your flavours, add a message and send them. We also create stunning branded chocolates for corporate gifting or events and bespoke wedding flavours. The Eureka Moment: I had just finished a year with the New Entrepreneurs Foundation and the rest was serendipity – the sudden coming together of a wonderful product that we believe in, a team with great complementary skills and a shared vision for the future of the business. The Dough: Contrary to the current trend, we’ve aimed to build the business entirely on revenue, with small loans or

investments from ourselves as directors. When we hit a big growth phase we may look for external investment in order to take us to the next stage. The Key to Success: Having someone in the wings with more experience than ourselves has been invaluable. You can do a lot of hard work in the early stages without getting anywhere if you don’t have the right guidance and advice on avoiding costly and time-wasting mistakes. The Present: We are three partners and one advisor and are starting to offer flexible part-time employment to young people in our local area who would otherwise find it difficult to get work experience. Our website sales are growing 25% month on month and our corporate business with top City firms is gaining traction. The Future: We will continue to expand into other channels such as retail, hotels and hospitality and will look to expand abroad next year. The Nitty-Gritty: www.troffle.co.uk verity@troffle.co.uk The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events Marbella Gathering Summer 2015 Miles Bolus (B1 1945-49), the Marlburian Club Secretary for Southern Spain, met up with Andrew Linn (B2 1955-59) and Nicholas Grose-Hodge (LI 1956-61) at the monthly luncheon of Marbella Business International. While Nicholas is now based back in the UK, both Andrew and Miles have been Marbella based for 40 and 50 years respectively.

The evening provided a terrific opportunity to reconnect

Alex Backhouse (LI 2005-10), Jamie Roden (SU 2005-10), Matt Taylor (SU 2005-10) and Tom McCollum (BH 2005-10)

Five Year Reunion: The Class of 2010 22 September 2015 Of the 100 plus OMs who gathered for this reunion, most in attendance had recently graduated from university and had moved to London so were very grateful for the opportunity to reconnect with school friends they had lost touch with. Chris Carpmael (C1 1980-84) and Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67) spoke briefly about the opportunities available to young OMs through connection with the Club. There was a wonderfully warm atmosphere and guests enjoyed music, food and drinks. Andrew Linn (B2 1955-59), Nicholas Grose-Hodge (LI 1956-61) (previously Malaga-based, now resident in Winchester but a regular visitor to Spain) and Miles Bolus (B1 1945-49)

Summer School OM Drinks Parties July/August 2015 OMs attending 2015’s Summer School were once again welcomed to drinks in Court each week over the four-week period. They were not only able to meet up with other OMs attending Summer School but also with OMs living in the area. Many beaks, both past and present, came along to add to the general enjoyment and nostalgia factor, with Martin Evans (CR 1968-) drawing the biggest crowd in the third week. Top Left: Sue and Chris Rogers, Angela de Saram and Caroline Land. Top Right: Robert Savory (C2 1949-53) and Peter Makin (CO 1958-61). Bottom Left: Robert Savory (C2 1949-53), Sarah Tanner and Anthony Tanner (LI 1953-57). Bottom Right: Chris Rogers (CR 1974-90), James Thompson (C2 1957-61) and Sue Rogers 12

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Harry Scott (C1 2005-10), who was one of many who enjoyed the event, commented: “The event was well attended with many of them now living and working in London. Many thanks to the Marlburian Club for organising a fantastic evening and giving us the opportunity to catch up with old friends after five momentous years.”


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Club Day 11 October 2015 There was a great turn out for Club Day and the 1960’s-decade reunion. The day began with a moving dedication and an unveiling of a plaque to George Medal winner Joe Brain in Chapel. Afterwards the Adderley filled up for the AGM and, at the reception in a marquee in Court, OMs caught up with each other and listened to the Master’s welcome while enjoying drinks and canapés. Some then made their way to the Maples hockey pitch to watch the OM Women’s Hockey team take on the College XI with Jon Copp on hand to referee. The College ran out 3-0 winners. After lunch in Norwood Hall, there was a plethora of activities on offer during the afternoon. An expectant audience watched Michael Boxford (C1 195560) perform Chopin’s Ballade No 1 in

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G Minor Op 23 before being joined on the Memorial Hall stage by the Master who, accompanied by Michael, sang ‘Im wunderschönen Monat Mai’, ‘Im Rhein, im heiligen Strome’ and ‘Ich grolle nicht’ from Schumann’s Dichterliebe Op 48. This was followed by music scholar Lizzy Daniels’ (IH 2014-16) stunning performance on the violin of Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso by Saint-Saëns.

Property Group Drinks Reception 14 October 2015 The OM Property Group drinks reception was hosted at The Pavilion in Victoria, which is the impressive marketing suite of Land Securities, and was led by the current Chief Executive, Rob Noel (C2 1978-82).

Many tried their hand at shooting in the Range while others either viewed the Charles Hamilton Sorley exhibition on display in the Archives or the screening of the 749 Film before a visit to their old house, ending the day with tea in the marquee. Club Day 2015 was yet another great success, evoking memories of times past and providing an opportunity to observe College life as it is now, catch up with old friends and, for some, make new ones.

Guy Wengraf (CO 1992-97), Edward Gregg (C2 1988-93), Niall Hamilton (CR 1985-) and John Ring (C2 1994-99)

The group received a talk about the redevelopment of Victoria, London

Michael Boxford (C1 1955-60) played the piano while the Master sang a selection of melodies

Shooting in the Range

Alex Hoare (C1 1997-02), Rachel Dickie (MO 1997-02) and Edward Twort (TU 1999-01)

James Gillett (C2 1971-75) introduced the evening followed by Ben Ridgwell, from Land Securities, who kindly gave an intriguing insight into the master plan behind redevelopment in the Victorian era. Niall Hamilton (CR 1985-), still known as Doc H, entertainingly rounded off the evening’s talks with an update from the College.

Robin Brodhurst (PR 1965-70), Charles Warner (C1 1963-68) and Philip Woods (C1 1963-68)

The drinks reception will be held on an annual basis with a dinner held every three years. Please contact James on jgillet@savills.com if you are in a property-related business as we would like you to attend next time. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events Arts & Media Drinks Reception

entertaining. There was a diverse group of OMs in attendance: comedians, actors, designers, producers and journalists.

21 October 2015

Andrew Shepherd commented: “We were delighted with the turnout, and there is clearly a desire to really take the group forward. I hope that this is the start for the future.”

The White Hart Pub on Drury Lane hosted around 40 OMs for the Arts & Media drinks reception last October. Group secretaries Susannah Tresilian (NC 1992-97) and Andrew Shepherd (LI 1993-98) introduced the evening and spoke about their plans for the future development of the group; their desire for input from members in shaping the group; their plans to help develop collaborations, share advice, offer mentoring; and also their wish to maintain close links with Marlborough and any current pupils interested in arts and media. Johnny Gee (CO 1985-90) arranged to have Radio 2 artist Sara Spade play an informal ‘pop-up’ set, which was hugely

East Sussex Dinner 5 November 2015

Sara Spade and the Noisy Boys: Sara Spade, Jonny Mattock and Jonny Gee (CO 1985-90)

Fifteen OMs met for their annual dinner at The Star Inn in Waldron near Heathfield in the heart of East Sussex. They were pleased to include four new local members as well as welcoming Chris Carpmael (C1 1980-84), Chairman of the Marlburian Club. Chris talked to the group about his hopes that Club members might do more to help young OMs and current pupils in their careers. As always, the evening was rounded off by the rousing singing of ‘The Old Bath Road’. Anyone who lives in East Sussex and who would like to join us in 2017 should contact Robin Bather on 01435 810076.

Ali Boyd-Brent (C3 1992-97) and Ben Fogg (TU 1992-97)

Digital Players 3 November 2015 Around 15 members of the Digital Players group met up in London at the Rack and Tenter pub in Moorgate. A range of OMs discussed new technologies, their careers and future business opportunities. Organised by James Spender (C2 1987-92) and Mark Tidmarsh (B3 1983-87), it was the second Digital Players’ night following the inaugural event in November 2014.

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Nigel Wattis (C3 1963-68) and Jane Green (B3 1982-84)

“Thanks to all for making the night so vibrant. It was great to see so many bright minds sharing to mutually develop businesses”, said Mark Tidmarsh. “I would argue the value of such ‘free consultancy’ can’t be measured. We now have ideas on the next event, which we will keep posted. In the meantime, please feel free to post on our LinkedIn page as a virtual trading space. As a group, we exist to help you develop your business, so let’s get exchanging!”

If anyone is interested in joining any future events, would like to set up their own event or would like to get in touch with the organisers of any events, please contact the Club office on marlburianclub@ marlboroughcollege.org or phone 01672 892385.


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Art Event 7 December 2015 An exhibition at the Mount House showed the work of five OMs, who studied to MA level in Fine Art. Each one has taken a different journey and developed a very particular and distinctive practice, yet they have identified the common discipline of drawing as a way to meet again at the art department where they all studied at A-level. The large brush and ink drawings of Tyga Helme (MM 2003-08) are reminiscent of Chinese painting. The picture surface appears littered with marks but this is something of an illusion; each brushstroke is a short dab allowing white space to shine through in a wonderful fresh glow. Emilie Pugh (PR 2004-06) is using light itself as her drawing medium. This is shown most directly in ‘Psukhe’, a work using printed Perspex sheets illuminated in a lightbox. Her other work, although not back, lit shows a similar luminosity and has the mystery of images showing nebula and distant galaxies.

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Rose Arbuthnott (PR 2004-06) works with serious subject matter and cleverly walks a tightrope between the crass and the comic. A panda strolls across the picture frame offering its back for prime advertising space while the world around it appears to be falling apart. The etchings of Freya Wood (NC 2001-06) show a lyrical sensitivity of the local landscape, places that many of you will know and see afresh in these beguiling and sometimes tender scenes.

St Michael’s, Chester Square

Zanny Mellor (MM 2000-05) seems acutely aware of her years of training and has purposely shed any artfulness with bold brave strokes of white gesso over deep black paper. Her work shows a sophistication that is nowhere near as primitive as described. The show proves that in our world of factions and dispute there is the common language of drawing that can bring us together. Drawing is an activity most of us were doing before we could speak and write so it is no surprise that this seemingly basic way of communicating is celebrated.

Carol Service 10 December 2015

Zanny Mellor (MM 2000-05), spoke to a group of 6th Form Art Students about her work, the process and the influence of her travels and different environments on her art

St Michael’s, in Chester Square, was packed with OMs and their families for this inaugural OM Carol Service. Nearly everyone taking part was an OM, from the scratch choir, who sang gloriously, to the readers, Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72), Pip Brignall (LI 2002-07), Georgina Brown (B1 1976-78), Michael Elwyn (B3 1956-61), Florence Keith-Roach (NC 2000-05) and Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67). The renowned trumpeter Crispian Steele-Perkins (B2 1958-62) played wonderfully and the Rev Charlotte Banister-Parker (C2 1972-81) gave the address. The service was followed by a reception where much catching up was done over mince pies and glasses of glühwein. Many thanks to Charles Marnham (PR 1964-69), Vicar of St Michael’s, for making us all so welcome. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events L6 Careers Fair 9 March 2015 The Hundred’s Career Speed-Dating event brings OMs from all sectors back to MC. Here are details of the evening from a pupil’s perspective: “A group of Old Marlburians were invited back to Marlborough to talk about their current careers and how they got to where they are. After being split up into groups of about six, we got a brief insight into what each OM does and how they got to these positions. After they gave us a summary, we had time to ask questions and were able to discuss the details of their day-to-day jobs and the sorts of things, if any, they had done at our age to prepare themselves. We had five minutes with each person before the ring of the bell moved the OMs on to the next group. There were a variety of jobs represented with everything from bankers and doctors to the owner of a construction company and the owner of a hotel. All of the speakers were young and so made the event far more relatable to us. It also allowed us to hear what challenges we might face and to find out any truth in the tales of dread that we so often hear. Even if the experience hasn’t given rise to dreams of future careers, it was a valuable chance to get a glimpse of the choices we may have in the approaching years.” Celeste Spink (MO Hu)

With thanks to the following Old Marlburians: Alex Guerin (CO 2002-07) – Insurance, Marsh Alex Price (LI 2006-11) – Website Development/Digital Marketing, 93Digital Nick Simmons (C1 2003-08) – Credit Risk, 4most Europe Will Lough (C2 2000-05) – Investment Banking, River and Mercantile Asset Management LLP

1993 Hockey XI Gathering 26 February 2016 Members of the 1993 Hockey XI met for drinks at The Duke of Clarence on Old Brompton Road in February before the group headed off for a curry where tales from tours to Holland and Germany were relayed.

OM Women’s Network 1 March 2016

James Gerard (SU 2004-09) – Property Development Cass Horowitz (C3 2004-09) – Journalism, ITN Chris Bovey (SU 2000-05) – Sports Marketing, Right Formula Chris Bishop (PR 2000-05) – Stock Broking, Aviate Global Henry Price (CO 2006-11) – Engineering, GE Aviation

There was a high turnout for the first OM Women’s Network

Charlotte Gibson (EL 1998-2003) – Government Relations Adviser, Shell Alix Young (MO 2001-03) – Hospitality, The Pear Tree Hotel Tom Geddes (TU 2004-09) – Medicine Jojo Furnival (LI 2002-04) – Marketing Communications, CALM Tatiana Delany (MM 2000-05) – Consultant , Ethics & Sustainable Development in global supply chains

Antonia Whitehead (NC 2001-06), Pippa Blunden (PR 2010-12) and Caroline Laidlaw (MO 1992-96)

As with many positive ventures, it was an aggravating article that prompted it – splashed across the internet: Marlborough College produces excellent wives. It galvanised Caroline Laidlaw (MO 1992-96), Lara Cowan (MO 1992-97) and Susannah Tresilian (NC 1992-97) to join forces to acknowledge, support and celebrate the many brilliant women that the College has produced since girls were introduced in 1968. Supported and welcomed from the outset by the Marlburian Club, the network launched in March 2016 with a record 120 women joining together at Rathbones for a series of inspiring talks and networking drinks afterwards. All OMs are welcome to join us – women and men alike!

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Edinburgh Dinner 10 March 2016 Major James Scott (LI 1942-46) once again kindly hosted the Edinburgh Dinner at his adopted home, the New Club, on Edinburgh’s Princes Street overlooking the Castle. The dinner was held in the Castle Room which has beautiful views across the city.

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1970-72) and several OMs who are currently studying at Edinburgh University. A most agreeable evening was had by all.

St Paul’s Eucharist and Drinks Reception 25 April 2016 The Chapel Choir sung the most beautiful Eucharist at St Paul’s Cathedral, before a selection of parents joined OMs for a large drinks reception at The Guild Church of St Martin within Ludgate. Many thanks to Nigel Grieve (B1 195760) for his assistance with the venue.

Second Master Bill Nicholas (CR 1998-) joined the dinner this year along with Club President Olivia Timbs (C1

OMtrepreneurs 17 March 2016 The OM Entrepreneurs and Small Business Group, now called the OMtrepreneurs, held a panel discussion on ‘Raising Seed and Growth Capital’ at Google Campus, Shoreditch, London in March. The event was hugely successful with over 100 OMs attending on the evening. The panel consisted of professional growth-capital investor David Mott (PR 1986-91), co-founder of Oxford Capital Partners, angel investor Richard Pembroke (B1 1985-90) and entrepreneurs Tom Hooper (C1 1994-97), founder of Third Space Learning, and Emily Brooke (TU 2002-04), founder and CEO of Blaze, who, between them had recently raised over £3m from a variety of sources. James Lewis (TU 1995-00), Investment Manager at growth investor Downing, moderated the fascinating, audience driven, discussion.

100 OMs attending the evening

South West France Lunch 2 April 2016 This wonderful lunch was a very good occasion for 21 OMs to sit down and enjoy a magnificent six-course meal

Ollie Hooper (C1 1995-00), Max Fahie (C2 1995-00), Fergie Miller (C2 1992-97) and Tom Burne (CO 1993-98)

accompanied by excellent wines. The senior OM present was Lt Col James Rich (B3 1951-55), who had once been the Military Attaché at the British Embassy in Paris. We owe a great deal to John Wilkinson (CR 1967-93) and his great friend Louise Wythe for organising this splendid occasion at John’s beautiful 15th-century house. Jonathan and Emma Leigh, who also attended, were tireless in mixing with all the OMs present and the Master sang the College Grace most melodiously. We look forward to the next lunch in 2018.

Golfing Society Dinner 12 May 2016 The quinquennial formal dinner of the OM Golfing Society, held at The East India Club in London, was hosted by President of the Society, Tony Hill and Captain, Iain Macdonald-Smith (B1 1959-63). 76 of the 110 attendees were members of the society and 34, which included a few OM’s were there as guests. The principal guest was Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72), President of the Marlburian Club. Other guests included the captains and secretaries of the various golf clubs that very kindly allow the society to hold matches on their courses. The society enjoys excellent relations with many Golf Clubs throughout the UK and this dinner gives it the opportunity to reciprocate hospitality and express gratitude for letting us play their courses, and to thank opposing match managers. Attending from the College were the Chaplain, Reverend Dr David Campbell (CR 2012-), who gave the Grace Prayer, Martin Evans (CR 1968-), President of the 1843 Society, and Jon Copp (CR 1981-), Director of Development. From Common Room were two youthful and keen golfers, Joe Lane (CR 2014-), and Hannah Meehan (CR 2014-), the former being Master in charge of Marlborough golf. There seemed no doubt that the dinner was greatly enjoyed by all and many lingered on afterwards until late to catch up on all the news, recounting old stories – all this being so much part of this occasion. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events 1949-1954 Lunch 13 May 2016 This gathering of ten Old Marlburians took place at the wonderful Honourable Artillery Company in the City. The lunch was organised by Adrian Platt (C2 1949-54), with the help of Michael Virtue (C2 1949-54), who is also a member at the venue. Whilst some of them had been able to keep in

touch, many had not seen each other for about 62 years! They enjoyed a very happy get together and found that they had so much in common even though their lives had taken different directions. Best wishes to Patrick Keightley (C2 1949-53), who had hoped to be there but was unwell and to David Slee (C2 1950-54), who was coming from Australia but broke his ankle and could not travel.

From left: Colin Cooke-Priest, Steven Bishop, James Flecker, Sue Cooke-Priest, John Worlidge, Olivia Timbs, Emma Leigh, Peter Brooke, Jonathan Leigh, Sarah Hamilton-Fairley, Richard Wells and Nick Maurice

Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72), Sarah Hamilton-Fairley (B2 1974-76) and Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81)

Past Presidents’ Lunch 20 May 2016 From left: [with beard] Jimmy Doak (C2 1949-53), Robert Savory (C2 1949-53), Michael Virtue (C2 1949-54), Jeremy Coltart (PR 1949-54), John Labouchere (PR 1950-54), Muir Stratford (PR 1949-54), Ben Hopkinson (C2 1949-54), David Forster (C2 1949-53), Chris Bond (C2 1950-54) and Adrian Platt (C2 1949-54)

North East Dinner 19 May 2016

in subsidising the event, and for hosting us all so brilliantly. George Coleman (C1 2007-2012).

Sir David Chapman (LI 1955-59) hosted the first North East Dinner at the Northern Counties Club in Newcastle in May. It was a brilliant occasion. The group’s broad age range made for some very interesting stories of the changes that have taken place at Marlborough over the past half-century. It was lovely to meet the Master and his wife, Emma, who provided an interesting and comprehensive update from the College, and gave an insight into plans for the future. On behalf of all OMs present, I would like to thank Sir David for his generosity 18

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Top Row: Julian Moon (CO 2007-12), William Eversfield (C3 2007-12), Harriet Hedges (MO 200712) and Alice Scotts (PR 2010-12). Bottom Row: Annabel Holmes (NC 2007-12), Tilly Niven (MM 2007-12), Stuart Swift (C2 2007-12), Jack Glover (C2 2007-12) and George Coleman (C1 2007-12)

On a warm May day, 15 past Presidents and guests met for lunch to chew the cud and watch life flow past the Royal Festival Hall. The Master and Emma Leigh joined them on their way back to Marlborough from the North East Dinner. John Worlidge (B3 1976-81), the senior PastPresident thanked the current President, Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72) for arranging the lunch and ensuring that so many were able to attend. Attending were: John Worlidge (C2 1942-46), Alan and Patricia Gillett (C2 1944-48), Richard Wells (C2 1946-51), Peter Brooke (LI 1947-52), James Flecker (C1 1952-58), Susanna Spicer (SU 197981), Nick Maurice (C3 1956-61), Sarah Hamilton-Fairley (B2 1974-76), Colin and Sue Cooke-Priest (LI 1952-57), Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73), Robin Janvrin (B1 1960-64), Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72), Jonathan and Emma Leigh (Master 2012-).


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Cotton 1969 Leavers’ Reunion 27-29 May 2016 A selection of Cotton House 1969 leavers travelled to the Czech Republic for a reunion at the home of Vasek (CO 1968-69) and Marcela Jelinek. Guests included Ian Crowlesmith (CO 1964-69) and his wife, Lyn, Rod Hawnt (CO 196569) and his wife, Rosie, and Olof Olsson (CO 1968-69). The visit, over the May Bank Holiday weekend, included walks in the woods, visits to historical sites and

25 Year Reunion: The Class of 1991 11 June 2016 Inspired by the Class of 1990’s 25th anniversary reunion last summer, Christopher Buxton (C1 1986-91) and Katie Beney (MO 1989-91) organised a Class of 1991 event. They managed to track down most of the year group via the OM database and a Facebook group, which encouraged lots of prereunion banter and photo sharing of their MC days. Nearly 100 OMs descended on the College and they were joined by some of the Common Room from their era. Despite 25 years of hair loss and over-

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plentiful sampling of Czech beer, Slivovitz (traditional Czech plum brandy) and food. It also included a memorable International Cotton House Leavers’ ping-pong contest.

Summer Drinks 14 June 2016

Stationers’ Hall, canapés in the garden From left: Rosie Hawnt, Marcela Jelinek, Vasek Jelinek (CO 1968-69), Ian Crowlesmith (CO 1964-69), Olof Olsson (CO 1968-69), Lyn Crowlesmith and Rod Hawnt (CO 1965-69)

indulging, faces were pretty much the same and everyone quickly slipped back into old friendships. Following drinks and canapés on the lawn, they enjoyed a hog roast and lots of reminiscing. The evening passed far too quickly, but an after party led to promises of another reunion in the near future, with Jonny Kirkwood (TU 1986-91) offering to host everyone in the States! During the evening, two OMs went missing for a few hours after they decided to take a trip down memory lane and visit old haunts around the College. A massive thank you to Fiona Cottrill, Alex Martin and Kate Goodwin in the MC Development team for all their help in making the event so memorable and such a great success.

Simon Everard (B3 1979-84), Dominic Nathan (TU 1979-84) and Richard Burrell (BH 1979-84)

Annabella Wass (C2 1982-84) and James Sykes (B3 1978-83)

Penny Linnett (CO 1974-76), Annabel Chater Davies (PR 1975-77) and Bridget Taxy (CO 1976-78)

The 2016 Marlburian Club Summer Drinks Party took place at the Stationers’ Hall, by kind permission of The Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers. Almost 200 OMs were present and, along with a lot of networking and good story exchanges, everyone enjoyed drinks and canapés in the hall and garden. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events C2 2006 Leavers’ Reunion 11 July 2016

Fauré’s Requiem

The get together at the Lobster and Burger restaurant in the City, was organised by Fynn Vergos (C2 2001-06). Afterwards everyone was treated to champagne and port at the Saddler’s Hall, where Sam Barclay’s (C2 2001-06) father is Prime Warden. Conversation during the night ranged from Brexit to hair products!

30 June 2016 To commemorate the 20 OMs who tragically lost their lives alongside thousands of others on the opening day of the Battle of the Somme, the College honoured them in two performances of Fauré’s Requiem in Chapel. The choir consisted of current Chapel Choir members, Old Marlburians, Common Room and some guests. Helena Mackie (MO L6) – Head Chorister 2016/17 – and guest baritone, Christopher Sheldrake (Wells Cathedral Vicars Choral) were the distinguished soloists. Each of the movements of the Requiem were interspersed with specially selected readings by Siegfried Sassoon (CO 1902-04) and other appropriate texts. A combination of the choir’s panache and flair superbly accompanied by Alex Hodgkinson on the organ and a genuine interest and support from the community of the College, ensured this was a beautifully poignant occasion, and a fitting close to the College year. Liz Priday (B2 1972-74) commented: “It was such a pleasure and a privilege as an OM singer to be included in this very special musical occasion. Singing behind the present Chapel Choir sopranos, I couldn’t but help feel a sense of the passing of the years and a feeling that those brave OMs, who lost their lives at the Somme, could easily have been singing from these very same choir stalls. A high point for me was the thrilling sound of the men of the choir lustily singing Hosanna on that top E flat – as exciting a sound as any bass line produced by the professional choirs with whom I have sung.”

Clare Russell, Marlborough College Archivist, and Lieutenant General Sir John Lorimer (C1 1976-81) 20

The Marlburian Club Magazine

From left: Sam Barclay (C2 2001-06), Jamie Clarke C2 2001-06), Lisa McVeigh, Jack Bonham Cozens (C2 2001- 06), Mark McVeigh (CR 1991-2013, Head of Senior School Malaysia 2013-), Tom Graham (C2 2001- 06), Ed Kilbee (C2 2001-06) and Fynn Vergos (C2 2001-06)

Paris Performance 12 July 2016 The Marlborough College Choir travelled to Saint-Eustache Church in Paris with the College’s Director of Chapel Music, Alex Hodgkinson, conducting the choir. The then President Elect of the Marlburian Club, Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72) was in attendance, along with Andrew Brown (Head of Modern Languages), friends of Marlborough College and OMs.

Saint-Eustache Church, Paris


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Thursday 9 March 2017 The 749 Society Meeting Marlborough College Friday 24 March 2017 Edinburgh Dinner New Club, Edinburgh

Diary Dates

Tuesday 25 April 2017 St Paul’s Evensong St Paul’s Cathedral

Saturday 19 November 2016 Class of 1981: 35-Year Reunion No 11 Pimlico, London

May 2017 TBC Summer Drinks Party Stationers’ Hall, London

Saturday 10 December 2016 1843 Society Carols Marlborough College

Friday 12 May 2017 Class of 1987 – 30-Year Reunion The Antelope, Belgravia, London

Wednesday 14 December 2016 OM Carols Chelsea Old Church, London

Saturday 10 June 2017 Class of 1992 – 25-Year Reunion Marlborough College

Thursday 9 February 2017 Arts & Media Networking Evening London

Sunday 11 June 2017 1843 Society Lunch Marlborough College

Tuesday 7 March 2017 OM Women’s Network London

A full list of OM Club events is available at www.marlburianclub.org/ events

If anyone is interested in joining any future events, would like to set up their own event or would like to get in touch with the organisers of any events, please contact the Club office on marlburianclub@ marlboroughcollege.org or phone 01672 892385.

es at lR s ia M ec r O Sp fo

Unique venues in a spectacular setting With picturesque surroundings, a wide range of excellent amenities and our own in-house catering team we can offer you fantastic venues for a variety of events: Conferences • Meetings • Special Occasions Weddings • Sports Events • Film Locations For more information, contact: Events Manager, Debbie Flower T: 01672 892459 or email: events@marlboroughcollege.org

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Creative Connections James Waldron (BH 1978-80) interviews the very impressive Ottilie Windsor (NC 2000-05) Ottilie Windsor has worked at some impressive locations in her time. In fact, the only job based in a run-of-the-mill office was also the only one she didn’t love. And that might not be entirely coincidental, because Ottilie adores working in the arts.

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he’s currently in charge of events at the three Gagosian galleries in London, although her remit also involves sales, and the day we meet she’s fresh back from a trip to New York meeting clients. The Gagosian Grosvenor Hill gallery in Mayfair definitely puts most workplaces to shame. Opened in October 2015, on the site of a Brutalist 1960s block, its lowbuilt and strikingly-clean lines are clad in

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handsome light-grey bricks. Inside, the designers have eschewed the gallery trend of industrial beams and concrete floors, choosing instead a warmer look with rich oak floors, more in keeping with its smart neighbourhood. And then of course, there’s the art: as we sit down to talk in the gallery space, we’re surrounded by a million dollars’ worth of Yves Klein and Alberto Giacometti – only a tiny portion of which is for sale. The Grosvenor Hill is owned by the dynamic American superdealer Larry Gagosian, an early proponent of this concept of securing sought-after loans of historic works to mount a

Nevill Holt Opera 2016

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museum-quality exhibition within a private gallery. With another 15 galleries spread across the globe, and an estimated billion dollars’ worth of sales every year, he is perhaps the only art dealer to have the clout to put on a show of this significance. Art displays also figured at Ottilie’s previous place of work, Nevill Holt Hall in Leicestershire, close to the borders with Rutland and Northamptonshire. It’s owned by one of the founders of Carphone Warehouse, David Ross, and he’s populated the house and grounds with an important collection of post-1960 British art, with visitors able to view the

Carmen

outdoor sculptures during the summer opera festival – the event which brought Ottilie to Nevill Holt. An opera company had been visiting for ten years, but Ross wanted to create something that would contribute to the local economy and community, an event which could stand on its own two feet and grow. And he wanted Ottilie to set it up, making clear there’d be no ‘micro-management’ from him. She was a little unsure that she was ready for that sort of responsibility at the age of just 24, but a visit to the 13thcentury Grade-I house encouraged her to forget her doubts and accept the job. Ross had saved the romantic, castellated pile from dilapidation (and from eager developers) in 2000, and had spent years sensitively restoring it. The gardens, with sweeping views of the surrounding countryside, have been landscaped by Chelsea Flower Show gold medallist Rupert Golby, and are a picturesque setting not just for those works of art, but also for picnics during the opera. It’s a similar set-up to Glyndebourne, with a black-tie dress code and a dining interval. It hasn’t however – at least so far – had a permanent structure to call its own. The wings, with their dressing rooms and so on, are within the lovely stone walls of the late-18th century coach house, while the stage and seating for 350 are covered by a semi-permanent roof in its courtyard. As we speak, the plan is to take all that away at the end of the 2016 Festival, and replace it with a more permanent structure. The number of seats will increase slightly, but there are limits because the coach house, too, is listed. Like her current role, the work at Nevill Holt allowed Ottilie to satisfy one of her great passions. “I’m not a performer, but I do love to help present something to the world which engages people’s emotions, making them happy or sad, revolted, delighted, or whatever.” And Ottilie is proud of her and the team’s achievement, creating the first opera house in this country for 20 years, with nothing inherited from the company that visited previously. Not only is she still a trustee, but she’s now also a governor at one of the thirty schools sponsored by the David Ross Education Trust: the Malcolm Arnold Preparatory School. The choice of name is important, because this is a prep school for “ordinary” children. The ethos of all the schools in the Trust is to provide the best opportunities from the The Marlburian Club Magazine

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“...what I’m good at is supporting creative people, enabling and celebrating them.”

independent sector to children who wouldn’t otherwise have the chance of experiencing such an academically rigorous education, and with such a broad range of extracurricular activities. The Malcolm Arnold Prep opened in 2014 in Northampton, and the 56 five year olds

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who enrolled spoke no less than fourteen different first languages between them.

Sadler’s Wells, the Barbican and the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden.

If you don’t count a short stint in the City (in that boring office block), Ottilie’s first job after university was helping to set up the Mayor of London’s Fund for Young Musicians (now called the Mayor’s Music Fund). It’s all about helping musical children from families and from schools that might not have the money or the ambition to encourage their talent. There are opportunities to go to orchestra rehearsals and dance recitals, as well as go back stage and talk to professional musicians at places like

There’s a very clear link with her school governorship, and certainly Ottilie would like as many children as possible to enjoy the sort of benefits she had at Marlborough. She adored her time at the College, and remains a great admirer of Edward Gould (Master until her last year). She says though that her achievements at school were only “mediocre”, and corrects me when I suppose that she must have done well in the “arty” subjects. “Oh no, what I’m good at is supporting creative people, enabling and celebrating them; I’m not creative, I’m what I call ‘creative adjacent.’ And I really enjoy working with artists because they’re so fascinating, so varied and eccentric.” Many would say that her boss at the Fund is also somewhat eccentric. Because the job was partly about raising private funds, Ottilie didn’t work within the culture team but rather in the rarefied atmosphere of the Mayor of London’s private offices, right at the top of City Hall – or the ‘glass gonad’, as Boris Johnson once famously called it. He was Mayor at the time, and she found him, “far more switched on and intelligent than I’d thought from his press image, and coming almost straight from university it was just so exciting to be working around him – as well as all these super-impressive trustees.” One of those trustees was David Ross, and the good impression was obviously mutual, because it was seeing her in action setting up the Fund, liaising with different individuals and organisations, and, of course, raising funds for music, that resulted in his offering her the job at Nevill Holt. Ross felt that although she had that experience, she was also young enough to have fresh ideas. Indeed, even now one forgets that she still hasn’t left her twenties behind, so much fascinating experience has she packed into her career. I suspect we’ll be hearing a lot more of Ottilie Windsor. www.nevillholtopera.co.uk Box office telephone number: 0115 846 7777 James Waldron writes for commercial clients, and for the Financial Times, Daily Mail and Spectator

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THE MARLBURIAN COLLECTION 2016–2017 All profits from the Collection will go towards bursaries For a catalogue please telephone Crosby & Lawrence: 01672 892 498

Visit our online shop at: shop.marlboroughcollege.org

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Humanitarian by Design HMS Bulwark on operations in the Mediterranean In the summer of 2015 the world watched in horror as a tide of migrants began crossing the unforgiving Mediterranean, often crammed by the thousand into unfit vessels. HMS Bulwark was sent in to help interdict the boats and rescue their passengers. Here, its Commanding Officer, Captain Nick Cooke-Priest OBE (LI 1983-85), tells us the realities of coping with such a task.

n a beautiful evening in April 2015, the Royal Navy’s Flagship HMS Bulwark, of which I had the great privilege to be in command, was anchored off Gallipoli for the centenary commemorations, when she received revised orders directing her to the southern Mediterranean to assist in the search and rescue (SAR) of migrants as they tried to make their way from Libya to mainland Europe. It was election week and the realities of the situation and the UK’s response had made its way to the front pages and started a debate that has seldom been far from the news since; and, as a strategic challenge, will most likely endure for at least the next generation.

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HMS Bulwark is a phenomenally capable amphibious assault ship. She has eight landing craft for delivering Royal Marines to a hostile shore, can operate large helicopters around the clock, has excellent command-and-control facilities, and she is huge, which made her ideally placed to assist. But there was much to do before we could be of use. With immediacy, we needed to get rid of nearly 60 assault vehicles embarked for an impending exercise, refuel, embark medical and humanitarian stores by the thousand and medics, linguists and portaloos – amongst other things – by the dozen! Stops in Crete and Sicily followed; diplomatic and international negotiations progressed; and our complex, innovative plans took shape. A week hence and having utilised every second of the transit time for scoping, planning, briefing and exercising the multitude of potential scenarios, we arrived on scene whilst awaiting only the finer details of bilateral agreements with contributing nations, ministerial approval and assurance against migrants seeking asylum on my ship. This I was particularly keen to confirm, even though warships have sovereign immunity. From the outset, it was obvious that the situation into which we were sailing was very different. The numbers were huge but the migrant vessels seemingly tiny when adrift in an unforgiving sea, the expanse of which covers over 200,000 square miles. Thus, merely covering the ground and finding them was a significant challenge. In any sea state above benign, the chances of survival diminished markedly and the difficulty in rescuing them increased exponentially. Over the following weeks we rescued nearly 5,000 people from two types of absurdly overcrowded and The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Nick Cooke-Priest OBE (LI 1983-85)

“The Mediterranean is the world’s deadliest border… Every single life lost off our coasts is a stain on Europe… The lack of a truly European asylum and immigration policy is now turning the Mediterranean into a graveyard.” Martin Schulz – President of the European Parliament, 2015

unseaworthy vessels: “jumbo” Geminis, effectively a long lilo with sides and carrying over 100 people; or two-decked, open-topped wooden vessels carrying 350400 and which readily capsized if the incumbents moved en masse to see their rescuers approach – those on the bottom deck did not stand a chance. The groups we rescued were multi-national, ethnically diverse and oblivious to the realities of their plight in that many had never seen a body of water or a boat before. They crossed the demographic span from babies to senior citizens, heavily pregnant women to fit young men, and they had been towed or shepherded out to sea where the smugglers had left them to fortune. Sanitation was non existent in their craft and disease, fresh wounds and dehydration prevalent. The Italian Admiral in charge of the broader operation referred to their journey as Operation Certain Death. Each SAR event had to be executed on its own merits and no two were the same. My landing craft and rescue boat crews deployed daily over the horizon to all corners of the compass with my implicit trust in their ability to make on-scene assessments and to act. The Navy’s adherence to the Nelsonian concept of Mission Command (permitting subordinate commanders to tackle assigned missions in their way) was fundamental to the whole effort. Even in a relatively mild sea, the potential for accidents was high and transferring infants and pregnant women from boats to rescue craft needed great care. The skills and

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patience of the coxswains being critical on every occasion to the success or failure of the rescue. We had converted the landing craft into bespoke SAR craft, with medical tents and supplies, life jackets by the hundred, water, scrambling nets and dinghies, and we enhanced their crews with medics, muscle power, linguists and personal protection. We expected the distraught and the delirious, we were prepared for the dying and the dead. On one occasion, one of the many pregnant women’s waters broke minutes after her rescue and, after a rapid assessment showed that her baby was breech, she was landed ashore by helicopter where she gave birth to a healthy boy only a few hours after nearly drowning – a rare moment of great joy. Having recovered the survivors to Bulwark, the second phase would begin. Everyone had to be processed, which included a body search, medical screening, recording of personal details, a photograph, the issue of water, blankets and dry clothes, then segregation for some. All of which had to be delivered with tact, compassion and understanding. Of course, not all are compliant, many are confused or unnerved, some even dissatisfied! Some had travelled for three years across the troubled continent to this point. Mixed emotions were prevalent. Saved lives and new hope were accompanied by sadness at their losses, and, for many, the indelible memory of man’s abhorrent cruelty.


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“We expected the distraught and the delirious, we were prepared for the dying and the dead.”

Personal protection was of the utmost importance and anyone coming into contact with refugees wore clinical masks and gloves at all times. Red and green zones were established to delineate contaminated and clean areas, whilst barriers were erected to contain the huge numbers and ensure my teams had unhindered access in the event of an emergency on board. The potential threat was a permanent consideration for me when operating off Libya and in IS/Daesh territory, with the avoidance of predictable patterns of activity and infiltration providing much to consider (NB The Daily Telegraph on 12 May: “ISIL planned to use migrant routes for UK attacks”). We focussed hard on exploitation and on more than one occasion the actions of my sharp-thinking sailors

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resulted in arrests for abetting people smuggling; similar vigilance, lead to vital information on the ring leaders in Africa. With heart-warming predictability, my sailors and marines leant into it with typical professionalism, resolve and humour. Whether medic, chef, engineer, seaman or other, Jolly Jack’s ability and willingness to readily adapt to the unforeseen and unknown (and, on this occasion, the deeply unpleasant), is phenomenal. Leadership and management structures galvanise to make it work. Innovation, experience, acceptance of responsibility and challenge come readily to the fore and the sum of the parts, as always, delivers an extraordinary whole. My 21 chefs scoffed comically at “only” having to produce 2,000 extra meals a day, whilst those who were merely guarding on board took it upon themselves to chat to rescuees in the small hours and garner information that might lead to useful information of perpetrators hiding amongst the hordes. And after each disembarkation in Italy or Sicily (which was already at capacity), we would

sanitise, re-stock and get straight back to it – any wasted time potentially meant wasted life. The breadth of naval operations knows few bounds and often involvement itself is sufficient reward; command though has its own very unique attributes. In the aftermath, I still feel great pride in my team and in what we achieved, and yet again in the Navy’s ability to deliver the most significant contribution to an operation, the majority of which necessarily goes unseen. A wise soul once said that, “the only thing needed for evil to prosper, is for good men to do nothing”. We were well aware at the time that rescue was only a sticking plaster. The far greater challenge is the evil that is growing and perpetuating the problem. Nick Cooke-Priest was recently described as a cross between David Niven and Austin Powers

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Marlburian VCs: 1915 Captain Charles C Foss, V.C., C.B., D.S.O. London Gazette, March 12, 1915. Victoria Cross citation: “After the enemy had captured a part of one of our trenches, Capt Foss on his own initiative dashed forward with eight men, and under heavy fire attacked the enemy with bombs, capturing the position, including the fifty-two Germans occupying it. The capture of this position from the enemy was of the greatest importance, and the utmost bravery was displayed in essaying the task with so very few men.” arlborough College’s third recipient of the Victoria Cross in the First World War was Charles Foss (C3 1899-1902). He joined the Bedfordshire Regiment after Sandhurst, and by the start of the war he had attained the rank of captain. He survived the war and continued as a professional soldier afterwards, becoming aide-de-camp to King George V before retiring from the Army and becoming the Colonel Commanding the Bedfordshire Army Cadet Force during the Second World War.

M

“...he ‘was rather afraid that he [the Commanding Officer] might not countenance his Adjutant going for a “jolly” on his own.’ ”

Charles Foss was serving in the 2nd Battalion of the Bedfordshire Regiment in South Africa when WWI broke out. The Battalion made it to the Western Front in time for the First Battle of Ypres. He was one of only four officers from the regiment to survive the battle during which he won his DSO (Distinguished Service Order). At the start of the following year, his battalion was moved into the reserve, to train in readiness for the coming operations around Neuve Chapelle. These operations were part of a series of battles fought by the British in the spring and early summer of 1915 in support of the French armies combating the Germans further south in Artois. The battle at Neuve Chapelle was followed shortly by the battles of Aubers Ridge and Festubert. Despite some limited success at Neuve Chapelle, these battles were plagued by a lack of adequate artillery and clear strategic planning – this was a time when the British Army was learning some very painful lessons

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about the realities of fighting an industrialised war against a bigger and better-prepared enemy. Other British and Indian troops (there is a fine memorial to the Indian Corps on the edge of the village) were to make up the first attacking waves on 10 March 1915, with the Bedfords moving through them to carry the lines further forward. With this in mind, at 10.30am they moved in a south-easterly direction, from the northern edge of Neuve Chapelle, towards the little village of Pietre. After advancing through the German barrage across open fields and passing the heavy casualties suffered by the first waves, they had cleared the old German front lines by 4.30pm. The following day was spent in the same position, manning a salient jutting into


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the German lines, with the British troops hugging the ground, waiting for firm orders that were delayed due to a supporting brigade not being able to make it into the allotted positions. Overnight the two front-line companies dug a new trench at right angles to their existing ones, which were being heavily enfiladed from their open southern flank, resulting in one company facing east, the other south. That night also saw a company of the Scots Fusiliers brought into the line on their right, but they were rushed by the Germans in the early morning mist and driven from the trench, leaving the Bedfords cruelly exposed. In a desperate attempt to rectify this situation, A Company launched an attack on the German trenches, which failed disastrously with heavy casualties. News of the doomed assault reached battalion headquarters just as the Scots to their right started suffering badly from their own British shell fire. The situation was falling into confusion and chaos, so Major Onslow, who was in command of the Bedfords in the field, ordered his adjutant, Captain Charles Foss, to go forward and find out what the situation was. Foss, it seems, was not satisfied with events and took control himself. Having considered the situation, he suggested one of the newly-raised bombing sections

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should attempt the assault, but he neglected to add that he intended to lead them himself. In his own words, he “was rather afraid that he [the Commanding Officer] might not countenance his Adjutant going for a ‘jolly’ on his own, so I did not hint that I thought of joining the bombers”. Foss then led his bombers from the front in a line through the trenches, intending to flank attack the German-held line, and he placed himself at the front as the leading bayonet man. Having moved through the “veritable shambles” that the British trenches had become, overflowing with wounded and dying men as they were, Foss approached the end of the British territory and was faced with open ground between them and the German lines, with flooded dykes running across their line of attack. As he describes: “We then launched our attack. The words sound grand; but we felt very ‘naked’ and ‘above ground’ in the open field – at least I did. The dyke caused me some amusement – none of the bombers were inclined to get their feet wet and I thoroughly sympathised with them – wet puttees are so cold. So they ‘covered’ me while I ran and leapt, then I ‘covered’ them while they ran and leapt. What’s more, we all cleared the dyke. This safely negotiated, we threw a few bombs. The bombs, the first I had seen go off in anger, frightened me with their

“The dyke caused me some amusement – none of the bombers were inclined to get their feet wet and I thoroughly sympathised with them – wet puttees are so cold.”

noise and the mess they made of the local Germans. They also stirred the Germans into activity. They got up and crowded round us with their hands up. The bombers thoroughly enjoyed themselves, waving the bombs in their faces, making grimaces and ordering them to hold their hands higher. I had to shout to warn the bombers not to throw any more as they would blow us all up.” This tiny band of eight over-zealous bombers and a single worried officer overcame one German officer and fiftyone men in addition to those who were killed during their bombing assault. A Company moved in to take over, and the salient was saved. David Du Croz is a re-tired Head of History with an interest in the Great War

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ROLL OF HONOUR 1916 MARLBURIANS WHO GAVE T HEIR LIVES IN 1916 AS A RESULT OF T HE GRE AT WAR E S WO O DWA R D H F ET H E R I N G TO N R A BUTT E F W COBBOLD E S WI L K I N S O N C W TRIBE P B B A R L OW A G A ADAM A N GARROD M J V I N C E N T-JA C K S O N B J P M AWD S L EY W H W HASLAM C A P HORNUNG F O L L OY D J W MALLINSON H H L RICHARDS J M AU G H A N A G B O U LTO N D J GEERE R J M LIAS O C RADFORD H G B U R D ET T A G B U C H A NA N J W HEINEMANN C H D PA S S Y B R NICHOLL G N EWC O M E A H BELL V A FA R R A R D A HOMAN A D T I D EY S J ALDOUS G J L WE L S F O R D H T WE L L S H P COLE J H B E R K L EY W M DOBIE A W GALE A F F E R G U S O N -D AV I E F N MCLAREN J CULLIMORE G PYKE S F HAMMICK H F C H O R S FA L L C A MACRAE F H B R OWN I N G G V PINFIELD L P F R EY B U R G 32

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( B 3 1899-1902) (C 1 1902-1905) (SU 1906-1909) (C 3 1908-1912) ( B 3 1905-1908) ( B 2 1883-1884) (CO 1898-1902) ( B 1 1899-1904) ( L I 1901-1905) ( B 2 1905-1911) ( B 2 1907-1911) ( B 2 1900-1904) ( L I 1911-1914) (B2 1895-1900) (C 2 1909-1915) ( S U 1906-1909) (C2 1903-1908) ( B 2 1892-1896) ( P R 1908-1912) (C O 1904-1909) (B1 1901-1905) (C2 1892-1895) (B1 1897-1900) ( B 3 1903-1908) ( B 1 1907-1911) (B3 1889-1892) (C 3 1888-1893) ( P R 1901-1904) (A 1907-1908) (C 2 1908-1913) ( B 2 1907-1911) (PR 1890-1896) (C 3 1909-1912) ( B 3 1908-1912) (B1 1909-1913) ( L I 1903-1907) (C1 1909-1914) (B1 1888-1891) (C2 1881-1885) (B1 1897-1900) (C1 1908-1912) (B1 1899-1904) (C1 1883-1886) (B3 1897-1901) (GREEN 1891-1893) (C1 1882-1886) (PR 1908-1912) ( P R I O RY 1 8 9 9 - 1 9 0 0 )

06/01/1916 08/01/1916 09/01/1916 12/01/1916 12/01/1916 14/01/1916 18/01/1916 22/01/1916 25/01/1916 05/02/1916 06/02/1916 07/02/1916 07/02/1916 12/02/1916 14/02/1916 14/02/1916 17/02/1916 18/02/1916 23/02/1916 23/02/1916 26/02/1916 03/03/1916 06/03/1916 06/03/1916 08/03/1916 09/03/1916 11/03/1916 16/03/1916 17/03/1916 17/03/1916 25/03/1916 26/03/1916 30/03/1916 02/04/1916 03/04/1916 08/04/1916 09/04/1916 10/04/1916 12/04/1916 15/04/1916 16/04/1916 17/04/1916 18/04/1916 22/04/1916 24/04/1916 24/04/1916 24/04/1916 27/04/1916

M E S O P OTA M I A FRANCE YPRES FRANCE FRANCE M E S O P OTA M I A M E S O P OTA M I A FRANCE ARMENTIERES K E N YA M E S O P OTA M I A FRANCE FLANDER S FRANCE SERBIA POPERINGHE FRANCE FRANCE FRANCE POPERINGHE ENGLAND LONDON FRANCE M E S O P OTA M I A IR AQ EAST AFRICA FRANCE FRANCE SOUTH AFRICA FRANCE N EU V I L L E -S T-VA S T FRANCE FRANCE BA I L L EU L C O N TA L M A I S O N IRAQ IR AQ IR AQ EGYPT IR AQ IR AQ SOMME DUBLIN DUBLIN AT S E A

AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED

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H C M C N E I L -S M I T H R J T WINGFIELD E J W BY R N E A B O OT H W H W YAT T T W POLLARD H G M M A N S E L -P L EY D E L L G L H D RU M M O N D H C SODEN E B KERR R L C L AY TO N L P R I C K ET T E A S T R E ET E R B OWL I N G L WO O D R O F F E W E L L E R S H AW W E D AY D G N I S B ET C L P E N N E FAT H E R C S COLE D W S PAT E R S O N M H O’ D O N O VA N E C H O OTO N M H YO U N G H L F I T Z H E R B E RT P T BENT D A B R OWN E M BURGE J M V B U X TO N E C E CHAMBERS C H C OX E C R E E D MU N D S O N C W ELLIS H L FIELD C W HICKMAN W A KO H N R D L O V ET T T M A R R I OT T-D O D D I N G TO N H F M OT T C B P R OW S E G E SANDERSON L H S A N G E R -D AV I E S J W TOW E R S - C L A R K F W WR AG G J V YO U N G L H B AT S O N R F B H E R A PAT H J C T LEIGH P B WA C E G SIMPSON E A H AT K EY H M WEBSTER A J T C RU I K S H A N K J C M ETC A L F E D F B RU C E R J W CARDEN G D M CROSSMAN F DODGSON L R L EW I S D W B R OWN G T L E L LWO O D M H G OODALL G L WO U L F E W P B E N N ET T J D H AV I L A N D E G M KING A H LISTER E V TAT H A M R H WA D E - G E RY E R F BECHER H R H E L E -S H AW

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(B3 1910-1912) (C2 1910-1914) (CO 1894-1899) (B2 1899-1903) (B1 1901-1906) (B1 1905-1909) (LI 1909-1913) (PR 1895-1899) (CO 1910-1914) (C1 1910-1914) ( U P C OT 1 8 9 7 - 1 8 9 9 ) (C3 1902-1905) (B3 1896-1898) (S U 1907-1909) (B1 1898-1904) ( L S 1883-1884) (C1 1897-1900) (B1 1909-1913) (C1 1908-1911) (B1 1909-1913) ( L I 1904-1906) (C 3 1909-1913) (CO 1905-1909) (C3 1908-1912) (C 1 1906-1909) (B2 1907-1912) (B2 1901-1906) (B3 1888-1892) (PR 1910-1914) (C2 1909-1913) (C2 1911-1915) (C 3 1905-1908) (C3 1911-1914) (LI 1908-1911) (LI 1901-1906) (CO 1907-1911) (C2 1883-1887) (PR 1909-1913) (C2 1907-1913) (CO 1882-1885) (C1 1903-1906) (C1 1907-1912) (B2 1910-1912) (C1 1894-1900) (B1 1906-1908) (B1 1907-1910) (PR 1907-1911) (B3 1907-1913) (C2 1897-1902) (C 3 1896-1901) (CR 1908-1915) (C1 1911-1914) (B3 1911-1914) (SU 1896-1899) (C2 1910-1914) (LI 1889-1893) (C2 1899-1904) (B3 1904-1907) (C1 1895-1900) (B3 1907-1912) (PR 1905-1911) (C3 1909-1913) (PR 1904-1906) (B1 1894-1898) (C3 1895-1901) (C1 1911-1915) (B3 1879-1883) (CO 1904-1908) (B3 1898-1901) (C3 1911-1914) (C O 1909-1914)

27/04/1916 27/04/1916 29/04/1916 30/04/1916 04/05/1916 16/05/1916 17/05/1916 23/05/1916 23/05/1916 26/05/1916 31/05/1916 02/06/1916 02/06/1916 04/06/1916 04/06/1916 05/06/1916 06/06/1916 10/06/1916 14/06/1916 19/06/1916 20/06/1916 21/06/1916 26/06/1916 29/06/1916 30/06/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 01/07/1916 03/07/1916 03/07/1916 03/07/1916 03/07/1916 04/07/1916 05/07/1916 05/07/1916 07/07/1916 07/07/1916 10/07/1916 10/07/1916 10/07/1916 10/07/1916 12/07/1916 14/07/1916 14/07/1916 14/07/1916 14/07/1916 15/07/1916 16/07/1916 17/07/1916 17/07/1916 18/07/1916 18/07/1916 19/07/1916 19/07/1916

AT S E A M E S O P OTA M I A SOMME

ARRAS SOMME

AT S E A N ET H E R AV O N FRANCE YPRES AT S E A ARMENTIERES

FRANCE VERMELLES N EU V E C H A P E L L E SOUCHEZ SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME FRANCE SOMME SOMME CAMBRAI SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME FRANCE

AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AG E D AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED

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H CHURCH G R H E A S T EY B WRIGHT J P CHAPMAN L W CROUCH G D B SCALE J L B R A I T H WA I T E D R B ODDAN A E BOUCHER J R REID H R R O B E RT S O N P G D H AWO RT H E E M EY R I C K G H W BL ACKMAN G T E DWA R D S R G A B AU D RY V ROGER SON R H S B O U LT H G GRESWELL J E T STRICKLAND G H A L I N G TO N L A N SLOCOCK H L WO O D L A N D G B A S H WO RT H E L BLECH G F H AY D O N A G CAMERON F B BENHAM G W BA RT H O L O M EW R G M J O H N S TO N G G E CASH G R D AY R E HODGSON W C CARBONELL R F F D AV I E S R D’A H A RV EY J H GALE N BUTLER J P M CARPENTER R W F E L L OW S A G HODGES D W HURD C R TISDALL F W B R OWN J R WO O D S M M WEBB H A BACK A F CHAPMAN D R D RY S D A L E C D P R A N G L EY F H C L AY TO N J S H PA L M E R A C POCHIN G G H B AT T Y A C T ALMACK F J H O L L I N G S WO RT H G M G R AY R C R O B E RT S E A S H AW J E DU BUISSON E R G A R N ET T D I LYA L L E P WA L L I S H B ADAMSON A C G O DWI N A H J E F F R EY S E J L WA R L OW K PEPLOE P B S TO O D L EY T B C AV E R H B OY S 34

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( B 3 1896-1902) (B2 1911-1914) (SU 1906-1909) (C3 1895-1898) (B3 1900-1904) (C 1 1 9 0 2 - 1 9 0 6 ) (SU 1908-1911) (CO 1910-1913) (C2 1909-1914) (PR 1911-1913) (B1 1879-1883) (B3 1907-1911) ( B 3 1905-1912) (C1 1910-1913) (LI 1905-1908) (LI 1907-1910) (C3 1908-1911) (PR 1908-1913) (C2 1902-1907) (C 1 1903-1906) (C2 1903-1907) (B2 1900-1904) (B2 1897-1901) (CO 1907-1910) (B3 1909-1913) (LI 1904-1909) (LI 1905-1908) (B2 1900-1904) ( L I 1895-1899) (PR 1895-1898) (CO 1909-1913) (B3 1902-1907) (B1 1907-1910) (C2 1906-1908) (C2 1891-1895) ( B 3 1898-1902) (C3 1910-1914) (B2 1901-1905) (B2 1907-1909) (C2 1901-1904) (C2 1898-1904) (C1 1908-1913) (CO 1906-1910) (B1 1909-1912) (SU 1910-1912) (B3 1907-1910) (B3 1894-1899) (C3 1892-1898) (B2 1909-1912) (C1 1911-1915) (B3 1906-1911) (B2 1911-1914) (B3 1909-1914) (B1 1908-1912) (C2 1909-1913) (B2 1898-1900) (C2 1910-1915) (B2 1880-1884) (B2 1906-1911) (LI 1912-1914) (C O 1 9 0 5 - 1 9 1 0 ) (B1 1911-1914) (C3 1908-1912) (B2 1894-1901) (B3 1898-1902) ( B 1 1909-1912) (C1 1907-1911) (LI 1907-1910) (C O 1906-1912) (LI 1902-1905) (B2 1903-1905)

19/07/1916 20/07/1916 20/07/1916 21/07/1916 21/07/1916 21/07/1916 22/07/1916 22/07/1916 25/07/1916 27/07/1916 29/07/1916 30/07/1916 30/07/1916 31/07/1916 31/07/1916 02/08/1916 05/08/1916 08/08/1916 08/08/1916 08/08/1916 09/08/1916 09/08/1916 09/08/1916 10/08/1916 17/08/1916 18/08/1916 22/08/1916 23/08/1916 25/08/1916 25/08/1916 27/08/1916 27/08/1916 31/08/1916 01/09/1916 09/09/1916 09/09/1916 14/09/1916 15/09/1916 15/09/1916 15/09/1916 15/09/1916 15/09/1916 15/09/1916 16/09/1916 16/09/1916 18/09/1916 22/09/1916 25/09/1916 25/09/1916 25/09/1916 26/09/1916 26/09/1916 26/09/1916 27/09/1916 27/09/1916 02/10/1916 07/10/1916 07/10/1916 07/10/1916 11/10/1916 16/10/1916 18/10/1916 18/10/1916 30/10/1916 30/10/1916 06/11/1916 06/11/1916 09/11/1916 09/11/1916 11/11/1916 13/11/1916

FRANCE SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME

SOMME SOMME FRANCE SOMME SOMME YPRES SOMME SOMME L E TO U Q U ET SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME AT S E A SOMME FRANCE SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SOMME SALONIKA SOMME SOMME SOMME

FRANCE SOMME MACEDONIA SOMME SOMME

AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AG E D AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED

33 18 26 34 29 27 22 20 21 19 50 22 23 20 25 23 22 21 27 27 27 29 32 23 20 25 25 30 35 34 21 28 22 24 39 31 19 28 23 29 31 21 23 21 21 24 35 36 21 19 23 19 20 21 21 31 20 50 24 18 24 19 22 34 32 20 22 23 23 27 27


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L H W MCK ISACK E M MILLER S E C OWA N C L S A N C T UA RY J H ADDENBROOK E J T I L L EY H N S T EWA R D A M DURRANT E H C U R R EY R B KITE P T F OY S T E R J C LU D L OW G F PRIDHAM H T R S WR I G H T J L BA R N I C OT E L L EWI S

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(PR 1907-1907) (B2 1895-1898) (C 3 1911-1914) (C2 1902-1906) (C 3 1 9 1 0 - 1 9 1 3 ) (CO 1910-1914) (C1 1899-1904) (B1 1902-1905) (HE 1868-1869) (B2 1909-1913) ( L I 1902-1906) (C O 1908-1911) (C 2 1892-1895) (G R 1897-1897) ( P R 1912-1915) (S U 1909-1912)

13/11/1916 13/11/1916 17/11/1916 18/11/1916 23/11/1916 28/11/1916 03/12/1916 05/12/1916 10/12/1916 10/12/1916 11/12/1916 15/12/1916 16/12/1916 21/12/1916 22/12/1916 26/12/1916

AIR ACCIDENT SOMME FRANCE SOMME ARRAS AIR ACCIDENT BIRKENHEAD SOMME FRANCE FRANCE EGYPT EGYPT FRANCE FRANCE

AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED

23 35 19 28 20 21 30 28 59 21 28 22 39 31 19 21

F U RT H E R R E A D I N G As part of its Great War commemorations, the College has made available online the entire contents of the Roll of Honour, both photographs and citations, along with The Marlburian magazines for the years 1900 to 1925. These are accessible at: archive.marlboroughcollege.org. The collection is fully searchable and will be a great resource for anyone interested in OM involvement before, during and after World War I.

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Spirit, strategy, service Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67) is a man who has been involved in an amazing variety of things and, with everything, he works quietly and he works tirelessly. Alexandra Jackson (CO 1974-76) talks to him about his many roles past and present. here is nothing Richard Fleck likes more than a project, be it building a fabulous family house with uninterrupted views over the Dorset countryside, opening a brand new school for Marlborough College in Malaysia, realigning the charitable purpose of an 800-year-old livery company, sailing competitively, or crossing the northernmost stretches of Canada on a dog sledge. And, all these are things he has done in his spare time. His day job is as a city lawyer, albeit now working on a consultancy basis.

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On his home patch, Richard is relaxed and amiable, but it’s clear that this benign

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and essentially modest exterior hides a steely determination: he is no slacker. This drive was not always apparent, however. As a boy he was, by all accounts, a late developer: rather small and young for the year when he arrived at Marlborough in 1962. He was hugely helped by Dennis Silk, legendary educationalist, who was his junior housemaster and with whom he is still in touch; but this influence was short lived, as he soon moved to the spartan corridors of B3, where Richard found it harder to make a mark. He still remembers the moment, after winning the Colts Rackets Cup, when an older boy remarked that, perhaps, “he was not entirely useless”. These natural ball skills saw Richard become Captain of Rackets under John Thompson’s watchful eye. He also took up squash, which he played with increasing success at university, eventually representing his country. More time away from his books at the University of Southampton, where he was studying law,


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consolidated his skills as a sailor; here, again, he had chosen a sport where application, planning and strategic thinking were the order of the day. Indeed, it was this attention to sport rather than studies which resulted in Richard getting no more than an adequate degree. It was not a result, apart from a first in the jurisprudence paper, which suggested a man who would come to understand the law exceptionally well. Such is his expertise that he has been the “go-to” lawyer for many matters which involve the Royal Household, especially on sensitive issues such as employee confidentiality. Again, this is extracurricular stuff, all done quietly and behind the scenes: known about but not shouted from the roof tops. But back to the early days: luckily, in the circumstances and according to the practice of the time, recently-graduated Richard had pre-arranged his articles, as they then were, at Herbert Smith, a modestly-sized firm in the City employing under a hundred people. At this point, Richard’s secure world was turned upside down. His talented and successful father, who was the child of German Jews and who had fortuitously been educated at

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“...he had chosen a sport where application, planning and strategic thinking were the order of the day.”

Marlborough, died suddenly, aged only 51. As the oldest of three Richard had to grow up fast, providing emotional support to his mother and direction and guidance to his younger siblings, one of whom, Andrew, was about to start at Marlborough and is now headmaster of Sedbergh School in Cumbria.

Despite family responsibilities, Richard’s early professional life – building up expertise in litigation, competition and corporate law, and becoming a partner in 1980 – also allowed time for messing around in boats. Actually, to be fair, this involved some quite serious sailing and winning national and world titles in International Fourteens. It also saw Richard meeting his Canadian wife, Mary, a textile designer and keen yachtswoman, whom he married in 1983. Together they owned a series of boats and won various offshore and other closer-toshore racing trophies. In due course, a second home in Canada allowed for ambitious cruising holidays in the Pacific North West. It was no surprise that, in 2003, the Fleck children, Sara and Peter, should come to Marlborough: Sara is now an equine vet, whilst Peter is a guide and conservationist – having cut his teeth on the 1,000 mile Yukon Quest across Alaska, thwarting all the pundits and training his own husky team. No mean feat and one of which Fleck Snr, who was one of his team of supporters, is immensely proud. Richard’s continued commitment to Marlborough College is palpable: his

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“...The College has been extremely fortunate to have someone as dedicated and applied as Richard providing advice. He is generous with his time and is not prepared to watch from the sidelines.”

dedication has seen him participating in all the various voluntary bodies which support the school. He has sat on Council, in the UK and Malaysia; has been on the Club Committee since 1990 serving as President in 2014-15; he was the first Chairman of the Foundation and is now a wise Trustee of the Charitable Funds. Looking ahead, this aspect of Marlborough’s work will take on increasing relevance, as the need to support talented children from less affluent backgrounds will be critical to the College’s success and reputation.

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Although there are benefits in having non-Marlburians fulfilling some of these roles, as they bring objectivity and expertise from other fields, there is still intrinsic value to be gleaned from OMs who have imbibed the essence of what it means to be a Marlburian. The time and expertise that Richard shared with the College came when he was still working full-time in the City. Moreover, alongside his regular work for Herbert Smith, he had a pro-bono practice, was a key figure in the influential Financial Reporting Council, where he was chairman of the Auditing Practices Board and the Financial Reporting Review Panel. During this period, Richard wrote a strategic plan for Herbert Smith, which is still core reference material and which refocused the firm on FTSE100 clients and underpinned the partnership’s expansion to today’s 4,000 employees and 25 overseas offices. To his credit, and although he is ambitious, Richard is not proud. He is prepared to admit defeat, as he did in 2005 when,

contrary to some expectations, he failed to become the firm’s Senior Partner, having been pipped to the post by a canny opponent. Perhaps more overtly political skills would have served him better. But despite this disappointment, Richard was a good loser, showing admirable loyalty, remaining with the firm and becoming a consultant in 2009. The winner has long since departed to pastures new. A lighter workload allowed Richard, this summer, to become Master of the Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers, a guild with which he has been long associated as his father was also a member. Again, he is not prepared to play a passive role and has been involved in rebooting the guild’s educational programme, making it a blueprint for other charities. Richard’s long list of voluntary activities and interests indicate a man with a strong sense of responsibility. He admits that life has treated him well. He comes from promising stock – it’s no mean feat to have a maternal grandfather who won an MC and a paternal grandfather who won an Iron Cross. A true European indeed. The College has been extremely fortunate to have someone as dedicated and applied as Richard providing advice. He is generous with his time and is not prepared to watch from the sidelines. His tireless commitment to Marlborough College Malaysia developed paradoxically from an initial scepticism. So, what makes a person like Richard Fleck share his experience in this way? The reasons are multifarious; some deeply hidden, but critical in Richard’s case is his father’s experience. That a Marlborough education provided opportunities which might not otherwise have been available at that time, given Richard’s father’s background. By involving himself in the many aspects of governance of the College, and especially now he is involved with the Foundation and the Charitable Funds, Richard may be able to give another child such a chance – and who knows what that foresight might facilitate? Alexandra Jackson OM, parent of four OMs, J.P., Blue Badge Guide, erstwhile city analyst & financial journalist

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Brothers in Arms Redmond (C3 1990-95) and Roley Finer (BH 1992-97) have been running a successful fine antique-arms business for 11 years in central London. Now the go-to experts talk to Niall Hamilton (CR 1985-) about this specialist business. eter Finer’s business in fine antique arms and armour is known around the world, and the London showroom, in Duke Street, St James’s, is run by his sons Redmond and Roley Finer. Their brother Alex ‘Smudge’, was in C2 (1989-93) and their sister, Daisy, was in

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Millmead (1989-94). They all studied History of Art at Marlborough and succeeded in amusing their teacher (the author of this piece) so much that conversations about art which began in the early nineties continue to this day.

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Top: Medieval shield and swords from the 14th-15th Century. Above: Armour from the East: Ottoman, Tibetan and Chinese. Above right: European firearms from the 17th-19th Century

“In the periods of their use they were revered as items of undeniable prestige, as much as for their aesthetic qualities as for their technical excellence, and were borne as emblems of taste and wealth, as much as of power.”

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The Finer family home has been a centre for jolly Marlburian meetings for 25 years, so much so it deserves the title Marlborough College, Warwickshire; and whenever a Finer is around there will be another Marlburian not far away and a plan being made to meet up. Red and Roley cast a particularly broad net with their dealings and their participation in the great international art shows in New York, Maastricht and London, and this has resulted in the most extraordinary displays of treasures of armour, swords and pistols. Peter Finer spotted a gap in the fine-art market fifty years ago and the firm has emerged as the place to go to in order to find that special piece of early sixteenth-century German armour, that sword from a medieval battlefield, or that pair of Georgian duelling pistols. Redmond and Roley grew up surrounded by such objects and are now involved in a business that entails a rich and varied range of work. The shop was conceived in 2005, ten years after Red had left Marlborough. Peter had built up the business through the art fairs, auction houses and relationships with clients all around the world,

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but they felt that having a shop in Central London would broaden the client base. It did this rapidly and the permanence of the shop has helped to generate trust with collectors, something that has to be nurtured over a period of time. It has proved to be an excellent catalyst for business, and as Roley said: “You can buy some shirts on Jermyn Street and then, on the spur of the moment, just pop around the corner to buy a suit of armour.” In Duke Street, you may find Corinthian helmets, 17th-century Samurai armour or an Ottoman trousse (a knife collection), or a pair of pistols by Nicholas Boutet presented by Napoleon to the Spanish naval captain Coronado. They have a cannon bearing the arms of the French king Henry II, weighing 2,200 lbs, which also bears the arms not only of his wife, Catherine de Medici, but also of his mistress, Diana de Poitiers. The market that they deal with is changing all the time. In 2005, 90% of the armour that they dealt with was European, but now 30% is Eastern. Around 20% of their business is done with museums, with clients including The Met in New York, the V&A, the


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Royal Armouries in Leeds and the Dresden Rüstkammer. Today, 50% of the business involves work in North and South America and their Russian market is growing. Good quality armour from China is rare, although the Chinese themselves are increasingly interested in European works. Japanese arms and armour is an expanding market and a new field for the Finers, but this is a complex area, “understanding Japanese blades is almost like learning Japanese”. Getting to grips with arms and amour from this country is made all the more complicated by the presence of European influences, notably the Portuguese, whose seaborne empire enabled them to make their presence felt on many distant shores. The education of clients is an important part of their work and both Red and Roley are just a little surprised that they have, in a way, become teachers. There are not many approachable books on the subject, most being in German or over a hundred years old, and so every two years they produce a comprehensive catalogue in order to help demystify a subject that has, since the First War, become shrouded with an air of mystery. It is interesting to note that until this time the highest prices for works of art were commanded by arms and armour.

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Pieces often reflected the status of the owner and extraordinary teams of craftsmen with different skills were required to make them. “In the periods of their use they were revered as items of undeniable prestige, as much for their aesthetic qualities as for their technical excellence, and were borne as emblems of taste and wealth, as much as of power.” There are not so many connoisseurs now, but new collectors are realising that the abstract qualities of armour can look marvellous in a contemporary setting, and the play of carefully arranged light on metal surfaces “can restore life and vibrancy to these ancient artefacts, be they either bright steel, glittering gold, silver or patinated”. The old can work well with the new: the example of a sixteenth-century European helmet juxtaposed with a work by Jeff Koons was cited. The firm offers expertise with the presentation of works and offers an unlimited range of bespoke mounts, mannequins, equestrian models for armour. Firearms can be arranged in cases, viewable from all sides or even displayed in the manner of a traditional castle gunroom. Advice is also given on climate controlled environments and on periodic conservation and restoration.

Red, Roley and their father monitor the world of the international auction houses carefully and find that often works come back onto the market. Of the stock in the shop, 20% has been recycled as a result of death, debt or divorce. They have known many pieces for years, and it is the experience of handling great works that has made all the difference to them. At times the transport, the packing and the unpacking of great works at international art fairs can seem like a treadmill, but it is the experience of holding, feeling and weighing objects that gives them the edge. It is the accumulated expertise and the sensitivity gained from first-hand experience that enables them to spot and evaluate the genuine article, and there are a lot of things in the art world that are not what they purport to be. The brothers have come a long way from the world of A level art history essays and staring at slides in a dark classroom. They are the leaders in their field and theirs is the only shop in the world that sells arms and armour of the very highest quality. Niall Hamilton is the College’s Senior Admissions Tutor

Roley and Red Finer in their Duke Street shop

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THE MARLBURIAN COLLECTION 2016–2017 All profits from the Collection will go towards bursaries For a catalogue please telephone Crosby & Lawrence: 01672 892 498

Visit our online shop at: shop.marlboroughcollege.org

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Bullet-ant ceremony

Philosophy, through the lens Nick Shoolingin-Jordan (B1 1987-92) is travelling the planet and making award-winning documentaries. Clem Simon (NC 2007-10) speaks to him about the life he leads and the impact this has on him and his family, the crossover between the human and natural world, and about his future projects.

here’s nothing better than looking down a camera and being able to capture something. I actually prefer to do the filming than to have a cameraman because you’re so connected to the scene and you can choose which part you’re going to record; you can choose which emotion you’re going to capture just from zooming in or focusing on one thing. It might not even be the person that’s in focus; it might be the person that’s listening, or someone tapping their foot. When you have a cameraman, you have to tell them to film that and by the time you’ve told them, it’s too late. The moment has gone.”

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This is what Nick Shoolingin-Jordan tells me as we talk over FaceTime; he in Bristol and me in Berlin. He has visited almost every inch of the planet making award-winning documentaries, but Berlin has, as yet, escaped his eagle eye. A producer, director, scriptwriter and cinematographer extraordinaire, Nick tells me he is most concerned with telling great stories. “I’m really interested in the junction between the human world and the natural world, where they clash.” The drama of that clash is perfectly illustrated by his description of the most challenging drama he has filmed thus far: the bullet-ant ceremony in the Amazon for Earth’s Natural Wonders on BBC Two. “These eight-year-old boys put their hands in gloves, which are lined with The Marlburian Club Magazine

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bullet ants, the most painful stinging creatures on the planet. On the Schmidt sting-pain index, they rate as a four.” This is the highest rating, with entomologist Justin O. Schmidt describing the pain as “pure, intense, brilliant pain… like walking over flaming charcoal with a three-inch nail embedded in your heel”. Nick says it’s unbelievable. “They put their hands in these gloves with two or three hundred ants as part of their coming-of-age initiation ceremony. They’re screaming for 20 hours. Some of the boys were passing out; some of them were delirious.” So did he just watch? He says his soundman really wanted to give them painkillers. “It’s really difficult, but all we can do is observe. We couldn’t get involved. Even from our boat, which was moored half a mile away, I could hear the boys screaming.” And yet, even though he says it was agony listening to those blood-curdling cries, he confesses that the experience was uplifting. “It’s absolutely at the centre of their culture. It prepares them to become warriors, and the girls look on to see whom they may want to marry,” he says with a grin, adding: “The next day the boys were so pleased they had succeeded.” The chief asked Nick if he would like to have a go. It was a no from him.

“They’re screaming for 20 hours. Some of the boys were passing out; some of them were delirious.”

Relationships between humans and animals can, however, be less painful. Tangil, the crew’s guide in the mangroves of the tiger-infested Sundarbans (a natural region comprising southern Bangladesh and a small part of West Bengal), sounds extraordinary. He had been studying tigers his whole life, and he was doing bits of camera work for the BBC. During this time he slept in a little tent while following a female tiger. The pair were just getting to know one another, when one night he was in his tent and he couldn’t see her, so he lay down to sleep. A few hours later, he felt a weight leaning down upon him. Nick relays the story magically. The female 44

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Satere Mawe Warrior Boys


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tiger had lain down on the other side of the tent, her body pressed against Tangil’s, so closely he could hear her breathing and her heartbeat. Nick laughs. “The funny thing is, when the BBC guys arrived the next day to bring him some supplies, they approached the tent and saw these big paw marks all around and assumed the tiger had taken him. But he was OK. He is a wonderful man.” When he talks of filming in Bangladesh, it is always the people he focuses on. He found the inhabitants more fascinating than the animals. “They were some of the poorest people I have ever met, but the most beautiful in spirit, in the sense that they just seemed to be at peace. We’re in such a materialistic money-driven world in the West. When you go over there

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“...even harder than filming on a boat while nursing a slipped disc and nothing but a chef to massage his back.”

where they have so little, they still seem a lot happier than do a lot of people in our sort of civilized, over-developed world.” Since becoming a father he’s upped his life-insurance policy, just in case he doesn’t come back from one of his adventures. “It may sound weird to most people, but I do some dangerous things.” This is no exaggeration. Before his last time filming in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Nick went on a

hostile-environment training course. “Air force guys teach you the A-Z of being kidnapped and abducted. They let off shells and fake grenades and you have to go through imagined scenarios. They drive you up to a checkpoint, drag you out of the car and put a gun to your head. They try and make it really realistic.” Because it really does happen; a few years before his crew had gone to the DRC, the scouting volcanologists had been robbed at gunpoint. But safety issues go beyond bandits and guns: more people have stood on the moon than on the edge of the lava lake where Nick decided to take a selfie. It is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world and it’s permanently erupting. Nick tells me (and he of all people would know) there is nowhere quite like it on the planet.

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though he’s still needing investment. The working title is Project Earth and the aim is to tell the story of the unsung heroes of our planet, the ones who spend every day fighting on the front line to save it, from the coral reefs or the remains of our rainforests to a specific species of shark. “I’d like to go and meet some of these devoted people and retell their story.” It’s not an eco-project; it’s a project about people. “Everyone has desensitised everything to do with conservation already, so I think people need to hear human stories; then they’ll be able to identify with them.”

“...more people have stood on the moon than on the edge of the lava lake where Nick decided to take a selfie.” He’s off filming again soon for the first time since his son was born. He’ll be away for three or four weeks and tells me he will miss little Wilde. In fact, he thinks it will be the hardest thing he has ever done; even harder than filming on a boat while nursing a slipped disc and nothing but a chef to massage his back. Nick seems to be constantly questioning our species and our planet: how did life come to be on our Earth? Why here and nowhere else? What is it about Earth that makes it so persistently alive? He seems fascinated, indeed captivated, by the marvel of life. I ask him if he is enjoying fatherhood. He tells me: “I now know why I’m on the planet. It suddenly all becomes clear.” He has become more acutely aware of everything he does in his career. He wants to ensure that the projects he does now have some sort of useful purpose. He wants to do something that’s important, otherwise, he asks, “What’s the point of having another generation to pass the planet on to?” 46

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Nick with his wife at the Emmy Awards

Currently, he is working on the biggest, most ambitious documentary series National Geographic has ever done. It comprises ten one-hour films, and it’s what Nick describes as a kind of Planet Earth revamped. He says that show was very beautiful and scenic, but his will be more intellectual. “There’s a touch more philosophy and science of why we are here and how we came to be on this Earth.” Nick is passionate about conservation. His next project sounds wonderful,

Of course, he knows he’s fabulously fortunate to have filmed in these far-flung countries. But he spent some time finding his way to this point. At one stage he was an estate agent. Now, he has filmed in Greenland on a dog-sled, he’s captured Californian condors swooping over the Grand Canyon, and he’s stood motionless for hours in deep jungles, awaiting the perfect shot. ‘It’s a job where sometimes you just have to pinch yourself.’

Clem Simon has just finished a year abroad in South Carolina, Cape Town and Berlin


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Behind the Mask Grace Jackson (LI 2007-09) has spent the last two years in Sierra Leone working with the Ebola Response Team. The job, for which she was awarded an OBE in this year’s New Year Honours List, is chronicled here. fter leaving university in 2012, where I studied Politics, Philosophy and Economics, I joined the Civil Service Fast Stream. Initially, I was placed in the Department for Work and Pensions and I spent a year with my fingers permanently crossed, hoping that, eventually, I’d find my way to a role within international development.

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In spring 2014, about halfway through my first year working for the Department for International Development, better known as DFID, I received news that my next

posting would be working on the Economic Growth Team in Sierra Leone. As I prepared to move overseas, I worried about where I would be living, getting my visa and what to take with me – colleagues advised that I would find favourite cereals and drinkable wine in short supply and that I should bring a surfboard – but not about Ebola. It wasn’t until the week before I was due to fly that Ebola really started to hit the international press and friends started to make nervous jokes about it. The virus arrived in Freetown the weekend before I did. As I walked into the office on my first day, British Airways announced the cancellation of direct flights to Sierra Leone because of Ebola fears. Worried that other airlines would follow suit, many people left the country. The next few weeks were very uncertain as we watched the epidemic spread and wondered if we’d be evacuated next. I tried to share photos of “normal” life to counter the hysterical panic my family and friends were seeing in the media.

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“Having your temperature taken half a dozen times a day became normal and I lost a few layers of skin to constant chlorine hand washing...”

Around the same time the UK Government was scaling up its response to the crisis, with the overall UK commitment eventually reaching £427million. I started working on building the Kerry Town Treatment Centre, the first Ebola facility built by the UK government, stomping around a muddy field in the middle of the West African rainy season and arguing with the contractor over children running amok through the construction site. At the end of September’s “stay at home” weekend 48

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(where everyone was asked to remain at home while healthcare workers carried out a campaign to raise awareness of the virus), several hundred UK military personnel arrived in Freetown to help us build five more treatment centres, strengthen national coordination of the response and staff the dedicated healthcare worker facility at Kerry Town. Having your temperature taken half a dozen times a day became normal and I lost a few layers of skin to constant chlorine hand washing. One safety measure, the “no touch” policy, became so quickly ingrained that on trips back to the UK hugs from friends would give me quite a shock, and for some months after the end of the outbreak I would still forget to shake hands. During construction of the Ebola Treatment Centres we couldn’t afford even a few hours’ delay. On one memorable Friday afternoon, I raced down to the bank to negotiate an extension to a contractor’s credit limit so he could buy more materials before the weekend, offering the bank’s sceptical manager the UK Government’s reputation as my only collateral. There was little time to process the reality of what was happening, as I spent all my time focused on practical problems like how quickly the incinerators could burn clinical waste or whether our NGO partners had their preferred types of PPE (personal protective equipment) goggles. I think I would have been overwhelmed by the scale of the crisis had I taken time to dwell on the very real people and deaths behind the statistics reported at every evening’s briefing. In January 2015 things started to slow down, although we were still dealing with crises of all sizes: a chicken was smuggled into and then escaped from a red zone and was promptly incinerated; potential breaches in infection prevention protocols

put your accommodation camp on lockdown for 24 hours; ministers came to visit. Ending the “bumpy road to zero” meant looking for new ways to halt transmission, working with local communities to identify specific challenges and solutions, while maintaining response capacity across the country. During most of this time Sierra Leone was under a curfew, with all shops and restaurants closing at 6pm and large public gatherings forbidden. Christmas, Easter and Independence Day celebrations were cancelled. This meant that social life was quite restricted, however there were a couple of bars that managed to escape the curfew and stay open through tactful bribes or hidden entrances. It was difficult to find anyone to talk to who wasn’t involved in the crisis response in some way, which just added to Ebola’s omnipresence. The last few months of the outbreak were often frustrating as we started the countdown several times only for another case to emerge. Eventually, we reached the official end of the outbreak in November 2015 and there was a collective sigh of relief across the whole country. From a work perspective not much changed: we immediately started worrying about the next case. I’ve spent the last few months designing and setting up DFID’s longerterm funding to help Sierra Leone prepare for, detect and respond to future Ebola cases or other public health emergencies, supporting the President’s aim of maintaining a “resilient zero”. When the next case did emerge, in January 2016, systems were in place to respond quickly and effectively. Freetown now feels as if it is emerging from hibernation. During this year’s Independence Day celebrations, it was amazing to see crowds of people wandering along the waterfront, listening to live music and watching performances. At the weekends the beaches are full of people relaxing and having fun in a way that wasn’t possible a year ago. The effects of the Ebola crisis are still felt throughout the country, from the thousands of children who missed a year of school to the survivors coping with long-term health problems, but life is starting to return to normal. Grace Jackson has now moved back to London from Freetown


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Marlburians in Racing: A turf education Richard Corbett (B2 1985-90) interviews his friend and champion racehorse trainer Ralph Beckett (C2 1985-89). he atmosphere is electric and the applause is intense and enthusiastic, some people are cheering, others are manoeuvring to get a better view. Trainer Ralph Beckett is striding into the winners’ enclosure at the Derby meeting at Epsom in May 2013. Racing presenter Clare Balding is pursuing him with a microphone, a posse of journalists are scurrying towards him and cameras click and flash all around him. Ralph has just trained Talent and Secret Gesture to first and second in the Fillies Classic, the Oaks.

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It is an achievement that has not been replicated for more than 40 years and is a current high point of his racehorsetraining career. You cannot measure euphoria, but a picture of Ralph’s youngest daughter, Cressie, holding aloft Beckett’s post-race bar bill made the national press and gave some indications of how much it meant to the horse’s connections. Nearly a quarter of a century earlier, the seeds of that success were being sown at Marlborough College. In the early

mornings of the summer of 1989, as Field House slept, Ralph Beckett would already be on his bicycle, and on the Bath Road. His destination, Robert Sangster’s Manton stables where the incumbent Barry Hills trained some of the country’s leading bloodstock. Beckett would ride out before making the return trip to C2 to begin his educational obligations for the day. It was a journey not without risk. His Housemaster, John Osborne (CR 1980-89), discouraged Ralph’s early morning outings. He was keen for Ralph to concentrate more on his studies, where he was normally to be found towards the rear of the field, and to pass his Maths O level, which had unseated him on more than one occasion.

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Above: Ralph with Simple Verse, winner of the St Leger Stakes and first filly to win the race since 1992. Above right: Simple Verse coming in first and making it Ralph’s third Classic victory

“Beckett was one of a handful of Marlburians who would cluster at the far end of Stan James with one eye fixed on the door, for fear of a visit from the college’s dreaded enforcement agency: Vice.”

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“To be fair, Mr Osborne was sympathetic to my racing aspirations enough to allow me to drop down to two A levels,” says Beckett. “That meant I normally did not have first lesson and I could leave at 6.30am, ride out the first lot, have breakfast in the lads’ hostel and be back for 9.30am before anyone came out of first period.” Ralph was not only riding out for Barry Hills three times a week during term time but was supplementing this by working during school holidays with iconic jump trainer Jimmy Fitzgerald up in Yorkshire, where he grew up. Such was his interest and dedication to the sport of kings that it would be fair to say that Ralph operated on the fringes of Marlburian society. His job as Master of the College Beagles for two seasons would take him even further out of the school and into the rolling Wiltshire countryside. Ralph admits that his fanatical interest in racing even distracted him from this role: “I was a poor choice as Master,” he says. “I was too keen on racing to make a good huntsman.” Ralph would fill the gaps in Channel Four’s racing coverage by making his way down the high street, picking up his copy of Sporting Life from Kiosks newsagent, strolling past the Castle and Ball and

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WHSmith before crossing over at the old Gateway supermarket and into the turf accountant, Stan James. The clientele was a mixed bag of racing enthusiasts. An eclectic melange who spent their days lingering in a grubby smoke-filled room, talking out of the sides of their mouths and staring up at a bank of screens showing all the day’s racing. It was a close-knit but diverse community that included, amongst others: the proprietor of the White Horse Bookshop, Dougie the Houseman from B House, a sprinkling of stable lads from Manton and a window cleaner who could run the marathon in under twoand-a-half hours. Beckett was one of a handful of Marlburians who would cluster at the far end of Stan James with one eye fixed on the door, for fear of a visit from the College’s dreaded enforcement agency: Vice. Now one of the country’s leading bookmakers, in Beckett’s day Stan James operated just two shops. Ralph was to bump into Stan James’s owner, Steve Fisher, again last year on the race course when Fisher was presenting a trophy. Ralph recalls: “I asked him if he remembered us, and he said of course he did because we were always in the way


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and used to hide behind the counter if a beak appeared.” It was a compliment to Ralph that with his exams finished and his time at Marlborough coming to a conclusion, the stable lads and staff at Manton held a wellattended leaving do in the lounge bar of the Crown public house to see him off. There is no fast track to the top table of racing. And at the end of his time at Marlborough he packed his bags to begin work at the bottom rung of the racing ladder, in Australia for champion trainer Colin Hayes. Ralph felt it was an easy decision: “I had a place at the Royal Agricultural College, but didn’t go, it felt like the right thing to do to go away.” After a year Down Under, Beckett returned to Europe. He did so via the US, where he recalls being asked to help the rapper – and unlikely racing enthusiast – MC Hammer overcome his fear of a horse he had recently acquired – the former Kentucky Oaks winner, Lite Light. Promotion to head man for leading Irish National Hunt trainer Arthur Moore

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followed, before Beckett finally returned home to the UK. He continued his racing education with prolific jump trainer Martin Pipe. The subsequent opportunity to work as assistant to Peter Walwyn, at Windsor House in Lambourn, was too tempting to turn down. And with Walwyn’s retirement three years later, a gap opened up. In 2000, having worked all over the world and watched some of racing’s leading operators first hand, Beckett felt ready to join their ranks. He took on Walwyn’s licence and rented Windsor House stables.

Racing is an unforgiving sport. With just 15 horses in training, Ralph had a small window to demonstrate he had ability. He soon began to show initiative: he was one of the first trainers to identify the equestrian qualities of Brazilian stable staff and brought a number over to work in his yard. Quite apart from his Brazilian charges helping him to win the Lambourn Stable Lads five-a-side football Trophy three years running, he also started to win races. It was, however, a horse owned by a syndicate made up of some of his Marlburian contemporaries, who a decade or so earlier had watched the racing with him in Stan James, that was to raise eyebrows. Ralph trained Inzacure to win three races in a week for his delighted owners – a considerable feat of training. Penkenna Princess gave him his winner in a prestigious Group 3 race, while a second in the Irish 1,000 Guineas and a victory in the November handicap helped establish a strong reputation. He now had 105 winners under his belt.

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Now married to the ever-cheerful Izzi and with the yard full, Beckett was ready for a step up in class. In 2005, Ralph accepted an invitation by Chris Harper to move his 60-horse string to his state-of-the-art training set up on the Whitsbury Estate near Fordingbridge. These cutting-edge facilities enabled Ralph to move to the next level. Within three years he had pulled off a shock win in the Epsom Oaks to claim his first of flat racing’s Classics with Look Here. Ralph concedes even he was surprised: “Astonished actually. She was 33/1 and we were even supposed to be out for supper later. I felt this overwhelming sense of achievement for everybody involved.”

That same year he was to bring home the Breeders’ Cup Marathon at Santa Anita in the US. In the five years at Whitsbury the yard boasted 244 winners, before once again Ralph was on the move. Whitsbury was high end, but it was not his own and the chance to buy the Kimpton Down Stables from fellow Old Marlburian and legendary trainer

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Toby Balding could not be resisted. Over the next few years Toby – who died in September 2014 – was a wise head to turn to as Ralph set about building the yard and gallops to his own pioneering vision. Ralph will always be grateful to Toby: “He was a big supporter of ours and we miss him.” The hard work was soon yielding results and the winners were soon clocking up. His reputation for handling fillies had been highlighted by his two wins in the Oaks, but was cemented last year when he notched up his third Classic victory, this time in the St Leger Stakes at Doncaster with Simple Verse. No filly had won the race since 1992. It is also worth bearing in mind that even some of the finest flat horse trainers in the land can go through their entire career without winning even one of the English Classic races. With over 700 winners on the board and 125 horses in training, the Kimpton chapter still remains unfinished. Ralph looks back on his time at Marlborough fondly and credits its proud tradition of celebrating the individual for facilitating his seamless move into racing. “On the whole the school turned a blind eye and I was allowed to get away with splitting my time between Manton and Stan James and that gave me a head start.” Luckily he has never needed that Maths O level. Richard Corbett is a drinks consultant living near Winchester

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Flat racing’s Classics explained Ralph Beckett has already notched up an impressive three Classic wins in his career: two in the Epsom Oaks (Look Here in 2008 and Talent in 2013) and one in the St Leger at Doncaster (Simple Verse in 2015). But what are the Classics and why are they so important? There are five English Classic races in flat racing: • • • • •

The 1,000 Guineas The 2,000 Guineas The Derby The Oaks The St Leger Stakes

They are the oldest, most prestigious and hotly contested races in the UK flat horseracing calendar and attract the best horses in the world. The oldest Classic of them all is the St Leger Stakes, which was first run in 1776 at Doncaster – just as the founding fathers of the United States were declaring independence from Britain.


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Powered by Coffee: Awholenewmeaning Catherine Brumwell (NC 1991-96) learns about Arthur Kay’s (PR 2004-09) system for turning waste coffee grounds into advanced biofuels. carbon-neutral biomass briquettes, now marketed as Coffee Logs™, which burn longer and are 150% more heat effective than wood and so are perfect for fuelling homes and for being used in appliances such as wood-fired stoves, chimeneas, barbecues and pizza ovens.

n 2013, Arthur Kay (PR 2004-09) was working on an architectural project at university and was researching circular economy, a system by which waste and by-products can be recycled into something new and useful. He happened to be working on a coffee-shop design. As he investigated the lesser known qualities of coffee, he discovered that the oil from the coffee grounds is pure, highly calorific and high in residual oils. Therefore, a potentially perfect biofuel. It was at this moment that the concept of bio-bean® was born.

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Three years later, Arthur is now revelling after an incredible summer, in which his team is up to 30 and includes biochemical engineers, scientists and eco-warriors; he had a successful crowdfunding campaign, a result of which brought Coffee Logs™ onto the market; and the team won Virgin’s #VOOM competition. All this from a simple cup of coffee. “We consume a phenomenal 70 million cups of coffee per year in the UK alone and currently only extract the taste from the bean – the rest, over 500,000 tonnes in the UK, is wasted, costing the industry over £50 million in disposal costs and global coffee waste produces millions of tonnes in methane and CO2 emissions.”

bio-bean® is a UK-based, cleantechnology, green-energy company, and is the first in the world to industrialise the process of recycling waste coffee grounds into advanced biofuels and biochemicals, displacing conventional fuels and chemicals in the process. It operates the world’s first coffee-waste recycling factory with a capacity to process 50,000 tonnes of waste coffee grounds a year (the equivalent of one in every ten cups of coffee drunk in the UK). They have developed a sophisticated coffee-waste recycling infrastructure working with waste management companies across the UK to collect the used coffee grounds from restaurants, cafés, airports and coffee factories and transport it to its factory, where, using pioneering mechanical and biochemical techniques, they recycle the waste on an industrial scale. Arthur says, “The biodiesel and biomass pellets we produce from the coffee waste are cost effective and carbon-neutral alternatives to conventional fuels and can be used for heating buildings and powering transport systems.” So far, the company is focusing on four main products. The two already in production are the biomass pellets, which are used for heating buildings, thus displacing fossil fuels; and the

The two products still under development are biodiesel and biochemicals. The team is undertaking extensive research into the commercial application of taking biodiesel from waste coffee grounds. And they are exploring the potential of extracting biochemicals for a range of commercial purposes. “The approach we have developed at bio-bean towards sustainability has been around creating a circular economic model focused on the built environment”, Arthur says. “We believe that there is no such thing as waste, simply resources in the wrong place and we view the city as an urban mine, from which riches can be safely and inexpensively quarried.” With big ambitions from the outset, Arthur and his impressive team now have a number of high-profile awards under their belt; they have the backing of some of the world’s biggest brands; investments running into millions; grants from the UK government; and the support of some of the world’s leading conservation campaigners. The parallels between the everyday benefits of coffee and those developed by bio-bean® are obvious: coffee is no longer just a thing to get us through the day, there’s now the very real belief that it will help our planet survive its days, too. Catherine Brumwell, new editor and new expert on biofuels The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Matthew Wilkinson and the Rebellion Our author, Nick Baxter, was the first Chairman of Marlborough History Society and continues to be on the committee as an historical adviser. One of the subjects he’s studied is Matthew Wilkinson. In the first of a three-part series leading up to the 175th anniversary of the founding of the College, he writes about the Rebellion of 1851 and gives us some insight into the first Master of Marlborough College. n November 1851, the press reported on boy “mutineers”.

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“An attack was made on the house of one of the subordinate officers of the College by a small body of ill-disposed boys a short time ago. Under cover of darkness, they escaped detection for some days, and the necessary consequence was that the boys were ‘kept in’ after dusk.” 1 The attack was directed at the gatesergeant Thomas Peviar’s lodge, a onestoried brick hut. Volleys of stones and brickbats were thrown, smashing windows, roof tiles and the door. Even the single chimney pot was “shivered to atoms”. 2 Peviar was unpopular with the boys as he reported misdemeanours to the Master, Matthew Wilkinson, and made the birches with which they were beaten.

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The following day the Cockney Peviar gathered up the spent missiles and deposited them with the Master complaining that he had received, “’alf a ’undred stones at his ’ead and as many more at his ’ouse”. 3 Wilkinson investigated and found the ring leader to be a 12-year-old boy, Samuel Piggott, who was promptly expelled. Resentment festered as boys were not allowed out after dusk. “This checked, for a while, the disorder, but 5th November being unfortunately close at hand, the cowardly assailants got up a larger conspiracy, and a combined assault was made in all the houses, with large quantities of squibs, crackers &c., and much mischief done. In a day or two, however, order was restored: the mutineers expressed their contrition,

yet not without the Master thinking it necessary to send five boys home.” 4 The mischief did not end with the expulsion of these ringleaders. The Rebellion, as it came to be known, gathered momentum. Windows were smashed and the contents of the masters’ desks thrown onto open fires, followed by parts of broken desks. Burnt too were the copy books from Mr Sellick’s cupboard (W P Sellick was an extra master who taught writing; he began at Marlborough in 1849 and was to stay until 1887). A wooden wing of the fives court was set alight, but fortunately extinguished by the popular Mr Sowerby’s timely intervention. The rebellion was eventually suppressed but the damage was done: the continued existence of Marlborough College hung on a knife edge. Wilkinson remained in command as the new Half began in February 1852. (The three-term system did not come in until the 1870s and so, up to that point, the year was divided into two “Halfs”: February to June and August to December). He accepted the job as Vicar of West Lavington and tendered his resignation as Master. He did the decent thing and stayed on until the end of the Half in June. He was to remain a vicar for the remainder of his life.


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Matthew Wilkinson was the son of a Leeds cloth merchant and attended Leeds Grammar School where he excelled. In March 1831, he was awarded a sizar 5 to study at Clare Hall, Cambridge taking classical and mathematical honours. In 1836, he was made a Fellow. He accepted the curacy of Oakington and was ordained priest. In December 1838, he was appointed the first Principal of Huddersfield Proprietary School but, by October1840, the school debt had become so great that he and the assistant masters resigned. On 11 December, he was appointed Principal of the Proprietary School in Kensington. It was there that Wilkinson heard of the proposed school at Marlborough. In February 1843, he was appointed Master.

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of heart; a kindness of heart which, perhaps, in many instances, may have induced him to act with less rigour than is sometimes exercised in the conduct of a public school.” 9

Matthew Wilkinson

“The new school, advertised as “The Marlborough School for the Sons of Clergymen and Others” was ambitious.”

(though he was a very little man) had shown himself capable of great undertakings (cheers and laughter).” 7 Wilkinson’s youngest child, Clara, was born on 2 June 1851. With eight children under the age of 11, family life must have been demanding. Wilkinson publicly admitted the difficulties he was facing,

Memorial window to Matthew Wilkinson and his wife, Laetitia Martha, in All Saints Church, West Lavington

The new school, advertised as “The Marlborough School for the Sons of Clergymen and Others” was ambitious. On 25 August 1843, 203 boys arrived to participate in the educational experiment. Re-named Marlborough College in 1845, its first years were successful despite worrying incidents such as “several squares of glass – nearly 30 . . wantonly broken in the School room”. 6 In 1848, the number of boys increased to over 500. Scarlet fever had claimed four lives that summer and boys were sent home early. At the postponed prize-giving the Reverend Erasmus Williams, the fiery Vicar of St Peter’s, commented on Wilkinson, comparing his short stature with the growing college, “. . so fine a bantling had hardly ever before been produced in England as Marlborough College! (applause) It had been founded, and taken care of, and nurtured by its excellent master, who

“It is not an easy thing for a man to manage a large family, but when he comes to have the management of children who are not of his own blood, and whom he has been unacquainted with from their earliest years, he requires a degree of promptitude, judgment and calm deliberation: a determination to punish, a desire to pardon, and such a combination of principles as are seldom found to exist in one man.” George Bowers, a key College founder, extolled Wilkinson’s achievements stating that he had, “succeeded to the utmost expectation of every person”. Wilkinson responded, “We have fallen far short of anything like the description given by our excellent President.” 8 The Master of Marlborough College had lost his confidence. The Rebellion followed. The prize-giving in June 1852 was Wilkinson’s public farewell to the school that he had moulded. His pupils had gathered over £100 and presented him with a silver tea service. He took the blame for the Rebellion. His “failing” was attributed to, “his extreme kindness

Wilkinson spent 21 happy years as Vicar of West Lavington followed by three as Vicar of Melksham. He died at the age of 68 on 4 March 1876. His obituary reflects a much-loved and respected country vicar. “Those who remember the daily service, the Sunday Congregation, the hearty worship, and the earnest practical tone of his discourses; those who know how regular and systematic was his parochial visiting; those who have walked about his parish with him, and recollect the friendly inquiry, the cheerful word in passing he had for all he met, will recognise in him the exemplary clergyman, and the kindly genial man.” 10 George Cotton, from Rugby School, succeeded Wilkinson as Master. At the end of his first year, Cotton candidly admitted, “I think sometimes with trembling of what we have to do, and fear almost to congratulate ourselves too much upon what we have accomplished. All that I would venture to say is, that I commit the past to God’s forgiveness, and the future to His fatherly care.” 11 Cotton succeeded in reforming the College and establishing it as one of the great public schools. Nick Baxter, retired teacher with an MA in Public History from the University of Warwick 1 Devizes and Wilts Gazette, 13th November 1851 2 Marlborough College Thirty Years Ago, published in All The Year Round, 19th April 1879 3 Extracts from Chapter 9 Reminiscences written by J S Thomas from Newton Mant The New Chapel at Marlborough College 1889, p175 4 DWG, op cit 5 Financial help from the college 6 Marlborough College archive EC/08/08/1845 (410) letter from Rev M Wilkinson to “The Secretary dated 8th August 1845 7 Marlborough Times, 24th August 1848 8 Devizes and Wilts Gazette, 26th June 1851 9 Devizes and Wilts Gazette, Thursday 17th June 1852 10 Marlborough Times, 11th March 1876 11 Marlborough Times, 23rd June 1853 The Marlburian Club Magazine

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#NotGuilty Last year, Ione Wells (EL 2008-13) was attacked by a 17-year-old boy outside her London home after a night out. She had been followed from the Tube, and was only spared a more serious assault by the intervention of neighbours who heard her screams. er attacker was caught, pleaded guilty and was imprisoned, but, in the aftermath of the attack, through a media campaign, #NotGuilty, Ione has drawn attention to the unspoken shame and blame felt by victims of sexual assault, both male and female, and the injustice of this situation.

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Incredibly, Ione was subjected to online insults following her decision to abandon her right to anonymity by publishing an open letter to her attacker. She was determined not to be dragged down by her experience and refused to allow the crime committed against her to define her response. She observed that victims of sexual

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assault are themselves doubly victimised by being accused of being, in some way, complicit in what happened to them. A year on, and now in her final year reading English at Keble College, Oxford, Ione, in conversation with her godmother, Alexandra Jackson, (CO 1974-76) reflects on her campaign and its impact on the issues surrounding sexual violence. Q Your open letter to your attacker published in a student magazine was, I recall, part of your coping mechanism to offload your feelings of anger and frustration as to what had happened. Had you any idea that it would go viral and that you would become a regular speaker on forums dealing with sexual violence? A Not at all – the media attention was a complete surprise. Originally, I had written the letter as a cathartic exercise for myself – as a way to condense what I was feeling into something I could work through. On arriving back in Oxford, feeling frustrated about how few opportunities there were for victims of assault to speak out, I decided to publish it in the student paper, hoping to reach out to other students who might have had a similar experience and feel the same way. Little did I realise that, through the sharing of the article


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online, it would go viral and spread across the world and into the national press. It was a very overwhelming experience, but the fact that it gave the campaign momentum, and helped it to reach others in need, has been a positive thing. Q Should there be more in our education system that makes it clear that unwanted sexual attention is completely taboo? A Yes, I definitely think so. There is such an emphasis in sex education in schools on contraception and sexual health which are, of course, incredibly important. But we rarely, if ever, discuss issues surrounding consent and relationships in general. This is damaging for potential perpetrators, but also for victims of abuse or sexual harassment who may feel that unwanted sexual attention is normal or okay. Having now taught workshops both in schools and at university, it is clear that many students do require this kind of discussion from an earlier age – particularly when alcohol or relationships are involved; many students are confused about where the line is – it is not enough to simply say that “no means no”. Q Did you feel that the police and the criminal justice system provided you with appropriate support, and how

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much did the invitation of the court for you to submit a victim-impact statement prompt your open letter to your attacker? A I was very lucky as I had fantastic support from the police and victim support unit, so my experience was overwhelmingly positive. I had the opportunity to submit a victim-impact statement to make sure that how the attack had affected me was considered at the point of sentencing. I’m aware that this is not always the case, and many victims of assault feel the police or criminal justice system are unwilling to believe them. My victim-impact statement was submitted after the open letter and the two had different purposes. Whereas my victim-impact statement was for court purposes and showed how the attack had affected my studies and wellbeing, the letter, for me, was a way to focus on the positives – that there exists a very strong community wishing to fight against sexual assault who won’t stand for this kind of an assault upon their community, both locally and globally. Q It’s over a year since you were attacked. You’ll never forget what happened but, in the aftermath, you not only seem to have drawn on your inner strength in launching this campaign, but you got a

first in your exams, taken only a few weeks later. In April, you gave an amazing TEDx* talk to 700 delegates at Thessaloniki University on the role of social media in situations such as yours. Are you happy to be defined in this, albeit positive, way? For example, “the girl who…” A I have always tried to stress that, of course, the incident changed my life in a huge way, and now the campaign has become a significant part of what I do; but I am not wholly defined by any one thing. Just as I may be “the girl who started the #NotGuilty campaign”, I am also a student, a daughter and a friend, all things that I emphasised at the start of the open letter. What I always hope to portray in our events, support groups, or talks, is that incidents like these certainly aren’t the only thing that define you, even if they are part of who you are. The campaign is something I feel proud of and it gives me huge amounts of hope and positivity, so I definitely hope it will be something that I continue building in the future. *The TEDx Program is designed to help communities, organizations and individuals to spark conversation and connection through local TED-like experiences

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Ione’s open letter to her assailant

I cannot address this letter to you, because I do not know your name. I only know that you have just been charged with serious sexual assault and prolonged attack of a violent nature. And I have one question. When you were caught on CCTV following me through my own neighbourhood from the Tube, when you waited until I was on my own street to approach me, when you clapped your hand around my face until I could not breathe, when you pushed me to my knees until my face bled, when I wrestled with your hand just enough so that I could scream. When you dragged me by my hair, and when you smashed my head against the pavement and told me to stop screaming for help, when my neighbour saw you from her window and shouted at you and you looked her in the eye and carried on kicking me in the back and neck. When you tore my bra in half from the sheer force you grabbed my breast, when you didn’t reach once for my belongings because you wanted my body, when you failed to have my body because all my neighbours and family came out, and you saw them face-to-face. When CCTV caught you running from your attempted assault on me... and then following another woman twenty minutes later from the same Tube station before you were arrested on suspicion. When I was in the police station until 5am while you were four floors below me in custody, when I had to hand over my clothes and photographs of the marks and cuts on my naked body to forensic teams – did you ever think of the people in your life? I don’t know who the people in your life are. I don’t know anything about you. But I do know this: you did not just attack me that night. I am a daughter, I am a friend, I am a girlfriend, I am a pupil, I am a cousin, I am a niece, I am a neighbour, I am the employee who served everyone down the road coffee in the café under the railway. All the people who form those relations to me make up my community, and you assaulted every single one of them. You violated the truth that I will never cease to fight for, and which all of those people represent – that there are infinitely more good people in the world than bad. This letter is not really for you at all, but for all the victims of attempted or perpetrated serious sexual assault and every member of their communities. I’m sure you remember the 7/7 bombings. I’m also sure you’ll remember how the terrorists did not win, because the whole community of London got back on the Tube the next day. You’ve carried out your attack, but now I’m getting back on my tube. My community will not feel we are unsafe walking back home after dark. We will get on the last tube home, and we will walk up our streets alone, because we will not ingrain or submit to the idea that we are putting ourselves in danger in doing so. We will continue to come together, like an army, when any member of our community is threatened, and this is a fight you will not win. Community is a force we all underestimate. We get our papers every day from the same newsagents, we wave to the same woman walking her dog in the park, we sit next to the same commuters each day on the tube. Each individual we know and care about may take up no more than a few seconds of each day, but they make up a huge proportion of our lives. Somebody even once told me that, however unfamiliar they appear, the faces of our dreams are always faces we have seen before. Our community is embedded in our psyche. You, my attacker, have not proved any weakness in me, or my actions, but only demonstrated the solidarity of humanity. Tomorrow, you find out whether you’re to be held in prison until your trial, because you pleaded ‘not guilty’ and pose a threat to the community. Tomorrow, I have my life back. As you sit awaiting trial, I hope that you do not just think about what you have done. I hope you think about community. Your community – even if you can’t see it around you every day. It is there. It is everywhere. You underestimated mine. Or should I say ours? I could say something along the lines of, ‘Imagine if it had been a member of your community,’ but instead let me say this. There are no boundaries to community; there are only exceptions, and you are one of them.

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The Equality Portfolio: Seeking fair opportunities for women in business Caroline Hitch (B3 1975-77) is interviewed by Naomi Kerbel (NC 1993-98) aroline Hitch and I are sitting beside a large, curved picture window in the Grand Room of HSBC Global Asset Management’s UK headquarters. We’re discussing gender balance in the workplace and the secret to how she got here; not literally (she bicycles everywhere from her home in Notting Hill), but her journey up the ranks of one of the largest banks in the world.

C

Nothing seems to hold Caroline back. HSBC has hired and rehired her three times during the course of her long career with the bank. She firmly believes that “a healthy dose of common sense 60

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gets you a long way, whether in portfolio management or anything else”. Until recently, Caroline was Head of Wealth Portfolio Management and it has been a “wonderful 10 years” with the bank. She’s been directly responsible for $10 billion and jointly in charge of a department managing $25 billion. Caroline is keen to help the next generation of women in banking find their feet, but says she’s surprised that gender is still an issue in the workplace: “If you told me that towards the end of my career I would still be having these discussions, I wouldn’t have believed you.” There’s a calming hush about the room which is only interrupted by our laughter and the outside hubbub of St James’. For the first day in a while, the sun is out


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and office workers are heading out for early drinks. The place has the feel of a very comfortable private-members’ club – originally it was the home of the Conservative Club. Damaged in the war, it was later bought by HSBC and fully restored. It’s the perfect place to contemplate how far we’ve come: “I thought we were done – the Pankhursts of the world, the co-education that I’d been through. That was it.” Caroline is a trailblazer in her own right. She was in the first ever intake of girls into B3, “stuck at the end of San, around the back of the playing fields”, and was amongst the first cohort of women to be accepted into Trinity College, Cambridge. She won her scholarship in natural sciences but then read economics – a change that paid off. On graduating, she was snapped up by the top-flight City stockbroker James Capel and Co. “It was very male. I had been used to coeducation through all my upbringing. This swung right to the other end of that,” she says. “That was when I really became aware of gender imbalance and issues.” At Marlborough she knew that she was in the minority, but it was a fact to be observed, not a hindrance to be dwelt upon or to hold you back. Caroline was the only girl in the Chapel Choir (“it

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went treble, treble, treble, Caroline, treble, treble!”) and was used to both sexes rubbing along side by side. She remembers fondly that every breaktime the Master’s wife would invite the girls to the Master’s Lodge for coffee: “...just the girls. I think most of the time the boys were thinking – what are they talking about? I can’t remember... the weather probably.”

“Caroline is keen to help the next generation of women in banking find their feet, but says she’s surprised that gender is still an issue in the workplace.”

The two of them knew early on that they wanted more to life and decided to look for ways to give something back. An opportunity came for her husband to use his accountancy skills to help communities in Botswana and they went for it. The couple ended up living in a safari tent bordering the Okavango River on the Namibian border, surrounded by the bush and “extraordinary wildlife”. Caroline puts her sense of adventure in part down to Marlborough and in part to her upbringing. Her parents were diplomats. Born in Japan, she lived all over the world and, so, moving somewhere new didn’t worry her. She and her husband spent two and half years on the Delta helping the local community. When they returned Caroline needed a job and was rehired by HSBC.

Caroline, now 56, is refreshingly frank and funny. Friends from overseas introduced her to her husband. But they were so convinced that the two of them wouldn’t get on that they planned to invite them out on different nights. They couldn’t make the dates work so Caroline says, “they just thought: stuff it, they can hack it for one night”. Caroline and her husband have now been married for nearly 22 years.

She says that she didn’t allow herself to be phased by being out of the financial services industry for a few years, “I needed a job, so I just got on with it.” Her pragmatic no-fuss approach makes Caroline a natural role model for women coming up through the ranks of the bank and she’s a regular speaker at internal events. Often she’s asked what she wished she knew when starting out.

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Caroline says it’s all about confidence. “Women require [of themselves] a higher overlap of skills when going for a new job than men. The men will apply if they’ve got five or six of the required skills. Women will require eight or nine.” She believes that if a woman acknowledges that skills-gap gender trait in herself, she can choose to ignore it or not. These traits, Caroline thinks, slow women down on their way to the top. “If you look around the world at the moment there are actually some very powerful women – Angela Merkel, Christine Lagarde, Hillary Clinton, Janet Yellen. But, if you look at them, they’re all on average older than the same set of powerful men. It probably takes longer to prove yourself and for society to be accepting of the skilled and powerful woman than the man. That really resonates with me”, she says. Caroline has made it to the top of her profession and has now decided to change the balance in her life. Concerned she was “getting stale”, she wanted to do something different and so spoke to her bosses about

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her thoughts. They didn’t want to lose her and proposed that she continue two days a week, giving her a chance to pursue her other interests outside of the office.

and she thinks the times we are living in are exciting, despite the inevitable market turmoil an EU referendum, Donald Trump and terrorism create.

In her words, she took a “nanosecond” to think about it and promptly accepted, ending up with a flexible working arrangement of which many in the City and beyond would be envious.

“As an investment manager you’re trying to predict the future and people always think it’s particularly difficult at that moment.” Caroline doesn’t buy it. “It’s difficult all the time. I don’t think anything has changed in that respect.”

Her plan is to expand upon the things that she’s passionate about: music (she sings in the English Baroque Choir and the OSJ voices); animals (she’s helping the RSPB with conservation development); financial education of children (“some of the stats around it are really scary”), and she’s hoping to add another non-executive director role to the one she has already. She’s also keen to hear about other ways she can use her skills in the profit and not-for-profit sectors. When reflecting on the world that the next generation of OMs are graduating into, Caroline is optimistic. She highlights the opportunities to learn at a specialist level in financial services, techniques and structures that she would have loved to have known about early on

She may be optimistic but she’s not complacent about what more needs to be done to overcome the gender divide. “We need to keep the pressure up, keep the focus up”, she says. “We need to make sure women going into the workplace have buddies and mentors. You can’t magic-up role models. You have to do little bits here and there.” And Caroline Hitch is certainly not done doing her bit. Naomi Kerbel works in TV news for Bloomberg in London


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OM News... President Elect Elizabeth Clough (LI 1968-70), next year’s President of the Marlburian Club, came to Marlborough in the autumn of 1968 as one of the College’s first fifteen girls. Her tenure as President could not be more perfectly timed, as in 2018 we celebrate 50 years of girls at Marlborough. Elizabeth’s life has been terrifically interesting and varied and we know she’ll bring great breadth of vision to the Club.

genius of Bletchley Park. Filmed extensively at Bletchley Park, the centre for codebreaking operations during World War II, this documentary featured the abandoned buildings where thousands of people worked tirelessly trying to crack the codes, including Hut 6 where Welchman pioneered his ground-breaking work, and the machines that Welchman helped design.

After studying history at Somerville College, Oxford, she joined the BBC as a News Trainee, initially working as a radio producer based in Belfast covering the Troubles. After a few years working at London Weekend and Thames Television she took a career break and spent a year on a Benton Fellowship at the University of Chicago. She returned to the BBC in the mid 1980s, working first as a producer on Newsnight and then Panorama, concentrating on investigative journalism. This interest took her to BBC Documentaries where she edited many award-winning series, several dealing with the law in some way: Taking Liberties, Rough Justice and The Trial. In 1996 she was seconded to work in South Africa to help Desmond Tutu set up the televising of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. In 1999 she joined Channel 4 as Commissioning Editor for history, and then religious programmes. She left in 2006 to run Mentorn Television’s Oxford based company and since 2009 has worked mainly as a freelance executive producer in both documentaries and current affairs. Aside from her business life, Elizabeth lives in Oxfordshire with her partner and three children and is a non-executive board member of Wild Blue, a Kensington-based angel-investment group, and advisor to a couple of charities – the African-based Children’s Radio Foundation, and the more local Turville School Project. She is about to join the Independent Monitoring Board for Bullingdon Prison.

locomotive steam engines. Network Rail Chairman, Sir Peter Hendy, unveiled the statue with members of Sir Nigel’s family. In February The Flying Scotsman returned to action after a £4.2 million, 10-year refit. The locomotive was built in Doncaster becoming the first locomotive of the newly formed London and North Eastern Railway (LNER). In 1934, it was clocked at 100mph on a special test run – officially the first locomotive in the UK to have reached that speed. A statue of Sir Nigel Gresley (B1 189093) was unveiled at King’s Cross station on the 75th anniversary of Gresley’s death. Sir Nigel designed the Doncasterbuilt Flying Scotsman and the Mallard

Gordon Welchman (C3 1920-25), one of the original elite codebreakers crucial to the allies defeating the Nazis in World War II, was featured in a BBC documentary. He is the forgotten

Flight Lieutenant John ‘Hoppy’ Hopgood’s (C1 1935-39) Distinguished Flying Cross and Bar was sold at auction for £24,000 and his family have donated the money to the charity WaterAid. The collection fetched less than the pre-sale estimate but the Government has pledged to match the sale price. This means £48,000 will go towards building a dam in Uganda, which will give 95,000 people access to clean water. His niece, who has already published his biography from letters he sent home during the war and who encouraged the sale of the medals, said: “We are a large family and it wouldn’t have been right if the medals ended up going down one side of the family in the future. When we realised the value of them we felt it was a unique opportunity to put them to good use.” Gordon Hamilton-Fairley (CO 194648), father of Council Member Sarah Hamilton-Fairley (B2 1974-76), was featured on the BBC Radio 4 Great Lives series. He was a brilliant cancer specialist, the father of oncology in the UK. Sadly in 1975 he was killed by an IRA bomb intended for a politician who lived in his street. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... Tim O’Donovan (C0 1946-49) was honoured to receive the Royal Maundy from Her Majesty The Queen at St George’s Chapel, Windsor in March. 84-year-old O’Donovan has authored the annual survey of Royal Family engagements published in The Times since 1979.

John Manser (PR 1953-58)

He is also a retired lay steward for St George’s Chapel and said he began keeping the record “out of curiosity”, after thinking, “perhaps one should know what the Royal Family are doing”. Richard Fox (LI 1951-56) discovered his father’s war memoirs and letters hidden in a small leather suitcase in the family attic. Harry Fox (CO 1911-16) stored all his war memorabilia but never spoke of the war or of his writings which weren’t discovered until after his death. Richard has very kindly donated his father’s suitcase to the College Archive and the fascinating War Memoirs and Letters of Harry Fox, 1917-19 are available to read, along with photographs etc, via the College website by clicking on WW1 and then Memoirs. John Manser (PR 1953-58) retired as Chairman of the Board of SABMiller plc, a brewing and beverage company, this year. John, who joined the board in 2001, was appointed Senior Independent Director in July 2010 and became Deputy Chairman in 2012. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants and was, until his retirement in February 2013, Chairman of Shaftesbury plc. 64

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Michael Pennington (PR 1957-61 ) was nominated in the Best Actor in a Supporting Role category in the 2016 Oliviers for his performance as Antigonus in The Winter’s Tale. He was also among the nominees for the 2015 Sheridan Morley Book for his Let Me Play the Lion Too: How To Be An Actor. He appeared an episode of Father Brown in January and played the title role in a UK tour of King Lear. Michael Elwyn (B3 1956-61) received complimentary mention for his role in the National Theatre revival of Granville Barker’s politically-charged play Waste. The Guardian described Elwyn’s performance as “sharply observant”.

Marlburian Club Past President Nick Maurice (C3 1956-61) worked for ten days as a medical volunteer in and around the refugee camps in Calais.

Graham Bagall (C2 1960-64) has retired after working for 50 years as a shipbroker for various firms on the Baltic Exchange, in the City of London. He retired as a director of SSY, the second largest firm, and has been elected Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers. In early 2015, after recovering from a hip replacement, he resumed his interest in rowing and this summer won two gold medals in the British Rowing Championships for Masters (veterans!) in VIII’s and Quadruple Sculls. Sir Philip Williams (LI 1963-68) has been ‘pricked’ at a 1,000-year tradition to appoint a High Sheriff of Dorset. Sir Philip said it was an honour and a privilege to take on the role. He will be following in his mother’s footsteps – Elizabeth, Lady Williams who was the first female High Sheriff in 1979. Former Master John Dancy was among 21 World War II veterans from across Cornwall presented the Legion d’honneur by Alain Sibril, the French Honorary Counsel, at a ceremony in Truro in March. The French Government has been awarding the Légion d’honneur to D-Day veterans to honour and thank those who fought and risked their lives to secure France’s liberation during the Second World War. The Légion d’honneur was


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established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte and is France’s highest distinction and awarded in recognition of both military and civilian merit. Charles Rodwell (PR 1969-74) has announced a new micro-gallery project for his work, in the form of a travelling cabin trunk. The trunk, previously owned by Charles’ parents and used for travelling to and from Africa in the 1940’s and 50’s, is to be filled with small works and used as a travelling pop-up gallery. He has also exhibited recent paintings including work based on an inspirational trip to Rajasthan together with a selection of English landscapes and other subjects. Following the highly successful production of his own stage adaptation of The Hudsucker Proxy, Simon Dormandy (C2 1971-75) is directing the UK premier of Luce at the Southwark Playhouse with Mel Giedroyc and Josette Simon among the cast. After opening at the Edinburgh Festival, Simon McBurney’s (LI 1971-75) amazing production for Complicite, The Encounter, had a successful UK and European tour, and a performance was streamed live from the Barbican.

A charity founded by Mayoor Patel (PR 1973-77) and his brother, Arun, has been given a Points of Light award, recognising outstanding individual volunteers – people who are making a change in their community. Ex-Prime Minister, David Cameron, tweeted, “Arun and Mayoor Patel from Polio Children are todays #PointsofLight for changing hundreds of children’s lives.” Arun and Mayoor Patel founded the charity in 2003 after visiting a school for children affected by polio in Rajasthan. Having suffered polio as an infant, Arun learned from his own experience that a good education was the best way to live a full life despite the lasting effects of polio. The brothers wanted to give other children the same chance to complete their education and have raised over £1.2m to help change the lives of over 1,000 children. Sarah Taylor (SU 1973-75) has been appointed High Sheriff of Oxfordshire. She took up the position at a ceremony in April and will spend a year in office. Jonathan Hall’s (C1 1974-79) firm, Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

Last year’s BBC Radio 2 series 30 Years Man And Boy – A Calmer Chameleon: The Boy George Story, was written and produced by Lewis Borg-Cardona (BH 1973-77). The programme, for Magnum Opus Broadcasting, won a Gold Award at the 2016 New York Festivals World’s Best Radio Programs competition.

(AHMM), recently won the RIBA Stirling Prize 2015 for Burntwood School. Jonathan has also been involved in other recently completed award-winning schemes: Sunshine House, a Children’s Development Centre in Southwark, and housing developments at Church Street and Crown Street Buildings. “The Stirling Prize is the UK’s major architectural prize and we are very pleased as success comes after being on the final Stirling shortlist three times previously, but missing out on the award itself.” Robert Perrins (SU 1979-83) has been awarded an honorary degree to mark the 50th Anniversary of Aston University’s award of a Royal Charter and status as a university. Twenty three honorary degrees were awarded to prominent Aston graduates, luminaries and leading figures from throughout the university’s history. Many congratulations to Lieutenant General John Lorimer (C1 1976-81) who was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (KCB) in the 2016 Birthday Honours. Damian Jones (TU 1978-82) produced Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie for his company, DJ Films, which opened to great reviews. This follows both commercial and critical success for Dad’s Army and The Lady In the Van.

Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM), recently won the RIBA Stirling Prize for architecture for 2015 for Burntwood School The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Congratulations to Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81) who has completed the 250 mile walk of the WWI Western Front to commemorate all those who died between 1914 and 1918, and particularly her great-uncle, whose idea the Via Sacra was. So far she has raised £2,323.52 for www.Legs4Africa.org. Susanna also sung the part of the Angel in the Dream of Gerontius with the MC Choral Society in Chapel. Edward Bayntun-Coward (PR 197984) was sworn in as High Sheriff of Somerset at Wells Cathedral in March. Edward is the great-grandson of George Bayntun and son of Hylton. He read Modern History at Oxford University and then worked for five years at Maggs Bros. in London. He now runs George Bayntun, a venerable bookbindery and rare-books seller in Bath that was founded by his great-grandfather in 1894. Stephen Reid (SU 1980-85) is now heavily involved with the charity Attitude is Everything, which improves deaf and disabled people’s access to live music. Reid was a promoter, band manager and nightclub owner for 20 years, and is now a farmer in addition to his role as Chairman of Attitude is Everything’s Board of Trustees. Having begun as a pilot project in 2000, they are now a fully independent charity and part of Arts Council England’s National Portfolio of Organisations. They encourage events producers to go beyond the legal obligations set out in the Equality Act and implement best 66

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practice, providing a fair and equal service to their deaf and disabled customers.

welcome any interest and support from other OMs, in Scotland or elsewhere, and can be contacted via SIU’s website.

The Archbishop of Canterbury’s chaplain, the Rev Canon Jo Bailey Wells (B3 1981-83), was appointed as the fifth Bishop of Dorking in the Church of England’s Diocese of Guildford. Jo studied at the University of Minnesota and from 2005 to 2013 was the director of the Anglican Episcopal House of Studies at Duke Divinity School in North Carolina. She was Chaplain of Clare College, Cambridge from 1995 to 1998 and Dean from 1998 to 2001. From 2001 to 2005, Jo served as a lecturer in Old Testament and Biblical Theology at Ridley Hall, Cambridge.

Matt Reid (CO 1985-90) won his first BAFTA in 2015 as part of the team on The Island with Bear Grylls. Matt’s other documentary work has included Jon Richardson Grows Up and Monarchy: The Royal Family at Work. He also made a film about the band, New Model Army called Between Dog & Wolf, which had a cinema release and is currently available on DVD. Matt particularly enjoyed the dichotomy of filming such diametrically opposed British institutions in close succession. He has also made many documentaries for Sport and Comic Relief and made a film about Bradley Wiggins as he prepared for the Rio Olympics. Matt made his first steps into filming in the audio/visual department at the College.

Tamara Heber-Percy MBE (TU 198190) features in the article ‘The busy woman’s guide to building your A-team’. You know the saying: if you want something done, ask a busy person. But who do the busy ones lean on? Tamara features in the article, which sees four successful career women asked who they depend on for sanity, timesaving… and late night fro-yos.

Heath Harvey (B1 1986-90), CEO of London based Saracens, led the club to European Champions Cup and Aviva Premiership victory, the first time the double has been achieved in 12 years. Alastair Cameron (B2 1983-88) is living in Edinburgh and working as an independent management consultant. In addition to client work and family life, Alastair founded a non-party proUK movement, Scotland In Union, in March 2015. The group promotes a positive view of Scotland within the UK, and seeks to counter the rise of nationalism in Scotland. Alastair would

With the first Varsity Match being played in 1872, it is one of the world’s longest-running sporting fixtures. A number of Old Marlburians and members of Common Room, both past and present, have played in the prestigious fixture. Recent performers with Marlborough connections include: Tim Marvin (Housemaster of Preshute) was a member of the


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Oxford XV that defeated Cambridge in December 1985, his second blue after appearing in the 1984 encounter; John Henry Bothwell (B2 1986-91), Oxford; Keith Budge (CR 1984-95), Oxford; Owen Jones (TU 1993-95), Cambridge; former Ireland international Tyrone Howe (CR 1997-99) played in the Oxford side in 1994 and 1995; Gavin Turner (CR 2007-15) enjoyed consecutive wins as an Oxford Blue in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Financial recruitment specialists Halliday Marx, set up by John Marx (B2 1987-92), recruit across all levels within finance and accounting teams. They are looking to hire two graduates per year for the next three years. So if you have just graduated or are about to graduate in the next year or two, and might be interested in a career in finance/accounting recruitment in London, then get in touch with John at jmarx@hallidaymarx.com or call 020 3402 6370. Imran Tayabali FCA (LI 1989-94) cycled from Shelford to Southwold (around 90 miles) in memory of his father who died of meningitis in 2008. A director of Chartered Accountants & Business Consultants Tayabali Tomlin & White, Imran took on the challenge in July. He commented, “This is an opportunity to raise money for Meningitis Now, a charity that supports those affected by the disease. The cycle ride, itself, went well and we managed to raise over £5,000, which is more than we initially anticipated. The pint at the end tasted amazing after a dip in the North Sea to cool down!” Jonathon Barton (C1 1981-86) has joined the Bank of America from Meru Capital Group as Managing Director of global swaps products and stock loans. Gavin Tan (B2 1981-85), CEO of Singapore Cellresearch Corp, was interviewed for The Peak Magazine. “At the age of 12, he was sent to the prestigious Marlborough College in England.” A self-described shy kid, Tan says those were formative years for him. ‘I learnt to get on and empathise with others, and to live in a community. The school taught us that with privilege comes responsibility and that we

Old Marlburians and members of Common Room, have played in the prestigious Varsity Match

couldn’t take this education and do nothing with it’, he said.” Ben Slee (C2 1987-92) recently became a trustee of the Tutu Foundation UK. The Foundation was created by his parents in collaboration with Desmond and Leah Tutu to help UK communities deal with conflict by promoting and using many of the ideas that helped lead to some sort of reconciliation in communities in South Africa. The Tutu Foundation UK is currently going from strength to strength. Last year they ran a series of workshops with young people in schools and youth groups culminating in the Youth Summit. Miranda Wells (B3 1987-89) has relocated back to the UK after nine years as OM Middle East Club Secretary. Nicholas Stockwell (C2 1992-97) has agreed to take over and already has lots of ideas to implement. He can be contacted via the office. We would like to thank Miranda for her many years of hard work for the Middle East Group. Neil Cleminson (CR 1989-2012) offers revision sessions in Fulham, specialising in A Level Physics and, perhaps uniquely, Common Entrance Maths, Physics and Chemistry. Please visit www.oystereducation.com for details. Congratulations to Katie Beney (MO 1989-91) and the team at Welcome to Yorkshire who won the BBC/RHS People’s Choice Award: Show Garden at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show.

In his role as Head of Co-Creation at Instinctif Partners, Tom Tuke-Hastings (BH 1990-95) has helped his team to success at the UK Event Awards. His team won the Best In-House Event of the Year category for their work with Coca-Cola Enterprise on the Rugby Ready GB Roadshow 2015.

Congratulations to all Old Marlburians who ran the London Marathon on Sunday 24th April. Jim Ashley-Down (BH 1991-96) ran to raise money for Phab Kids, a charity offering children with disabilities unique experiences in outdoor activity centres. Roger Backhouse (C1 1974-79), Alex Backhouse (LI 2005-10), Robert Gibson (C2 2007-12) and Tom Rowe-Jones (LI 2005-10) ran as part of Team Blind as a Bat – managed by Theo Backhouse (LI 2007-12). Roger, who has retinitis pigmentosa (RP) himself, is trustee and long-time supporter of the charity and he ran the London Marathon for RP Fighting Blindness in 2010. They have now raised almost £125,000. Victor Yiu (C3 1992-97) returned to the College for the first time since heading off as part of the class of 1997. Returning to Wiltshire along with his family, Victor took in sights both old and new. “I had five great The Marlburian Club Magazine

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years in C3. As a foreign pupil coming from a totally different background and culture, I was very grateful that my housemaster, beaks and fellow C3 members helped me to settle so quickly. I truly enjoyed the friendship and the unique culture in the house.” Victor is pictured here standing proudly in Court, a place that holds a special place in the hearts of all OMs. “Court is the symbol of Marlborough. I am grateful for the education that I received at the College, in particular the education on values and personal developments. Returning some 18 years after I left, it looks as though the tradition still plays a big part, whilst there have been some developments too.” There is one quintessential English pastime that he continues to enjoy – thanks to cold afternoons upfield. “I first learned how to play rugby at Marlborough. I was only an average player during my time here, I never played on the XV pitch, but I developed a keen interest in the sport which I continue to play in a Hong Kong league and occasionally coach young players, too.” Lara Cowan’s (MO 1992-97) company, Grenadine Escape, collected the International Property Award for Caribbean Real Estate Marketing this year. Grenadine Escape is a luxury travel and real estate company specialising in the Caribbean destinations of Barbados, St. Vincent, and the Grenadines and Grenada and has featured in How to Spend It, Condé Nast Traveller and Vogue magazine. 68

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Susannah Tresilian (NC 1992-97) curated the NEAT Studio at Nottingham Playhouse as part of NEAT 16. This year the festival had a literary theme, recognising Nottingham’s successful bid for UNESCO City of Literature, and profiled Nottingham as an innovative, creative European city. “Under the curation of Director Susannah Tresilian, the Studio comes alive with a kaleidoscopic series of events. These include staged readings of never-before-seen-in-the-UK plays selected from all across Europe and performed by the in-house NEAT Ensemble, debates, workshops, Q+A sessions with international playwrights.” James Deboo (TU 1992-97) is currently writing his second book following a move back to Cumbria. Having finished at Marlborough in 1997, James attended Lancaster University while his wife, Thirza (SU 1997-99), studied medicine at Liverpool. After the birth of their first child the couple moved back to Marlborough with Thirza later working at Marlborough Medical Practice until Easter 2015. “We moved back again to the Lakes in May 2015 as we missed the hills and the sea!” said James. “Thirza is a partner in a GP surgery round the corner and I’m currently writing my second book, which is about the Lakes.” Theatre503 has appointed Andrew Shepherd (LI 1993-98) as Executive Director. Shepherd is the founder of theatre company ACS Random, which he set up in 2002 and focuses on developing new writing. Andrew, who is also an actor and writer, said he was “thrilled to be joining the venue”, adding, “As a passionate advocate for new writing and supporting emerging talent, it’s incredibly exciting to be part of one of London’s best venues for ground-breaking new work.” Congratulations to Constantin Atnas (SU 1993-96) who has been elected to the Foreign Trade Council of the

Austrian Federal Economic Chambers. This is a 20-member panel representing Austria’s exporting industries and companies. Congratulations are also due to his sister, Catherine ‘Kiki’ Atnas (SU 1996-98), who has recently completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Surrey. Ollie Baines (C1 1996-2001) who sings with British vocal group Blake appeared on The Graham Norton Show with his counterparts and Dame Shirley Bassey, singing their festive single ‘The Christmas Song’. The collaborative act appeared on the Strictly Come Dancing Christmas special, with their single in aid of children’s charity Variety and Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital. They will be singing the biggest songs from their six albums during their 2016 UK-wide tour. Blake launched their first album in 2007, only six months after the three reunited as friends on the social media outlet Facebook. The debut went straight to number one in the UK Classical Chart, got into the Top Twenty pop chart and sold over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks of sale.

Jake Meyer (C3 1997-02) thankfully survived an avalanche and returned home safely from his attempt at climbing K2, the world’s second highest mountain. Beginning his final summit push on July 21, Jake was taking part in his second attempt at the mountain having previously reached 7700m in 2009. If he had succeeded then Jake would have become the youngest Briton to successfully climb the mountain,


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Katyuli Lloyd (MO 1998–2003) Children’s Book Illustration

situated in Pakistan, as he was when he reached the summit of Everest at 21 in 2005. The avalanche swept away all the tents, equipment and supplies, including nearly all the oxygen. Jake said: “2016 will rank as the K2 season which should have seen summits, but did not – the season that ended before it had even begun. Climbing K2 has been a dream of mine ever since I climbed Everest, and I’ve now made two attempts to realise that dream. I am incredibly fortunate to have had the opportunity to spend four months of my life on K2, which is in one of the most awe-inspiring mountain ranges in the world.”

Claire Lowdon (MO 1998-2003) returned to Marlborough in February to speak to the Literary Society. She spoke in the Adderley to an appreciative Literary Society audience about the writing of her first novel, Left of the Bang, which one reviewer has called “the definitive novel of a generation of Londoners”. Her talk about the craft of writing was compelling, generous and candid – a fascinating insight into the creative process.

Congratulations to Katyuli Lloyd (MO 1998–2003) who has completed her MA in Children’s Book Illustration at the Cambridge School of Art. She has also been short-listed for the Victoria and Albert Museum illustration prize in the Student Category for her illustrations for Virginia Woolf ’s novel Flush. Emerald Fennell (NC 1998-2003) has had a busy year. As well as appearing in the BBC’s Call the Midwife as Patsy, she played the role of Emerald in the film The Danish Girl and the Commander in Pan. Author of Shiverton Hall and The Creeper, her latest novel for young adults Monsters, published by Bloomsbury, received great reveiws.

Ed Perkins (TU 1999-2004) was named as one of the 18 emerging talents selected as this year’s Breakthrough Brits. Breakthrough Brits is the UK’s leading initiative that identifies,

supports and celebrates the most promising newcomers across film, television and games. After graduating from university, Perkins started working for the National Geographic, before making behind-the-scenes documentaries for such celebrated works as Project Nim (2011), The Imposter and Searching for Sugar Man (both 2012). With the subject of his first featurelength documentary, he struck gold… Garnet’s Gold (2014). After a neardeath experience in the Scottish Highlands, Garnet Frost believes he discovered the site where Bonnie Prince Charlie hid his gold. Twenty years later, Frost decided to try to relocate the hiding place and Perkins was there to capture his journey every step of the way. Naturally, the film is not simply about the charismatic Frost’s treasurehunting but more about his existential search to understand himself. Shot over four years, the documentary, which was produced by two-time BAFTA-winner Simon Chinn, is impressive filmmaking and clearly made by someone who both understands and loves the genre. Garnet’s Gold recently won Best Newcomer Documentary at the 2015 Grierson Awards. Tandem is a year-round arts project based in Oxford set up by Nina Brown (MO 2000-05). It is about bringing eco-friendliness to new audiences through the arts, all whilst celebrating vibrant cultures from across Europe and beyond. As a not-for-profit initiative, any surplus made will be reinvested back into local community groups and cultural enterprises focused on sustainability and environmentalism. Nina also runs InTandem, which brings international writers and artists together to collaboratively produce publications that deal with a broad spectrum of environmental and social issues. They fuse fact, fiction, poetry, photography and illustration to make these issues accessible to new audiences. Having ignored advice “not to pursue the career path she wanted to because it was too competitive”, Emily Chiswell (SU 2000-02) has become a successful continuity announcer on BBC 1 and 2 and a voiceover artist. As a result she has set up www.passionpods.co.uk with The Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News...

the aim of inspiring and encouraging young people to seek out those creative, unusual careers that can so often seem impossible. The series has over 75 exclusive interviews with an impressive line-up of entrepreneurs and creative minds. If you would like to get involved or think you could support young people that are pursuing their passion or if you just want to know more contact Emily via her website. Helena Dickie (MO 2000-05) has worked as Event Manager and Live Entertainment Producer at Sound Advice for two years. Her most recent success was the annual Cornbury Festival in Oxfordshire for which she is Festival Producer. Georgia Cummings (MO 2000-05), founded Potage in 2013. For the first year Georgia did all the cooking at home and delivered on a bicycle. Now they are a team of eight with a goal to make eating easy. All food is served in a pot and meals are freshly prepared by hand each morning using organic meat and eggs, and fresh veg from the local market. Harriet Green (EL 2000-05) appeared in Freddie Syborn’s (B1 2000-05) latest play You Mean the World to Me at Theatre Delicatessen in January, and Freddie’s short film, Isla Traena, was chosen to be screened at the Dingle Film Festival. 70

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Florence Keith Roach’s (NC 2000-05) latest play Eggs played at the Vault Festival from 24 February until 5 March following a successful run at the Edinburgh Playhouse. Eggs was chosen by Nick Hern Books to be published in an anthology of the five best plays performed at Vault Festival.

Jack Whitehall (B1 2001-06) appeared in the final series of Fresh Meat on Channel 4 and in Mother’s Day, directed by Garry Marshall, alongside Julia Roberts, Jennifer Aniston and Kate Hudson. He takes his show, Jack Whitehall at Large, on a National Tour next year.

Pip Brignall’s (LI 2002-07) Tangled Thread Theatre, set up to provide paid opportunities for young actors and creatives, had a successful run of Only Forever at the Hope Theatre in Islington and produced Tallulah Brown’s (MO 2002-07) second play, After the Heat We Battle for the Heart at the Vault Festival.

Founded by Hannah McCollum (MM 2003-08) ChicP was set up to bring healthy, colourful dips to the food market. A lover of hummus and tired of bland, unhealthy options, Hannah decided to combine her creative cooking and eagerness to help prevent food waste, to create healthy, punchy vegetable hummus from surplus vegetables. The inspiration behind ChicP was the overriding determination and passion to change the way we approach cooking and food waste. Angharad George-Carey (MO 200407) was described as “eye-catching and charismatic as both the Prime Minister’s po-faced advisor and Chantille, a sultry prostitute” in an adaptation of Measure for Measure at the Jermyn Street Theatre

Several OMs returned to the Memorial Hall on Friday 20th May for the Orchestral & Ensembles Concert. Tom Hooker (LI 2001-06) played the French horn whilst Joe Arkwright (SU 2010-15) and Ellen Arkwright (MM 2007-12) were in the audience to witness their father, Alex (CR 1995-, pictured), conducting Brasser. Millie Ashworth (MO 2006-11), Tom Cayley (CO 2010-15) and Julia Mackie (née Daniels, B3 1978-80) were also present for what was a memorable and emotional event. Tom Durrant Pritchard’s (TU 200106) Prowl Theatre Company staged Sexual Perversity in Chicago in the summer last year after a stint appearing at the RSC as Edward IV in The War of the Roses, shown on BBC Two as Britain’s Bloody Crown. He has recently filmed The Head Hunter which is due for release later this year.

Sebastian Fagg (C1 2004-09) brought bands from his Yucatan record label to perform for MC pupils in the Mem Hall on Saturday 5th March. After a sequence of electronic music by Tom Niven (B1 2004-09), Wovoka Gentle (Will Stokes (B1 2003-08), Immie Mason and Ellie Mason) treated us to a performance of high quality musicianship. Alexandra Dowling (TU 2005-07) continued her role the final series of The Musketeers on BBC One playing Queen Anne. She also starred in Terence Rattigan’s While the Sun Shines at Theatre Royal, Bath. Members of The Marlburian Club office caught a performance of Sasha McMurray’s (LI 2005-07) Open Air Immersive production of As You Like It at The Savill Garden, Windsor Great


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Park for Watch Your Head. An imaginative and thoughtful rendering of the play, a talented cast, music, dance and circus acrobatics combined with the background of The Savill Gardens led to a magical evening. Her next production, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, part of the Royal Collection Trust’s Shakespeare 400 programme sold out all their performances at Windsor Castle. Hattie Briggs (MM 2006-11) recorded her second album, Young Runaway, whilst continuing to play gigs around the UK. Alex Price (LI 2006-11) has been named as one of the top 100 most influential people in digital by the British Interactive Media Association, the youngest person to ever make the list, aged 23. BIMA represents Britain’s digital industry and is now one of the most widely respected names in the digital community. Commenting on the news, Alex said: “The start of 2016 has been incredibly exciting for 93digital, having recently moved into a bigger office and taken on three new team members. To be included in the BIMA 100 this year alongside such an inspiring list of names tops it off.”

During his travels, George Sopwith (LI 2006-11) met the people of Thanamir village and became involved with them in their Community Conservation project to create a formally recognised reserve that will protect an area of virgin forest. Thanamir’s forests fall in to the Indo-Malayan region, a global biodiversity hotspot that is home to many endangered species such as the

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hoolock gibbon, Asiatic black bear and clouded leopard. Tigers are still occasionally reported in this area and with sufficient protection could make a comeback. “We have been working in partnership with the Wildlife Protection Society of India and with their help have made significant progress on the project.” James Lam (CO 2007-12) led an Oxford University Expedition to Svalbard in the High Arctic during the summer. A 184-mile crossing of East Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, just 700 miles from the North Pole, retracing the steps of an Oxford expedition that explored this region of the Arctic in 1923.

Will’s father, Geoff, commented: “We all went over to Dublin and saw the match at Trinity in beautiful surroundings and England triumphed – so all those days of thinking about rugby when he should have been focused on Chemistry may have paid off !” Grace Jackson (LI 2007-09) was awarded an OBE in the New Year Honours list for her work with the Ebola Response Team. BBC Two viewers will have spotted Jack Ruddy (PR 2007-12) leading Queen’s, Belfast to a strong win against the University of Sussex on University Challenge.

James became obsessed with climbing and subsequently with expeditions almost as soon as he started in Shell. Since his first trip to the Alps with Marlborough Outdoor Activities led by the late Mr Rosedale and other members of the OA department in 2008 he has never looked back! He sees this expedition as a chance to also work on another passion that began when he was at Marlborough: using science to ‘make a difference’. The main purpose of the expedition is to record the effects of climate change in this Arctic region. Huge congratulations to Will Eversfield (C3 2007-12) who represented England Rugby in April. Will played for England Students in their 57-30 win against Ireland Students in Dublin. Having just returned from the game,

James Sennett (TU 2008-13) organised a charity cricket match between an OM XI and a Sepsis Select XI for the UK Sepsis Trust. James lost his father to septicaemia some 20 months ago and the match took place in his memory, to raise more awareness of the disease and funds for the charity. James was Captain of the XI in 2013 and the OM side was from his generation. He said: “My father was a great sportsman and there was nothing more enjoyable for him than to take part in or watch cricket all around the world.” Six Old Marlburians have just completed a 2,000-mile drive through India, raising £2,000 for charity. Taking part were Guy Wilkinson (CO 2009-14), Harry Parker (SU 2009-14), Rory Govan (BH 200914), Ollie Foster (TU 2009-14), Joe Macguffog (C2 2009-14) and Nick Clark Bryan (BH 2009-14). The group were raising funds for the SPRINT fund and Cool Earth, which works alongside The Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... indigenous villagers to halt rainforest destruction. The adventurous drive was made in motorised rickshaws with a top speed of 35mph. Tristan Robbins (CO 2009-14) was selected by the Madison Genesis Team for his biggest and highest-profile race: Le Tour de Yorkshire. He has been riding professionally for two years and competed in the Category 1 race on the pro circuit organised by the Tour de France ASO organisation. It is hugely prestigious and was included on the pro circuit after the success of the Grand Depart in Yorkshire in 2014.

Big names who took part included Wiggins, Hayman, Voeckler and Bernie Eisel. Rory Lorimer (C1 2009-14) has caught the eye of the Scottish Exiles with some impressive performances for Exeter University. During his College days, he played hooker and open side and was a part of the Rosslyn Park Shield winning side. He also represented the South West of England U16. Sophie Spink (MO 2009-2014) and Annabel Hazlitt (MO 2009-2014) both played for the winning Oxford team in this year’s Varsity Hockey Match, beating Cambridge 2-1. Alessandro Latif (B1 2009-14) has returned to home turf after a year away and is contesting the fiercely-disputed, 72

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ITV4-televised Porsche Carrera Cup GB – the UK’s fastest one-make series – for the first time with former titlewinning outfit GT Marques. “The level of opposition in the Porsche Carrera Cup GB this year is extremely strong – including the reigning champion and a number of drivers who have been competing in the series for several years – but our pace was promising from the outset”, reflected the 2014 Blancpain Sprint Series Pro-Am Champion. The Marlburian Club’s extensive networking opportunities have recently helped an OM make the most of a professional opportunity in Hong Kong. Libby Adam (NC 2009-14) takes up the story. “After leaving Marlborough in June 2014, I had always planned to go straight on to university and had never considered the potential advantages of undertaking a gap year. However, when a rather unique opportunity came about to live in Hong Kong with another Marlburian, I could not resist the temptation and without the Marlburian Club’s support I quite possibly would not have been able to go. Feeling a little awkward about cashing in my all too recent OM status, I phoned the Club and I am pleased to say I had the most incredible and rewarding time. I completed a three-month internship for an international jewellery company; a six-month internship with an awardwinning event marketing agency; and, finally, I spent two weeks helping manage a Chinese warehouse during the Christmas build up. All these experiences were with people who, in some way, had a connection to Marlborough. Many young OMs are completely unaware of how the Club works to connect people all across the world. I was astonished at how so many people were willing to give me advice, an interview or even a much needed Sunday roast during my time. I hope that the success of my adventure will encourage more OMs to fully engage with the Marlburian Club and everything that it has to offer.”

Awarded a Travel Scholarship from the Arthur Scott Fund in 2015, Charlie Bawden (MM 2010-15) has recently spent time volunteering at Springvale House in Zimbabwe, which serves as the preparatory school within the Peterhouse Group of Schools. Juliette Casini (MM 2010-15), Belgian swimming champion in the 50m, 100m and 200m freestyle, was selected to represent Belgium at the European Aquatics Championships, which took place at the Aquatic Centre in London earlier this year. Henry Martin (PR 2011-16) was included in the Bath Rugby squad for the Singha Premiership Rugby 7s Series at Sandy Park this year. Martin was a regular for the XV and on the sevens circuit, as well as being a part of the Bath Rugby Academy. Now an OM, the winger is also contracted as an England 7s Academy player.

Dan Springate (SU 2013-15), who plays bass in seven-piece jazz group The Ben Cipolla Band, has been on tour. Dan joined frontman Ben and five other bandmates on a tour of the south of England with dates in London, Bristol, Cheltenham and Cirencester. Remarkably, the tour was accomplished entirely using National Express coaches in order to save money since every member of the band is currently either a student, or taking a gap year. You can also catch a clip of them at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival earlier this year on YouTube.


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Engagements, Marriages & Births Engagements Michael Bush (TU 1993-98) to Lesley Olsen Phillipa Mitcheson (MO 1994-99) to Nicholas Easener

Antonia Whitehead (NC 2001-06) to Monty Halliday (C2 2004-006)

Gavin M Gardner (PR 1998-2003) to Lauren Leony Albrecht-Brown

Charles Hardwick (CO 2002-2007) to Alexandra Bromley-Martin (EL 2003-2008)

Victoria J Rees (CO 2002-04) to Peter James Hannah Molly Cowan (MO 2001-06) to William Taylor (PR 2001-06)

Anthony Edward (Roo) (C3 19962001) to Alice Williams

Marriages

Kate Guinness (NC 1998-2003) to Julian de Segundo (C2 1999-2004)

Philip Walker (CO 1940-44) to Fiona Frances Rose Burra

Annabel Buchan (MO 1999-2004) to Ricardo Sitrangulo

Simon P Beards (B2 1964-68) to Ms Gillian Patricia Laws

Births

Zinka Bozovic (EL 2000-05) to Captain Martin MacHale

Dennis W Ng (B3 1986-91) to Dr. Iulia Emilia Hategan

To James Singleton (PR 1988-93) and his wife, Kristina Strunz, a daughter, Annabel Christa Penelope StrunzSingleton, on 6 June 2016

James Soper (SU 2005-10) to Amy Edwards

To Sam Rogers (B1 1992-97) and his wife, Priya, a daughter, Sasha, on 14 December 2015 To Katie Coakes nĂŠe Waite (EL 1992 97) and her husband, Alistair, a girl, Maisie Sophia, born on 24 June 2015 To Sarah Peldmanis, nĂŠe Hunt (CO 1996-97) and her husband, Mark, a daughter, Georgina Lily, born on 20 January 2015 To Stephen Pottinger (C3 1994-99) and his wife, Kayoko, a son, Daisuke, on 17 January 2016 To John Beauchamp (C3 1995-2000) and his wife, Magdalena, a son, Idzi Kazimierz, on 18 September 2014 To Daniel Chiappa-Patching (PR 1995-2000) and his wife, Michela, a daughter, Serafina To Clare Newcome-Evans (NC 19992004) and Dan Evans a daughter, Willow Bay Alianna, on 26 May 2015 To Edward Dickson (SU 2005-07) and his wife, Joanna, a son, Andrew Edward, on 26 June 2016 For more details of the above, please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ announcements The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Deaths Rupert D’Mullins (C1 1927-31) Herbert Nigel Raban (B3 1929-33) James A Hibbert (B2 1931-34) Arthur Raymond Ward (C2 1932-34) Hector Gordon Jelf (C1 1930-36) Dr William Hanbury (C1 1931-36) Edward Chambre Dickson (LI 1932-37) Brigadier Anthony Taggart (C3 1932-37) see obituary Greville Selby-Lowndes (B3 1933-38) Squadron Leader Geoffrey Edgar Cruwys (C2 1934-38) Dr Michael B Matthews (B1 1933-38) Donald Hugh Andreae (LI 1935-39) Rear Admiral Geoffrey Mitchell (LI 1935-39) Gordon Eldridge (B1 1933-39) Kenneth MF McAlpin (C2 1936-40) David St Clair Roberts (C3 1935-40) Roger Lews Morley (C2 1935-40) Edward L Cavaliero (C1 1939-40) Douglas Elliot Rae (B1 1936-41) Dr Francis Peter Willis (C2 1937-42) Colin Peter Lindsay (PR 1938-41) William L Harragin (B1 1939-42) Keith Maxwell Ferguson (C3 1938-42) John Grosvenor Baddeley (B3 1939-42) Lt. Col. Thomas Huggan OBE (B1 1939-43) John R Wadman OBE RN (B1 1940-43) Francis Prichard (LI 1939-43) Derek Anderson (LI 1938-43) Air Vice-Marshal Sir John de Milt Severne (CO 1939-43) see obituary Professor Philip K McPherson (C2 1940-44) see obituary Nicholas William Cranfield (PR 1939-44) Martin W Busk (PR 1939-44) Ernest Roney (PR 1940-44) Martin Evans (PR 1940-44) Charles RC Aston (B2 1941-45) Adrian Marston (C2 1941-45) see obituary The Rev Ivo Francis Trelawny Morshead (B2 1941-45) Dennis R G Marler (C3 1941-45) Ronald G Lagdon (B2 1941-45) Richard Donald Ninian Fisher (B1 1941-45) Rear Admiral John Hervey (C2 1942-45) see obituary David Bryant (C1 1941-46) John Hurle Morshead (B2 1942-46) Stephen Holmes (B2 1942-46) Charles Hull (PR 1943-47) James B Jonas (B3 1943-48) 74

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John F Parsons (B1 1943-48) Mr John Patrick Wood (B3 1943-48) John R Pretty (B11944-48) Michael Hardy (CO 1945-49) The Rev Gareth Salisbury (CO 1945-49) Professor J Richard Batchelor (SU 1945-49) see obituary William (Bill) Armitage (CO 1944-49) Richard Golding Constable (C2 1945-50) see obituary Andrew P Mapplebeck (C2 1946-50) Clive Hunter Millar (SU 1947-51) Professor Evelyn Ebsworth CBE FRSE (B2 1946-51) see obituary Philip James Worsley (B3 1949-52) Peter Hugill Grainger Clarke (C3 1948-53) David Nobbs (CO 1948-53) see obituary Michael O Sackett BEM (C3 1947-53) Patrick Templeman Windeler (LI 1949-53) Michael H White (C3 1950-54) Richard K Gaskell (B3 1950-54) see obituary Wing Commander David Henry Insall (C3 1952-54) Michael A Finn (C1 1951-55) James H Tilden (B3 1950-55) Professor Charles Arthur Cain (C1 1952-56) Mr Nicholas Hallam Stuart Kindersley (PR 1952-56) Andrew Paul Shaw (CO 1952-56) Dr Nicholas W Pumphrey (B1 1952-56) Peter J Neil (PR 1953-57) Duncan C Jarrett (B2 1953-58) Martin James Gordon Moir (CO 1952-58) Michael Cannon (B2 1954-59) Robert Manning (B2 1954-59) Charles Spencer-Bernard (B2 1955-60) Richard K L Singleton (C2 1958-62) John Santer (C2 1958-62) Franc Richard Sadleir (B1 1958-63) The Reverend Edward Bailey (CR 1965-68) Paul Anthony Tahany (C3 1966-69) William Henry Clive Matthews (SU 1966-70) William Tobias Hall (Toby) (C1 1966-70) Peter M Smith (CR 1969-73) Elizabeth Dare (TU 1982-84) Janet Tanner (CR 1968-96) see obituary Victoria Macdonald (Nana) (TU 1998-2000) F Thomas Clift (TU 1997-02) Hamish Howitt (LI 2009-14)


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Obituaries Force Association and also President of the Queen’s Flight Association and of the Central Flying School Association. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Richard Batchelor (SU 1945-49) rofessor Richard Batchelor, MD, FRCP, who died on 21 December 2015 at the age of 84, was one of a group of eminent medical scientists, who made pioneering advances in the field of tissue typing and organ transplants in the second half of the last century.

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John de Milt Severne (CO 1939-40) ir Vice-Marshal Sir John Severne, who died aged 90, was a Cold War fighter pilot before becoming Equerry to the Duke of Edinburgh. After a series of senior command posts in the RAF, he was appointed Captain of the Queen’s Flight.

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His career in the RAF, which started in 1944, ranged from post-war fighters and jet trainers to the Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft. He won the King’s Cup Air Race in 1960 and became the British Air Racing Champion the same year, flying a Turbulent aircraft entered by the Duke of Edinburgh. In January 1954, he joined No 98 Squadron, flying Venom day fighter/ground attack aircraft based in northern Germany close to the Iron Curtain. He was soon appointed Flight Commander. On 1 November 1954 he was carrying out a looping manoeuvre when the engine of his Venom caught fire and he elected to crash land so that investigations into the incident could be carried out. For his gallantry he was awarded the Air Force Cross. After a year in the personnel department of the Air Ministry, John was appointed Equerry to the Duke of Edinburgh. John’s varied flying career took another turn in January 1971 when he was appointed to command the RAF’s

largest maritime base at Kinloss in Scotland. His three squadrons of Nimrods patrolled the North Atlantic shadowing Soviet submarines and powerful surface fleets. During his command of Kinloss, the station was awarded the Wilkinson Sword of Peace. In 1972 he was appointed ADC to the Queen. John returned to the Central Flying School (CFS) as Commandant. This provided him with a wide variety of flying opportunities with the RAF, including having the Red Arrows under his command. After leaving CFS in 1976, John spent two years responsible for all flying training in the RAF before taking over as Commander, Southern Maritime Region, an appointment that also carried two senior NATO war appointments. He controlled all British and NATO maritime aircraft and the Rescue Co-ordination Centre. He retired from the RAF in 1980.

After his long stint as Director of the Blond McIndoe Research Centre, where Batchelor led a team of research scientists who attempted to elucidate many of the obstacles that stood in the way of successful transplantation of foreign tissues and organs, he went on to become Professor of Tissue Immunology and, later, Head of the Immunology Department at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School at Hammersmith. He became Deputy Chairman of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology; was the European editor of the Journal of Transplantation; Chairman of the Medical Research Council’s grants committee; and President of several professional societies, including the International Transplantation Society.

In 1982 he was recalled to be Captain of the Queen’s Flight and a member of the Royal Household. After seven years he finally retired, at which point he was advanced to KCVO. He served as Deputy Lieutenant of Somerset from 1991 to 2001 and was Honorary Air Commodore of No 3 Maritime Headquarters of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force. He was President of the SW Region of the Royal Air

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Born in 1931, Richard grew up in Chennai, India during the last years of British colonial rule. An early familial connection with immunology came from his grandfather who was Deputy Director of the Indian Medical Service and had established the Pasteur Institute at Coonoor with a mandate to develop vaccines for rabies. Richard left the warm climate and privileged colonial life in southern India for the colder existence of Marlborough. Lifelong friend, and head of house, Nicholas Roskill (SU 1945-50), recalls, “He was a good sportsman, particularly good in swimming, perhaps due to having had the advantage of a pool at home in India!” For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Tony Taggart (C3 1932-37) nthony Brand Taggart was born on 28 September 1918 in Shanghai. After Marlborough he went to Sandhurst and then on to Ambala, India.

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In 1940, he joined the 2nd Battalion 3rd Queen Alexandra’s Own Gurkha Rifles (2/3 GR) and saw action in Iraq in 1942 before moving to Egypt. During fighting near El Alamein, his battalion was overrun by the Germans but he avoided being wounded or taken prisoner and in 1943 he was mentioned in dispatches. In 1944, Tony was awarded an immediate MC in Italy. While in command of a company of 2/3GR, he was ordered to capture a strategic

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strongpoint north of Perugia. Tony came under intense fire from machine guns as he led the attack. Despite this, his company managed to take two prisoners, seize five machine guns and cause the enemy considerable losses. However, having seized the objective, they came under heavy mortar fire and shelling and he was severely wounded in the leg. Tony refused to be evacuated until he could hand over command in the knowledge that his company would drive off a counter-attack. The citation for the award of an immediate MC paid tribute to his courage and inspiring leadership. In 1955, he was again mentioned in dispatches. He served with the Brigade of Gurkhas as Brigade Major until 1959, when he assumed command of 2nd Battalion 10th Princess Mary’s Own Gurkha Rifles. After a spell as a liaison officer at the War Office, he commanded 48 Gurkha Infantry Brigade in Hong Kong. Command of British Gurkha Lines of Communication, Dharan, followed and his last appointment was that of Defence Attaché, Seoul, South Korea. He was ADC to the Queen from 1970 until his retirement from the Army in 1973. For the next four years, he worked in the Foreign Office in London. Tony was a keen photographer and mountaineer. During a trek in Nepal with a gun bearer and four porters, the party saw a tiger lying a few yards ahead. Tony quietly asked his gun bearer to hand him his gun but, on looking around, he saw that all his companions had climbed the nearest tree leaving him to face the animal unarmed and alone. Fortunately, the tiger did not want a scrap and Tony and his retinue withdrew without further incident. He took many photographs during his time in Nepal, recording Gurkha soldiers and their families, and his travels around the country. He was Chairman and later Vice-President of the Britain-Nepal Society. Tony Taggart was unmarried and died at the age of 97 on 26 January 2016. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

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Pat Cotton (Dame C1 and C3 1977-97) at Cotton, was Dame of C1 and C3 for over twenty years between 1977 and 1997.

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Pat was highly regarded by all who knew her and a true professional at all times, a very caring person and a great support to her Housemasters Martin Evans (CR 1968-), Bob Sanderson (CR 1972-2007), James Rothwell (CR 19822009) and Neil Moore (CR 1996-). Pat had a good sense of humour – very much needed in the role of a Dame – but she was also firm when required and noone could ‘pull the wool’ over her eyes and on hearing the advancing footsteps of Dame Cotton no-one over slept! Pat had many interests, campanology was a favourite and she was also a great supporter of house events and athletic pursuits. Her cheerful presence will be much missed. Martin Evans (CR 1968-) President 1843 Society For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Evelyn Ebsworth (B2 1946-51) n the opinion of Steve Chapman, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh and ViceChancellor of Heriot-Watt University, Evelyn was one of the leading inorganic chemists of his generation. He was also an excellent university administrator.

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Evelyn was a Fellow of King’s College and Christ’s College, Cambridge, faculty member at Princeton, Crum Brown Professor of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh, and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Durham. In his tribute, it was recalled that during Evelyn’s tenure, from 1990-98, the number of undergraduates increased from 5,200 to 8,320, and that links between the university and industry were dramatically enhanced. As the son of Brigadier Wilfred Ebsworth, Evelyn attended many schools but finally settled at Marlborough, where he was inspired by a brilliant head of the chemistry department, AK Goard (CR 1925-54). “On account of my huge good fortune in being taught by Goard, I made a point of getting to know local chemistry teachers in Cambridge, Edinburgh and later Durham, to tell them how important they were in fostering talent.” Evelyn became a hugely influential mentor to many.

The actor Ronnie Barker read the book and reported laughing 287 times and crying twice. David would write three more Perrin novels and more than a dozen others, leading Jonathan Coe to acclaim him “probably our finest postwar comic novelist”. While talking to the BBC about the Reginald Perrin show, he was sat in a chair that he remembered made a mournful noise “like a cross between a muffled fart and an elderly toad’s sigh of satisfaction”. The farting chair became a running gag along with the hippopotamus which trotted into Reggie’s mind’s eye at every mention of his mother-in-law.

For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

David Nobbs (CO 1948-53) avid Nobbs was a prolific writer of novels, TV series and scripts, who created some of the most memorable and enduring comedy moments of ’70s television, including The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin.

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Articulating in comic form the existential crises of 1970s middle England, David’s anti-hero sprang from his 1975 novel The Death of Reginald Perrin before transferring to television.

David Gordon Nobbs was born on 13 March 1935 in south London. On the outbreak of the Second World War the family evacuated to Wiltshire, where George Turner (Master 1926-39) had invited the City of London School to share premises at the College. In 1944, the family returned to Orpington. When the last doodlebug (indeed, the last bomb of the war to fall in Britain) landed in the next road, burying David, he hurt only a thumb. In 1959, David worked on his first novel and had two sketches accepted for a revue at the Lyric Theatre, although the show failed to impress. Early in 1963 he rang David Frost at the BBC’s That Was The Week That Was with a script for a monologue; Frost remembered Nobbs from the Cambridge Footlights and told him to put it in a taxi: this was the first of many of his items to be included on the show.

After this Nobbs and old friend Peter Tinniswood began contributing regularly to TW3. Nobbs was introduced to Peter Cook, one of his heroes at Cambridge, who used a couple of his sketches at his Establishment Club. This led to more work for Nobbs as a writer on The Frost Report and Frost On Sunday. Once Frost asked Nobbs if he preferred to be paid in money or champagne. “I received a bottle of vintage Krug”, Nobbs remembered, “and I didn’t have to send my agent 10 per cent.” In 1968, Nobbs worked as script editor on the first series of The Two Ronnies, and wrote many of their sketches, including Barker’s “Pisprununciation” monologue and the Rook Restaurant sketch. David also oversaw the introduction of their trademark sign-off “It’s goodnight from me and it’s goodnight from him.” Later he wrote for most of Britain’s leading television comics: Tommy Cooper, Ken Dodd, Frankie Howerd, Dick Emery, Jimmy Tarbuck and Les Dawson. Post Perrin, Nobbs’s television career faltered, but in Fairly Secret Army, Nobbs morphed Reggie Perrin’s military brother-in-law into Major Harry Truscott and it became cult viewing in 1984. A Bit of a Do, published as a novel in 1986, became an ITV drama attracting nearly 15 million viewers a week. Nobbs went on to write another novel, Second To Last in the Sack Race (1983), and then Pratt of the Argus (1988), The Cucumber Man (1994) and Pratt A Manger (2006). He was showered with The Marlburian Club Magazine

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industry awards and his autobiography I Didn’t Get Where I Am Today appeared in 2003. David, who died on 8 August 2015, was married twice, first in 1968 to Mary Goddard and secondly, in 1998, to Susan Sutcliffe; three stepchildren of his first marriage survive him along with a stepdaughter of his second. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Fraser Scott (C1 1933-37) rigadier Fraser Scott, who passed away at the age of 95, was the founder of the Defence Manufacturers’ Association (DMA).

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Fraser was born on 9 September 1919 and educated at Marlborough before going up to Christ Church, Oxford, to read Chemistry. In 1940, he was commissioned into the Royal Artillery. In August 1942, on learning that his unit, 1st Survey Regiment, was about to embark for the Middle East, he rose at first light, put on his dressing gown, found a ladder, climbed up to a firstfloor window in Womersley Hall, Yorkshire, where he was billeted, opened a sash window, found a telephone and proposed to his future wife, Biddy. In Italy, in October 1944, whilst manning a forward observation post in the Tuscan Apennines he was shot. The bullet drove 78

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part of his supply of lavatory paper into his chest. After surgery, he was medically downgraded and joined the Ministry of Supply’s Weapons Technical Staff. A spell in Trieste was followed by a move to the Directorate of Artillery in the Ministry of Supply; two years with anti-aircraft units in the Canal Zone and then a posting to the Army Operational Research Group, where he researched the accuracy of artillery fire and the height at which nuclear weapons would explode. In 1957, Scott took command of 2 Division’s independent locating battery, with the powers of a commanding officer and the role of Counter Bombardment Officer. While in command of 94 Locating Regiment in BAOR in 1960, after repeated attempts to obtain new radios, he travelled to London to see the officer in charge of the department concerned. The officer was out so he looked up his regiment on the card index system. Written in pencil was the instruction: “No radios until further notice.” Scott rubbed this out and inked in the order, “Issue radios as soon as possible.” He soon had his radios. Fraser took a close interest in the welfare of his men. When a soldier was killed in a traffic accident, he insisted that the padre write to the parents saying that the regiment would make arrangements for repatriation. The story reached the tabloid press. Upon hearing this the Adjutant-General’s staff asked for an explanation and then withdrew their objections. Since then, the MOD has arranged repatriations and they have become a familiar event. Scott’s Christian faith was the foundation for his role as an apologist for the British arms trade. He spoke in public debates about the ethics of the trade and took a bishop round an arms fair. He served on the local authority as a Liberal Democrat councillor. He also served the Defence Surveyors’ Association for thirty years as Treasurer, as well as cooking, opening his garden under the National Gardens Scheme, designing gardening quizzes and supporting the University of Surrey, among many other things. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Adrian Marston (C2 1941-45) oyal Society of Medicine (RSM) Academic Dean and Honorary Fellow Adrian Marston died peacefully aged 89 on 7 April 2016.

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Adrian, christened Jeffery Adrian Priestley, was born in London on 15 December 1927. After Marlborough he went to Magdalen College, Oxford and then to St Thomas’ Hospital Medical School. Undertaking his National Service with the Royal Army Medical Corps, Adrian went on to work as Consultant Surgeon and Senior Lecturer at Middlesex Hospital, Royal Northern Hospital and later University College London. His interests lay in vascular surgery, and he published over 130 works in the field. Adrian played an integral role in the RSM’s academic programme, starting with his time as Honorary Secretary of the Surgery Section from 1971-73 and then President from 1979-80. He went on to become their second ever Academic Dean, serving from 1995-99 and is recognised for his significant contribution to the way the academic programme is run today. Adrian was Vice President of the RSM from 1998-2000 and in 2007 he was invited to become an Honorary Fellow. He was also a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, serving as Vice President from 1986-94; President of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (1986); and founding member and President of the Vascular Surgical Society (1985). He is survived by his wife Sylvie and children Joanna, John and Nick. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries


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Richard Constable (C2 1945-50) ichard Constable, who died aged 83, was the great-great-grandson of the landscape painter John Constable, and was himself an artist who did a great deal to further his ancestor’s reputation and legacy.

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Born in Lewes, East Sussex, Richard was brought up on a farm in Devon. Time spent on Dartmoor made him a keen naturalist, with a passion for collecting and breeding butterflies and moths. Another early interest, which was one that had run in the family for generations, was painting, and in 1945 Richard won an art scholarship to Marlborough.

He took his entomological equipment and paints with him when posted on National Service to Korea (1951-52). Although he was not cut out for military life – on one occasion he inadvertently directed his fire at the officers’ mess rather than towards the enemy – the experience proved formative. The landscapes he observed in Korea (and in Japan when on leave) were to prove a powerful influence on his painting in subsequent years.

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Richard was fascinated by, and hugely knowledgeable about, his family history, and there was nothing he loved more than showing family memorabilia to visiting researchers and enthusiasts. Richard is survived by his second wife, Valerie, and their children, Sasha and Ricky; and by four children, Yvonne, Julia, Caroline and Stephen from his first marriage to Elaine. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Robin Fletcher (C3 1936-41) r Robin Fletcher OBE, DSC was a wartime sailor who became a leading academic and sports administrator. Robin was a distinguished President of the Marlburian Club 1985-86.

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During the war Robin commanded a Caique in the Eastern Mediterranean, working with special forces and Greek allies to resist German occupation of the islands. This led to a lectureship in Modern Greek at Oxford University, a Fellowship at Trinity College and a successful career as its Domestic Bursar. His career culminated in his appointment as Warden of Rhodes House, responsible for the administration of the scholarships set up under Rhodes’ will. He played hockey for England and Great

Britain, won a bronze Olympic medal, and later managed the British Hockey Team at the Tokyo Olympics. When war broke out, Robin was still a schoolboy at Marlborough College. On sentry duty for the Local Defence Volunteers, predecessors to the Home Guard, he just managed to avoid shooting a wandering cow which had failed to respond to his challenge. On leaving Marlborough he volunteered for the Navy and, at end of the war, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Demobbed, he resumed his academic career, going up to Trinity College Oxford where he was immediately called to the hockey team. He became an international in 1949 and won his bronze medal at the Helsinki Olympics of 1952. He was President of the Hockey Association from 1973 to 1983 He was appointed Secretary of the Rhodes Trust and Warden of Rhodes House from 1980 to 1989 and on his death tributes poured in from Rhodes Scholars around the world, many of whom commented on how his guidance and hospitality had enabled them to make the most of their opportunity. “He quietly and professionally guided all of us through the bewildering mazes of Oxford academia, counselling and smoothing the way for us as students.” For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Robin Fletcher (C3 1936-41), front row, second from right, with the Trinity College hockey team in 1949

Richard went on to teach art at Saxmundham Secondary School in Suffolk. In 1967, he gave up teaching to concentrate on painting full time, producing a substantial body of work in gouache with an oriental flavour that featured, for example, junks, exotic flowers and insects. His paintings were exhibited in galleries from Suffolk to Singapore, and were widely collected, especially in the 1970s and early 80s. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Janet Tanner (CR 1968-96) anet was appointed to teach Spanish at the College in 1968 as the first full-time female member of Common Room. Janet showed great courage and dignity, never allowing any problems of acceptance to impinge on her public life. Of her teaching, a colleague wrote: “If ever there was an advertisement for a rigorous approach, supported by a sturdy learning structure, this was it.”

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In 1980 she was appointed Director of Studies, a post requiring both intellect and diplomacy. Her successor wrote, “Her grasp of all the issues to do with the timetable was immense and really peerless – these were pre-computer days, when sheer brain power was key.” The post requires close liaison with the Master and one from her time wrote: “I couldn’t count the number of occasions on which Janet would wisely anticipate a knotty administrative problem ahead and, at the same time, present me with a lucid analysis of all the best options for its solution.” The appreciation of many senior colleagues is summed up by one former Master: “The abiding memory of Janet is of her unfailingly proactive kindness as a colleague.” In that difficult post, Janet was always the soul of courtesy but behind the easy laugh and the twinkle of an eye was a steely personality well able to charm the many, and often conflicting, demands of the different Heads of Departments. In 1991, Janet relinquished the post of Director of Studies and became the first Senior Mistress. During her time, she oversaw the introduction of an appraisal system, which was another potentially divisive issue. She had previously also served, with much appreciation, on the working party that prepared the College for full coeducation. Overall one senior colleague wrote, “When you consider how difficult things must have been for Janet in her early days one should recognise the immensity of her contribution.” Beyond the academic world, music was at the heart of Janet’s life. She was always a valued member of the College orchestra. But the bulk of her playing was outside the College. Throughout 80

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her time, she was a member of up to three amateur orchestras, often leading sections and of great help to younger players. Chamber music brought her many close and greatly valued friends. With her untimely death the College has lost one of its most distinguished servants and musicians and a loyal friend to many from the College and beyond. Christopher Joseph (CR 1967-2000) For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

John Hervey (C2 1942-45) ear Admiral John Hervey not only survived an underwater collision with a Soviet submarine but also proved his diplomacy during the Falklands War.

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On the surface, in the dark, John discovered that the conning tower was skewed sideways and a large part had been chewed off by the Soviet’s propeller. John received a letter expressing the Admiralty’s “severe displeasure”. However he was still appointed OBE in 1970 and CB in 1982. After Marlborough, John went to Dartmouth College and then to sea in 1946 and his first command was the minelayer Miner VI, but he chose to specialise in submarines. He became one of the most experienced submariners of his generation, and one of the last to learn his trade from the battle-hardened veterans of the Second World War. He served in the diesel-powered submarines Acheron (1950-51), Aurochs (1951-52), Tradewind (195253), Sea Devil (1953-56) and Aeneas (1956-57); he commanded Ambush (1959-62) and Oracle (1962-64). After Warspite (1968-69) he was Operations Officer to the Flag Officer Submarines. In 1971-73 he enjoyed his one desk job in the Ministry of Defence, and was promoted to Captain before commanding the 2nd Submarine Squadron at Devonport (1973-5) and the guided missile destroyer Kent (1975-76). Between 1976 and 1980 he was Deputy Chief of Allied Staff at its NATO headquarters at Northwood, in the rank of commodore.

Hervey was commanding the nuclearpowered submarine Warspite in October 1968 when she was creeping submerged across the floor of the Barents Sea, listening passively on Warspite’s sonars, behind a Soviet Echo-class submarine. Quite unexpectedly, the Soviet boat shut down one of its propellers to make it even quieter and then suddenly there was “an awful bang, crushing and scraping”. Alarm bells rang and red lights flashed while Warspite rolled on to her side and passed under the Soviet boat. As she bobbed upright again she once more struck the Soviet boat and was flung back on to her side.

Promoted to Rear-Admiral, from 1980 to 1982 he was Chief of the British Naval staff in Washington at the start of the Falklands War, when his ability, eloquence and sense of humour contributed greatly to the success of his dealings with the Pentagon. He was particularly effective in obtaining American support and supplies for British forces in the South Atlantic. After retiring from the Navy, John became a consultant in the defence industry, and his book Submarines (1984) is regarded as a bible for submariners. He revived the Friends of the RN Submarine Museum in Gosport, and led the campaign to save HMS Cavalier and make it a museum ship. In 1998 he successfully presented the case for


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saving Cavalier and got funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Cavalier is now an important tourist attraction in the Chatham Historic Dockyard, alongside the submarine Ocelot, in which his son served. Known for his endless supply of amusing stories, and his gentle, modest, unselfish nature, he was a gentleman who gave generously to charities. In 1950 Hervey married Audrey “Liz” Mote, who predeceased him; he is survived by their two sons and one daughter. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Philip McPherson (C2 1940-44) hilip McPherson was a pioneer in the scientific fields of gyrodynamics and complex dynamic systems control; he developed guidance and navigation systems mechanisms in the Royal Navy before moving to academia.

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His schooling started at Pilgrims’ School, where he was a choral scholar at Winchester Cathedral, before moving on to Marlborough, where he shone at maths, and then in 1944 to the Royal Navy. He began below decks, but soon set his sights on gunnery, and passed out third from an elite course at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich. After a period at sea, Philip was put in charge of developing the Gyro Rate Unit Stabiliser for the Admiralty, which is still to be seen on HMS Belfast. He was then seconded for a time to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Back in Britain, he became Head of development for Iinertial Navigation systems for the Admiralty, but retired in 1959 to work for Sir John Cockcroft at the UK Atomic Energy Authority. After a short period as a fellow at St John’s College, Oxford, in 1967 he moved on to the new City University, where he became Professor of Engineering and then Pro-Vice Chancellor, for 22 years, before retiring in 1987. The rest of his life was devoted mainly to the modelling of value, using complex mathematics in an attempt to counteract the prevailing “cheapest is

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best” approach that had defeated his reactor control system. His methods were adopted by many organisations. In 2006, he received the Pioneer of Systems Engineering Award from the International Council on Systems Engineering. He was a Freeman of the City of London. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Richard Gaskell (B3 1950-54) ir Richard Gaskell rose from being an articled clerk to one of Britain’s most respected solicitors who was at the heart of the biggest shake-up of the legal profession in the 20th century.

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As President of the Law Society, Richard was credited with persuading the government to break the monopoly that the Bar held on advocacy and litigation in the higher courts by granting solicitors rights of audience in the Crown Court, High Court, Court of Appeal, Court of Session, Privy Council, and House of Lords. At the same time, Richard was hailed for saving the livelihoods of many solicitors by persuading Margaret Thatcher to safeguard the profession’s monopoly over conveyancing of home purchases at a time when she was under pressure to open up the sector to banks and building societies. In 1988 Gaskell had been elected President of the Law Society and led the response to the Lord Chancellor’s reforms. He was instrumental in

persuading the Law Society to ask for full rights of audience even up to advocacy in the House of Lords, in the hope that admission for solicitors to lower courts would be agreed (it was) and campaigned successfully for solicitors to be eligible for appointment as High Court judges. Later, he established a successful advocacy training programme giving solicitors the skills they needed when they rubbed shoulders with QCs in the higher courts. Another change championed by Gaskell was the legalisation of “no win, no fee” cases. He felt that they would make the claims courts more accessible and potentially offer justice to those that could not afford it. Richard was born in 1935 in Kent and on leaving Marlborough he became an articled clerk at Burges Salmon. He later joined Tuckett, Williams and Kew and built a reputation for saving clients’ driving licences through outstanding advocacy and knowledge of criminal procedure. Throughout his career, the rich and famous turned to him in the wake of motoring misdemeanours. Richard played a key role in the merging of Tuckett Williams with Lawrence and Co to form Lawrence Tuckett. He became a senior partner at the company, now known as TLT. A keen farmer, Gaskell lived near Chippenham where he tended a herd of North Devon suckler cows. His farm was kept as a refuge from his professional life. Colleagues at the Law Society knew the urgency with which he was treating a professional query if he said, “Can it wait until I’ve done the haymaking?” He collected classic sports cars, and was also involved in charitable work, including the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust and Bristol Zoo. Richard was also credited with turning around a floundering project to restore the SS Great Britain and so saving one of the world’s most important pieces of maritime history. His wife, Judith, survives him along with their son, Simon, a wild boar farmer in Wiltshire. Their daughter, Susannah, died of cancer in 2014. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Letters to the Editor Dear Madam... Dear Madam I do not think I am the only OM who found the Marlburian Club Magazine obituary of Douglas Quadling less than adequate.

More should have been said about his teaching and what made him so great. To my mind, it was the combination of his absolute dignity and control along with his exceptional clarity of mind. At any age, and at any level of mathematics, it was impossible not to listen spellbound as his exposition proceeded without a pause, without a correction. This was equally true when he was explaining calculus to a large Hundred set in Museum 7 as when Frank Curtis and I were sitting either side of him in his C2 study (“that’s a rather overpowering after-shave, Charles”), marvelling as he worked his way through a Scholarship Mechanics question that had seemed impenetrable. Even in a Department with Michael Dain, Laurence Ellis and Colin Goldsmith all in their prime he was the nonpareil. It might have mentioned the number of mathematics awards won, the number of his pupils who went on to become school or university mathematicians themselves, and the fact that he was regarded by his peers as the doyen of their profession. The obituary should have set him more clearly in the context of Marlborough College, not least relating how proud he 82

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was “to have been fortunate enough to share” the wartime exile there of his own school, City of London. He was the House Tutor of B2 for at least a decade, under JHH, and then Housemaster of C2. He was a total schoolmaster, a real “Establishment Beak” in that he regarded it as a duty and a pleasure to support every possible College activity, from chapel to plays to school-and-house matches (and to referee them, too). Music was part of his life, his tenor voice being a leading contributor to the Common Room Barber Shop group and he was a pianist as well. His dry humour was a delight, and this kindliest of men was an inspiration to generations of Marlburians, not just your correspondent. The obituary failed to mention the happiness of his marriage to Ruth and instead gave us the worthy but unnecessary details of his collaborators on the SMP. This great man, and great servant of Marlborough, deserved more. Charles Hasting (C1 1961-65) Sadly we get so many notifications of deaths each year that we have had to develop some policy guidelines for obituaries in the magazine. Generally, any OM whose obituary has appeared in The Telegraph or The Times would be allocated a full obituary in the Magazine; as of course would any longserving Beak, housemaster or prominent member of staff. These guidelines can’t always be followed; for instance, where space in the magazine is very limited, or notification of the death comes very close to the publication date. All deaths of which we are notified prior to publication are of course listed in the Deaths column. Securing the very best obituarist to do a subject full justice is sometimes quite difficult, especially when time is limited prior to publication. I sincerely regret that this was the case when it came to chronicling Douglas Quadling’s life and contribution to the College and I am

most grateful to you for illustrating his enormous talents. Editor

Dear Madam Susanna’s bumper farewell edition of the Marlburian Magazine has just reached these shores and I congratulate her on such a fine production! On only 24 hours per day, I’m not sure how she managed it, but I trust she is now enjoying her newfound freedom. The articles cover a wonderful range of topics. The admission of girls a few years after my time has wrought a glorious transformation to the Marlborough scene and this is reflected in the magazine. It’s a great read. Thank you very much for including my letter and the two photos. Not that my mother would have approved: she hated being photographed! On the other hand, she was proud to have been one of the four people who chose the Lovat Tweed that was chosen for the Lower School boys’ jackets. Mrs Heywood, Mrs Hunter, Mrs Halliday and Mrs Hext (the four H’s) went to Gorringes in London where they were treated as royalty, and it was generally reckoned that they made a very good, practical choice. John Hext (A1/C2 1952-56)


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perhaps 450 in the corps, and there were handfuls in the Navy and RAF sections. This meant some 400 would march up High Street with Brasser and Union Flag leading the way on Field Day – a stirring sight. Townspeople turned out to clap, and platoon sergeants used to order “eyes left” or “right” to their platoons towards the pretty girls and the pubs.

Dear Madam I am pretty certain that the photo on page eight of last year’s magazine (number 116) is of Alan ‘Daddy’ Whitehorn, Head of Classics 1945-59, for whom I had great affection. He was the father of Katharine Whitehorn (a writer, journalist and columnist) and I have looked in her autobiography and found a photo of Alan Whitehorn that could have been taken on the same day as the one in the magazine. Michael Virtue (C2 1949-54) I asked our wonderful archivist Clare Russell if she was able to get to the bottom of this, but, I’m sad to say, she was unable to. Are there any other OMs who can help? Editor

Dear Madam I have just come across this splendid 1948 photo of the Combined Cadet Forces officers (14 members of CR), senior NCOs (33 boys – including me!) and two sergeants.

Some names for the photo, front row: left – Sgt Joe Brain (later GC); with stick – Col W F Harling (Commanding Officer); right end (second last) – J R Thompson (the brilliant sportsman and known to generations); right end – Company Quarter Master Sergeant (I believe) Shaw. Richard Russell (B1 1943-48)

Dear Madam An article in last year’s magazine (number 116), has raised the interesting question of why Marlborough Council decided in 1968 to admit girls – interesting and, in view of the number of schools who followed Marlborough’s example, important. What I remember, quite vividly, is my own motivation. The final prompting came from an unlikely source, the philosopher Bernard Williams, husband of the politically better-known Shirley. It happened during a meeting at Marlborough of the government’s Public

School Commission, a commission with the specific briefing of making recommendations for the future of public schools. Bernard, as a member of it, stayed overnight at The Lodge, and we fell to gossiping in my study. Suddenly he said: “What I don’t understand about you John, is why in your ambition to widen the entry into PS, you don’t do the one thing that is already in your power.” “What is that?” “To admit girls”, he said. The more I thought about it, the more I could see sense in it, so I made my natural first move, namely to discuss it with Angela. Angela immediately welcomed it; she had so often said to me what excellent husbands Marlburians must make, because they are so open and frank and straightforward. So we began introducing the notion around the school and found that, with a few predictable exceptions, there was general approval of the idea. Now it had to be put to the Council. At this point, I had to come clean about my own motives. When I talked of “widening the entry into the school”, I was more concerned with the working class than with the so-called “weaker sex”. Now it so happened that I had already raised money for the USA to finance what we called the Swindon Scheme. This paid the fees of fifteen boys from Swindon to come to Marlborough for their sixth forms. As a scheme it did not achieve all that I had hoped, so I am glad to learn that an improved version of it is now being trailed by the College.

Combined Cadet Forces officers 1948

The CCF (successor to the Joint Training Corps) was probably at its height then. The necessity for compulsory service was obvious not only as the war ended, but also as we all expected to go into the forces for National Service, school training was, therefore, useful. The number of beaks in uniform was because they were coming out of the forces and they were useful to Colonel W F Harling, the Commanding Officer. Our uniforms were the ordinary ones, we did not have the current smart No 1s. I believe with a school roll of 720 at the time and with the exemption for those in Junior Houses and those working for Oxbridge, there were The Marlburian Club Magazine

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I decided to put up to Council not one scheme but two, each of which would widen the entry. At the crucial meeting the Council spent about half an hour discussing the proposal to admit day boys from Swindon, and then rejected it – before accepting, not just the principle, but the practice, of coeducation virtually on the nod. It would start with 15 girls the next term. I don’t remember any discussions in Council about the financial implications of the move, but they would certainly have been considered by the Finance Committee, which then contained quite a few Governors of the Bank of England. And, as I now realise, they decided to do it as economically as possible. Sleeping accommodation for girls was provided in former servants’ rooms of the boys’ houses, with the Master’s Lodge chipping in with half a dozen similar rooms. Angela shared with me the interviewing of all applicants (priority being given to daughters of OMs) and took overall pastoral responsibility for those accepted. They all still recall with amusement her way of checking the length of girls’ skirts. To do it she rigged up a table tennis net across our diningroom table, on which each of them had to kneel for measurement. As to the upshot, I will end by telling two stories, which illustrate the sort of benefit I believed should accrue to Marlborough from co-education, from my first term’s experience of it. The first is simple – something that could never have happened in a boys’ school. I was sitting one morning, working in the dining room, when the door opened and a girl tore through. “Oh dear,” I said, “are you alright?” “Oh yes, thanks,” she replied, “it’s only the curse.” She was on her way upstairs to the private end of the house. I realised that in the 25 years that I had lived in boys’ boarding schools, I had never once so much as heard mention of an issue that significantly affects the lives of half the population of the world. The second was told to me by a boy. “The other day”, he said, “I joined a group of boys and girls who were talking about nothing in particular. We boys went on talking in our usual way: conversation turned into argument and argument began to turn a bit personal, with put-downs getting rather nasty. 84

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Suddenly, one of the girls clapped her hands and said, ‘For goodness sake, shut up! You simply can’t talk to people like that.’ There followed a deathly silence, till one of the boys said, ‘She’s right you know’ and we’re now trying to give up that sort of talk!” These two stories illustrate between them the qualities that Angela and I saw as characteristics of Marlburians: frankness, straightforwardness, tolerance and honesty. I trust they are still the same, strengthened by co-education. John Dancy (Master 1961-72)

Dear Madam There were several nice stories about Hubert Wylie (CR 1927-59) in the letters section of the 2015 edition of the magazine, and it may be of interest to those who knew him to know more about his life away from Marlborough. Although I was in Hubert Wylie’s house for four years and chosen by him to be a school prefect, I should have known him quite well, but he was an unusually reserved and austere person who never spoke of his private life or family. His attention seemed to be entirely focused on his teaching of history, and he carefully watched over the progress of the boys in his house. Wylie was brought up in South Shields where he won a Corporation Scholarship to the local grammar school and an Exhibition in History to Merton College, Oxford. He went up in October 1913, but the war intervened. He saw active service as a lieutenant in the 9th Battalion the South Wales Borderers in France at the Somme in 1916, and later in Palestine and Egypt, suffering a number of injuries to his arm, knee and stomach. Though none of them were serious, the stomach wound was incompetently doctored leaving him with much intermittent pain for the rest of his life. He was awarded the Military Cross for distinguished conduct in the field. He returned to Oxford in 1919 and gained a first in 1921. He did some research at Armstrong College, then was appointed Senior History Master at Exeter School in 1922, where he coached the rugby XV. In 1927, he moved to Marlborough where he was to become Senior History Master and

Housemaster of C3 from 1935 to 1954. He was President of Common Room from 1947 to 1952 and retired from the College in 1959. His lengthy obituary in The Marlburian starts: “The most impressive schoolmaster I ever met. We have lost one of the most outstanding men who have served Marlborough. He was a teacher of superlative distinction with an unremitting belief in the value of striving for excellence down to the smallest detail: his rigorous and stimulating criticism was a model of what criticism should be. He would quietly annihilate inaccuracies of interpretation with his gentle signature tune of “No, because…” and his pupils treasured his numerous and careful marginalia in their weekly essays. One who is now a distinguished civil servant said to a companion “I did better than you this week ; I only got four ‘ugh’s’. “His happiest and most rewarding years were in C3. He first demanded of his pupils respect and because he was by nature shy, it was some time before they came to know him as a friend. They came willingly to seek his advice because they knew his deep kindness of heart and his almost clairvoyant perception of their needs. Two words of praise from him were worth a panegyric from another man, and the quiet certainty of his rebuke was the more devastating for the knowledge that it was deserved. “From the deep affection of his heart stemmed his outstanding human quality: his stark honesty; his immensely high standard of personal honour; the delicate feeling of a great gentleman; his patience and courage; his academic integrity; his firm faith; his great gift of friendship; his loyalty to every community in which he moved; his horror and anger when he heard or saw anything mean or low; his kindly eye; his memorable laugh; and the soft music of his Northumbrian voice.” Hubert retired to live in Wensley, Yorkshire, but his last years were dogged by physical disability and he could no longer stride over his beloved fells. He died of pneumonia in hospital at Richmond, Yorkshire on 1st May 1965. Christopher White (C3 1947-52)


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Looking ahead When I was at Marlborough our then Master John Dancy seemed a little larger than life. Usually, it seemed, with an academic gown wrapped around him and always a pronounced limp, Dancy was a magnetic, if intellectually formidable, and, to some, rather unapproachable leader. He appeared intent on challenging the complacency of a comfortable and successful middle class boys’ boarding school. e excelled on the sports field and held our own in terms of university places. And, at least as I remember it, we were a pretty happy lot. So there was no burning reason for change; we were quite comfortable as we were. The term I joined the school so did three of my cousins. Routine and tradition were strong forces. Yet complacency, as Dancy recognised, was our greatest enemy.

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Somehow those who had chosen Marlborough’s Master had settled on a revolutionary – perhaps they thought he was just another clever Wykehamist who would liven up teaching in the classroom. And in some places this was certainly needed. But behind that cerebral academic exterior beat a sterner heart: John Dancy was an unapologetic progressive who was determined to blow open the stuffy doors and windows of Marlborough and bring in both girls in the Sixth Form and full bursary boys from neighbouring Swindon. He recently told me that he had been warned in a Commons Committee hearing by a Labour MP to make sure there were motorbike racks, as working class boys would never come to Marlborough if they could not bring their bikes. He restored the progressive spirit of Marlborough’s 1843 beginnings: a school explicitly intended to use the fees and donations of wealthier families to allow the children of less well-off clerical and military families to enjoy the same education. In other words, to cater to a broad social mix. That progressive purpose found new contemporary expression in Dancy’s two big reforms: girls and bursary boys. At a stroke, he updated and renewed the original mission.

Now we are honouring him and his vital partner in all of this, his late wife, Angela, who was counsellor and guide to so many of the first girls, by naming our new girls’ house Dancy House. However, his real legacy remains the impact he had on so many of us as students. He, and the team of beaks he recruited, made us think more critically, and, in my case, progressively, as he ensured the social and political issues of the day reached the classrooms and assemblies in the Memorial Hall. We were no longer a quiet secluded corner of Wiltshire – he made us feel at the centre of the world. He ensured the wider debates of a Britain struggling to re-find itself at the end of the sixties and early seventies, as our colonial past shrank, found their way into the school. And, for many of us, that changed our lives. I hope in the future, a current student and future chairman may have equally fulsome, although no doubt different, things to say about Jonathan and Emma Leigh and today’s Common Room, because you cannot say anything more important about a school than this: ‘it changed my life’.

Mark Malloch-Brown (C1 1967-71) Chairman of Governors and the former Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations

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The Master’s Review The virtues of diversity It is a privilege to be asked to contribute to the OM Magazine with some thoughts about the complete nature of a Marlborough education. As ever, the articles herein prove the point that the Marlborough experience cannot be compartmentalised into simple definition. he condition of being diverse has made successive generations distinct. The huge variety of things which people go on to do is testimony to the belief at Marlborough that we should pursue many branches of learning in an age where the polymath is rather an endangered species.

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It is an advantage of full co-educational boarding to experience breadth whilst alongside people who are destined to become friends for life. Historically, some of the greatest ages produced people with multi-educational talents. The very definition of civilised human beings suggests that they have attributes beyond the prescriptive fundamentals of mere exam-driven learning. Recently, it has been a pleasure to meet groups of ten from the Hundred at a series of lunchtime discussions. We challenged them to think about what it means to be scholarly. This, of course, is not about the designation of being a scholar but asks them to think beyond the campus, to be informed well beyond the basic curriculum and to broaden their minds as they move on to the Sixth Form. For many people, Oxbridge remains an ultimate pinnacle. However, as the world order of global opportunities shifts, multiple new opportunities open up. Of this year’s Upper Sixth, 10% are going to Canada or the US, an indication of how the other side of the Atlantic is now a serious Marlburian option. Equally, there are an increasing number of European options being thought through. The Garnett Room was filled to the brim when the representatives of six Dutch universities visited Marlborough earlier this year. This was a commendable 86

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indication that parents and pupils are thinking beyond the traditional Russell Group universities as we plan for increasingly diverse futures. It is commonly thought that the next generation are destined for some six to eight different careers. Additionally, it is interesting to note how many pupils from this year’s Upper Sixth think that a delayed university placement is a good thing. A couple are actually off to paid apprenticeships and a world of new options is opening up as they do so. Thinking broadly, the diversity of the creative industries, digital literacy and the fusion of technology and creativity continue to open up a new world. Equally, this generation is looking at society increasingly philanthropically as they grapple with the social issues of the age and realise the importance of social enterprise. When attending the G20 schools meeting in Guangzhou, China at Easter, the Chinese entrepreneur and founder of Alibaba, Jack Ma, delivered a brilliant lecture. He stressed the key need to inculcate responsibility both for oneself and others. He stressed that true understanding of freedom is to know that there are confines – tramlines of sensitivity to the other man, to encourage the underdog and those who have been less fortunate. In promoting such fundamental values and encouraging perseverance, we wish to promote an education that emphasises character. Wherever people end up subsequently, the varied experience of being a Marlburian enhances lives which will be challenging but informed. They also should be optimistic and live in the spirit of giving back as a result of having learnt through such diversity.

Jonathan Leigh Master (2012-)


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College Admissions and Academic Results 2016 or Shell entry the College uses an assessment system that seeks to select children with academic, sporting and artistic appetites and abilities that suggest they will make the most of their time at Marlborough. The process relies mainly on interviews at the school and reports from the head of the applicant’s current school. If you are interested in sending your child to the College, please contact the Admissions Secretary, Louise Smith, on 01672 892 302 in the first instance, indicating that you are an OM so that this can be taken into account at the time of assessment.

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Scholarships and Exhibitions A wide variety of scholarships and exhibitions is available to all children

Academic Results he College celebrated another excellent year of public examination success in 2016.

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In July, our final set of IB results came through. Of the 23 pupils who achieved the Diploma this year, six did so with a score of at least 38 points (which has a UCAS points equivalence of A*A*A*A* at A level), while the average score was just under 35 points (which has an equivalence significantly higher than A*A*A* at A level).

(whether offspring of an OM or not) at 13+ and 16+ entry. Details of all such awards, including values, dates, qualifications and examination procedures, may be obtained from the Senior Admissions Tutor, Dr Niall Hamilton. The Scholarship Booklet may also be viewed on-line at www.marlboroughcollege.org The Marlburian Club Charitable Trust makes funds available for various purposes but most commonly assists OMs with a child at the College who experience unexpected hardship. It also gives grants to College leavers pursuing GAP Year projects involving an element of service to others. The Marlborough Children of Clergy Fund, in accordance with the intentions of the College’s founders, assists ordained members of the Church

of England (whether OMs or not) to send their children to the College. To apply to either The Marlburian Club Charitable Trust or The Children of Clergy Fund please contact Peter Bryan, Deputy Master and Director of Corporate Resources, on 01672 892 390 or pnb@marlboroughcollege.org

Can you offer a work placement or internship? The Guidance Department is keen to support sixth formers and young OMs taking their first steps towards a career. If you think you or your organisation may be able to offer work experience or internships please contact Guy Nobes in the Guidance Department who will be delighted to give you more information: egn@marlboroughcollege.com

his leadership in this post over a number of years. At A level and Pre-U, almost one in every five examinations was awarded an A* grade (or its Pre-U equivalent) and above, and our pupils’ average UCAS points score was over 380 – equivalent to A*AA at A level. (With IB results added into the mix, the average for all of our leavers is equivalent to A*A*A).

Among the highlights for our IB pupils were places achieved at Cambridge (Architecture), Imperial (Medicine), Stanford (Global Health), and NYU and McGill are taking several pupils each.

Four pupils scored four straight A* grades at A level/Pre-U, and eleven achieved at least 3 A* grades. Nine pupils achieved a D1 grade in Pre-U (rated higher than an A* at A level), with one boy scoring D1 in two different subjects. At the time of writing, 80% of our leavers have achieved places at their first choice of university.

It is a time of mixed emotions for us as we bid farewell to the IB at Marlborough College, but we are very proud indeed that the last cohort performed so well as a collective. We pass on particular thanks to Mr Andrew Gist, Director of IB, for

GCSE and IGCSE results continued the theme of success – almost half of all entries were awarded the A* grade (with three-quarters awarded A* or A). Nine pupils achieved A* grades in all of their subjects (with five doing so in twelve or

more subjects). In total 15% of our pupils achieved at least 10 A* grades, and a third achieved at least 8 A* grades. While a Marlburian education proudly continues to encompass so much more than just academic success, it is hugely pleasing to see our pupils perform so well in this important sphere. Well done to all of them on their talent, commitment and dedication in achieving these results, which provide firm foundations for future success Jaideep Barot Deputy Head (Academic) The Marlburian Club Magazine

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The Master’s Review (Malaysia) Although not quite at the Shakespearian level of ‘parting is such sweet sorrow’, a few tears were shed as we bid farewell and au revoir to members of the Upper Sixth following the Master’s Invitational Dinner and Prize Day at the end of the Summer Term. ur 41 leavers have been at the top of the school for their entire time at Marlborough Malaysia. Many of them were founding pupils in August 2012 as members of the Remove, which was, at the time, the most senior year group in the College. They were, therefore, the first cohort to take public examinations and completed their IGCSEs in June 2014 and the IB Diploma Progamme earlier this year. They have been in a unique and privileged position. Their actions have effectively set the tone for future generations and they should all be very proud of what they have achieved.

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Thinking of their futures encouraged me to look back at the College register of 1843, the year of the College’s foundation, to find out the careers and destinations of the first leavers from Wiltshire. It makes for interesting reading. James Allen became Canon of Perth, Western Australia; Henry Anderson signed the Anglo-German agreement over Africa and Heligoland in 1890; William Bennett went on to be a tea planter in Sri Lanka; whilst Clement Cobb, the first Marlborough Senior Prefect, became Principal of the Banares Missionary College in India. From a predominantly church background, many took Holy Orders and a significant number of others joined the armed forces, with John Hopkins reaching the rank of Admiral, and both John Byron and Francis Jenkins becoming Major Generals. Julian Pauncefote has the longest entry in the register as a barrister, judge and diplomat. He was Attorney General in Hong Kong, Chief Justice of the Leeward Islands and Permanent Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. In 1889, he was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States, an office that was upgraded to that of British Ambassador to the United States in 1893. He was elevated to the peerage as Baron Pauncefote of Preston, Gloucester in 1899 and died, in Washington DC, in office in 1902. Sadly many died at a relatively young age, often in the ravages of war; the prize of longevity goes to James Girdlestone, one of three brothers who joined in 1843, who reached the impressive age of 95. Looking at our 2016 leavers, 19 were founding pupils in August 2012 and both of the Lent and Summer Term Senior Prefects, Alisha Krishnan and Tim Wu-Murphy have strong claims to be included in that list. Tim joined in October 2012, missing only the first half term and Alisha was one of the very first pupils to be registered for the College back in 2011, even though she only joined the College in the Lower Sixth in 2014.

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Saihiel Bakshi, Kashmera Balani, Michael Baldwin, Joshua Bickford, Edward Chai, Ameer Chughtai, Laura Connolly Kimberley D’Arcy, Isabella De Smet, Irfan Haron, Arran Hashim, Darryl Heng, Sin Che Hia, Kirby Hickling, Jack Hobby, Anyalemma Igwe, Haruto Ima, Rebecca Jaya Sudhir, Alisha Krishnan, Li Zhe Lai, Su Ern Lee, Jun Yie Loo, Eilidh Lui, Muhammad Naim Mohd Mokhtar, Hilma Nurmi, Vieshal Pillay, Alexander Reissiger, Sayuj Sanjay, Gavin Singh, Zarif Sinha, Rudy Tan, How Cheng Teng, Miriam Walford, Tessa Wilkinson, Min Wong, Adam Wright, Timothy Wu-Murphy, Alya Yazid, Seth Yeo, Andrew Yeow and Ainnur Zaini

“It is impossible to predict what the future holds but I would urge them all to hold steadfastly to the values and beliefs they have learnt during their time at Marlborough, particularly when the going gets tough.” Although a good number started with Alisha at the commencement of the IB Diploma Progamme, quite a few joined, rather like Tim, in the Remove or at the beginning of the Hundred. Three of these were our Khazanah scholars: Edward Chai, Irfan Haron and Naim Mokhtar. Khazanah, the sovereign wealth fund of Malaysia, through their foundation Yayasan Khazanah, sponsor a number of pupils through secondary and tertiary education. Marlborough College Malaysia was recognised as a suitable institution and we now have 23 Khazanah scholars from Shell to Upper Sixth. They have been a hugely positive addition to the community and we look forward to this association continuing for many years to come. As this cohort leaves the relatively sheltered environment of school and the vast majority move on to university, I hope they will make appropriate arrangements

for suitable reunions, through the Club, at various stages of what I am certain will be their exciting life ahead. The diversity of university choices means they will cover the globe: University of Auckland, University of Melbourne, McGill University, New York University and University of Toronto are some of the destinations alongside the traditional UK institutions such as Bath, Bristol, Durham, Exeter, Imperial, King’s College London, Manchester, Newcastle and St Andrews. There is a mixture of excitement at the prospect of leaving school, as well as varying degrees of trepidation as the unknown beckons. As a measure of a person’s happiness and fulfilment, I often use an iceberg analogy: what you can see (approx 10-11%) is the success, what sits beneath the surface (the other 89-90%) represents the dedication, discipline, sacrifice, persistence, disappointment and failure that supports and makes the

success. Along the way, there is sure to be failure, as no one has travelled the road of success without encountering difficulties along the way. It is impossible to predict what the future holds but I would urge them all to hold steadfastly to the values and beliefs they have learnt during their time at Marlborough, particularly when the going gets tough. Go forth you first leavers from Malaysia and make your contribution to the betterment of society over the next fifty plus years. We will watch with great interest. Good luck and good wishes from us all.

Robert Pick Master (2012-) The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Established groups Business, Banking & Finance (Commercial and Investment Banking, Insurance, Asset Management, Private Banking, Family Offices, Accounting) – Imran Tayabali (LI 1989-94) OMtrepreneurs Ali Wade (TU 1989-94), James Leighton-Davis (B2 1987-89)

Professional Groups When Chris Carpmael (C1 1980-84) took over as Chairman of the Marlburian Club in 2015, he saw a need to connect pupils at the College with those who had left. here was a very clear opportunity for OMs to help and guide new leavers and also to assist those already established in business by either giving advice, helping with a change in career or offering networking opportunities.

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Up until this point, there were a few wellestablished professional groups who held dinners and networking events. However, Chris, the Club Committee and the Development Team wanted to establish a wide range of professional groups, each with a formalised brief and defined objective. And so, the Professional Groups initiative was born. The key focus is to connect people within and across groups; to provide a forum and opportunity for OMs to network; to be a port of call for College pupils to seek help and advice in pursuing their chosen careers; and to be a source of advice, mentoring and possible work experience for pupils. Along with all Marlburians, Swindon Academy students will also be able to access this network. By the middle of 2015, 18 groups had been earmarked and the process of finding a head and formalising the structure of each group had begun. Once the heads were appointed they were asked to schedule the most appropriate events for their profession, be they dinners or drinks; guest speaker events; visits to the College for careers networking; or visits to an industry place of work for pupils or leavers to gain a better understanding of that industry or profession. 90

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As well as events, it is hoped that the Professional Groups will also offer access to professional support. For example, if someone in the property group needed financing for their business, they could approach the finance head to see if a solution existed within the group. You don’t need to belong to the profession to attend an event, everyone is welcome, and all planned events can be found on the Events page of the College website. The logistics for events are organised by the Development Team at the College, and OMs have been very generous in offering appropriate venues to host these events. All have been provided without cost enabling ticket prices to be kept low. The growth of the groups continues, all thanks to the extreme hard work of Chris, the Group Heads and the Development Team. However, if anyone would like to assist in any of the groups or has any helpful insights or suggestions, please get in touch with the Club Office. Here are the 18 established groups and the names of each of their heads. If you would like to contact anyone please visit www.marlburianclub.org tap on Careers and then on Professional Groups; or you can contact the Development Office via email marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org or phone 01672 892385.

Property James Gillett (C2 1971-75) Science & Technology and Digital Mark Tidmarsh (B3 1983-87), Jim Spender (C2 1987-92) Arts & Media Susannah Tresilian (NC 1992-97), Alethea Steven (MC 1994-99), Andrew Shepherd (LI 1993-98) Masonic Lodge Julian Soper (LI 1979-81) Law Claire Evans (B2 1986-88) Healthcare Sam Barclay (C2 2001-06) HM Forces Jamie Geddes (TU 2002-07) Engineering James Meredith (B2 1988-93) Clergy Charlotte Bannister-Parker (C2 1979-81) Art & Architecture Simon Henley (CO 1981-85) Music Simon Arnold (B1 1971-76) Education Craig Stewart (B3 1979-84) Not for Profit Mayoor Patel (PR 1973-77) Public Sector Sue Bishop (C2 1977-79) Women’s Network Lara Cowan (MO 1992-97), Caroline Laidlaw (MO 1992-96), Susannah Tresilian (NC 1992-97) PR, Marketing, Communications and Recruitment Alex Northcott (B1 1982-87), Karen Hill (B2/MM 1988-90)


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Valete optional; and embracing the inherent IB spirit of “languages for all” in a Marlborough context, which survives in the wide range of Upper School nonspecialist language options. With the UK now looking to redefine itself on the world stage, the opportunities for Marlburians to leave as skilled speakers of any of eight languages are directly due to Robin’s visionary leadership of the department.

Robin Cockett (CR 1999-2016) obin joined the Modern Languages Department 17 years ago, leaving the City to move into teaching German

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and French. For all but one year, when he moved across to Sevenoaks before being almost immediately drawn back to succeed David Whiting as Head of Modern Languages, we have enjoyed his genial, sparkling and mischievous good humour in the department and in the wider Common Room. Robin is a phenomenal Germanist. He loves the language and speaks it beautifully. He has wide cultural knowledge and particularly loves German film and twentieth century literature. Like many linguists, he appreciates the humour inherent in language with its pitfalls and traps, and often he has stumbled with a chuckle across cartoons, online clips, articles and the like, which show up the comic side to language use and misuse. As Head of Modern Languages, Robin led some bold initiatives by not only adding Chinese and Italian to the four existing major languages (French, German, Russian and Spanish), but also by making French

Robin loves exchanges and foreign visits, and he relishes these opportunities, not only for individuals to perfect their language skills and to appreciate a foreign way of life, but also for schools to be open minded and work together for longlasting educational benefit. In the classroom, Robin’s sets have appreciated his patient, well-structured teaching, his calm good humour, and his thorough and rigorous demands of precision and accuracy in the learning process. On the cricket field, the 4th XI has benefited hugely from his coaching and sense of fun, and this year he has introduced them to the world of village cricket, another example of Robin’s outreach instinct. Singing has long been a favoured hobby of his, too: inspired by his love of choral singing, he has instigated some memorable collaborations between the Modern Languages and Music Departments, including the annual Liederabend and the multi-lingual Advent Celebration. For the past two years, Robin has had wider responsibilities as Director of Cultural and Global Awareness, while remaining Head of German. The experience he has gained in this wider role will serve him well as he now moves to Hockerill Anglo-European College, Bishops Stortford, as Assistant Head of Sixth Form. An internationally inspired school specialising in Modern Languages and Music, Hockerill is surely tailor made for Robin. We congratulate him and thank him for all he has done at Marlborough over the past 17 years. Andrew Brown (CR 1981-) The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Andy Pembleton (CR 2010-16) ndy Pembleton joined us from Wanganui in New Zealand bringing with him some excellent skills in rugby coaching. Being the sportsman he is, he was also a very effective hockey coach and Head of Tennis. Head of PE was another important role taken on by Andy and I know that his large department greatly appreciated the caring approach he always showed.

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Duncan Curry (CR 2010-16) uncan has worked in the Outdoor Activities department for seven years; firstly with Rupert Rosedale (CR 1999-2009) and then Russ Tong (CR 2001-). He is an excellent practitioner of a whole range of OA activities with climbing being his particular interest. He has also been a major influence in the increasing popularity of the Devizes to Westminster (DW) canoe race each year: indeed, his dedication to kayaking even extended to him heading up the Kennet to Waitrose to pick up his shopping on occasions. In every OA activity Duncan is involved in, he manages to be an excellent motivator of the young: he certainly has an excellent pastoral instinct. Many pupils over the years have benefitted greatly from the interest Duncan has shown in them as individuals. Duncan has certainly learnt a lot since coming to Marlborough and some of this has been through trial and error. When learning the art of trailer towing he watched the DW trailer loaded with kayaks overtake the minibus he was driving and nearly collide with a row of parked cars. An experience which impressed upon him the importance of hitching the trailer to the minibus before starting to tow.

Andy loves his sport and takes his inspiration from Vince Lombardi the former American football coach who said: “perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.”

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As well as providing a huge contribution to OA, Duncan has been a valued tutor on Wednesday evenings in Cotton and a great supporter of all Common Room events. He leaves us to become Head of the OA Department at Bryanston next year and we wish him all the best. Neil Moore (CR 1996-) 92

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of classical subjects and students, impressing everyone with her indefatigable energy, her razor-sharp mind, the range and depth of her knowledge and her love of words. Though her puns were formally banned from Classics Department meetings, she got her revenge by trouncing Julian Lloyd (CR 1991-) at Scrabble on a Greek trip. Do not attempt to challenge Georgina to Scrabble, in any language! She has co-ordinated the Extended Essays for IB, mentored Upper School scholars, as well as mentoring Oxbridge candidates and supervising some EPQs. She has taken a major role in debating and has helped take Classics into local primary schools through her highly successful outreach programme. All of this activity has been fuelled by cups of intensely strong coffee brewed in the Languages Resources room. She has been a fantastic role model during these five years for those pupils who love to explore ideas on an exciting journey of intellectual discovery. In Elmhurst, she is one of those tutors who goes the extra mile – always attends House events, arrives on duty with an excellent array of cakes, helps anyone who needs help with their personal statements, and is happy to turn her hand to anything. I know Harriet and the Elmhurst girls will miss her enormously.

Andy is off to Millfield to be Assistant Director of Sport, and is to co-coach the Yearling’s first rugby team with John Mallet (CR 1995-96) a former Marlborough Beak. We wish him well in his move to Somerset. Neil Moore (CR 1996-)

Georgina Longley (CR 2011-16) eorgina Longley arrived at Marlborough five years ago from Oxford High School, with impressive academic credentials – a First in Classical Mods and Greats, an MA with Distinction and a DPhil. She honed her teaching skills here across the full range

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Georgina heads off to pastures new at King’s Canterbury. Neil Moore (CR 1996-)


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Development Focus How quickly the past twelve months have come and gone! It has been a year bursting with fresh ideas and energy from within the Marlborough family and a privilege for us in Development to facilitate many new and exciting initiatives. uilding on the strong relationships that exist within year groups, the main focus has been to extend the common bond across the age range and demographic, to create a genuinely inclusive and connected Marlborough community. It is so rewarding to witness the coming together of Old Marburians, renewing friendship, socialising and reminiscing. In particular, the past year has seen a marked increase in professional and business networking events and the opportunity to access an updated database of contacts and experience.

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Keeping the OM community in touch with the Marlborough of the present is key to harnessing the influence and advocacy of those it has educated, for its support, protection and improvement in the future. There is undoubtedly a growing sense of purpose in coming together in a broader range

of settings, to celebrate the proud past, present and future of our alumni relations. It is against this wonderfully positive background that I would like to take this opportunity to thank and congratulate the OM community for embracing the move to bring the operational functions of our Alumni Relations and the Foundation under the single umbrella of Development. This progressive and far sighted step provides a more efficient model of support with a broader range of skills that is better equipped to embrace ever changing technology. Indeed, it should be noted that the new Marlborough model is seen by many as an example of best practice within the independent schools’ sector. Work continues to reach out to OMs living and working overseas with a growing list of Old Marlburian groups forming on each continent. In a globally competitive world, building a comprehensive international network is a vital element in keeping pace with contemporary challenge and opportunity. So there is much to celebrate as we look back on the past year and many highlights will be covered in these pages. I would, however, make special mention

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of three innovative areas of development that encapsulate our direction of travel. • OM Futures – established by OMs to enable past year groups to raise money for a bursary to support one pupil for five years • OMtrepreneurs – a group to support budding entrepreneurs • Mentoring platform – a scheme for networking, support and advice In closing, I would like to reinforce the importance of effective lines of communication that undoubtedly underpin a successful Development function. Whether through print

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(The Marlburian Club Magazine, Marlborough Together, The Marlburian Magazine); websites (College, Marlburian Club and Foundation); e-newsletter (Club Connect); social media (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn); or events (OM and Foundation). Please take advantage of the facility to update your personal profile through the OM website.

Mentoring Support We are delighted that so many OMs have offered to become part of our mentoring scheme. You can now find information and contact details on the Club website in the Members’ Area, where mentors are listed under their Professional Groups. There will be further developments in the coming months and if anyone would like to become a mentor please contact the Club Office.

Jon Copp (CR 1981-) Director of Development

New to the Team Alex Martin replaced Charlie Munro as Alumni Relations Assistant in April. She has past experience in performance management and policy co-ordination for the British Transport Police, policy administration at Victim Support, mentoring work with Crime Concern. She is an alumni of Ardingly College. Jon Copp (CR 1981-), Jonathan Kirkwood (TU 1986-91), Lucy Olson and Paul Olson (C2 1986-91)

Alex works closely with Kate Goodwin helping run the day-to-day activities of the Marlburian Club. She works 9am to 3pm in term time only.

Welcome to 2016 Leavers I would like to take this opportunity to welcome the Class of 2016 as Old Marlburians, which for the first time includes 41 leavers from Marlborough College Malaysia. I look forward to building our relationship with them as OMs into the future.

Property Group event 94

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Legacy for Life Campaign Considerable progress has been made with each of the three campaigns: the Bursaries Appeal, the Memorial Hall Appeal and the Science Appeal, both in terms of project development and fundraising strategy. s of 31 July 2016 a total of £6.6m has been raised in donations and pledges in support of the campaign, and I am enormously grateful to those who have given such generous support.

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Bursaries Memorial Hall Science Greatest Need

£2.5m £1.8m £1.5m £0.8m

Bursaries Appeal Marlborough seeks to be a great school, providing an uplifting, broad education to a wide range of students. Marlborough is not a school that sought charitable status in order to protect its future. Marlborough College has, from its outset, been a Charitable Foundation, founded by Royal Charter in 1843 with a charitable purpose to educate those who could not afford the fees at some of the early “Great Schools”. Over the years this charitable purpose drifted to the sidelines. As fees relentlessly increased to enable the quality of teaching, care and facilities that top schools offer, the traditional broad Marlborough intake narrowed. The Bursaries Appeal focuses on the aim of our charitable foundation, to include students unable to afford the fees. Marlborough wishes to admit children from all backgrounds: wealthy, educated or only able to afford part of the fees, and also children – with some special spark – from underprivileged backgrounds that can not afford fees. The Bursaries Appeal aims to fund many more places for the last two categories, so that eventually 30% of students are on financial aid. At £13 million, Marlborough’s Endowment Fund was very small by comparison to several schools with whom we are frequently bracketed; over the coming years the aim is to make it

very much larger. To date £2.5m has been raised for bursaries, which is pleasing, given the co-existence of the Memorial Hall and Science Appeals. In continuing the appeal to grow the Endowment Fund, it is hoped that alumni and parents will remember the great benefits received from a Marlborough education and will in time, according to means, do everything possible to enable our charitable foundation to give this same chance to children from all backgrounds.

Tim Martin-Jenkins (B3 1961-65) Chairman of the Campaign Board

Colin Smith

How you can help?

Director of Partnerships

There are many ways in which you can support our Bursary Programme.

As part of the College’s increasing commitment to Outreach and Partnership part of Colin’s role is to assist the Development Office forging links with local state schools and identifying academically-able pupils who could benefit from the variety of life-changing experiences offered at Marlborough College.

Ben Miller Major Bursarial Award Mentor After 11 years as Housemaster of C1, Ben will now mentor major bursary award holders to ensure their abilities and opportunities are maximised. He will also be part of the selection process for offering life-changing bursary places to pupils and will be helping place the first OM Futures award.

The Bursary Endowment Fund invites capital donations and uses only the income from the fund to provide bursaries

The Annual Fund for Bursaries uses the full amount of donations as they are received to pay bursary fees.

OM Futures – established by OMs to enable past year groups to raise money for a bursary to support one pupil for five years. The first OM Futures Fund set up by the 1990 year group has raised over £100,000.

Please visit www.marlborough collegefoundation.org for more information.

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“Marlborough was built on benefaction; the generations before us have cared for this place. Now it is our turn”

Timeline December 2015 Appeal Launch October 2016 £2.5m raised so far November 2016 Fundraising events to meet target of £6m July 2017 Hall closes for refurbishment July 2018 175 Anniversary Celebrations November 2018 Grand Opening for end of WW1 Commemoration Event

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Memorial Hall Appeal This time last year we wrote of plans to restore and upgrade the Memorial Hall and are delighted to say that at the time of writing, October 2016, we have raised nearly £2.5m. Marlborough is so grateful for the support of Old Marlburians and current parents that the College Council have agreed to match this, leaving another £1m to raise in order to reach the recently revised final cost of £6m. We will close the Hall in July 2017 and aim to complete by the summer of 2018. This will match the triple anniversaries of 175 years of Marlborough, 50 years of girls and, most fittingly, the conclusion of the Great War in which 749 Marlburians fell. The Memorial Hall has been part of the campus in the memory of all living OMs. What makes it unusual is that it is still an important functioning building, as well as being a memorial to those who died in WWI and subsequent conflicts. Since its completion, it has been the College’s main assembly hall and the natural place

for musical performances and lectures. Sadly, drama and musicals can no longer take place there due to the lack of facilities available. Over the last year there has been much work done, evolving plans after taking soundings from many different constituencies of the Marlborough community. The spirt of W.G. Newton’s design has been upgraded and enhanced with empathetic understanding of the original concept. Now we have an opportunity to create a contemporary performing arts centre for generations to come. Full details of our plans, and how you can support, are available on our website www.marlboroughcollegefoundation.org or in a booklet which we can post. Please contact Jan Perrins, Development Office on 01672 892439 or email jperrins@marlboroughcollege.org ‘Please join with me in support of this appeal, and enable this vital project to be fully realised,’ Jonathan Leigh, Master.


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Science Appeal Never has a deep and rounded education in the sciences been more important than at the present time. Science and technology are engines of innovation in the modern world, opening up previously unimagined possibilities and solving some of our biggest problems, so the value of an excellent grounding in science cannot be underestimated.

responsible global citizens of the future. So a good working knowledge of Science, its principles, methods and skills are essential. When added to the UK government’s desire for investment in science to ensure continued economic competitiveness, the case to provide a state-of-the-art Science Centre at Marlborough College to educate future generations is compelling.

We want our pupils to be able to contribute meaningfully and lead positively as

The time is right, therefore, to consider an overhaul of our Science teaching facilities.

Extensive consultation has occurred, an architectural competition held, and ideas have moved on from renovating and rebuilding around the current Newton Building, to a better, contemporary, purpose-built building located more centrally on the campus. The project will capture the College’s vision for new directions in Science at Marlborough in the 21st century. It will be a statement of intent that Science is central to any education in the modern world. The Science Centre will facilitate better learning, with lighter, more inspiring, more flexible teaching spaces and communal areas for individual and collaborative learning. It will ensure that all Science can be taught in laboratories specifically designed for such teaching. It will place Science at the heart of the campus, and at the heart of the education we offer. Should you be interested to learn more of the project detail and plans for achieving our goal we would be delighted to hear from you. Estimated project budget Donations received to date

£22m £1.5m

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1843 Society By leaving a gift to Marlborough in your will you can make a real difference to the lives of pupils for generations to come. he founding fathers of Marlborough built the College through benefaction and even though the fees are significantly higher than they were in 1843, we do still need your support if we are to ensure we remain an innovative and dynamic school.

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The 1843 Society was created to allow the Master and staff to thank all those who have a provision for, or are

considering, making a bequest. And I endeavour to ensure they are never dull affairs! It is right and proper that you will wish to make adequate provision for your family but if you leave a gift to a charity in your will, its value will be deducted from your estate before Inheritance Tax is calculated. Please see below for the tax advantages. If you would like to learn more, and/or attend one of our events, please call Development Manager Jan Perrins on 01672 892439.

Martin Evans (CR 1968-) President of the 1843 Society

How you can reduce your inheritance tax bill by giving to charity? If your estate is worth over £325,000 when you die Inheritance Tax may be due but, since 6 April 2012, if you leave 10% of your estate to charity the tax due may be paid at a reduced rate of 36% instead of 40%.

Inheritance tax new rules Example 1

Example 2

without 10% gift (tax@40%)

with 10% gift (tax@36%)

£1,000,000 £325,000 £675,000 £0 £675,000 £270,000 £405,000

£1,000,000 £325,000 £675,000 £67,500 £607,500 £218,700 £388,800 £16,200

with 10% gift (tax@36%)

without 10% gift (tax@40%)

value of estate IHT allowance net value of estate 10% gift to charity leaves IHT due Remaining for beneficiaries

£525,000 £325,000 £200,000 £20,000 £607,500 £64,800 £115,200

£525,000 £325,000 £200,000 £0 £200,000 £80,000 £120,000

Difference/actual cost to estate

£4,800

• If you leave a gift of £67,500 from an estate of £1,000,000, the actual cost to your estate will be only £16,200 • If you leave a gift of £20,000 from an estate of £525,000, the actual cost to your estate will be only £4,800

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Development Events Highclere Castle Around 200 guests attended a fundraising evening at Highclere Castle on Wednesday 8th June, helping to raise over £36,000 for Bursaries and Capital Projects. The event, hosted by the Earl and Countess of Carnarvon, began with a

welcome from the Master, Jonathan Leigh, who gave an overview of the current fundraising campaigns. Guests enjoyed visits to the Egyptian exhibition and Downton Abbey rooms before listening to an enchanting performance from the College Choir in the Saloon.

USA Receptions In July, OMs and parents based in the New York area met the Master and his wife, Emma, in the prestigious setting of the Racquet & Tennis Club at a delightful canapé reception hosted by parents Charles and Lili Neuhauser. Building on the success of last year’s inaugural San Francisco Bay event, the Master and Emma were thrilled to have the opportunity to meet with a good number of OMs living and working in the Bay area. The evening was generously hosted by Za Berven (CO 1973-75) at her family home on Sixth Avenue.

On both occasions the Master presented a confident vision for the future of the College and drew attention to the three appeals that are currently in campaign.

St James’s Palace Dinner In November 2015, a dinner was held for 50 guests in the Mess of Her Majesty’s Body Guard of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms at St James’s Palace.

The evening was generously hosted by Major Charles Macfarlane (CO 196771), who welcomed guests with a brief talk about the history of Her Majesty’s Body Guard.

Hong Kong Reception

During dinner, the Master presented a compelling overview of Marlborough’s ambition to significantly expand the number of bursary assisted places in the years ahead. He then introduced former bursary recipients who spoke passionately of the privilege of receiving a Marlborough education and the benefits and opportunities they had gained as a consequence.

OMs, current parents and past parents living in the area met for an evening drinks reception at the Yacht Club overlooking the harbour.

It was a very special occasion and a rare treat to enjoy such a unique and historic setting.

In April 2016 the Master and his wife, Emma, visited Hong Kong to attend two Marlborough events.

The following day a smaller group attended a lunch in the grand surroundings of the Hong Kong Club in central Hong Kong. Both occasions were well attended and guests were updated on current news from Marlborough, plans for the future and details about our current fundraising campaigns. The Marlburian Club Magazine

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Sports & Club Reports OM Beagling

OM Cricket Club – The Marlborough Blues

uch is the popularity of beagling that two minibuses were required to transport the 25 pupils who follow the hounds every Tuesday afternoon. Much of the credit for the surge in support is due to our charismatic kennel huntsman, Danny Allen, but I would also like to highlight the inspirational leadership of Captain of Beagling, Will Heard (LI U6), as well as the enthusiasm and energy of the main whips, Laura Southern (IH U6) and Miles Brandi (C3 L6).

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The 64th season ended with a Lawn Meet in Court that was attended by a large number of supporters including Brigadier Tom Sneyd (C1 1948-52), who was a pupil at the College when the pack was established in 1952. In the afternoon, hounds followed trails laid around Temple Farm and then we were treated to a delicious tea by the evergenerous Countess Goess-Saurau, who allows us to hunt across her and her husband’s estate in Rockley and always provides a magnificent feast afterwards. On 12 March, 50 people enjoyed a marvellous Annual Dinner in Adderley and the Common Room Dining Room. It was our pleasure to welcome back Nick Wykes (C1 1948-52), who was one of the co-founders of the pack, as well as fellow OMs, Richard Bateman (B2 1947-52) and Brigadier Sneyd. Any Old Marlburians who wish to subscribe to the hunt are encouraged to contact the Master-in-Charge, Sean Dempster, via email, smdd@marlboroughcollege.org

Winners: The victorious Blues team at the Guards, July 2016

successful 2016 season for the Blues saw excellent victories over Hurlingham, Dilettantes, Westminster, Guards and Eton. The CMJ Trophy was retained against the Radley Rangers, but defeats were suffered at the hands of Sherborne, the School, the Flashmen and Downside. There was a winning draw against the HAC and rain intervened to end proceedings against the Hampshire Hogs. Wet weather meant that the Cricketer Cup 1st Round encounter at old rivals Rugby Meteors was reduced to a twenty-over affair. After losing an important toss the Blues failed to stop Rugby chasing down a total of 127 with an over to spare. Individual successes included centuries for Tom Burne (CO 1993-98) versus Hurlingham and Alastair Edmonds (C1 1997-2002) against Downside, and five wicket hauls for Barney Parton (B1 2004-09) at Hurlingham and Will Caldwell (CO 1991-96) at home to Sherborne.

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Elsewhere Charlie Bawden (MM 2010-2015) became the first female to represent Blues on Prize Day. Further history was made with the Blues playing their first ever match in Asia. An OM XI featuring players from five different decades, captained by Chris Hill (C2 1978-83) and including former Cricketer Cup

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Charlotte Bawden (MM 2010-15) makes history on Prize Day becoming the first female to play for the Blues

captain Andy Gough (C1 1989-94), took on a Marlborough College Malaysia XI led by Bob Pick (CR 1980-2012 and Master in Charge of Cricket 1988-96) in Johor Bahru on 11 June. Despite the strong MCM team winning by 118 runs, the match was played in good spirit and enjoyed by all. It is hoped that this will become an annual fixture. On a sombre note it is very sad to report that Tom Clift (TU 19972002) passed away in July as a result of a brain tumour. Tom was an enthusiastic and popular member of the Blues who made a number of contributions with the ball over the years. He will be much missed by the many friends he made. Secretary Mike Bush (TU 1993-98) michaelbush1979@googlemail.com


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Cricket results P: 13 W: 6 D: 2 L: 5 v Hurlingham (away) 8 May – Won by 24 runs Blues 221 all out (Tom Burne (CO 1993-98) 103) Hurlingham 197 all out (Barney Parton (B1 200409) 5/44, Alex Armstrong (C1 1996-2001) 2/35) v Sherborne Pilgrims (home) 15 May – Lost by 10 runs Sherborne Pilgrim 140 all out (Will Caldwell (CO 1991-96) 5/31, Harry Staight (B1 2003-08) 2/11) Prize Day v School (home) 28 May – Lost by 4 wkts Blues 145 all out (Alex Combe (PR 2010-15) 33) School 146 for 6 (Finn Campbell (C1 2010-15) 3/44, Joe Arkwright (SU 2010-15) 2/39) v HAC (away) 4 June – Match Drawn Blues 251 for 8 dec (Harry MacDonald (PR 200308) 72, Simon Battersby (B1- 1966-69) 36, James Caldwell (CO 1995-2000) 33, Will Caldwell 31*) HAC 137 for 8 (Will Caldwell 4/19, Alex Armstrong 2/19, Harry MacDonald 2/20)

Marlborough Blues AGM & Dinner 2017 to be held at

Cricketer Cup 1st Round v Rugby Meteors (away) 12 June – Lost by 5 wkts* Blues 127 for 4 off 20 overs (Ed Kilbee (C2 200106) 54) Rugby Meteors 128 for 5 off 18.4 overs (Alex Armstrong 2/19, Will Caldwell 2/34) *Match reduced to Tw20 due to rain v Dilettantes (home) 19 June – Won by 10 runs Blues 176 for 2 dec (Pete Shone (B3 1980-85) 81*, Ali Robinson (PR 1983-88) 59) Dilettantes 166 all out (Ali Robinson 5/14, Richard Graham (B1 1981-85) 2/58) v Hampshire Hogs (away) 2 July – Match abandoned due to rain Blues 145 for 9 (Will Von Behr (B1 2007-12) 55*)

Lord’s Cricket Ground on Friday 27 January 2017 courtesy of Mike Griffith (C3 1957-62), President of Marlborough Blues CC Please contact Tom Montagu-Pollock (C2 1996-01) (tom.montagu-pollock@schroders.com) if you are interested in joining.

OMs help College to shooting success

v Flashmen (home) 10 July – Lost by 34 runs Flashmen 229 all out (Ed Rothwell (TU 2005-10) 3/26, Mark Cattermull (C3 2009-14) 2/38, Finn Campbell 2/44) Blues 195 all out (Joe Arkwright 63, Ed Rothwell 31) v Old Westminster (away) 17 July – Won by 2 wickets Westminster 162 all out (Barney Parton 3/18, Mike Bush (TU 1993-98) 3/27) Blues 165 for 8 (Alex Middleton (C1 2004-09) 37*, George Strang (BH 2004-09) 36) v Downside Wanderers (home) 24 July – Lost by 64 runs Downside 242 for 6 dec (Harry MacDonald 3/59, Alec Cunningham (C3 1969-74) 2/93) Blues 176 all out (Al Edmonds (C1 1997-2002) 100*) v Guards (away) 30 July – Won by 179 runs Blues 254 for 8 dec (Ivo Cunningham (B1 200409) 57, Mike Bush 51*, Andy Bush (PR 19952000) 41, Will Fremlin-Key (C2 1998-2003) 34) Guards 75 all out (Harry MacDonald 4/30, Mike Bush 2/8, Piers Stoop (C2 2000-05) 2/32) v Radley Rangers (home) 31 July (CMJ Trophy) – Won by 8 wkts Radley Rangers 95 all out (Max Koe (BH 2008-13) 3/33, Alec Cunningham 2/10, Harry Staight 2/10) Blues 99 for 2 (Olly Logan (PR 2006-11) 42*, Ed Kilbee 41) v Eton Ramblers 16 August – Won by 3 wkts Eton Ramblers 267 for 8 dec. (Alec Cunningham 4/32, Mike Bush 2/32) Blues 269 for 7 (Will Caldwell 91, Joe Arkwright 54, Alex Combe 45, Andy Bush 36*)

helping hand from Old Marlburians helped the College to succeed at Bisley in April. Shooting at 300 yards, and then again at 600 yards, in a bitterly cold wind, two competitions were held; one for a team of three Old Marlburians and three current pupils, and one for a team of six current pupils.

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In the mixed competition, Schuyler Neuhauser (B1 U6), Oskar Money-

Kyrle (C3 L6) and Tom Elvin (BH Hu) shot alongside Sandy Gill (BH 19962000), Charles Brooks (PR 1969-74) and Jim Spender (C2 1987-92), scoring 562 with 47 V bulls, but were unlucky to come fourth in a very close competition. Elvin top scored for the College with 94 and 8 V bulls, but was rather outshone by a brilliant performance from Sandy Gill with 99 and 14 V bulls. The Marlburian Club Magazine 101


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Sports & Club Reports selection of food and drink was supplied again by David Richards (B3 1972-76) and Dominic de Vere (BH 1987-92), to whom we were most grateful.

OM Rifle Club

On the international front, Charles Brooks (PR 1969-74) was the successful Captain of England in the Mackinnon long range match, selecting Bill Richards as his main coach, who also participated in all the other international matches for England or Great Britain. Sandy Gill (Scotland) shot in the National and Mackinnon matches, but the highlight of the team matches went to Richard Jeens, Ed Jeens (BH 1998-2003) and Martin Watkins who represented Wales in the National match, won by Wales for the first time in its 142-year history. nother action-packed year for the OM Rifle Club has passed with many club and individual successes to report, albeit with slightly fewer individual successes this year than we have become used to. The National Championships have just been completed at Bisley and the Club was narrowly unable to repeat its success in the Marlingham Trophy (teams of five with aggregate scores over the week’s competitions), falling just three points short. We struggled a little in other concurrent club competitions, due to slightly fewer OMs competing this year. On the individual front, in the two premier individual competitions, we had two OMs in the top 50 of the Grand Aggregate, with a further three in the top 75, and we had five in the final of HM Queen's Prize. Two individual matches were also won by the new OMRC President, Bill Richards (C1 1977-79).

This time last year, we reported that Bill Richards and Ed Jeens were travelling to the World Championships in the USA. We are delighted to say that they were both part of the winning Great Britain team, with a record score, and Bill Richards secured a gold and silver medal in the World Individual Championships. Robin Baker was a member of the team that came second in the World Veterans’ Championships.

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Internal Club trophies, based on scores in the Championships, were won by Richard Jeens (BH 1994-99) (top OM in the Grand Aggregate and long-range matches) and Bill Richards (top OM in the Queen’s). The Public Schools Veterans’ match was an exceptionally high-scoring event, with Simon Horner (C3 1977-82) securing the Vezey Trophy as the highest scoring OM in the event. The “A” team came 102 The Marlburian Club Magazine

fourth, the “B” team fifith and the “C” and “D” teams sixth and tenth respectively. We were fifth in the Aggregate to Old Guildfordians. The other individual Club trophies in the Veterans were won by Sandy Gill (BH 1996-2000), Robin Baker (B2 1954-59) and Richard White (LI 1987-92). After the veterans match, 39 sat down for our Annual Dinner and this year we were honoured to host the Master, Mr Leigh, his wife, Emma, and Danielle Griffin, our honorary auditor, as our guests. This was their first time to Bisley and considering they had arrived from San Francisco earlier that afternoon, it was a testament to their commitment to the OMRC and their stamina! Others attending included Peter Finn (CR 2003-), Martin Watkins and Nicky ‘Marge’ Watts from the College, and the six students shooting the National Championships. A terrific

Our four shoulder-to-shoulder matches during the year with the College team at Bisley and the College over the last year has seen the College VIII get the upper hand over the Club in three of our four fixtures. We entered a combined Club/School team into the Malvern Cup in April, coming fourth behind a strong team from Wellington. We relish our matches against the school, but ‘could do better’ seems to be permanently appended to the match reports! Over the forthcoming 12 months, Bill Richards and Richard Jeens will be travelling to South Africa next April with the Great Britain team to compete for the Australia Match, the second most prestigious international match in target rifle. Charles Brooks has been selected as the Vice-Captain of the Great Britain team to tour Canada in August 2017. President Bill Richards (C1 1977-79)


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OM Sailing he Arrow Trophy is an annual sailing competition held between independent schools and takes place every October in the Solent. The 2015 Old Marlburian Sailing Association (OMSA) team saw many faces returning from the previous year to create our most experienced crew to date! The range in crew age spanned an epic 49 years giving us a wonderful mix of youth and experience.

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The 2015 race weekend began early on the Friday when we collected our Sunsail F40 from Port Solent and headed out to begin our yearly training session. Our collective experience from previous competitions meant we were quickly pulling on the right ropes and managed to sail our way through numerous spinnaker jibes without tearing the sails on our way to Cowes. Feeling confident we disembarked in Cowes and made our way to the curry house for a couple of ales and a hearty feed prior to the real competition. A communication breakdown meant we made an inauspicious start to proceedings by missing the crew briefing on Saturday morning. However, this was quickly forgotten and before long we were out in the Solent ready for the first race. Throughout the day the team demonstrated some of the best boat handling, manoeuvring and yacht racing that we have ever achieved. The foredeck crew consisted of William Steward (C3 2007-12), Ed Gregg (C2 1988-1993) and Alex Quinan (C1 2004-09) who

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worked brilliantly together without a single error all weekend. The cockpit crew, Charlie Kendrick (C1 19982003), James Meredith (B2 19881993), Hannah Sauer, Rob Barnes and Will Sheard (LI 1997-2002), demonstrated great skill under some intense pressure at times. Richard White (LI 1987-1992) and Mike Dana (B3 1959-63) on helm and tactics also did a fine job in keeping the Marlborough boat in the thick of the action. Overall the team worked really well together with very few errors over the weekend. Our best mid-fleet results left us somewhat surprised because we felt that our sailing had been excellent. This is in no small part down to the very strong competition from other schools, who demonstrated their world-class sailing skills. The highlight of the weekend is the dinner at the Corinthian Yacht Club. They even managed to find enough televisions to watch the England rugby match although sadly that ended in disappointment. All in all an excellent weekend of sailing was had in a genuinely fiercely competitive competition. Join The Club! The club is always keen to welcome sailors of any ability, particularly since this is a social club rather than a serious sailing club! There are various opportunities to learn to race yachts in London and on the South Coast over the next year. Commodore Charlie Kendrick (C1 1998-2003) 07946 641136

OM Girls’ Hockey he annual OM Girls’ Hockey match against the College XI was a fantastic success, with the biggest turnout in recent memory. Nineteen Old Marlburians (including a goalie!), with parents and dogs in tow, came down for a sunny afternoon of hockey on Club Day.

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The OMs fielded a strong side of various ex-XI players, with a real mix of age groups, from the most recent leavers to those who’d left five years ago or more. The game itself was enormous fun with end-to-end play and some demonstrations of really top-quality hockey. Despite the scoreline it was an extremely even game, with the College coming out on top with a well deserved 3-0 win. Tired legs were treated to a slap-up BBQ above the astro, and a chance to watch the College in their six-a-side tournament being played out below. It was a fantastic afternoon enjoyed by everyone who came down, with hopes of it continuing to be a popular event for Club Days to come. To anyone interested in playing in upcoming fixtures, we would love to hear from you! Secretary Louise Burn (MO 2006-11) louiseburn@hotmail.co.uk

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Sports & Club Reports OM Golf

OM Football

his past year saw another very active year for the society. All our fixtures, tournaments and meetings were well attended and the society continues to thrive.

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April saw a disappointing result in the Halford Hewitt, with Marlborough losing narrowly to Rossall in the second round. The high spot of the year was our fabulous quinquennial dinner superbly organised by James Hopper (C1 1957-62) and Oliver Hickling (CO 1994-99) at the East India Club. The evening was presided over by outgoing President Tony Hill (CO 1949-53) and outgoing Captain Iain MacdonaldSmith (B1 1959-63), and over 100 OMs and guests enjoyed a great evening. Our new year sees Chris Dowling (B2 1966-71) as Captain and David Coe (B1 1948-52) as President. As ever we would be delighted to hear of any OMs who would like to play OM golf. Secretary Adrian O’Loughlin (B3 1965-69) adrian@gooserye.com

ollowing unprecedented success by way of four consecutive promotions, the Old Marlburian Football Club (OMFC) found itself in the top tier of the Arthurian League – the Premiership! The season promised to be a real step up in terms of quality and would require even more commitment and effort from the squad; it did not disappoint. Following a pre-season tour to Barcelona, which was rich in banter and beers but lacking in confidence – building performances, we faced Shrewsbury on the opening day of the season. A backs-tothe-wall performance on a terrible pitch resulted in a gritty 1-0 victory to get our campaign off to the perfect start. The next few weeks proved difficult with points hard to come by despite some decent performances. Established Premiership teams including Forest, Eton, King’s College Wimbledon, Lancing and Tonbridge ruthlessly capitalised on mistakes that would have gone unpunished in previous seasons, dispatching us with relative ease. A cup exit to Harrow in the Arthur Dunn Cup and two further league defeats to Charterhouse and Shrewsbury left the OMs season on the brink with only three points from eight games. It was make or break.

And then it clicked. A superb team performance away to Lancing saw the OMs run out 6-1 winners. Goals from Rob Guppy (C3 2002-07) Alex Middleton (C1 2004-09) and Niall Alcock (C2 1999-2004) sealed a win in a match where Ben Walters (SU 2005-10) and George Brown (BH 2002-07) asserted their authority and superior fitness in midfield. The shackles were off, confidence was oozing through the team once more and the love for the game had returned! The OMFC’s Christmas pub crawl – stopping for an obligatory pint at each railway station between Tolworth and London Waterloo – ensured the feel good vibe continued well into the night. Despite a defeat to reigning champions Charterhouse, there was renewed belief in the squad that we could avoid the drop. And this belief manifested itself in two 104 The Marlburian Club Magazine

key victories against relegation rivals Chigwell and Highgate with Tom de Boinville (C3 2002-07) scoring some vital goals and giving Ole Gunnar Solskjaer a run for his money for the ‘supersub’ tag. Jack Webb (C1 1991-96) again proved that age is just a number with some majestic performances in midfield. Further decent results for the return legs against Eton and King’s College Wimbledon proved that lessons were being learnt. Harry von Behr (B1 200106), Nick Horowitz (C3 2002-07), Harry Bristow (C3 1999-2004), Alex Azis (CO 2004-09), Joe Hare (C3 1999-2004) and Joel Hughes (C3 1999-2004) were mainstays playing virtually every minute of every game. Cameron Gordon (PR 2012-14), Tiger Foot (SU 2009-14), Tom Forsythe (BH 1999-2004), James Allan (C3 2000-05), Edmund Hill Smith (C3 2002-07) and Jim Gray (CO 1994-99) all played their part as the OMs secured their safety in the Premiership for another season. After seven years of running OMFC, it is time for Dan Black and myself (both C3 1999-2004) to step down. The Club has gone from playing a couple of friendlies a year to establishing itself in the top division. This year a remarkable 29 games were played! It has been an honour and privilege to be part of the success achieved in the Club’s short history, and we thank everyone who has made it such an enjoyable experience. Our reign will be ably succeeded by Nick Horowitz and Ben Walters with support from George Brown who will continue in his role as treasurer. Whilst experience is key, the Club needs to blood some new, energetic, ambitious recruits to propel us forward as we look to build on what has been achieved so far. If you are a keen and committed footballer reading this, I urge you to put your services forward and get in touch at omfc.management@gmail.com Secretary Joe Hare (C3 1999-2004) Joe.Hare@dtz.com


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OM Squash

OM Tennis The Rose Bowl team: Joash Nelson-Piercy (CO U6), John Menmuir (PR 1991-96), Nick Fallowfield (B3 1981-85), Charles Laughton (TU 1994-99), Toby Warren (C2 1992-97) and Jules Beckett (CR)

he Courtiers Londonderry Cup run ended in defeat in the quarters at the hands of the Old Etonians. Our first round victory over Old Wellingtonians, will long be remembered for Nick “Lazarus” Atkins (BH 1975-79) recovering from match point down at 8-0 in the third game to win the deciding match.

the deserved winner of the trophy, defeating Joash Nelson-Piercy of Cotton House in the final. Joash is the first pupil to get to the final of the Rose Bowl. Many thanks to Charles Laughton (TU 1994-99) for organising the day.

Another successful Rose Bowl was held at the College in January. Nick Fallowfield (B3 1981-85),

Secretary Alex Wildman (C2 1984-89) alex@brookshirecapital.co.uk

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OM Real Tennis he father and son pair of Steven (PR 1969-73) and Ollie Bishop (PR 2000-05) represented the OM Real Tennis Club in the Cattermull Cup held in January at Middlesex RTC. This was only Ollie’s second competitive appearance on a real tennis court which helped our handicap and also lulled our opponents into a false sense of confidence. Despite losing to the eventual winners, Eton, in the group stage, wins over Millfield and Charterhouse saw us through to the knock out stages. The quarterfinal against the extremely experienced Rugby pair was close, but Marlborough came out winners resulting in a semifinal match against the young pair from

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As ever, please get in touch if you are looking to join the OM Squash Team.

Wimbledon High School. For the second time, we were up against an all-female pair but, unlike Millfield, Wimbledon were relentless and error free. We found it extremely difficult to get to the service end and when we did it was not for long! We went down to a heavy defeat but with our pride intact, determined to go one stage better next year. I would encourage all OM tennis players to get in touch – it would be great to enter more than one pair in the Cattermull, and even better to have a strong entry into the open Henry Leaf. Secretary Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73) smwbishop@yahoo.co.uk 07802 500274

M tennis has experienced something of a resurgence. When I was still at Marlborough, I don’t remember many OMs vs current VI fixtures taking place, but we’ve managed to have many fun (and successful) days out in recent years – not just against the school but in various other competitions. This year, Alex Brignall (B1 1999-2004) and I teamed up and won through to the quarter finals of the Public Schools Old Boys’ Championships (otherwise known as the D’Abernon cup), where we are due to face topseeded Reeds. We are able to count on a number of OMs still playing at a very high level, from club and University teams to ITF Futures competitions. I am trying to organise more fixtures in the coming months, as well as a number of socials and casual hitting sessions, so please do get in touch if you’d like to get involved.

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Secretary Greg Caterer (CO 2000-06) gjcaterer@gmail.com

If anyone is interested in joining any of the sports’ clubs or would like some more information please contact the Club office on marlburianclub@ marlboroughcollege.org or phone 01672 892385

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Financial help for OMs Are your finances in a mess through no fault of your own or do you know an OM who is struggling? Do you need help to complete your postgraduate studies or specialist training, or to undertake a gap year project? OMs may be eligible for support from the Marlburian Club’s Charitable Funds in the following ways:

1. College fees When OMs with children at Marlborough encounter some unexpected hardship (sudden redundancy, severe illness or death) funds can be made available to ensure their children can continue their education there.

2. Professional training expenses

The trustees have supported a range of OMs who need support with training: many medical students have been given contributions towards the costs of undertaking elective training overseas; a music graduate who had shown great initiative and determination in his fundraising was given a grant for specialist training in the US; and a young OM was given a grant to take up a United Nations internship.

3. Emergency assistance Help is occasionally given to OMs who fall on hard times and are in need of short-term

help in order to get them back on their feet. Such assistance is usually given as a one-off ex gratia payment for a specific purpose.

4 . Gap-year grants All pupils are invited to apply for support when they wish to undertake gap year schemes which involve an element of service to groups less privileged than themselves. Individual grants average about £400 and come from an endowment made by Judge Edwin Konstam (LI 1884-87). If you would like to apply for assistance please send an email to the grant administrator at MCCF@marlboroughcollege.org or write to him c/o The Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 IPA. Please write in the subject line or mark the envelope Grant Application – Private & Confidential. All enquiries are treated confidentially.

Photographers and writers

The Magazine would like to help any potential writers and photographers. If you would like get your name onto the pages of this magazine (going out to over 10,000 subscribers), then please contact the Editor, Catherine Brumwell, on catherine@theommagazine.co.uk

106 The Marlburian Club Magazine


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On the Shelves experience in 2014, the major part of the book comprises chapters devoted to commentary on the play, its thoughts, motives and its themes in Lear’s own words, with other chapters equally devoted to similar commentary from other characters in the play.

Salisbury in the Great War By Neil Hall (SU 1961-63) Published by Pen and Sword, £12.08 ISBN 978-1473843738

The Bonniest Companie

‘The war invisibly regulated our lives’, commented a Salisbury resident when recalling the calamity, now known as the Great War. Much of life in the city – with its ancient cathedral, the finest spire in England, medieval New Town built on ‘chequers’ and meeting place of five rivers – would be challenged. Vast areas of the nearby plain, recently purchased by the military, became an add-on, tented city as thousands of men responded to Kitchener’s call. Soldiers from the farflung Empire arrived too, including one Canadian with his mascot bear. Hardly a street or village failed to witness what Wilfred Owen called the sad “drawing down of blinds”.

The early 1980s in Britain were a time of hope, and of dread; of Cold War tension and imminent conflict; when crowds in the street could mean an ecstatic national celebration or an inner-city riot. Here, Andy Beckett recreates an often misunderstood moment of transition, with all its potential and uncertainty: the first precarious years of Margaret Thatcher's government. By the end of 1982, the country was changing, leaving the kinder, more sluggish post-war Britain decisively behind, and becoming the country we have lived in ever since: assertive, commercially driven, outwardlooking and often harsher than its neighbours.

King Lear in Brooklyn By Michael Pennington (PR 1957-61) Published by Oberon Books, £14.88 ISBN 978-1783193264

By the time the war had ended in 1918, the people of Salisbury had adapted, endured and “done their bit”. Surely they believed this had been the war to end all wars. Uniquely compiled from extensive archives, personal interviews and with striking images, Hall’s book unveils the minutiae of the Salisbury Home Front.

Promised You a Miracle: Why 1980-1982 Made Modern Britain By Andy Beckett (SU 1983-88) Published by Allen Lane, £9.98 ISBN 978-0241956885

By Kathleen Jamie, Illustrated by Olivia Lomenench Gill (MM 1990-92) Published by Picador, £7.49 ISBN 978-1509801718

In her extraordinary collection, Kathleen Jamie examines her native Scotland – a country at once wild and contained, rural and urban – and her place within it. In the author's own words: “2014 was a year of tremendous energy in my native Scotland, and knowing I wanted to embrace that energy and participate in my own way, I resolved to write a poem a week, and follow the cycle of the year.” The poems also venture into childhood and family memory – and look ahead to the future. The Bonniest Companie is a visionary response to a year shaped and charged by both local and global forces, and will stand as a remarkable document of our times.

Monsters An original approach to Shakespeare's King Lear, Michael Pennington takes us on a fascinating journey through the play from the point of view of Lear himself and others. Although Michael also writes about his own New York acting

By Emerald Fennell (NC 1998-2003) Published by Hot Key Books, £7.99 ISBN 978-1471404627

A blackly comic tale about two children you would never want to meet. The Marlburian Club Magazine 107


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On the Shelves Set in the Cornish town of Fowey, all is not as idyllic as the beautiful seaside town might seem. The body of a young woman is discovered in the nets of a fishing boat. It is established that the woman was murdered. Most are shocked and horrified. But there is somebody who is not – a twelve-year-old girl. She is delighted; she loves murders. Soon she is questioning the inhabitants of the town in her own personal investigation. But it is a bit boring on her own. Then Miles Giffard, a similarly odd twelve-year-old boy, arrives in Fowey with his mother, and they start investigating together. Oh, and also playing games that re-enact the murders. Just for fun, you understand...

keepers; seed savers and de-pavers; cloud commuters and e-bike couriers; care farmers; food system curators; fibershed stewards; money designers and more – from Bali to Brazil, as well as Delhi, London, and California. At Marlborough, John was the joint editor of an unofficial magazine called Gutbucket. It was suppressed by the then Master following its publication of a satirical story about the visit of an eminent OM General.

Arcadian Nights; The Greek Myths Reimagined A book about two twelve-year-olds that is definitely not for kids!

By John Spurling (B3 1950-54) Published by Duckworth Publishers, £20.41 ISBN 1468311794

How to Thrive in the Next Economy By John Thackara (PR 1964-69) Published by Thames and Hudson, £15.88 ISBN 978-0500518083

Drawing on a lifetime of travel in search of real-world alternatives that work, John describes how communities the world over are creating a replacement, leave-things-better economy from the ground up. Each chapter is about creative ways to tackle timeless needs that matter: restoring the land, sharing water, making homes, growing food, designing clothes, journeying, and caring for each other. John writes of soil restorers and river 108 The Marlburian Club Magazine

murder, power, revenge, love, lust and dysfunctional family relationships. Although ancient in origin, they are contemporary in their portrayal of human character and motivation. Master of historical fiction (Kirkus) John Spurling freshly reimagines key narratives from the Greek canon including tales of the doomed house of Atreus, of the sun god Apollo, Theseus scourge of the minotaur, the Twelve Labours of Heracles and Perseus, rescuer of Andromeda. Inspired by the great poets and playwrights – from Homer to Euripides – this exemplary recounting for a new generation of readers young and old tells us much about these human archetypes in a lively and contemporary style

Business Writing Tips for Easy and Effective Results By Robert Bullard (LI 1976-81) Published by Perfect Text, £14 (incl P&P) ISBN 978-0-9931898-0-7

Does your writing get the reaction you want from customers? Do your words make you stand above your competitors? Or do you find writing can be a struggle? In this handbook, Robert Bullard draws on his ten years’ professional writing experience to provide concise and practical help. His tips will make your writing jobs easier, have fewer errors and more impact. In addition to 170 tips (10 per chapter), the book contains exercises, key points and example texts with commentaries.

A vibrant, gripping and often grisly retelling of Greek myths by the author of The Ten Thousand Things, winner of the 2015 Walter Scott Prize. Over the centuries, legendary figures and mythic monsters have inspired art, literature, and drama. They have persisted in classic Greek tales, violent stories of


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Readers will benefit from guidance in areas such as: How to Write with Ease and Speed; Tips from Professional Writers; How to Grab Readers’ Attention; Make Your Writing Memorable; and Writing for Particular Outputs.

How English Became English: A Short History of a Global Language By Simon Horobin (CO 1985-90) Published by Oxford University Press, £10.99 ISBN: 9780198754275

The English language is spoken by more than a billion people throughout the world. But where did English come from? And how has it evolved into the language used today?

Simon Horobin investigates the evolution of the English language, examining how the language continues to adapt even today, as English continues to find new speakers and new uses. Engaging with contemporary concerns about correctness, Horobin considers whether such changes are improvements, or evidence of slipping standards. What is the future for the English language? Will standard English continue to hold sway, or are we witnessing its replacement by newly emerging Englishes?

Crisis By Frank Gardner (LI 1974-79) Published by Bantam Press, £7.99 ISBN 978-0593075784

Introducing Luke Carlton – ex-Special Boat Service commando, and now under contract to MI6 for some of its most dangerous missions.

Sent into the steaming Colombian jungle to investigate the murder of a British intelligence officer, Luke finds himself caught up in the coils of a plot that has terrifying international dimensions. Hunted down, captured, tortured and on the run from one of South America's most powerful and ruthless drugs cartels and its psychotic leader thirsting for revenge, Luke is in a life-or-death race against time to prevent a disaster on a truly terrifying scale: London is the target, the weapon is diabolical and the means of delivery is ingenious. Drawing on his years of experience reporting on security matters, Crisis is Frank Gardner’s debut novel. Combining insider knowledge, up-to-the-minute hardware, fly-on-the-wall insights with heart-in-mouth excitement, Crisis boasts an irresistible, visceral frisson of authenticity: smart, fast-paced and furiously entertaining, here is a thriller for the 21st century.

In Her Wake By Amanda Jennings (PR 1989-91) Published by Orenda Books, £8.99 ISBN 978-1910633298

A tragic family event reveals devastating news that rips apart Bella's comfortable existence. Embarking on a personal journey to uncover the truth, she faces a series of traumatic discoveries that take her to the ruggedly beautiful Cornish coast, where hidden truths, past betrayals and a 25-year-old mystery threaten not just her identity, but her life. Chilling, complex and profoundly moving, In Her Wake is a gripping psychological thriller that questions the nature of family - and reminds us that sometimes the most shocking crimes are committed closest to home.

The Grantchester Mysteries: Sidney Chambers and the Dangers of Temptation By James Runcie (B2 1972-77) Published by Bloomsbury, £13.48 ISBN 978-1408870228

Archdeacon Sidney Chambers is beginning to think that the life of a full-time priest (and part-time detective) is not easy. So when a bewitching divorcee in a mink coat interrupts Sidney's family lunch asking him to help locate her missing son, he hopes it will be an open and shut case. The last thing he expects is to be dragged into the mysterious workings of a sinister cult, or to find himself tangled up in another murder investigation. But, as always, the village of Grantchester is not as peaceful as it seems… From the theft of an heirloom to an ominous case of blackmail, Sidney is once again rushed off his feet in this eagerly anticipated fifth instalment in the Grantchester Mysteries series. The Marlburian Club Magazine 109


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On the Shelves revenge that rules the world. Author Jeremy Holden will have you laughing out loud at the absurdity of the challenges that Mal and his team find themselves confronted with, while at the same time forcing us to examine the role we all play in enabling the media to shape our thinking and dictate our lives.

Under a Sickle Moon: A Journey Through Afghanistan By Peregrine Hodson (C1 1967-71) Published by Grove Atlantic Publishers, £10.71 ISBN 978-0802139528

Three different vegetable cookbooks by Christopher Trotter (B1 1970-75) Ned Waddlesworth has always considered his world to be exceptionally ordinary. Until the day he discovers it isn’t. At all. Because on Ned’s thirteenth birthday he discovers that everything magical he’s ever read about or imagined is real. And without him, the world will soon be engulfed in monstrous beasts and beings. In 1984 journalist Peregrine Hodson crossed the Pakistan border into Afghanistan with rebel mujahedin smuggling arms and ammunition, beginning a thousand-mile journey through the war-torn nation. Fluent in Farsi, he was able to observe the war with stunning intimacy and eloquently capture the essence of the Afghan people and their culture. As the travellers survived bombings by Soviet aircraft, an ambush by a rival faction, and becoming swept up in a major offensive, Hodson would come to gain a unique perspective on their hopes for peace and religious devotion. Bringing together travel writing, war reportage, and history, this is a richly rendered portrait of a complex people.

Ned’s Circus of Marvels By Justin Fisher (Justin Blampierd B3 1986-90) Published by Harper Collins Children's Books, £4.00 ISBN 978-0008124526

From exciting debut author Justin Fisher, comes this rip-roaring, page-turning new magical adventure. Perfect for fans of House of Secrets. 110 The Marlburian Club Magazine

So with the help of a robot mouse, a girl witch and a flying circus unlike any other, it’s up to Ned to swoop in and save the day! Roll up, roll up, and prepare to be amazed by Ned and the marvellous, magical, monstrous flying circus!

Beetroot, Courgette and Kale Published by Christopher Trotter, £6.95 Bought through www.christophertrotter.cartloom.com/shop/

Beetroot often gets a bad press. In the days of my youth the only way it was served was pickled in vinegar, and the flavour so strong that no trace remained of the vegetable itself. Today you can buy over cooked vacuum packed beetroot which for me still does not truly do justice to this most delicious vegetable.

Sea of Doubt By Jeremy D Holden (BH 1978-82) Published by Clean Publishing, North Carolina, USA, $10.95 ISBN 978-0-9978970-0-5

Sea of Doubt provides a window into the modern world of digital and social media-driven mass persuasion, while forcing us to examine whether it’s love or The humble courgette, or zucchini, depending where you come from, is such a versatile vegetable. Kale is undergoing a renaissance, for years it has been seen as food fit only for cattle or as a vegetable your granny used to put in soup, but at last its nutritional properties are being appreciated, that and the fact that it survives a harsh winter and chefs are starting to use it in dishes attracted by the vibrant colours and textures.


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Sloane Club

he Sloane Club is delighted to offer members of the Marlburian Club complimentary membership, which includes dining access through the week and accommodation access at the weekend, until the age of 25. The Sloane Club is an exclusive Private Members’ Club in the heart of Chelsea, offering homely Drawing Rooms, a five-star quality restaurant, led by Executive Chef Bernhard Mayer (previously of The Savoy) and over 130 bedrooms. The Sloane Club also has a spa, private roof terrace and event spaces.

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To apply for your complimentary membership, please email the Membership Secretary, Fran Bremner, on fbremner@sloaneclub.co.uk quoting ‘Marlburian Club Membership’. Terms and conditions apply.

East India Club opportunity of paying a one-off subscription of £350 for membership between the ages of 18 and 25, with no entrance fee, proposer or seconder required.

he Club is situated close to Bond Street and within easy reach of the City and Canary Wharf. It offers an elegant dining room with a Michelin rated Executive Chef, spacious drawing rooms for relaxing, bars, meeting rooms and a billiards room. There is also a tranquil terrace, an IT suite, private dining rooms and forty well-appointed bedrooms. There is a programme of social events and different societies to join and the Club is a member of the Inter-Club Group for Under 35s.

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If you are interested in Membership or would like to learn more about the Club please contact the Membership Secretary on + 44 (0)20 7629 5126 or at membership@orientalclub.org.uk www.orientalclub.org.uk

For under 25s, the Club has established the OC7 Scheme whereby there is the The Marlburian Club Magazine 111


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Classified A PORTRAIT OF YOUR HOUSE A portrait of your house as a birthday present or as postcards by Hugh Cantlie an OM and leading contemporary water-colourist. Ring 01993 832 213

MALLORCA VILLA Take a break in our lovely villa in South East Mallorca! Great for big or small groups. andrew.taylor@pobox.com

BLOWING MY OWN TRUMPET An original and entertaining life, termed by Francis Fulford Fulford Manor as: “Fantastic”. Available from The White Horse Bookshop, Marlborough, Amazon, Waterstones or the author: mrfbrown@hotmail.com Post paid £10.99

ANIMAL ONESIES For the best fun animal onesies in the world look no further than kigu.co.uk − get cozy for those chilly nights.

WILLBOX CABINS & CONTAINERS Container hire from £1 per day Premium shipping containers, ideal for storage and site accommodation. Visit: www.willbox.co.uk or call 0800 023 50 60 TUSCANY/UMBRIA VILLA Tuscany/Umbria border. Spacious farmhouse villa − our loved home. Sleeps 10. Pool. Views. Magical atmosphere. Culture. Everything... just read reviews. www.ladogana.co.uk

A PIECE OF CAKE BY BEV.NET Homemade traybakes... exceptionally good! Order online/phone for posting or local delivery. 07769 255019

LONDON RESIDENTS CLUB

The London Residents Club is offering all OMs a free trial. We will upload your property and collect all the data, including queries and viewing figures. In doing this, we can provide you with very accurate rental estimates without ever taking an actual booking. We are also currently offering a £500 referral fee to all OMs. 020 3096 6057 thomas@thelondonresidentsclub.com 112 The Marlburian Club Magazine


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Advertising he Marlburian Club Magazine is circulated to over 11,000 alumni of Marlborough College as well as to all parents and guardians of over 900 current pupils.

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Research indicates the Magazine is read by between two and five AB1 readers per copy, and that it is kept for the whole year. With alumni and parents living in all corners of the globe, its reach is international. For that reason, the Magazine has always attracted very high quality advertisers. If your business would like to target the same demographic and you would like the opportunity to advertise in next year’s edition, please register your interest today by emailing marlburianclubmagazine@ marlboroughcollege.org

Advertising options Full page Half page horizontal Half page vertical Quarter page Outside back cover Inside front/inside back cover Classified

Advertising Sales Kate Goodwin, Alumni Relations Manager, The Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire SN8 1PA

DISCOUNTS FOR OM OWNED & LOCAL BUSINESSES

Tel: 01672 892 384

Your Network – Your Way Stay connected to your Old Marlburian community… your way Have your contact details changed?

New Distribution Policy

Update your profile or join affiliated clubs and groups through the Members’ area of the Club website www.marlburianclub.org/members or the Club Office.

Only one copy of the Club Magazine is now being sent to each household. Members sharing an address may request their own copy or receive alerts for the online version through www.marlburianclub.org or the Club Office.

Join the Marlborough College Alumni LinkedIn group Click Like on The Marlburian Club Facebook page To receive e-newsletters update marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org with your latest email address

Online This Magazine can be read on mobile devices and online www.marlburianclub.org/magazine Wherever they are in the world, the Club is delighted to send OMs their copy of the Club Magazine. Mindful of using subscription funds wisely, do let us know if you would prefer to receive your copy electronically.

The Marlburian Club Magazine 113


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Crossword Competition crossword by Alberich (C1 1976-80). Closing date: 31 March 2017. Please send completed entries to: Kate Goodwin, The Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire, SN8 1PA or scan and email to marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org

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2015 Crossword solutions We were delighted to receive several correct entries for 2015’s crossword (see below). The winner was Jason James (C3 1978-82) who received a pair of Marlburian Club cufflinks. B S

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I

D

A

E

A I

E I

L

E

V

D E

E

D

T S

A

I

A

N G

N

I

E

H O O

S

A

U

A

L

A M P

S

W O

L

L

S I

E

S O N H

R

S

R

R

A G G R

T

I

P

N

A G

P H

E I

H

T

S

O

A

D D

20

T

21

A

Y

S

U A

A

D

L

D

A M E

S

R

A

E

N N

F

P

E

R

19

22

23

24

26

27

Y

Each clue contains a superfluous word. The initial letters, in clue order, spell out an instruction which should be followed after completion of the grid. ACROSS 1

Woofer and tweeter finally get new speaker housing each (5,4)

6

Good judge tackles current hooligan trouble (5) Nearly all train at the one ground where you can see Arsenal play (8,7)

25

S

2016 Crossword

9

18

16

T

S A

17

K

H E

P

15

17

Y

A P

14

E

C O U R C

13

S

S R

A

12

19 One having terrible row departs, touched with affection (7)

6

Visitors occasionally wanting time to think (5)

21 Could be apt dude overspends, given current account? (7)

7

Not knowing where Noah’s party took refuge involves utter dimness, principally (2,3,4)

8

Grand Duke tours eastern Australia – it’s a holiday (6)

23 Ban therefore includes overseas business graduate (7) 25 Doubt is harboured by extremely patient maintainer of French historic sites (15) 26 Opera to Milan’s La Scala at heart (5) 27 Clergyman runs around river valley (5,4) DOWN

13 Fatigue, it arises, hides sign of embarrassment? (9) 15 Abandon coarse, foul-mouthed Australian bird (5,4) 16 Canadian city men do not dance, often (8)

1

Government’s not the first to outlaw importing fashionable rum drink (3,3,2)

11 American eventually shut up about note still in his wallet? (7)

2

John Lennon for one left boarding school (5)

12 One monotously recites popular fashion mag’s tips for Easter (7)

3

Strange yen to pawn belongings of little value (3,1,5)

20 Male equestrian riding favourite’s an idiot (6)

14 Italian tenor’s to study opera after university (6)

4

A friend said you are ordering ham (7)

22 Article generated thank you letter from Rhodes (5)

17 To some extent, Geoffrey thinks Jana’s a goddess (6)

5

Give responsibility to nutters? That’s rather silly (7)

24 Sounds like skates maybe breed extensively (5)

10 The Spanish joke about drinking around nine times as much (7)

114 The Marlburian Club Magazine

18 A large port south of New Hampshire town (7) 19 Person with loud voice lent gun to Regina (7)


Peter Page DESIGNER • GOLDSMITH

4 The Square, Ramsbury, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 2PE Telephone: 01672 520428 www.peterpage.co.uk info@peterpage.co.uk


NUMBER 117

WINTER 2016

T H E M A R L B U R I A N C LU B M A G A Z I N E

The Marlburian Club Magazine

WINTER 2016

Cover story: Philosophy, through the lens Nick Shoolingin-Jordan, award-winning cameraman, producer and director

Profile for rawdesign

Marlburian Club Magazine 2016  

Marlburian Club Magazine 2016  

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