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NUMBER 115

WINTER 2014

e Marlburian Club Magazine Cover story: From Wellies to War Horse Artist and illustrator Olivia Gill explains her cra to Nicola Read


Contents Features 07

Totally inspirational Donald Wright

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My house Marlburian Dynasties

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e Croquet Man Eleanor Pontin takes tea with long-time international player Dr William Ormerod

oM entrepreneurs Blaze, Henry Tuke, Near the Motorways, Mr & Mrs Smith

royal Peculiars 4 Clerk of the Parliaments David Beamish

Comparing notes: Harriett Jagger and her daughter India Gaul

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From wellies to war horse Artist and illustrator Olivia Gill explains her cra to Nicola Read

Brigadier Michael Koe on B1

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water, water everywhere Susanna Spicer visits Richard Pim’s extraordinary Herefordshire garden

i’ll never forget... A bit of illicit fishing on the Kennet

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wwi in Memoriam 1914 e OMs who gave their lives in the first few months of the Great War

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Marlborough legends Beak and poet John Bain

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Marlburian VCs: 1914 Captain Edward Bradbury

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Ch Sorley’s ‘To germany’

Cover: ‘Standing To’ – charcoal drawing with wash, collage and mixed media © Olivia Lomenech Gill 2013 www.oliviagill.com

Michael Ponsford introduces one of the OM Great War poets

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Chance encounters An OM recalls serendipitous collisions with others worldwide

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Striving to make the world a better place Dr Benjamin ompson interviews charity founder and director Rev Charlotte Bannister-Parker

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letting the gini out of the bottle e relationship between Marlburians and academe is examined by Dr omas Crump

being smart is not enough Charles Grant meets international economist Charles Collyns

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“exquisitely made, historically fascinating, irresistibly charming…”

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Alexandra Jackson pens a portrait of newly appointed Ashmolean Director Dr Xa Sturgis

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rising to a challenge Six OM Adventurers compare their exceptional experiences

Regulars View 04 05 06 76

Upfront From the Chair is year Letters to the Editor

The Club 14 Club Events 58 OM News 67 Engagements, Marriages & Births 68 Deaths 69 Obituaries 97 Sports & Club Reports The College 84 Looking ahead 85 e Master’s Review 87 College Admissions Procedures 88 Common Room Leavers 90 Development Plan 92 A Legacy for Life 94 Meet the team 95 1843 Society 96 Development Events liTerary 103 Book Reviews 110 Crosswords

The Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire SN8 1PA Telephone +44 (0)1672 892 384 marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org www.marlboroughcollege.org Twitter: @OldMarlburians Editorial and advertising enquiries: Telephone +44 (0)1672 892 384 Editor: Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81). Editor Emeritus: Martin Evans (CR 1968-). Editorial Board: Alexandra Jackson (CO 1974-76), Harriett Jagger (PR 1976-78), Rob Peal (BH 2001-06), Jane Gow (B3 1982-84) (Communications Manager). Design: Andy Rawlings. © The Marlburian Club 2014 e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Upfront Sometimes I think this publication is jinxed: no sooner do we feature an individual than their career takes a totally different turn, or pronounce on a subject than it is turned inside out or upside down. So it was last year when I congratulated the powers that be on assembling a full development and management team… half of it had disappeared before my piece even hit your doormat. In reality it is as much the consequence of our unavoidably long lead-in period as fate, but even so, this year I will try and be a little more circumspect, just in case. I will nevertheless venture to say that once again it looks as though the Club’s staffing sails are set fair, and I hope will still be so by the time you read this.

“I am particularly pleased to welcome Jane Gow, née Green (B3 1982-84) and Chris Tanner to the production team...” – the irreplaceable Terry Rogers (CR 1964-2014, Archivist 1996-2014). Tributes to both appear in the following pages, though I hope Terry will not stray far.

ew Director of Development Jon Copp (CR 1981-) is of course actually an old hand, knowing Marlborough so well from the inside as he does. He and his team (see p94) therefore hit the ground running, tackling everything from social media, new networking events, development planning and alumni liaison to establishing a digital archive. From the Magazine’s point of view I am particularly pleased to welcome Jane Gow, née Green (B3 1982-84) and Chris Tanner to the production team in place of Alumni Manager Jane Pendry, who has moved on to e Dragon School’s development department, but is sorely missed. But balancing that delight is the great sadness attached to our losing Robert Smith (B1 1943-48, Club Secretary 1989-96), most loyal proofreader and friend of all things Marlburian, to cancer earlier in the year, and – due to his retirement this summer

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is summer saw the start of the national commemorations of the centenary of the First World War. We at the Magazine hope to play our part in bringing OMs’ attention to Marlburian involvement throughout the next five years; particularly in respect of those who lost their lives fighting for the freedom we continue to enjoy, in some cases earning the highest of military honours – the Victoria Cross – in the process. eir stories are fascinating and inspiring and we make no apology for continuing to remember and honour them. Altogether Marlborough lost 749 OMs, beaks and staff to the conflict, a shocking and chilling figure. But life goes on and we will therefore also continue to look forward to the future and the role OMs do and will play in the 21st century in equal measure. e following pages give but a glimpse of the range of stories that reach my inbox during the year. Your 2014 Editorial Board (Martin Evans, Alexandra Jackson, Harriett Jagger and Robert Peal) debated

long and hard which ones we should feature, and I am as indebted to them as I am to the volunteer authors who subsequently allow themselves to be persuaded/bullied into giving their time and expertise to ensure the Magazine remains as fresh and interesting as may be. Also, as always, the proofreaders too deserve much commendation: Terry Rogers has this year been joined by incoming archivist Clare Russell (CR 1980-), while the aforementioned Jane Gow and Chris Tanner and mine of information Martin Evans complete the formidable team and keep me firmly on my toes. Andy Rawlings, our designer, is also a delight to work with and is not only consummately skilled but infinitely patient. My thanks to them all, for without them it would not exist and I would be out of a job. I am hopeful that we have found me a successor; watch this space! But in the meantime send you my best wishes as ever for a most successful year to come.

Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81) Editor


From the Chair In my notes last year I remarked on the rapid period of evolution the Club was experiencing. Little did I think that, a year later, it would be ongoing. e retirement of MCWE was well flagged; the resignation, aer less than five months, of the new Director of Development and, more pertinently, the departure of Jane Pendry aer six years sterling service were quite unanticipated. However, despite the initial hiatus, the Club has continued to prosper and it has been another busy year with a wide range of social events both at home and abroad, some notable sporting achievements and continued support for both young OMs and current pupils on the careers front. Imogen Hendricks (BH 1979-81), Hattie Jagger (PR1976-78) and Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81).

s you know, Jon Copp (CR 1981-) was appointed Director of Development in January and quickly set about restoring stability in the Club office. He has a strong team working with him and Jan Perrins, Kate O’Connor, Jane Gow (B3 1982-84), Ian Leonard and Chris Tanner have all played their parts in supporting Club activities. In particular Kate has been a very efficient first port of call for OMs contacting the office and Chris has transformed the Club’s social media presence – key to our retaining contact with younger OMs.

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I am conscious that the Club can appear rather London-centric and it is good to report that OMs have wined and dined from Edinburgh to Toulouse and Waldron to Malaysia via Stellenbosch, as well as in Piccadilly and Pall Mall. Most recently 300 OMs attended the Summer Drinks party at the Stationers’ Hall, a triumph for organisers

Success has also continued on the sporting front: the footballers beat Charterhouse in the final to win the Junior League Cup while the golfers both got to the semi-finals of the Plate at the Halford Hewitt and qualified for the Graon Morrish for the first time in many years. Two new trophies also reflect the Club’s continuing interest in cricket and rugby: the CMJ Trophy, in memory of Christopher Martin-Jenkins (B3 1958-63), will be played for between the Blues and the Radley Rangers (the Blues won in 2013), while the Silk Cup, named for Dennis Silk (CR 1955-68), coach of the 1963 XV amongst other honours, will be awarded to the aggregate winner of the rugby fixtures between MC and Radley. Although the XV won an exciting away match, Radley were the inaugural winners overall.

I now wear two hats as I succeeded John Manser (PR 1953-58) as Chairman of the Foundation in June. Over the coming months you will be hearing more about the College’s Strategic Development Plan, encompassing both capital projects such as the Memorial Hall and the Science Block and the establishment of an Endowment Fund to provide much more bursarial support to encourage greater diversity in the College’s intake. I hope that those who are able to support these initiatives will feel inclined to do so; but I can assure you that Club events will not be hijacked by fund-raising activity.

Steven bishop (PR 1969-73) Chairman of e Marlburian Club

OMs now participate in two College careers events. e first, involving recent graduates, is a ‘careers speed dating’ opportunity for the Hundred. Later in the Lent term the L6 spend an aernoon with more senior representatives of industries and professions related to their own areas of interest. is year Andrew Barnes (B1 1973-79) also kindly arranged for a group of current undergraduates and U6 pupils to spend an aernoon at Lloyds insurance market followed by a reception hosted by Lloyds’ Chairman, John Nelson (C3 1961-65). Details of all these events and sporting fixtures can be found in succeeding pages. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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is year It is a great privilege to be invited to become President of the Marlburian Club – especially at a time when it is in such excellent health. e Club has increased its range of activities – sporting, cultural and social – and attendances have broadened and increased. is has been achieved through the commitment of the team in the Development Office, led by Jon Copp, and your Committee, led by my predecessor Robin Janvrin and Chairman Stephen Bishop. Over the past 50 years, the College has changed beyond recognition and in doing so it has built a reputation for innovation and being able to move with changing times. Examples include the admission of girls, changes to the curriculum to ensure that it is responsive to social and business advances, and the establishment of Marlborough College Malaysia. I am therefore delighted that many of those responsible for the College’s development over that period will be present at the Annual Dinner in March 2015. Marlborough College was founded as a charity to enable the sons of clergy to receive a quality education, and the objective of providing private education to those who cannot afford it remains as relevant now as it was then. For that reason, I welcome the decision of the College Council, led by Mark Malloch Brown, to increase the College’s ability to provide a private education to talented

individuals. e Club provides a valuable means of communicating the College’s initiatives, and I hope that OMs of all generations will support the events that the College organises. Communication is critical to the operation and success of the Club. is magazine is, rightly, regarded as making an outstanding contribution, but it is an annual publication and electronic communication is now the norm. Much effort has been committed to improving the Club’s website so that it becomes the route through which Club events and activities are publicised, and key changes at the College and Marlborough College Malaysia reported. But we are also keen to be able to communicate more by email, and I would urge Club members to check that the Club holds their correct email addresses. I look forward to meeting OMs of all generations, both in the UK and overseas, over the coming year and contributing to the continuing evolution of the Club.

richard Fleck (B3 1962-67) President of e Marlburian Club

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Totally inspirational: Beaks who hit the spot Iain Ward-Campbell (UP/LI 1957-62) recalls his Housemaster Donald Wright (CR 1953-63, HM LI 1958-63) moved into Littlefield in September 1959 aer an unusually long stay in my Junior House (Upcot) and am eternally grateful to my parents for their determination that Donald Wright should be my Housemaster. Donald was tall and a little stooped; he smiled oen and you knew things were OK when the little lines crinkled at the corners of his eyes. He wore baggy trousers and jackets and smoked a pipe; as he roamed the corridors the aroma preceded him and you knew he was on his way. Many years later he admitted he was well aware of this!

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It’s safe to say that Littlefield then was enticingly eccentric. One boy kept a dog, another ferrets and one a kestrel in his darkened study. ARDW justified this as being only right: these boys were not destined for Higher Education but to run their family farms and estates and be occupied substantially in outdoor pursuits. On summer Saturdays he would drive Littlefield Peripatetics Cricket Club in a minibus to matches with surrounding villages; we were never denied our post-match pint with the local team. Another indelible memory is the fire drill, when to add realism ARDW placed a dustbin of smouldering cardboard outside the dormitories. e ensuing panic took some time to calm. We would hear him playing the piano through his sitting room door and spent some evenings in there with him, listening to music. I recall being introduced to Shostakovich’s symphonies. His teaching was keen and demanding, relaxed and purposeful, all at the same time. He instilled in me the need to analyse critically what you read and hear: this has stood me in good stead throughout my professional career. e whole house was invited to the baptism of his youngest daughter in Preshute Church. at sums up another of

Littlefield Uppers Hockey Team 1962; Captain: Iain Ward-Campbell. Above: Donald Wright (ARDW).

Donald’s characteristics: he considered Littlefield his extended family. Kind, yet keenly observant, he was a great judge of character and nurturer of talent. How appropriate that he should later become the Church of England’s ‘bishop hunter’. He said of his time at Marlborough that the contact with individual boys made it rather more his thing than being Headmaster of Shrewsbury, as he later became. At that age, one absorbs influences osmotically. It was ARDW’s recognition of what was important in life: his sense of values, liberal and humane, that I carry as my example. He expected the highest standard of which you were capable, but was never judgemental when you struggled to deliver. It’s maybe a strange thing to say about one whose job was to oversee the daily lives of a group of teenage boys, but Donald didn’t interfere with your life, which is not to say that he didn’t tell

you what to do (or not!); he would reprimand thoroughly if he thought it deserved. My study companion and I were once summoned to his sanctum. “Why is it that you two – the most creative boys in the house – should have the untidiest study?” Many years later when we recalled the incident, “I hope I didn’t make you do anything about it…” With my very inadequate A-level scores, it was Donald who suggested a choral scholarship as an entry route to Cambridge, thereby changing my future course. I shall always be grateful for the extent of his influence over my life and am so glad to have had him as guardian, teacher and friend. Aer a first career culminating in partnership at one of the big international accounting firms, Iain Ward-Campbell is now Senior Lecturer in Accounting and Finance at the School of Management at Bradford University. i.ward-campbell@bradford.ac.uk e Marlburian Club Magazine

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I’ll never forget... Fishing on the river Henry Tett (LI 1996-2001) During my time at Marlborough being Master of the Beagles meant that in the winter months I wasn’t expected to be in study periods on Tuesday and ursday aernoons before supper because I would usually be running around a muddy field aer a pack of only partially controllable hounds. owever, it didn’t take me long to realise that no-one had twigged that beagling was a winter sport and that I should therefore attend Studies in the Summer term. I decided that this was a golden opportunity of which I should take advantage and that instead of trying to boost my limited academic prowess, my time would be far better and more enjoyably spent brushing up my casting skills on the river, without the disturbance of having to share it with any other pupils. Many a blissful evening was therefore spent on the lovely stretch of the Kennet which runs through the College, including my memorable capture of an extremely large brown trout which used to live in the water below the Preshute footbridge. is fish had been nicknamed “Moby” by the other keen fishermen at

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school; he had done everything to avoid capture until falling foul to a small shrimp imitation of mine – much to the annoyance of the other anglers who had spent weeks trying to catch this monster! I have many fond memories of warm summer evenings spent with a cold beer (usually costing a small fortune from a profiteering senior boy, but worth every penny!) surreptitiously hidden in my fishing bag, relishing the peace and quiet of the whole school being in Studies. e Master’s garden was also a favourite spot, the pleasure probably doubled by the fact that I was breaking plenty of rules by both drinking beer and fishing there when I should have been behind my desk. is was about as civilised as you could get, even if running the risk of a hard “gation” or technical suspension (familiar phrases to me!). Fishing had plenty of benefits; there was even one Maths master who would let me off my regular detentions from him if I produced a fresh trout! It all brings me to wonder if many pupils learn to appreciate what lovely surroundings they are in while they are actually at Marlborough? I certainly did. Whether running across the Downs aer a pack of hounds, Point-to-Point racing at Barbury Castle or carefully treading the riverbank did my academic career any good I very much doubt, but it made my time at the College far more enjoyable and has given me many happy memories. Henry is currently applying for his racehorse trainer’s licence and will be training both flat and National Hunt horses out of Lambourn, Berkshire. www.henrytettracing.co.uk


My House: B1 Michael Koe (A2/B1 1945-49) In my day Marlburians spent their first year in one of the junior houses in A House: I was in A2. As new boys we looked with interest and some apprehension at B and C houses, occupied by older ‘In College’ boys. B House, on the edge of Court, looked, to our young eyes gaunt and daunting. Inside it felt (and still does, despite much internal improvement) very much like a high-class prison, with its 5’ tall, vertical iron bars 6” apart on each floor preventing those thereon from falling into the central ‘Well’. 1 occupied the building’s top two floors with B2 below. My dormitory, housing 12, was on the 4th floor, as was the Prefects’ Room and one of the two large shower and bath rooms. On the ground floor, the two houses shared the quiet and sitting room areas around the Well.

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Soon aer I arrived an older boy informed me that any new boy caught stepping out of line would be put in ‘the stocks’. ese were on the 4th floor, where there was a loose bar which could be moved at the top some 6” sideways and then locked back around the offender’s neck, leaving him staring down into the Well for as long as he deserved. I was never deemed rebellious enough to merit this treatment, though we were all given a taster on arrival (when neither the Dame nor Housemaster George Tarleton (CR 1929-61, HM B1 1940-53) was around) to learn what it was like.

and down the four flights of stairs from the top floor to the entrance and back – a record I suspect I still hold, as one of the boys attempting to beat it, going full tilt down the third flight met head-on George Tarleton coming rather more sedately up! Although ‘Health and Safety’ was not then a household phrase, Mr Tarleton unsurprisingly outlawed this competition.

externally formidable, but inside it has been dramatically changed into a comfortable and even homely abode for today’s privileged youth.

One of my sons, in B1 House some years later, claims he held the house record for climbing up the bars from the Well to the 4th floor on the Well side. I’m glad I didn’t hear about this until recently!

In the ’40s B1 held some 70 boys aged 14 to 18. It is sobering to realise that many who immediately preceded us took part in the Second World War, with some paying the ultimate price. Looking back, I can now appreciate the great debt that those of us who have grown up and lived in largely peaceful times owe to that previous generation, who fought for us with such courage and endurance.

I now return to Marlborough to visit my grandchildren and am amazed at the improvements, both inside and out. B House will, I suppose, always remain

Michael Koe’s latest book Walking with Wallace was reviewed in Edition 114. Copies are still available: www.walkingwithwallace.com

Generally I found life in B1 good fun and I made many friends, with some of whom I am still in touch. It was a very happy ‘In House’. Somehow we felt special and more than a match for the ‘Out Houses’, against whom we competed in hardfought hockey, rugby and cricket matches. Although, unlike my sons and eldest grandson, I never played in the College’s Cricket XI or Rugby XV, I did play once for the Hockey XI and for many of B1’s sporting teams. My only genuine claim to sporting fame at Marlborough was therefore probably in holding B1’s record for the fastest time up

Break in B House Well, June 1956, taken by John Tarrant (B2 1952-56)

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Marlburian Dynasties Comparing notes: Harriett Jagger (PR 1976-78) and her daughter, India Gaul (EL 2008-13) My MC ‘entrance exam’ was pretty unusual. Mrs Goldsmith was interviewing me in Cotton when there was a sharp knock at the door. A clipped voice reminiscent of Joyce Grenfell enquired, “Hattie Jagger? I hear you play hockey.” “Yes,” I replied. “Which position?” “Centre half.” “Excellent!” it said. “We could do with a good one of those.” e following September I found myself in Preshute discussing hockey trials with the formidable Mrs Birley; I had clearly passed. ere was so much to do at MC; coming from the country and an all-girl day school with few facilities it was amazing to have tennis and squash courts, hockey pitches, plays and concerts to be in, societies and dining clubs to join – seemingly endless and all on your doorstep. You could walk down the High Street too, even go to the pub when you were 18; I couldn’t believe this was school.

here were only 30 of us girls in the Lower Sixth that year. Aer three days that went down to 28: MC was not for the shy, faint-hearted female. at first week the girls were given scores as they walked into Norwood Hall, adjusted as term went on.

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36 hours aer I arrived, Kevin Maxwell (PR 1972-76), doing Oxbridge and therefore higher than God, asked me for dinner at e Bear in Hungerford; he said he would book a driver. I was thrilled; this school was something else! I naively told ‘Birley’ I was going out for dinner and wouldn’t be back till 10pm. ‘Birley’ couldn’t believe what he was hearing, Kevin was reprimanded and we ended up having a Dusty Road in the Polly instead. We had no uniform, just a loose dress code, with rather more formality for Sunday chapel. For sport I had an aertex shirt and shorts, plimsolls and a pair of hockey boots – my total games kit consisting of about six items a year. 10

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We had one payphone in the house and queued up to call our parents, but we didn’t ring oen – we were too busy. I think I saw mine once a year when they came down for Speech Day. Nobody went home at weekends; you picked up post off the hall table to read at breakfast, and I had £10 for the term, which I spent mainly on stamps. Our main communication tool was the board outside the Porters’ Lodge, where we pinned notes about anything and everything: sports arrangements, work, coffee invitations – even little love notes (mainly originating from A House). I was in the Navy one term as a Wednesday activity; great fun. Georgie Brown

(B1 1976-78), Julie Mead (B1 1976-78) and I donned uniforms and marched on the Parade Ground with the boys. Martin Evans (CR 1968-) was our leader. One Wednesday we all went in dinghies in the moat and spent hours capsizing, much to Marty’s annoyance. I remember toasters; huge loaves of white bread; Ken and Doll’s breakfast; and half of the in-houses coming for Sunday breakfasts in the Butlery, as we were allowed to wear dressing gowns. Quantities of coffee; big tins of biscuits; constant chits and nearly being shot by Connolly Ross (PR 1973-77), who had an air rifle and fired at a poster in the girls’ study from the library window, narrowly missing Nikki Willmore (PR 1976-78). e freezing winter and pouring water over the tarmac in Court to make an ice rink; the fire escape at the back of Preshute for a quick exit to e Who’d a ought It; and racing up and down the Preshute path on bikes, oen with three or more of us piled on each. I dated the SP – gorgeous Brazilian, Donald Munro. He had a suite in the


Porters’ Lodge: dining room, sitting room, kitchen, study, bedroom and bathroom! We had constant ‘studs’ (study periods) where we would sit in a boy’s bedsit, oen in New Court, listening to LPs of e Eagles, Jackson Brown or e Doors, windows wide open, the noise blaring through Court. Occasionally we went to the Mem Library, but patrolling prefects restricted gossip. Although it was brilliant to be a girl at Marlborough it was also tough; I think it still is. I faced many challenges academically and socially, but these were two of the best years of my life and gave me lifelong friendships, ambition, determination and an inner strength. I hesitated sending my daughter there, but when we stood side by side at her last Chapel service, belting out Jerusalem together with grins on our faces, however tough she had found it, I knew I had made the right decision.

aving heard stories from parents, friends of parents and other relatives about their time at MC, I knew this foreign land was one I should explore. On arrival, I think my mother and father (Simon Gaul, (SU 1971-74)) were more nervous than I was, revisiting angst over whether or not they had done their prep on time.

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“An Introduction to Shell,” I recognized the speaker’s name, Mr Evans, and approached him aerwards. “Hi, apparently you knew my Mum?” “Who was your mother, dear? I probably did.” “Harriett Jagger.” “Hattie Jags is your mum?! What a humdinger! We must have tea!” To say I had shoes to fill would be an understatement. With that in mind I had also been given strict instructions from current pupils to bring “fun clothes” for the event known as a Bar. is led to much speculation and heightened rumours in Elmhurst that first weekend, the U6 reminiscing and telling us about their first. As a 13-year-old girl, any previous party I’d been to had been in a go-karting warehouse; it was a big step to get dressed up with everyone else. Since then and looking back at our Sixth Form nights in e Marlburian, figuring out what to wear was exactly the same as it had been for the Morris Bar all those years ago, except that by then I had my own opinions to offer – the girls taught me so much. We grew up together, through the greatest period of development of our lives.

My progression through Marlborough is possibly best defined by my varying parts in school plays: beginning in the ensemble, then Mary (an off-stage voice), Venticello One in Amadeus and finally, in my Upper Sixth, the honour of my own character. Mr Kenworthy was my most inspiring beak, and writing and directing the Elmhurst entry for the House Play competition [which they won] was a real highlight.

We also experienced the evolution of security at the College; when we arrived there were no codes or smart cards to swipe on entry, then individual, then house codes… by the time I le I think we were on the cusp of finger print scanners. Once in the Remove we had new sisters arriving: fresh Shell to whom we could pass what we considered vital knowledge: not asking an U6 boy for direction to the Art Block as they would send you to the Science Department; at break in house not to sit on the sofas – they are for Sixth Form and Hundred – and, of course, you don’t have to be in uniform when doing a pink chit (though they were abolished during my time).

Fresh in crisp shirts and kilts, the new Shell wanders around the College on tours before their first official meeting. Occasionally we’d come across a boys’ house where one might recognize a familiar face from prep school, now drowning in a tweed blazer too big for it. In that first meeting,

such a place. Heading to Armadillo’s aer tennis for an ice cream, or meeting parents for a summary of that week’s events in ASK… or, on not so rare occasions, running into a beak in Waitrose when buying tuck with your friends. en, before you knew it, along came the black skirts, bigger exams, more important sports matches and greater responsibility of the Sixth Form.

In the Remove there was just one other girl and I who had a laptop on which we would blare out music before being ‘sshh-ed’ by Mrs McFarland (CR 2005-) because the Hundred had exams. e alternative to causing a riot in-house was, and still remains, the great privilege of going into town; it is astonishing we still have access to

Marlborough taught me the skills I needed when I was there, helped me put them into practice and guided me all the way through to where I am today. Our parents teach us what they’ve learnt and hope that we don’t make their mistakes; a school teaches us how to use those lessons from our parents. In my case Marlborough therefore taught me both. Harriett is a fashion guru who has occupied senior editorial positions at Elle, Vogue, Harpers & Queen, Tatler, Eve, Wedding Day and e Sunday Times Style Magazine, while India is currently studying directing and screenwriting in London. Once she has finished her degree course, she is off to complete her acting training, giving her the option of working both in ont of and behind the scenes. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM Entrepreneurs Blaze e Founder: Emily Brooke (TU 2002-04) e Business: Innovative products for urban cyclists. Blaze’s famous Laserlight tackles the greatest cause of fatality – vehicles turning across an unseen bicycle. e Laserlight is a front-facing white light which also has a green laser that projects the symbol of a bike onto the road ahead, beyond the blind spot, giving the bike a bigger footprint on the road e Beginning: A university project e Eureka Moment: Realising, with the appearance only two days aer exhibiting the concept of the Laserlight on every UK cycling blog (and by the end of the week in the Sydney Morning Herald), that it must become a reality!

Henry Tuke e Founder: Tom Tuke-Hastings (BH 1990-95) e Business: A British luxury brand creating gis and accessories for the man who has everything e Beginning: A marketing and brand background, with experience of product design and bringing products to market – not forgetting Design A Level and GCSE at Marlborough e Eureka Moment: Deciding to make

e Dough: One of the first successful Kickstarter projects in the UK: aiming to raise £25K in a month on the crowdfunding site, Blaze achieved this in less than five days and went on to raise £55K. Additional Seed Funding subsequently raised through Index Ventures and the Branson family e Keys to Success: Test your assumptions on customers as early as possible and get on with it – “learn as you do!” e Present: Bike-mad team based in Shoreditch; a team in China; products being shipped worldwide e Future: Build a global urban cycling brand e Nitty-Gritty: www.blaze.cc info@blaze.cc / @BlazeFeed

the company happen now rather than keep it as a retirement pipe-dream e Dough: Initial product and brand bootstrapped from savings, then growth financed through the sale of another business e Keys to Success: All products handmade in GB by artisans out of the finest materials. Corners are not cut; Henry Tuke believes “good enough is not good enough”. Existing products are not ‘blinged up’ and called luxury; all are designed from the ground up to be

different, intriguing and beautiful, so that they come with built-in unique selling points. e target market may be small, but the world is a big place e Present: Products in Harrods and a growing client base across the globe e Future: International brand recognition and a reputation for excellence, with patrons who come to us for repeat bespoke work e Nitty-Gritty: www.henrytuke.com tom@henrytuke.com 0800 848 8127

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Cheviot Books e Founder: Hugh Cantlie (C1 1945-49) e Business: Publishing the guide Near the Motorways – Affordable Alternatives to Service Stations e Beginning: Frustration, when working as Chartered Surveyor and trying to find pubs near motorways for site meetings, that no ready source existed to find them easily e Eureka Moment: Being stuck in a ten mile stationary queue on the M4 on an August Bank Holiday and being driven to use a service station… Resolution taken then and there that the market must exist for such a book!

e Keys to Success: Never give up. Of 220 entries most managers thereof do not know the difference between magazine and guidebook and believe authors have access to crystal balls. Patience and doggedness therefore essential to establish contact, whether by email, letter, phone, personal visit, or – most frequently – all four e Present: e book’s 10th edition has now sold 6,000+ copies through book trade / mail order, mainly through word of mouth e Future: Expand from longestablished hard copy to improved e-book formats and apps

e Dough: e founder’s shallow pocket

e Nitty-Gritty: www.cheviotbooks.com / info@ cheviotbooks.co.uk / 01993 832 218

Mr & Mrs Smith / Smith & Family

that are great for kids but don’t scrimp on the style and service expected by grown-up Smith guests

executive board of advisors a few years ago who were amazing in helping make the company as successful as the brand

e Founder: Tamara Heber-Percy (TU 1989-91) & husband James Lohan

e Beginning: (2003) A self-published coffee-table guidebook of 41 hotels in the UK and Ireland that became a bestseller

e Present: Bright; a record first quarter (2014) for global bookings

e Business: Mr & Mrs Smith: a hand-picked collection of boutique hotels, global travel club and online booking service for more than 950 properties worldwide – all personally visited by the Smith team and anonymously reviewed by tastemaker couples. Smith & Family: a newly-launched, stand-alone collection of parent-approved, child-friendly hotels

e Eureka Moment: Changing the business model from offline publisher to online booking agent (2005) e Dough: Initially borrowed from family and friends and house remortgaged; recently, more serious private investment e Keys to Success: Getting the right advice early on; appointing a non-

e Future: Grow the Smith & Family collection (only launched 2013); expand internationally with offices in Melbourne, New York and Hong Kong e Nitty-Gritty: www.mrandmrssmith.com 0845 034 0700 www.smithandfamily.co.uk 0845 313 9007

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Club Events B2 1981 Leavers

Elmhurst 2003 Leavers’ Picnic

28 February 2013

August 2013

In 2013 Charlie Horrell (B2 1976-81) organised a gathering of those who le B2 in 1981 because, “Most of us will turn 50 this year and this seemed an appropriate milestone for a reunion; if it did not happen soon the fading memories would disappear!” rough a combination of the Marlburian Club, Google and the perseverance of Robin Pakenham (B2 197681), 13 of the cohort met at Queen’s Club in London on 28 February. As few had seen each other in the intervening 32 years there was a degree of trepidation but it was so much fun that Queen’s had to turn the group out at midnight when they shut. Charlie added, “the jokes and stories had got no better but they still made us laugh. Old House photos were examined and we all agreed we had got better with age.” Waiting another 32 years seems inappropriate, so the B2 1981 leavers have decided to repeat the gathering every two years and thoroughly recommend doing so to other OMs.

To mark 10 years having passed since they le MC, Rebecca Walker organised a picnic in Hyde Park for her generation of Elmhurst girls. On a beautiful evening all but two of the complete 2003 cohort gathered together and ate, drank, chatted and sang the House Shouts that Elmhurst had won during their time at the College.

Clockwise from front left: Serena Urquhart, Amy Wackett (EL 2001-03), Clare Margary, Camilla Swire, Emma Rogers, Emma Shearn, Alice Keswick, née Rugge-Price, Jessica Murray Smith, Rebecca Walker holding newly-born Coco Keswick. Toni Brown and Victoria Pakenham also present, though not pictured. (All EL 1998-2003 unless otherwise stated)

Wiltshire Dinner 12 September 2013 John Manser (PR 1953-58) hosted a great gathering of 46 OMs and spouses at his Michelin-starred Red Lion Freehouse restaurant in Chisenbury last autumn, when those attending not only enjoyed a most convivial event but were able to hear directly from the Master of excellent exam results at the College. e Red Lion’s supremely talented chef, Guy Manning (C2 1990-95), produced an exceptional dinner and OMs thoroughly enjoyed the unique atmosphere of this truly Marlburian venue. Christopher Cannon (B2 1956-61) and Robert Smith (B2 1943-48)

Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73), Robert Smith (B2 1943-48) and James Flecker (C1 1952-58) put the world to rights at the Wiltshire Dinner 14

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Red Lion proprietor and host of the Wiltshire Dinner John Manser (PR 1953-58)


Middle East Dinner 12 September 2013 13 OMs and seven spouses made it to this year’s Middle East Dinner, organised as ever by William Wells (C2 1984-89) and his wife Miranda, née Lescher (B3 1987-89). e event was held in Dubai, though OMs came from as far afield as Saudi Arabia, Oman and Abu Dhabi.

Club Day 5 October 2013 Under a bright, autumn sky almost 350 OMs and Guests gathered for the Marlburian Club’s annual Decade Reunion and Club Day. Following the AGM, families joined older OMs and younger ones from the 1995-2005 period for the Chapel Service, Reception and Lunch. e Master welcomed all back to Marlborough, while the outgoing Club President, Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73), captured the qualities and charisma of Martin Evans (CR 1968-) who, aer 12 years as Club Secretary, was stepping down in order to take up his presidency of the 1843 Society. Never one to be out performed, Martin peppered his reply with many humorous anecdotes, raising much laughter. e aernoon was packed with activities geared to the 1995-2005 cohort and their offspring. In the Mini Marlburian Café, tots got creative with colouring, cras and

painting while OMs shared memories prompted by the display of stunning geography trip photographs from their era. While the OM Malones roundly defeated the Old Canfordians on the Rugby XV, near the Cricket Pavilion OMs and guests aged eight to 80 handled some exotic and ‘scary’ animals and enjoyed the antics of meercats in the Wildlife Display. A stilt walker, juggler, balloon modeller and facepainter added to the entertainment, while George de Moraville (PR 1999-04) led children’s performance activities. e day finished with tours of Ivy House, Marlborough’s newest boarding house, and a superb exhibition of art by 11 OMs from the 1996-2005 decade in e Mount House Gallery.

Charlie Cannon (C2 1990-95) and his daughter Viva

Philip Cayford (PR 1965-70) and Robin Brodhurst (PR 1965-70)

Declared by many the “best Club Day ever”, the success of the day was down to the co-operation and commitment of the whole Marlborough community – even IB pupils, who gained IB credits for their active involvement in the occasion.

Archivist Dr Terry Rogers (CR 1965-2014) and Greville Socket (C1 1948-53)

Younger family members made the most of everything on offer

Ivan Anderson (C1 2001-06) and Sasha Howard (EL 2002-07) e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events A Decade of Expression 22 September – 5 October 2013 ‘A Decade of Expression’ showcased the work of 11 talented OM artists, photographers and illustrators who were at MC between 1995 and 2005. Held at the Mount House Gallery, this dynamic exhibition promoted the artists’ skill and creativity and was the first of its kind to be held at the College, developed by Zanny Mellor (MM 2000-05), Lucinda Lovell (MM/SU 1999-2005) and Georgina Borthwick (NC 2000-05) with the help of the Club and the Art Department. e contributing artists were: Zanny Mellor (MM 2000-05): www.zannymellor.com Henrietta Abel Smith (CO 2003-05): www.henriettaabelsmith.com Chris Wheatley-Hubbard (CO 1996-2001): www.cw-h.co.uk Sophie Newnham (LI 1994-96): www.sophienewnham.com Johnny Morant (C2 1995-2000): www.johnnymorant.com Lara Carew-Jones (LI 2001-03): www.laracarew-jones.co.uk Olivia Ford (NC 2000-05): www.cargocollective.com/foxglove/ olivia-ford Charlotte Hollands (MM 2000-05): www.hiddeninthejam.com Emilie Pugh (PR 2004-06): www.emiliepugh.co.uk Macki Maconie (MO 1999-2004): www.macki.co.uk Millie McCallum (LI 1999-2001): www.milliemccallum.co.uk

From left to right: Zanny Mellor (MM 2000-05), Georgina Borthwick (NC 2000-05) and Lucinda Lovell (MM/SU 1999-2005) 16

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Top left: Southbank At Night (study II) by Zanny Mellor. Top right: Mindscape II detail by Emilie Pugh Below: Fading Stone by Johnny Morant


East Sussex Dinner 15 November 2013

Kosciuszko Foundation in New York

Music Scholars’ Concerts in New York October 2013 e highlights of the half-term Music Scholars’ trip to the USA in October 2013 were two recitals they gave at the Shawnee Playhouse and the Kosciuszko Foundation in New York City, to both of which OMs were welcomed. Having preceded both concerts with a trio of informal foyer concerts, the Music Scholars delivered two performances of extraordinary quality and consummate professionalism. 15 of MC’s 40 Music Scholars had been selected for the trip, predominantly on the basis of their chamber music skills. e Shawnee Playhouse was packed to the raers and whilst the Kosciuszko Foundation concert was given to a slightly more select audience, there was no doubt that OMs, special guests, friends and general public went away with a clear message that music at Marlborough is in a very fine place indeed.

e East Sussex OMs once again held their annual informal dinner at e Star in Waldron, near Heathfield. 21 sat down to a splendid meal, their ages ranging from mid-20s to mid-80s. ere were three newcomers this year, including John Cumming (B3 194146). e volume of noise in the pub’s small restaurant increased throughout

the evening, culminating with the traditional singing of e Old Bath Road much to the bemusement of the regulars in the bar! e event remains popular and has many regular attendees, showing the lifelong bond that seems to exist between OMs. Anyone who lives in East Sussex and is interested in joining should contact Robin Bather directly: robinbather@hotmail.com / 01435 810 076.

2012 Leavers Reunion 16 December 2013 Around 80 of our youngest OMs descended from all corners of the country on e Atlas in West Brompton in December 2013. For many it was the first time they had seen each other since the 2012 Leavers’ Ball and it was great for them to learn what everyone had been up to since, be it the first year of University, gap years or entering the world of employment. Georgia Bishop (EL 2007-12), commented: “It was a huge success and the general consensus was that it was just like being back in e Marlburian on a Saturday night!”

Tilly Niven (MM 2007-12), Camilla Hibbert (NC 2007-12) and Gabriella Rose (EL 2007-12)

Edward Siddeley (C2 2007-12)

Stuart Swift (C2 2007-12), Kitty Rowan Hamilton (MO 2007-12), Harriet Hedges (MO 2007-12)

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Club Events OM Insurance Event 14 January 2014

South African Dinner

e first event for young OMs and current Marlburians interested in a career in Insurance – followed by a networking opportunity for those in the Banking & Finance Industry Group – was held at Lloyd’s of London one Tuesday in January and proved an outstanding success. Marlburian Club Committee member Andrew Barnes (B1 1973-79) had initiated and organised the event, which gave young OMs and pupils the opportunity to shadow Lloyd’s underwriters and brokers for the aernoon. Lloyd’s Chairman John Nelson (C3 196165) welcomed everyone to the Reception in the Old Lloyd’s Library, aided by his newly appointed Deputy, Rupert Atkin (LI 1971-76). Sarah Morris (MM 200611), currently reading Classics at Exeter, attended both the aernoon shadowing sessions. She said she found the whole experience excellent, had made some good contacts and is now keen to aim for a career in this field.

21 February 2014 e OM South African Dinner, organised by SA Club Secretary Richard Hilton (B2 1982-87) took place in February at the 96 Winery Road Restaurant in the winelands of Stellenbosch. e chatter was nonstop, the assembled company raised a glass to the College and all OMs and the night was a great success. It is believed that there are around 33 OMs in South Africa and it is hoped

more will be able to attend the next event, which should take place in around 18-24 months. If anyone from outside SA would like to attend the next event and combine it with a holiday, they can quote ‘Old Marlburian’ when enquiring with Greatest Africa (www.greatestafrica.com), a travel company run by Richard Hilton! Meanwhile full details of the carefully wine-paired menu can be found through the event review page of the club website.

From left to right: Andrew Jackson (B1 1984-89), Tom Hannam (B3 1978-83), Robert Allen (LI 1954-58), Kit Jackson (C2 1953-57), Teresa Cross, née Butler (B1 1985-87), Julian Brewer (TU 1977-81), Richard Hilton (B2 1982-87) and Roman Roth (BH 1994-96)

Hong Kong Reception Marlburians Vanessa Riley (MO) and Amina Musaeva (IH) examine the Casualty Book, guided by Jess McCausland and Rory Buckingham, graduates on Torus Insurance’s in-house training scheme

Event organiser Andrew Barnes (LI1 1973-79), Lloyd’s Deputy Chairman Rupert Atkin (LI 1971-76). MC Second Master Chris Stevens (CR 2011-) and Lloyd’s Chairman John Nelson (C3 1961-65) 18

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26 February 2014 e HK Club Secretary, Guan-Hock Chua (B1 1978-82), hosted an extremely successful drinks reception at the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club on 26 February organised by Kate Richdale (SU 198486) and her husband Suzher Yan, who have two daughters at the College; and Christy Powell, wife of Nicholas (C3 1982-87). e Club’s Chart Room was virtually filled to its capacity of 70, with standing room only. Hock introduced the Master and Emma Leigh, stressing what a fantastic team they make. e Master gave an update on developments at the College and mentioned that he and Hock would shortly be flying on

to Marlborough College Malaysia for a Governors’ meeting and set of careers talks at MC’s sister school. e evening concluded with a lively and informative Q&A session, enabling OMs, prospective parents and their children to quiz the Master on a range of topics.


informative and reminded everyone at such a crucial stage not to underestimate the importance of our decisions, starting now!”

Career “Speed Dating” 25 February 2014 One Tuesday in late February, the Hundred was split into groups of around ten for a glimpse of their potential future. e Hundred’s Career “Speed Dating” evening was a chance to listen to many young professional OMs talking about a wide variety of jobs. e format was simple: aer each individual had introduced him/herself and had given the group a short but pivotal insight into their career, Marlburians were able to ask them questions – key to the whole experience. en, aer seven action-packed minutes, a new professional would take their place. A large range of careers was represented, from actuary to architecture, giving pupils a taste of many different career paths. ere were many conclusions to be drawn from the experience, but the recurring, fundamental points that struck pupils were the importance of interpersonal social skills and that to enjoy one’s job is crucial.

Ali Butler (LI) Contributors: Advertising: Chris Harvey (Parent) (Brandstory)

Marianne Helps (C2 2001-03) with current Marlburians Edo Marolda (C2) and Fred Vint (BH)

Property surveying: Patrick Robinson (B1 2000-05) (AGL) Government relations, energy industry: Charlotte Gibson (EL 1998-2003) (Shell)

Financial investing/advice: James Montgomery (C1 1999-2004) Advertising: Rosie Baring (MO 2000-04) (Mindshare) Law: Marianne Helps (CO 2001-03) (Slaughter & May) Engineering: Henry Price (CO 2006-11) (GE Aviation) Finance/underwriting: Olivia Wright (EL 2000-05) (Talbot Underwriting) Journalism: Lucinda Greasley (MM 1996-2001) (Grazia/ASOS)

Consultancy/IT: Mark Tidmarsh (B3 1983-87) (Orange)

Marketing, search engine optimisation: Bertie Miller (C2 1994-99) (Mindshare)

Engineering: Will Sheard (LI 1997-2002) (Siemens Wind Power)

Ship broking: James Allan (C3 2000-05) (RS Platou)

As has become the habit, OMs and parents provided much support for the College’s annual Careers Fair for the Lower Sixth. Representatives from the most popular employment sectors were invited to give a series of three seminars each to small groups of pupils, who found the information given invaluable:

Commercial: James Lydiate (SU 2002-07) (Defence BAE Systems)

Chartered Accountancy: Andrew Dunlop (Parent) (Spofforths)

Consultancy/IT: James Spender (C2 1987-92) (Schroders)

4 March 2014

Finance: Chris Bishop (PR 2000-05) (Aviate Global Equity Sales)

e City: Anthony Fry (Parent) (Evercore Partners)

Pharmaceutical consultancy: Rebecca Walker (EL 1998-2003) (ICON plc)

Lower Sixth Careers Fair

Contributors:

Architecture: Simon Henley (CO 1981-85) (Henley Halebrown Rorrison)

“As a Lower Sixth pupil who is fairly unsure about her university choices, let alone future career plans, I found the Careers Fair extremely useful… I attended three seminars: PR & Events Management, Advertising and Languages & Marketing. e speakers clearly explained the requirements needed for each job, touching on the importance of related subjects and university courses as well as the characteristics that suit each sector… the role of their own job… how they got there… and they guided us towards appropriate choices. At the end of each talk we were welcome to ask a range of questions; these were particularly useful, addressing concerns or queries which related to the whole class, not merely the individual. Fundamentally the talks provided brilliant information and allowed all pupils to get a feel for different jobs – an experience that most would not otherwise get. It was very

Engineering: Richard relfall (Parent) (LPW Engineering) Graphic Design/Structural Packaging: Martin Bunce (Tin Horse Design) Hospitality and Event Management: Andrew Phillips (CO 1968-72) (Boodles) Investment Management/Stockbroking: Lord Ivo Clion (SU 1981-86) (Rathbones) Law: Robbie Owen (Parent) (Pinsent Masons) Marketing/Languages: David Whitlam (Parent) (Gillette) Medicine: Dr Richard Carter (Parent) Psychology: Dr Judith Miller (Parent) (e Priory Group) Public Relations: Kelly Iacovone (Parent) (Front Row/Back Stage PR)

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Club Events e Annual Dinner 5 March 2014 e Marlburian Club Annual Dinner 2014 was once again held in the elegant surroundings of the Royal Automobile Club, Pall Mall. e President, Lord Janvrin (B1 1960-64) spoke persuasively of the importance of connection, networking and development and of keeping the spirit of philanthropy alive for the benefit of younger members and the Master updated guests on the many outstanding achievements of current pupils. Attendees included a whole table of OM golfers, many generations of fathers and sons (including Roger and Alexander Backhouse (C3 1974-79 / LI 2005-10), Christopher and Philip Chope (SU 1961-65 / LI 2005-10) and Alexander and Hamish Woodhouse (B3 1974-79 / LI 2005-10)) and Charles Spencer Bernard (B2 1955-60) who, having lived in Paris for 40 years, was attending the Dinner for the first time.

Alice Davies, Beatrice Gatti, Ivan Anderson (C1 2001-06) and Tom Bennett (C1 2001-06)

David Fahie (C2 1963-67), Michael Hutchings (C2 1962-66), Michael Hacking (CO 1961-66) and Nicolae Ratiu (CO 1961-65)

Tim Martin-Jenkins (B3 1961-65), William Segundo (C3 1958-62) and Director of Development Jon Copp (CR 1981-)

Ross Jennings (CO 2003-08) and Tom Mucklow (CO 2003-08)

Beatrice Gatti and Sebastian Fagg (C1 2004-09)

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From l to r: Roger Backhouse (C3 1974-79), Alex Backhouse (LI 2005-10), Alex Woodhouse (LI 1974-79), Hamish Woodhouse (LI 2005-10) and Philip Chope (LI 2005-10)


C3 1942-47 Reunion 26 March 2014 Six OMs, all of whom were at MC between 1942 and 1947, met for lunch at Kingham’s restaurant in Shere, near Guildford, in March. Michael Hutton (C3 1942-46) reported: “It was an extremely convivial and much enjoyed lunch and a toast was raised to MC and its future.”

Edinburgh Dinner 24 April 2014

From left to right: Hugh Baddeley (B3 1943-46), John Case (C3 1942-47), Richard Wright (C3 194147), John Crathorne (C3 1942-47), Michael Hutton (C3 1942-46), Peter Collymore (C3 1943-47)

e Edinburgh Dinner once again took place – as has become happily customary – in the historic New Club on Prince’s Street, a venue that enjoys one of, if not the best, uninterrupted views of the Castle across Prince’s Gardens to be had. Hosted by New Club resident Major James Scott (LI 1942-46), who knows every element of

Property Dinner 1 May 2014

Tom Gadsby (SU), John Wilkinson (CR 1967-93) and Andrew Gadsby

South West France Lunch 5 April 2014 A most enjoyable luncheon took place in April at the home of John Wilkinson (CR 1967-93), the South West France Club Secretary, in Le Castéra, Toulouse. ere were 25 at the lunch, including Martin Evans, President of the 1843 Society, and the Master and Emma Leigh. e Master gave news of the College and also most kindly sang the Grace. Club President Robin Janvrin (B1 1960-64) was sadly unable to attend, but sent a warm message wishing the assembled company “a long, leisurely and completely wonderful lunch in the true traditions of La France profonde”. His wish was most certainly granted! Proceedings finished with a rousing rendition of e Old Bath Road.

Over 60 OMs made merry at the biennial Property Dinner at the RAF Club on May Day evening. e Chartered Surveyors (founded 1952) have now kindly opened their doors to all OMs involved in property and these ranged from developers to agents, architects and even potential investors. e bar did swi business both before and aer the event and the networking was commensurately good. Rob Noel (C2 1978-82),

its history, guests were able to enjoy their pre-prandial drinks taking in the dramatic, floodlit panorama before settling down to dinner. 35 OMs were there, with Chris Stevens (Second Master) and Jon Copp (Director of Development) having travelled up from Wiltshire to represent the College and pass on news from the school to the Scottish contingent, who may not find themselves in Marlborough’s vicinity quite as oen as others.

Director of Land Securities and the OM behind the Walkie-Talkie building (among many others) kindly proposed the health of the College and the Master gave a quick rundown of things at the Marlborough end. anks were also voted to the Gilletts: James (C2 1971-75) for being the third generation of the family to run this particular Marlburian Club sideshoot (believed to be the oldest of its kind), and Alan (C2 1944-48) for having done so before him – as his father Herbert (C2 1908-12) had done before him.

Middle East Dinner 8 May 2014 In honour of Niall “Doc H” Hamilton (CR 1985-) being in town, Will (C2 198489) and Miranda Wells, née Lescher (B3 1987-89), in addition to their drinks party of last autumn, again swung into action (what troopers!), arranging a delightful dinner to give OMs based in Dubai the opportunity of seeing him. Back: Henry Adair (C2 1996-2001), Nick Stockwell (C2 1992-97), Jonny Webb (C2 1983-88), Lizza Scott, née Thresher (B2 1986-88), Tim Denton (C2 1976-80), Will Wells (C2 1984-86). Front: Niall Hamilton (CR 1985-), Ollie Westmacott (PR 1989-94), Miranda Wells, née Lescher, Sundeep Rao (B3 1984-89) e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events Past Presidents’ Lunch 8 May 2014

Summer Drinks Party

Always a well-attended event, this year’s gathering of the Club’s ‘greybeards’ and their guests was held in the historic surroundings of the House of Lords, courtesy of current President, Lord Janvrin (B1 1960-64). Twenty sat down to a particularly delicious lunch, which was graced by the presence of the Master and Emma Leigh, and Martin Evans, President of the 1843 Society. e Master kindly spoke on matters Marlborough and John Worlidge (C2 1942-46, President 1987-88), the Senior Past President present, briefly rose to pass on to the assembled company the good wishes of the actual Senior Past President, SirEricYarrow,Bt(CO1934-39, President 1984-85). By sheer coincidence Lord Boswell of Aynho (C2 1956-61) was on his feet in the Chamber as the lunch began; it was also good to have Lord Brooke CH (LI 1947-52, President 199394) with us in the Dining Room as a further representative of OMs who grace those hallowed corridors with greater frequency than the rest of us.

19 May 2014

The Master addresses the Club’s Past Presidents

The House of Lords 22

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Some of the 300 OMs who thronged to the Stationers’ Hall garden

Blessed with a simply glorious setting and even better weather, the Summer Drinks Party really did launch the sunny season, with one of the biggest and most enthusiastic occasions the Club has ever seen outside Wiltshire. Over 300 OMs (and more had been turned away having applied too late…) from all generations packed into the idyllic courtyard garden of the Stationers’ Hall or explored its elegant chambers, for the use of which the Club is 100% indebted to William Alden (TU 1968-72), Clerk of the Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspapermakers. The informality of the event seemed particularly in tune with the warm evening, and it was particularly special to see many OMs there who had not ventured to a reunion before. One later wrote, “Having hesitated about making a special trip up to Town from Hampshire, I am so glad I did. It was a very happy event and I packed in a wide variety of conversations with contemporaries, juniors and seniors… And it was not all about nostalgia, which becomes tedious very quickly; rather discovering how the rebel has been tamed, as well as

witnessing how the shy and timid has become the adventurer and risk taker. How we all change – yet the core personalities seem to stay constant… I had no idea that I drank as much as I did (until this morning), so the wine must have been pretty decent – and the food was first class. Combined with the quality of the venue, your £25 was a bargain, so thank you for working so hard to make the price accessible to all… I really enjoyed just bouncing through the crowd talking to him or her, and realising that the best form of disguise is to simply lose your hair…” To see Michael Pilkington (C2 1942-47) relaxing comfortably on a bench in the garden smoking his pipe, nattering happily to a bright young female (unidentified, alas) from the ‘00s squeezed in beside him, while fellow musician,

Imogen Hendricks, née Skeggs (BH 197981), Victoria Cahill, née Avon (BH 1979-81), Elizabeth Atkinson, née Radford (BH 197880), Peter Veitch (BH 1977-81), Denise Veitch

Mark Lee (C1 1974-79), Catherine Brumwell, neé Redpath (NC 1993-96) and Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81)


Jonny Gee (CO 1985-90) bridged the age gap showed exactly what the occasion was about. e food was delicious, the wine even better, the chatter insatiable and the atmosphere utterly relaxed and happy. Harriett Jagger (PR 1976-78) and Imogen Hendricks (BH 1979-81), backed up by Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81), did a magnificent job in organising so much fun for so many from all eras. However if you can help with next year’s party, please volunteer without delay.

Alexandra Hollingsworth, née Peal (EL 19992004), Tamara Dupree (MO 1999-2004), Amy Burridge (MO 1999-2004), Antonia Packard (SU 2002-04), Tessa Packard (TU 2001-03) and Xanthe Woodhead (SU 2002-04)

Diary dates 50th Anniversary reunion of the 1964 MC Cricket XI 16 July 2014

1964 XI Front: Nigel Barak, Peter Brooks, David Walsh (captain), Paddy Hosier, Graham Outram Back: David Allen, Chris Pyemont, Chris Page, Peter Greene, Aubrey Waddy, Philip Matthews

(CO 1960-65) the event was given a worthy venue: Crockfords in Mayfair. e beak in charge of cricket at the time, David Green (CR 1962-95), was unable to attend, but our coaches were well represented by Dennis Silk (CR 195568) and David Essenhigh (Coach). In an amusing speech, skipper David Walsh (C1 1960-65) welcomed the guests and entertained the gathering with vignettes of the cricket we had played. He shared everyone’s regrets that Nigel Barak (B1 1960-64) was unable to come from New Zealand. e absent John Meikle (C2 1961-65) joined us at Lord’s the following day for some cricket watching, and the other missing player, Nigel Gay (SU 1961-65), sadly died young. Self-deprecating biographies circulated before the lunch confirmed that there is no OM stereotype, other than the wit and good humour that were abundantly in evidence on a very happy occasion.

Sunday 12 October 2014 Club Day 2014, including a pre-1967 reunion Marlborough College Friday 24 October 2014 Arts and Media Group Event Café Kohar, London WC2 Friday 7 November – 12 December 2014 ‘With New Won Eyes’ A commemorative exhibition of works by Olivia Lomenech Gill (MM 1990-92) & Charles Poulsen Mount Gallery, Marlborough College Sunday 9 November 2014 Visions of Peace, a Service of Music and Readings to be sung by OMs and the College Chapel Choir Chapel, Marlborough College Monday 15 December 2013 Leavers’ Drinks e Atlas, Fulham Road, London

Aubrey Waddy (B1 1961-65) Friday 23 January 2015 Marlborough Blues AGM and Dinner Lord’s, St John’s Wood, London

2014 Front: Dennis Silk, Peter Brooks, David Walsh, Paddy Hosier, Graham Outram Back: David Essenhigh, David Allen, Chris Pyemont, Chris Page, Richard Friedman (1965), Peter Greene, Tim Martin-Jenkins (‘Cheerleader’), Aubrey Waddy, Nick Ross, Philip Matthews

It’s 50 years since the XI narrowly failed to beat Rugby in the annual fixture, then played at Lord’s, and 49 since largely the same team triumphed by six wickets. To celebrate the anniversary, virtually the entire group assembled for a lunch on the eve of this year’s Lord’s Test against India. anks to Peter Brooks

ursday 12 March 2015 Annual Dinner Lord’s, St John’s Wood, London April 2015 Edinburgh Dinner New Club, Edinburgh

David Walsh and David Essenhigh

Details of all Club and affiliate events can be found on the website: www.marlburianclub.org/events/ calendar e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Striving to make the world a better place Benjamin ompson (C3 1976-80) shares a cuppa with Charlotte Bannister-Parker (BH 1979-81) “I always knew I wanted to be a priest,” says the Reverend Charlotte Bannister-Parker, “or at least,” she corrects herself, “from the age of four.” And perhaps even more startlingly, it was seeing Jesus Christ Superstar at that age which clinched it. But – quite apart from the fact that Anglican ordination was not an option until she was around thirty – Charlotte’s path to the priesthood was no conventional progress and even now she does another demanding job for much of the week alongside her role as a non-stipendiary priest in North Oxford.

Charlotte and Rev Mpho Tutu (Archbishop Desmond’s daughter)

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s UK Executive Chair of the Children’s Radio Foundation since 2011, Charlotte has found a new focus for the development work into which she plunged when she le England for India on 2 January 1985. e CRF, however, operates in Africa, and its approach to development has several unusual features, not least its focus on teenagers, and on a simple technological device: the wireless. e charity trains 15-18-year-olds in five African countries to make their own radio programmes. As its website (www.childrensradiofoundation.org) proclaims, over 80% of Africans have access to a radio, whereas fewer than 7% are on the internet. Radio is also technologically simple and giving it to the young empowers them with their own voice. Played on local radio stations, the programmes reach 7.5 million listeners per week.

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is process therefore establishes dialogue, on subjects chosen by the young journalists themselves and which matter to them. ese range from alcoholism to apartheid, HIV, clean water, domestic violence, music, teenage pregnancy, love, Nelson Mandela and much more. e benefits to the journalists themselves are obvious in terms of their own skills in communication, critical thinking and problem-solving, and by empowering the young CRF also hopes to indirectly contribute to the development of future leaders – and perhaps to the health of the democratic process, depending as it does on the participation of the whole community in discussion.

CRF is particularly keen on positive marketing: no heart-wrenching images of emaciated or tear-stricken children here. But even though this is less eye-catching, it is consonant with the charity’s commitment not to do things to or for people, but to empower them to change their own world. As head of the UK operation and one of an international triumvirate with founder Elizabeth Sachs in the USA and the local Director in South Africa, Charlotte heads the fundraising and strategic development operation here. She brings to this role the North Oxford poise and confidence one would expect from being her father’s daughter (the clue is in the first part of her surname), not to mention her Marlborough education; but the energy and passion with which she discusses her work, even in the genteel surroundings of the SCR of my former women’s Oxford college, also carry a conviction which must communicate itself to donors.

“CRF is particularly keen on positive marketing: no heartwrenching images of emaciated or tear-stricken children here. But even though this is less eye-catching, it is consonant with the charity’s commitment not to do things to or for people, but to empower them to change their own world.”

CHILDREN’S RADIO FOUNDATION Amplifying Youth Voices Across Africa

Indeed Charlotte’s commitment to development dates back to her not being permitted by her parents to undertake Project Trust in Indira Gandhi’s turbulent India in her gap year; so instead she headed out there aer Gandhi’s assassination, by which time she had graduated from Durham with a degree in Anthropology and Politics. Travelling round writing articles for the Centre for the Development of Instructional Technology, she immediately fell in love e Marlburian Club Magazine

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asked them whether they wanted to lose that precious time to themselves or the simple pleasure of talking to each other which the loss of the journey entailed. is combination of commitment to improving society through its non-central population (aka non-adult-male) through communication and education eventually led her to found her own charity with a friend she met in the subcontinent, though aer she had returned to London to work as a TV producer. Learning for Life (www.learningforlifeuk.org), initially run from an attic and now hitting its twentieth anniversary, was specifically directed at the perceived need for the education of the girl-child as an investment in the future of subcontinental societies.

“Naturally there would come a time when so much global involvement would give way to the personal needs of her family, in Charlotte’s case four boys. Indeed, when her husband proposed, his condition for marrying her was that she would never go back to a war zone.”

with the country, both for its deep sense of spirituality and for its generous and unconditional welcome for the outsider. Alongside working in her time off with Mother Teresa in Calcutta, she immediately saw the fundamental gender issues lying at the heart of Indian society, an aspect largely ignored by the trajectory of development up to then. (Until then, she muses, her only mild contact with gender problems was being marked out of ten with the other girls, then distinctively in the minority, as they walked into the Norwood Hall.) Development agencies at that time usually failed to consider the needs of women from their perspective, quite apart from the evident need to educate them in the advantages of reducing family-size. For instance, a well was built within a village, yet, to their surprise, the authorities later learned that the local women were still walking a long way to the old well outside it; no-one had 26

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e charity has worked in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Afghanistan and Nepal, and in particular has brought education to rural areas where none has previously been available, especially for girls. In Muslim countries such as Pakistan this has proved a particular challenge and Learning for Life (LfL) was in the forefront of tackling issues which are much more familiar to us twenty years on. Indeed, the rapid involvement of the then Overseas Development Administration, now DFID, recognised how ahead of its time LfL was. e group has, however, also moved with the times, expanding its remit beyond the gender issue into education in impoverished communities more generally. It has worked with girls in Afghanistan aer the rule of the Taliban, in reconstructing schools aer the 2005 Pakistan earthquake, in communities cut off by floods in Bangladesh and with HIV/AIDS children in India. Now its website features two projects tackling the elimination of child labour in Bangladesh. Naturally there would come a time when so much global involvement would give way to the personal needs of her family, in Charlotte’s case four boys. Indeed, when her husband proposed, his condition for marrying her was that she would never go back to a war zone. In 1995 she was in Bosnia making a documentary about the use of rape as a weapon of war (much less in the public consciousness then than it is now) when along with the other last

westerners in the Bihac pocket, she was shelled as the Serbian forces closed in. e footage was initially taken by the main evening news bulletins, but was later spiked on the grounds that it was too traumatic. So what of Charlotte’s vocation as a priest? She realised this a decade ago, aer a placement in the deprived Blackbird Leys area of Oxford led her to be ordained to the non-stipendiary ministry at the University Church. She has recently moved north to St Michael’s, Summertown, where her title Associate Priest hardly reveals her full parochial ministry in a mixed area; there are seven old people’s homes in the parish, she says, and their residents need to be loved and nurtured as much as the rest of the population. In fact as she talks Charlotte has a gi for making things immediate and relevant. ere is still an interfaith element in her ministry, as one would expect from her previous experience. She founded the annual Friendship Walk in Oxford, originally to apologise to Muslims for torture in the Iraq war, and now embracing eight faiths. Despite having passed up on advancement in the church by not embarking on a paid career so as to maintain her charity work, she was nevertheless until recently the Bishop of Oxford’s adviser for overseas programmes and is now in his inner circle as adviser on special projects of all sorts in the diocese. Being a priest is about people, she says, and realising their potential. She hopes that this wide vision characterises liberal Anglicanism: to meet people where they are, and to help them reach what they can be. is is surely the unifying factor behind her exhausting range of activities. An institution dedicated to that very ideal, Marlborough can surely take a little bit of the credit for educating someone who has not only realised her own considerable gis, but has done so by replicating that process globally, happily trying to making the world a better place in the process. Dr Benjamin ompson is a Fellow and Tutor in Medieval History at Somerville College, Oxford


Being smart is not enough Charles Collyns (PR 1969-73) talks to Charles Grant (CO 1972-76) about his life and career spent at the financial centre of the Western world Charles Collyns has spent much of his life as a top financial bureaucrat – first at the International Monetary Fund, then in the US Treasury – combining a passion for economics with a desire to solve problems in the real world. His upbringing had prepared him for an international life: his father worked for Shell and the family lived at various times in Nigeria, Venezuela and the US. When he followed his father (Charles, B3 1940-46) and grandfather (Percival Charles, B3 1910-13) to Marlborough, Collyns found that his global outlook made him a bit unusual.

hat is one reason why he befriended the internationally-minded Christopher Joseph (CR 1967-2000), Head of Geography. Joseph reinforced Collyns’ interest in understanding how the world works through his fine A-level geography course – and also provided extra-curricular lessons in driving and cinema. Aer a year in Barton Hill, Collyns went to Preshute, where he greatly admired housemaster Michael Birley (B1 1934-39, CR 1970-88, HM PR 1970-80). He played cricket for the house, joined the Chapel Choir and remembers singing Bach’s B Minor Mass and Britten’s War Requiem in the Choral Society.

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Steered by Joseph to his old Cambridge college, St John’s, to read geography, Collyns soon decided that only economics could provide the tools for analysing the problems that he found most interesting. So for Part II of his degree he switched to economics. en he moved to Oxford, writing a doctoral thesis that was critical of then-fashionable trade protectionism. Deciding against an academic career – he was more interested in policy than theory – he went to work for the IMF in Washington DC. Collyns liked the IMF so much that he stayed for 29 years. “It was totally engaging – I found myself involved in the big macro-economic issues of the day and dealing with the decision-makers,”

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Collyns told me when I met him (I had not known him at Marlborough, where he was two years ahead of me). “e IMF’s lending power, its intellectual capital and its experience of dealing with crises have made a real difference.” One example he cites is Japan, which in the 1990s succumbed to stagnation and deflation aer its asset price bubble burst. Collyns and his colleagues helped convince the Bank of Japan that its monetary policy was too deflationary and that it should deal more firmly with hidden problems in the banking system. Another example is Brazil, where from 2004-06 Collyns ran an IMF programme to support President Lula’s government. e IMF persuaded Lula to maintain central bank independence and a tight fiscal policy but also backed the social programmes that he had been elected to implement; this contributed to several good years for the Brazilian economy. A lot of people despise the IMF for imposing painful austerity on the countries that borrow from it. Collyns had one hairy moment in 2002 when the Argentinian government was spurning IMF medicine. In Buenos Aires Collyns and his team were trapped in their cars by a demonstration of angry trade unionists. Eventually helicopters rescued the IMF delegation and took them to the airport. Most people at the IMF, says Collyns, are both clever and public-spirited, believing strongly in what they do. Recruitment to the Fund – rightly, he says – takes account of nationality and gender, to ensure diversity of talent and viewpoint. But once you are in, promotion is 95% based on merit, which is unusual in an international organisation. He also notes how important it is that people who are good at managing people tend to get promoted, since so much of the work depends on effective teamwork. Collyns says he was lucky to have inspiring bosses while at the Fund, such as Olivier Blanchard (now the IMF’s chief

In Red Square, Moscow

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economist) and Raghuram Rajan (a former IMF chief economist who now runs the Reserve Bank of India). And Collyns’ big boss for his last three years was the infamous Dominique Strauss-Kahn, for whom he has words of praise. “DSK was insightful on economics and politically effective – he took a strategic view when dealing with EU leaders during the financial crisis, so staff respected him”. e sex-scandal that destroyed Strauss-Kahn’s career came aer Collyns had le the Fund. In 2010 he joined Barack Obama’s administration, working under Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner as assistant secretary for international finance. is was only possible because of the US citizenship that Collyns had acquired (in addition to UK citizenship) through being born in New York. As a political appointee, he had to go through a gruelling confirmation process before the Senate involving close scrutiny of 25 years of tax returns, foreign trips and contacts. Collyns was busy with one crisis aer another: the Arab Spring, the Japanese tsunami, the reform of the IMF and, in particular, the near collapse of the euro. I have worked on that last issue myself, in my job running a European think-tank. When we discuss this it turns out we agree on the mistakes that the EU has made in handling the crisis, particularly in its early phases: pushed by the Germans, EU leaders decided that the root of the problem was profligate southern Europeans borrowing too much, and that austerity, combined with structural reform, was therefore the answer. We think the crisis had more complex origins, including the imbalances that arose between the southern countries, with their trade deficits, and Germany, with its trade surplus. We think the German-driven austerity has been excessive, contributing to an alarming drop in output, and that this has made it harder for the countries in difficulties to deal with the mountains of debt that depress their economies. But things could have been even worse without the US Treasury cajoling the EU, Collyns believes. “We were always pressing the EU to be more proactive, for example to create more effective safety-nets to limit cross-border contagion from countries in stress like Greece; and we supported the European Central Bank’s ‘OMT’ scheme [which allows it to buy the debts of countries in trouble]. Our pressure did

Charles and US Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner

help to move the EU in the right direction, but political forces shi only slowly.” In 2013 Collyns le the government to become chief economist of the International Institute for Economics, a Washington-based body that represents the global financial services industry. His current advice to the EU is that its central bank should be more aggressive in fighting the risk of entrenched, ultra-low inflation, like the US Federal Reserve has been doing – for example through ‘quantitative easing’ (creating liquidity by buying up assets). He thinks the Europeans risk repeating the mistakes of the Japanese in the 1990s – Japan’s ‘lost decade’ – in allowing deflation to take hold. In short, Collyns is a committed ‘Keynesian’ and a believer in the power of policy to do good. e economists he most admires are from the ‘MIT school’ [Massachusetts Institute of Technology]. His favourites include Laurence Summers, Paul Krugman, Jeffrey Sachs and Stanley Fischer – who was number two at the IMF and is now vice chairman of the Federal Reserve. “Stan combines academic rigour with a sense of the real world and a focus on real problems.” Collyns laments that, in many US universities, much of the economics taught is so mathematical and theoretical that policy relevance and historical perspective may be forgotten. My final question is whether Collyns learned things at Marlborough that helped him in his career. “Yes, Marlborough taught me that being smart is not enough. You have to be very well prepared, and also to get on with people. You can persuade people only aer earning their trust.” Charles Grant is Director of the Centre for European Reform and was made a CMG in 2013 for his services to European and wider international policy-making. His latest publication, How to build a modern European Union, can be found through www.cer.org.uk


MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE

SUMMER SCHOOL For further information and to receive your copy of the latest Summer School brochure, please contact us at: Marlborough College Summer School, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1PA Telephone: 01672 892388 Fax: 01672 892476 Email: admin@mcsummerschool.org.uk

www.mcsummerschool.org.uk Marlborough College is a Registered Charity No. 309486 incorporated by Royal Charter to provide Education

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Dr Xa Sturgis

The Holburne Museum, Bath

“Exquisitely made, historically fascinating, irresistibly charming...” e perfect exhibit, or its curator?! Alexandra Jackson (CO 1974-76) finds out. ere must have been a certain déjà vu for Xa Sturgis (LI 1977-81) in 2005, when he became Director of the Holburne Museum, as there, in pride of place, hangs Gainsborough’s largest painting, e Byam Family. Owned by Marlborough College for over 50 years, it hung in Adderley until 1999 when it was sold to a philanthropist who, in turn, lent it to this charming Bath museum. he Holburne is a gem of a museum with an eclectic collection of paintings, silver, furniture and porcelain put together by bachelor baronet, Sir William Holburne during the 19th Century. It stands in its own grounds within walking distance of Bath city centre and is well worth a visit. Coincidentally its Chairman of Trustees is OM, Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67), this year’s Club President.

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as he is known in academic circles, is the third of PNC’s pupils in distinguished jobs in the art & museum world – the others being Charles Saumarez Smith (C1 196771), National Portrait Gallery, National Gallery and now the Royal Academy and Lucy Whitaker (CO 1975-77), presently at the Royal Collection. And Sturgis’s career has just taken a new step up, as from this October he takes over as Director of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

Xa Sturgis will have last seen the Byam portrait in the late 1970s as one of Peter Carter (CR 1955-83) and Oliver Ramsbotham’s (CR 1971-85) double block history boys; indeed, Dr Sturgis,

Raised in North London by an architect and an artist, Sturgis and a younger brother, Dan (LI 1980-85, now a course director at Camberwell School of Art) followed three older siblings to

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Marlborough (James LI 1972-76, Matthew 1974-79, Louise 1978-80). It was not, he reminisces, an entirely happy experience but nor was it all misery: the Art Department, under Robin Child (CR 1971-92), Simon Brett (CR 1971-89) and Mark Cheverton (CR 1974-80) provided some respite, whilst the arrival of girls in the sixth form soened the otherwise seemingly hearty environment. An appreciation of beautiful things, combined with an intellectual curiosity as to how and why they came to be, will have been engrained in Sturgis by PNC and the Art Department. ey taught him to look and also to draw; these skills have made


The Byam Family by Thomas Gainsborough

The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

object,” he writes, “exquisitely made, historically fascinating, irresistibly charming and slightly mad.” is wish to communicate his enthusiasm and delight in fine objects stood Sturgis in good stead when, in 1985, with a BA in History from Cambridge and an MA in Art History from the Courtauld, he started work as Education Officer at the National Gallery.

“An appreciation of beautiful things, combined with an intellectual curiosity as to how and why they came to be, will have been engrained in Sturgis by PNC and the Art Department.” Above: English Beadwork basket, c1660-70 © The Holburne Museum, Bath Top left: The Byam Family by Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788) Oil on canvas. On long-term loan from the Andrew Brownsword Arts Foundation © The Holburne Museum, Bath

him a fine curator. It is clear that Sturgis understands how people should look at fine and interesting objects; indeed the way many of the objects in the Holburne are displayed reflects this –jugs hanging from wires from the ceiling, for example, allow the viewer to see as much of the object as possible and from unexpected angles. e love of the quirky and unusual is also apparent in Sturgis’s view of the world; one of the Holburne’s most recent acquisitions is an extraordinary 17th Century glass beaded basket depicting Charles II aer the restoration. Sturgis’s description of this object demonstrates the qualities he values: “is is the perfect Holburne

Sturgis made an impact there, with innovative programmes: children are, aer all, the fiercest of critics. Although most visitors to the Holburne and the Ashmolean should have slightly longer attention spans, the need to capture their imaginations remains valid. Aer honing his skills in education and outreach, a circuitous sequence of events took Sturgis out of the Education Department to curate an exhibition of Rembrandt’s Self-Portraits, stepping into a gap created when Christopher Brown moved to the Ashmolean; rather neatly it’s Professor Brown he replaces now. Sturgis’s boyish charm and retro style should not be underestimated. He has an impressive brain and a talent for combining what is required by specialists, whilst also appealing to the more everyday visitor. Aer all, it is all very well having a fine collection on which academics can pronounce and speculate, but it is footfall which keeps museums alive and thriving. Keen commercial skills are needed to run a successful and economically viable museum these days. Sturgis’s effectiveness as a fund-raiser and project manager has been amply demone Marlburian Club Magazine

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strated by the £5m redevelopment of the Holburne, with a fabulous extension by Eric Parry Architects which won a clutch of coveted awards. is was completed in 2011 and has seen visitor numbers increase a staggering six-fold, from 20,000 a year to 125,000. Alongside this achievement Sturgis has been behind various successful exhibitions, including Gainsborough’s Landscapes, Presence: the Art of Portrait Sculpture, Rembrandt and his Contemporaries, and Joseph Wright of Derby: Bath and Beyond. At the Ashmolean, Sturgis inherits a significantly revamped building and a quadrupling of visitor numbers, with almost 1.2 million people a year stepping through the original 1840s neoclassical façade into Rick Mather’s £61m, impressive, multilayered and interlinked galleries. Although there are some similarities between the Holburne and the Ashmolean – both originate from an individual’s collection, have recently been very successfully re-launched and extended, and have been well received by an eager public – the Ashmolean is different in a crucial way, namely it is a Department of the University of Oxford. e importance of this link cannot be overstated and the connection is fiercely protected. Dr Sturgis, for instance, is directly employed by the University, as are most of the museum’s staff, many of whom are academic specialists who in turn draw on the museum’s extensive collections for teaching and research across a range of academic disciplines. e Board of Visitors, whose Chairman, Bernard Taylor (who is, incidentally, married to Sarah, nee Taylor (LI 1973-75)), has no fiduciary responsibilities at all. In practice, this is not necessarily an issue, but the protectiveness of Oxford’s academics of the Ashmolean’s collection and its uses should not be disregarded. For instance, when the museum reopened its doors in 2009, there were some raised eyebrows from within the dreaming spires as to whether the museum’s redevelopment represented a dumbing down. With Sturgis’s experience in access and education this could prove an interesting topic for future debate. Other challenges facing Sturgis will be familiar, namely the constant need for funding. e relationship between art and money is always a tricky one, but not one which Sturgis finds problematic: 32

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he certainly managed the Holburne’s fund-raising smoothly and fully acknowledges the symbiotic relationship between curators, museum administrators and philanthropists, recognising the dynamic needed for most fundraising campaigns. ere will be more of that at the Ashmolean, but Sturgis is holding his plans close to his chest; there is no doubt that they will be energetic and will make visitors appreciate the collection in different ways while retaining the necessary scholarly integrity. Don’t forget that Sturgis is a keen amateur magician and erstwhile member of the Magic Circle

(his first tricks were learnt at the knee of family friend David Owen (LI 1973-75)), so he should be able to conjure up some eye-catching spectacles for the future. Perhaps an early and most appropriate showpiece will be the launch of a new gallery to house the Wellby Bequest, the unique collection of Renaissance and Baroque silver gied to the Ashmolean last year by renowned silversmith Michael Wellby (SU 1942-46). Alexandra Jackson is an erstwhile City analyst and financial journalist, now a Marlborough parent and JP

Michael Wellby (SU 1942-46)

Wellby Group Nautilus Shell © Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford


Rising to a challenge It is astonishing how adventurous Marlburians are; the number of exceptional feats of endurance undertaken by OMs all over the world and almost invariably for a good cause is growing ever greater. e Editor asked six of them: David Mott (PR 1986-91), Philip Mott (B1 1991-96), Bobby Dundas (TU 1997-2001), James Frome (C1 2004-09), Alex Middleton (C1 2004-09) and Ollie Robinson (SU 2007-12) some inane questions.

What was your challenge? DM: ‘e Coolest Marathon on Earth’: e Polar Circle Marathon (April 2012), which takes place in the Arctic Circle, the world’s largest ice cube, in temperatures of -20°C. My first marathon; result: 4:14:42, 8 / 97, first Brit across the line. PM: “My House to Your House”: cycling, swimming the English Channel and running 537kms from London to Amsterdam ( July 2013). BD: e Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge Rowing Race 2014: 3000 miles from La Gomera to Antigua. Only 11/16 teams finished; other five rescued by coastguard/helicopter/tanker vessel. e Atlantic Polo Team (BD + 3) finished 1st in the 4s class and 2nd overall in 48 days 7 mins. JF/AM: Cycling from Turkey to Hong Kong in winter: 13,000 kms across 7 countries, oen in -30ºC temperatures and extreme winds. Locals say we’re the first to cycle the Pamir Highway mid-winter.

OR: e Marathon des Sables: 152 miles on foot through the Sahara Desert over 7 days carrying everything needed to survive (except water). My fellow adventurer and I were the youngest 2014 competitors.

Which charity did you do it for and how much have you raised through this particular adventure to date?

OR: HOPE for Children, helping street children in the slums of Kampala, Uganda. Friends and I love HOPE so much we’ve set up a project at Edinburgh to build a legacy of fundraising for it. £13,700 of £14,000 target already achieved; another £4,000 pledged.

What was your motivation?

DM: £17,000 so far for Help for Heroes / Cancer Research.

DM: I wanted to do my first marathon but not end up comparing times with London marathoners for the rest of my life.

PM: £80,000 by group of 10, for Parkinson’s (one group member’s father is a sufferer).

PM: ‘Boys on tour’ + a physical challenge each day. e camaraderie was what sold it to me.

BD: e Brooke / Hilton in the Community Foundation / Right to Play; £40,000 so far.

BD: More people have climbed Everest or been into space than have rowed across an ocean; pioneering + fund-raising + inspiration provided by Army team in same race (Row2Recovery = two able bodied, one double amputee and one single amputee oarsmen).

JF/AM: Breakthrough Breast Cancer, specifically the Sarah Greene Foundation. Aiming for £10,000; so far a little over £6,000, so fingers crossed...

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AM: I’d done a marathon and an Ironman 70.3 (also with JF) but nothing can really compare to this sort of trip. OR: Yes, the Devizes to Westminster Canoe Race.

Did you make a will before embarking? DM: Yes, but a long time ago. PM: No. BD: Yes: the race organizers advised it. Two weeks before the start, while I was preparing in La Gomera, I rang a lawyer and le everything to Mum! JF: No, but when we crossed the bridge into Afghanistan, the possibility of death felt like it skipped along a bit. AM: No, as I don’t have anything to put in it. OR: No.

Bobby Dundas (TU 1997-2001)

JF: To accelerate a delayed maturity process. AM: Probably a mix between loving a bit of adventure, raising money for a good cause and delaying getting a real job. OR: e opportunity was put in front of me when I was trying to say “yes” more. It has taught me to say “no”.

Did anyone try to talk you out of it?

How did you train? DM: Essentially a standard marathon training programme over 10 months, though avoided running on roads and took to the Chiltern Hills to seek mud and uneven ground whenever possible. To test out kit and get used to the cold I borrowed an Eddie Stobbart freezer truck and ran up and down a 40-foot container for three long and mind-numbingly cold hours. For fun, a friend let me train in a butcher’s freezer and I got to pound animal carcasses – just like Rocky! PM: 9 months swimming, cycling, and running HARD. Swims started in the pool and progressed to Dutch lakes at 11°C with no wetsuit – unbearably cold, but exhilarating! BD: 3 / 4 of team (inc me) had no previous rowing experience. Trained on ergos every day for 4 months beforehand. Surrey Sports Park (our sponsors) planned weekly schedules. JF: Half an Ironman and various day-today activities – nothing particularly strenuous. AM: Actually…no training at all before I le. I needed to gain a bit of weight for the 34

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David Mott (PR 1986-91)

cold temperatures, so spent most of my final days in the UK eating anything I could get my hands on…which was pointless: aer a week on the bike I’d lost it all again. OR: Polar opposite to DM; a LOT of time spent in the sauna, fully dressed, running on the spot. Owing to ongoing knee injuries my training was limited; in the end I went to complete not compete.

DM: No chance! PM: Frequently – my wife! BD: No. My mind was quite obviously set, so no point, I guess. JF: Yes, my father especially – he recruited hordes of relations to suggest the same. AM: People said I was crazy, but not that I shouldn’t go. OR: Yes, mainly people I didn’t know that well.

What was the best bit of advice you got given beforehand? DM: “Start steady, finish strong” – the four best words I’ve ever been given about endurance racing. So many get it wrong. PM: Bring sleeping bags for the Channel

Had you done anything as remotely challenging as this before? DM: Yes, a lot of high altitude ski touring with my brothers Nicolas (C3 1988-93) and Philip, with the ‘Patrouille des Glaciers’ race in Switzerland a highlight. PM: Yes, the Marathon des Sables. BD: No. JF: No, the duration and temperatures were a new psychological challenge.

Ollie Robinson (788) (SU 2007-12)


Philip Mott (B1 1991-96)

swim – the only way to warm up when shivering uncontrollably. BD: From the race scrutineers: what survival kit to take; what to take energywise to keep on the oars 2-hours-on-2hours-off; to keep hatches shut at all times to avoid risk of sinking; how to use a compass. JF: Very little constructive advice was given – it was more “don’t go!” AM: My dad was able to give me a lot of advice on keeping warm, from his experience trekking to both the North and South Poles. OR: “Take strawberry laces.” e only food I ever looked forward to.

And the most ludicrous bit of advice you got given beforehand? DM: “You need to drink a lot, as the ice cap is as dry as the desert.” I drank a lot and had to stop to pee six times in the first 10kms! PM: “Smear yourself in goose fat to keep warm in the water.” It’s a myth, and is actually only used against chafing. BD: To be sure to stay in the boat when it gets rough! JF: None. AM: Probably my mum suggesting I take some strange, colourful pyjamas to keep me warm at night. I did my best to explain they wouldn’t hack the -40ºC evenings… she still insists they would have been a good addition. OR: “You have to use blown-up condoms as pillows to keep weight down.”

as the ice retreats apace, and on Inuit traditions and culture. It is dramatic. I felt angry that some people continue to dispute climate change. PM: 4am: coming out of the first of several sessions of the relay Channel swim during the night, unbearably cold, being dried off and thrown into a sleeping bag and shivering beyond belief for over an hour. Miserable. BD: Day 6, Force 8 storm: all four of us having to cram into the a cabin (about the size of a large coffin) for 72 hours while driing backwards the way we had come. No food; water rationed... JF: In the Pamirs, where a -30ºC wind swept through my down gloves with ease; desperately thinking of innovative ways to avoid frostbite. AM: Probably the start of a three-day ascent into the Tajikistan wilderness, where temperatures were around -30ºC, I had a terrible stomach and the road consisted only of sand, snow and ice. OR: In the final 10km of the 80km stage I hallucinated a lot, the most persistent being my conviction that there were Jeeps driving towards us about to run me over.

midst of this suffering there was a lot of fun banter. PM: Cycling in formation along the dykes of Holland at 55kph on cycle paths the size of roads and with the wind behind us, on a high of exhilaration… BD: Surfing the waves! Mid-ocean you get mountain seascapes all running in the same direction, one aer another. We took turns to stand and hand-steer; on the summit of a 40- wave you could see how the waves were set, the front rower would pull hard and you could surf at speeds of 18-19 knots! JF: A couple of days in Iran with the kindest family and people I have ever met. AM: Although the temperatures were well below freezing, riding across the Pamir Highway when the sun was out can’t really be beaten, especially as we had the road to ourselves. It was by far the toughest time for us, but without doubt the most rewarding.

e best moment (not including the end)? DM: At the start of the race we stripped off our down jackets and stood waiting for the gun to go off, but the race official wasn’t ready. Over 100 of us stood huddled together, flapping our arms like penguins as we battled the cold. In the

Philip Mott (B1 1991-96)

e worst moment? DM: Aer the race, I stayed in the Arctic for a while and got to see at first hand the effects of climate change on the landscape

James Frome (C1 2004-09) and Alex Middleton (C1 2004-09)

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OR: Aer arriving in the dark at our campsite from the airport, waking in the middle of the Sahara to watch a crystal sunrise breaking over enormous sand dunes (to the sound of tent mates snoring like pigs).

BD: Adrenalin. Tears. Pure joy. [at’s four, Bobby… but I’ll forgive you. Ed.] JF: What do I do now? […And that’s five… I blame their education. Ed.] AM: Exhausted. Elated. Proud. OR: Where’s my medal?

e most valuable piece of kit to you and why:

Would you do it again?

DM: My crampons – they fitted over my Gore-Tex running shoes and gave me a lot of confidence running over the ice. ey did add weight, but I was well prepared. PM: Goggles, to see and avoid the jellyfish. BD: e power anchor; it saved our lives on at least three occasions. It’s an underwater parachute on 50m of line attached to the bowfront and puts you straight on with oncoming big waves. JF: Garmin GPS with excellent free maps from OpenStreetMaps; it saved us so much time and was very comforting in the remote Pamirs. AM: I think it’s a toss-up between the GPS and my iPod. Of course I wouldn’t be writing this now if I didn’t have the right cold weather gear, but I’d say my iPod…music’s really got me through some tough times. OR: My iPod. I only actually used it for 5 minutes, but the thought of it was enough to keep my head in tow.

e random bit of memorabilia you will keep forever: GM: Aer the race we chipped ice off an iceberg and made gin & tonics. Wonderfully refreshing! [Confusion of memory with memorabilia, David? I blame the alcohol… Ed.] PM: Rock from the beach at Cap Griz Nez. BD: My journal; I wrote it daily. JF: None. AM: An all-in-one Kyrgyzstan Cycling Team tracksuit. OR: e roadbook.

What three words best sum up your feelings as you crossed the finish line? DM: Top 10. Wow! PM: Humbled. Sad. Proud. 36

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DM: No, only because I’ve got a long list of other adventures to get through. PM: No, it was a unique event and there are so many other challenges out there to get stuck into. BD: For the feelings alone in crossing the finish line and then seeing family…yes. JF: No. AM: Not a chance. OR: No.

What would you do differently if you were to do it again? DM: Not much really…Drink less before the race! PM: Wear a wetsuit for the swim. e cold is not worth it and near impossible to counter without increasing personal body weight by >10kg. BD: Take longer to prepare. Our campaign started end of March with the boat-build and raising funds to do it, but we only set foot in her 5 days before the start. Also pick charities that would help more with achieving the goal: synergy is very important. JF: Take a motorbike, not a bicycle. AM: Go in the summer! I would also take a more extensive library of audiobooks, Desert Island Discs and music. OR: I’d taste my food before going. I retched trying to eat a lot of the food I’d taken, meaning that I was on only around 1850 calories a day.

BD: Most definitely. I appreciate the smallest things now, like to think I take less for granted and have respect for anyone who pushes themselves to their limits while helping those less fortunate. JF: Of course. e kindness shown by others can only encourage one to do the same. e key question has not been resolved however: lawyer or Himalayan mountaineer? AM: Yes; the whole trip has been an eyeopening experience. It has also challenged us both mentally and physically. I’d like to think I’m a little tougher and more enduring. OR: I can’t see myself going on a beach holiday for a while.

Do you have plans to do anything similarly physically challenging? DM: My current goal is completely different: I’m competing in Modern Pentathlon and will be representing GB at the World Masters Championships in September 2014 in Berlin’s Olympic Stadium. PM: I try to do one big endurance event every couple of years. Coming up this summer: the birth of my second child – different, but equally challenging! BD: Yes, I’ve caught the bug! Doing a few things for Starlight at the moment…Maybe a mountain or a continent? Definitely something landbased! JF: For sure: the Marathon des Sables, an Ironman and climbing some big mountains are all on the to-do list. AM: No, thank God! Although we have been discussing the potential of doing a full Ironman some time in the near future. We’ll have to wait and see. OR: 100%

Has the experience changed you?

What would be your advice to anyone considering something similar?

DM: Yes. I am yearning for more challenges in the Arctic – watch this space. My boys want to do a dog-sledging expedition when they’re old enough. My wife, Julie, is less keen! PM: Yes. It was a great lesson that a group of 10 with vision can conquer anything they put their minds to.

DM: During my training José Maria Olazábal won the Ryder Cup and said, “All men die, but not all men live.” For me this means finding adventure and inspiration. And the Polar Marathon? I couldn’t recommend it more highly. PM: Go for it – you are your only obstacle.


BD: You can do anything you put your mind to. Definitely go for it, take in all positives, believe in yourself and completely disregard any negative input. If rowing: prep well and don’t skimp on food or water-makers. JF: Travel with someone like-minded and who is composed in the tough times. AM: ere is no better way to travel [than cycling]. You feel completely connected with any path you cross, whether it be on or off the beaten track. I couldn’t recommend it more (well, summer cycle touring that is). OR: Don’t get sucked in by the one-sizefits-all solutions to the race – do it your own way.

What is your day job? DM: Managing partner of Oxford Capital, a private equity firm I co-founded in 1999 (www.oxcp.com). PM: Marketing at Nokia. BD: Professional polo player. JF: Still thinking about that one. To enter the City or to escape the city is the question.

AM: Just graduated with a degree in Sports Marketing and currently doing a crash-course in Cycle Touring and Middle Eastern Studies (while on the road). OR: Studying Spanish & Politics at Edinburgh University.

Was anything you did or learned at Marlborough responsible/ contributory to your involvement and success in the challenge? DM: Lack of radiators in Preshute’s Shell dorm and long, winter cross-country runs – some for games, others punishment! Also Bruce Tulloh (CR 1973-94), who coached me at MC and sparked my love of running – many thanks, Bruce. PM: Wet chits in the outdoor pool during the summer term, making me think I could swim the Channel! BD: Yes; MC gave me a skill set I really needed to get across that ocean. Whether it was the freezing cold rugby games, bonds between friends or good old public school discipline…there were many solitary nights I thought about my school days and the general tough English spirit that helped me keep rowing. As Churchill said, “never, never give up.”

JF: Yes; I increasingly aspire to be a blend of Ben Miller (CR 2002-) and Rupert Rosedale (CR 1999-2009). AM: Our Housemaster (Ben Miller) had a big influence on the development of our adventurous side. Whether it was skirting around the C1 roof to evade him or the enjoyable House trips to Wales, I’d like to think it was a combination of the two. OR: Mr Rosedale was an absolute inspiration.

Contact details for blogs/ expedition story that readers could look up for further in-depth reports of your activity: DM: www.davidmott.vc for race website links and blog PM: www.mh2yh.com for team website and blog BD: www.atlanticpoloteam.com for blog, photos, videos / Fb: Atlantic polo team / @atlanticpolo / youtube: e Atlantic Polo Team, our story JF/AM: www.wheelsbelowzero. blogspot.com / Fb: wheels below zero / www.justgiving.com/wheelsbelowzero OR: www.thehopeproject.co.uk

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e eo Dreyfus Bolivian Memorial Fund With adventure comes the risk of mortal danger. e six OMs overleaf were lucky; not all are so fortunate. loved best. is year it is expected that 100,000 foreigners will bike down the single-lane track, formerly used by trucks and buses. In eo’s memory, it was decided to vanquish death from the road that bears its name.

n 9 May 2009, eodore Dreyfus (LI 2000-05) bicycled down the infamous ‘Camino de la Muerte’ in the remote Los Yungas region in Bolivia. is extraordinary road commences on a lunarlike plateau at an altitude of over 15,000 feet and wends its way downhill for 40 miles, at times carved into vertical valley walls. It serves as a lifeline for the few thousand families who eke out a living in that inhospitable terrain, but it has killed or gravely injured hundreds of Bolivians and dozens of tourists, including eo – the adventurer – who died doing what he

O

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e Dreyfus family, aided by Pablo Paz, owner of the bike tour company eo had used and who visited Marlborough to talk to pupils, launched an appeal for funds to pay for barriers on the worst corners, for the purchase of an ambulance, mountain rescue gear and short wave radios, and for training of the crews who would use them. Marlborough was brilliant in many different ways. Not only did most pupils participate in creative fund raising events but their parents also donated generously. School concerts (Illumination) were arranged and a now famous contemporary of eo’s offered the proceeds from one of his London shows. Marlborough’s brilliance also extended to its pastoral care for eo’s youngest brother, Daniel (LI 2008-13), who was in the Shell when the tragedy occurred. e College rallied round him: Sani was caring, his

Housemaster(s) attentive and the greater school community very loving and supportive during this dreadful time. However on 9 May 2014 eo’s Fund stopped taking donations, having hugely exceeded its aims. It has built and equipped a medical centre, named aer eo, in the village of Unduavi half way down the camino, freeing up eo’s ambulance from having to take injured tourists and sick locals on a daylong round-trip to the nearest hospital. Indeed, for the foreseeable future the Fund will be able to both maintain the vehicle and pay for First Aid and mountain rescue training courses for those who make their living from the road. eo died just four years aer leaving Marlborough. e College responded magnificently, nurturing eo’s family and friends and helping us to keep his memory alive both here and in a distant corner of the Andes. His family thanks you all. Dominic Dreyfus More can be found about the fund on Facebook: eodore Dreyfus (RIP)


Water, water everywhere Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81) visits Richard Pim (C2 1954-58): hydrogeologist, horticulturalist, folly-builder and clock-maker Richard Pim doesn’t believe in plans or designs; he just starts. “Too much thinking kills ideas. If you combine ideas with conviction, you can solve problems as you go along.” n those few words Richard virtually sums up a philosophy that has led him from Marlborough to the depths of Herefordshire via Africa, Nepal, Indonesia and Saudi Arabia, and from a career as a hydrogeologist to garden designer and creator of the world’s only water-powered cuckoo clock. is route wasn’t particularly planned, it just emerged from the serendipitous combination of Richard’s innate practicality, fertile imagination and dogged determination plus a good dose of fate and pragmatism. What results is a life in which Richard continues to advise Saudis Arabians on the extraction and use of water in their deserts, while at home on the Welsh border with his second wife Sally he develops and maintains a water garden and a selection of working follies that attract over 8,000 paying visitors a year.

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Richard’s journey began in 1958 when, post-Marlborough and without a clear academic vocation (“I was a late developer…”), he bought an old motorbike and rode down through France and Spain to Morocco: his first taste of North Africa. On return his father tried to persuade him into chartered accountancy; Richard instead got himself a job as an apprentice in a forkli truck factory in Basingstoke.

“Richard may not be a trained architect or builder, but he has constructed a range of stone, timber, bull-rush, turf and glass creations that both impress engineers with their scientific integrity while also bringing together Richard’s personal experience and artistic flair.” e Marlburian Club Magazine

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“e pinnacle of Richard’s achievements however must be his utterly ingenious, waterpowered 23 Cuckoo Clock. As he shows me what happens as it approaches its hourly zenith a couple of visitors eagerly eavesdrop...”

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At 26 he was offered the chance of returning to Africa to sell agricultural machinery in Libya and it was there that he met American hydrogeologist, Ed Fisk. Fisk was setting up an agricultural project in the desert and became Richard’s great friend and mentor; Richard ended up working alongside him in the Kufra Oasis, 400kms from the coast, organizing the exploration and drilling of water and becoming, almost by default, a hydrogeologist himself. [Hydrogeology? “Roughly, it is the business of understanding the geology and water-flow of an area to a point at which you can estimate the consequences on the supply if 100 wells were to draw on it for 10 years or more.”] Aer two years at Fisk’s side Richard backed up his newly acquired knowledge and experience with an MSc at Birmingham before heading out to Nepal’s Kathmandu Basin for three years with consulting engineers Binnie & Partners. Further lengthy contracts followed in Iran, Nigeria and Indonesia before he ended up in Saudi Arabia, where he still goes a couple of times of year to advise on projects. e UK’s recent floods prompt me to ask this specialist in water supply about climate change. “Oh, I’m a believer, without question. It’s a simple equation really, one I maybe even learned at Marlborough: over 300 million years the earth’s original CO2 atmosphere has been changed by the photosynthesis of the forests to produce vital oxygen and buried carbon. If we now dig up all the coal and other carbon and burn it in the oxygen we

simply reverse the process back towards the CO2 atmosphere – there is no getting around that. But it is not making any real short-term difference on the ground in the desert. And here in the garden we just hope for a decent summer and I adjust the sluices and look aer the pools and channels as millers have always done,” which brings us neatly back to Herefordshire and Pim’s Career No 2. Richard bought Westonbury Mill in 1969, while still in the desert. A “whim” prompted him to commission a friend to find him a water meadow with a stream and some sort of building; the friend duly obliged with a broken-down watermill set in 17 acres of wilderness 9 miles west of Leominster. “Behind the mill was an almost impenetrable jungle of scrub and nettles which is now the garden. Aer I completed a little work on the house and excavated a pond complete with island and tree-house for the children, the place became our holiday home.” Richard didn’t move in permanently until 1997, by which time he was on his own and in need of a potentially money-earning project. Despite being “comfortably ignorant” of the subject, he decided this would be a water garden with potential visitor appeal. With no particular design or plan in mind he hired a digger and dumper truck, extended the original pond and sculpted a random selection of channels and other ponds surrounded by high banks to vary the topography of an essentially flat site. His planting was equally random and experimental: he bought one of each of the


150 bog plants listed in a nursery catalogue. Miraculously most survived, and aer a bit more digger work and some more purposeful planting, the resulting mixture of ponds, rills, banks, paths, beds and meadows makes a most attractive whole, though what really draws the visitors are the additional features Richard has created: a selection of highly imaginative follies. Richard may not be a trained architect or builder, but he has constructed a range of stone, timber, bull-rush, turf and glass creations that both impress engineers with their scientific integrity while also bringing together Richard’s personal experience and artistic flair. e African Summer House mixes his memories of the Yemen with elm re-growth and bull-rushes that were freely available on-site; it cost nothing except a bolt or two to hold them together and some cleverly hidden plastic sheeting. e “useless, but quite charming” Stone Tower, which uses a belt-and-bucket system to fill a water tank that makes water gush every 15 minutes from home-chiselled gargoyles (c/o stone-carving evening classes) resulted from 3am musings and a determination to make use of an old iron waterwheel that emerged from the brambles during the Mill’s resurrection. One doesn’t like to ask the inspiration behind the Bottle Grotto, which suggests Martians might have landed the Marches while simultaneously inspiring one to head straight home and do something similarly creative with one’s own empties. ese follies are not mere feats of engineering but entirely original works of art.

“ese follies are not mere feats of engineering but entirely original works of art.”

e pinnacle of Richard’s achievements however must be his utterly ingenious, water-powered 23 Cuckoo Clock. As he shows me what happens as it approaches its hourly zenith a couple of visitors eagerly eavesdrop. I can’t believe detailed designs and calculations weren’t drawn up for this whimsy at least – if only on the back of some substantial envelopes. Richard concedes that, yes, for the Clock he did bring in some help and might have made the odd jotting. “Mine was the overall concept and I made most of the fiddly bits that pull the main components together, but I did get a lot of those made for me. I also made a good drawing of the tower, built by a local halftimbering specialist. My friend Rodney Briscoe, who restored the singing birds at the Villa d’Este, made the ‘barrel’ and its beautiful frame [the bit like a musical box], the little flutes and the downstairs water wheel. He also calculated the amount of pressurised air we would need. I commissioned a local machinist to make the important pulley mechanism up in the roof and one or two other components; for those I certainly drew clear sketches of what I needed. But there was never a detailed overall design involving everything needed to make it function, nor indeed any calculations of exactly how it was going

to work – except for Rodney’s about the air volume. I knew a lot of hiccups would emerge in the detail but was confident of finding solutions. e trouble is, I get bored once problems have been solved.” Subsequent generations now relishing Leonardo’s designs for helicopters and diving bells will therefore have no real clue to the workings of the Pim mind other than the clock itself once its creator is gone. Even one of the most crucial elements was discovered by accident: one balmy evening Richard realized two empty Guinness cans would be perfect for one particular bit of the job. Richard’s enthusiastic explanation of the Clock’s innermost workings charms and impresses his visitors. It’s easy to see why Westonbury is becoming so popular, and with all ages. e recent addition of a Spiral Mound earthwork that gives children a great clamber whilst providing adults with a panoramic view of the whole domain and surrounding countryside adds a further dimension. In early years visitors helped themselves to cake in Richard’s own lean-to conservatory; now there is a smart wooden café let out on a franchise too. “Looking back I feel rather embarrassed. We opened two years in and I knew nothing. I’d never been to anybody else’s garden, but followed my instinct and people seem to like it. But it’s been a lot of fun and gardens need that. I just started and solved problems as I went along.” Westonbury Mill Water Gardens are open om 1 April to 30 September, 11am-5pm www.westonburymillwatergardens.com e Marlburian Club Magazine

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THE MARLBURIAN COLLECTION 2014–2015

H I G H q UA L I T Y M E M E N TO E S O F MARLB OROUGH COLLEGE Ideal for birthday, Christmas or anniversary gis All profits from the Collection will go towards increasing bursaries and scholarships For a catalogue please telephone: 01672 892498 Online at: shop.marlboroughcollege.org

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FromWellies toWar Horse Nicola Read (PR 1986-88) talks to award-winning artist and sculptor, Olivia Gill (MM 1990-92) Olivia Gill worked in a tandoori restaurant in Hull to fund the framing for her first exhibition at the Mount House Gallery. Having deliberately chosen not to go to Art College, she was studying Drama at the University there at the time, a decision driven by her desire to combine her love for art and music with literature, and fostered by her work set designing in the Memorial Hall and the Bradleian. From 16 Olivia had also worked for various theatre companies during the holidays and felt that her more ‘renaissance’ approach to art could be best encompassed in the theatre.

‘Stopping by Woods’ and ‘The Listeners’ from ‘Where my Wellies take me…’ – charcoal, pen & ink and collage

hen she first arrived at Marlborough as an art scholar, she had brought with her an armful of small sketchbooks and very definite ideas about the way she wanted to work. An inspirational art teacher at her previous school had taught her to draw everything wherever she went and had given her “illegal” extra art lessons in what Olivia describes as a sort of hut – the complete opposite of the excellent facilities she found at Marlborough. However, she felt that her modus operandi didn’t always fit in with the approach to art she found at MC. “e art school was fantastic and I wanted to work hard. However, I found

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it all quite overwhelming and maybe didn’t quite understand the method of teaching; so I was perhaps deemed to be rather stubborn and wayward, challenging the system a little bit,” she ponders. But while she chose not to study art formally, she continued to draw seriously, both while working abroad and at university. at first exhibition at the Mount House, for which she drove the work down from Hull to Marlborough in the car, was sufficiently successful to fund the rest of her course. Some years later Olivia did in fact take an MA in printmaking at Camberwell College

of Art, where she was surprised that nobody mentioned the possibility of making a living as an artist. “Everyone knows that it is hard to make ends meet as an artist, but talking about it in art institutions is seen almost as dirty. Of course one must explore ideas and experiment throughout one’s career, but unless you have a private income and you’re in the privileged position of not needing to sell your art, there’s always that interface of how to make it work in the real world. Obviously you’re very lucky if you can make a career from doing what you love, and I have been lucky to just about make things work. It’s how I live and support my family.” e Marlburian Club Magazine

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‘The Owl & the Pussycat’ – etching with chine collé

‘The Last Unicorn’ – charcoal and gesso

“e art school was fantastic and I wanted to work hard. However, I found it all quite overwhelming and maybe didn’t quite understand the method of teaching; so I was perhaps deemed to be rather stubborn and wayward, challenging the system a little bit”

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‘Standing To’ – charcoal, pen & ink and collage

Olivia now lives amid the wild scenery of Northumberland, where her art and lifestyle reflect her affinity with and respect for the traditional. She uses a wide variety of media, from etching to oil painting and, most recently, bronze casting, but drawing and etching form the basis of her work and she has two etching presses housed in the workshop and studio she shares with her husband Vincent, a paper conservator. “In the last twenty years, with the move towards digital methods, it seems that a lot of traditional equipment has been discarded in the mistaken belief that ‘old’ techniques can be replaced by digital. So printing presses and looms ended up in skips.” She rescued a giant press from this fate and, with the help of a crane, has recently moved it into a new workspace. “When I originally bought the press – without even seeing it – I didn’t have anywhere to put it. It weighs about three tons and the studio I work in

at home is one we built by hand, ten years ago, entirely of timber. It’s a great place to work but couldn’t take the press’s weight, so it had to wait two years in Cumbria before I found somewhere concrete to put it! You can get lightweight ones, but I don’t like the results so much. is one is good for printing large plates, which I prefer. e flywheel is about 5 across and the solid steel rollers about 18 inches in diameter, so you get a really good pressure. It’s the closest thing I have to an assistant!” Olivia’s work is strongly figurative and her pieces oen tell a story. It is therefore fitting that she has recently illustrated her first book. Her collaboration with Michael Morpurgo on Where My Wellies Take Me... was the result of a chance meeting between artist and author. Serendipitously introduced at a children’s book festival in Brittany, they quickly bonded aer Morpurgo spotted and admired the literary roots of Olivia’s son’s


unusual name: Elzéard (from e Man Who Planted Trees). Aer seeing Olivia’s sketchbooks and talking further on the ferry home, Morpurgo and his wife unexpectedly visited one of her London exhibitions and invited her to illustrate the book they were planning together. With the approval of publishers Templar, she went to Devon, pitched her tent in the Morpurgos’ garden and spent a week researching the story’s landscape. Olivia designed the book to look like the child protagonist’s scrapbook, with paintings and drawings interspersing the poems and story. It has all the makings of a future children’s classic and has proved popular with children, parents and primary teachers, who find it a brilliant classroom stimulus. It has already won one award and is shortlisted for the 2014 Kate Greenaway Medal. Morpurgo went on to commission Olivia to design the poster for his War Horse concert. For this she worked closely with e King’s Troop at their London barracks. “e Troop is the closest link we have to the cavalry and artillery of WWI. e 13-pounder field guns are WWI originals, all the leather tack and harness is still made to the same design and the service dress very similar, so it was the only place to do the research. ey’ve been very welcoming and helpful. e barracks is like another world and I’m really keen to capture more of that.” She is working on an artist’s book about e King’s Troop, a behind the scenes study of the day-to-day

routine rather than the official ceremonial aspects of their life. Olivia’s forthcoming exhibition at the Mount House will form part of MC’s WWI centenary commemorations. “I’d really like to create a piece of work that could stay in the College’s permanent collection aer the exhibition – to commemorate the school’s specific losses.” A particular ambition is to create a lifesized statue of a horse. During her time with e Troop, Olivia was allowed to ride the enormous Austin, who became the subject of both the title artwork and a bronze statue. She had long been fascinated by the process of bronze casting and was excited to follow the progress of her wax maquette into finished bronze at an Edinburgh foundry. It will be on show in the Mount House along with the War Horse work and other pieces Olivia created while based with e King’s Troop. Olivia plans to produce further work commemorating WWI from a domestic perspective. “I’m not a specialist in military history, so I want to find an angle that I can identify with: the families waiting for the soldiers to return whether they came back or not, and the dramatic impact on domestic life at home and on agriculture aer so many horses were commissioned by the army. It is a huge subject and I try to work from life as much as possible, so it is important to find a way of bringing the subject to life today in a way that is relevant, rather than just by reproduction.”

‘The Floral Dance’ from ‘Where My Wellies Take Me…’ – pen & ink, watercolour and collage

Her work has a tremendous sense of authenticity, born from her deep-rooted habit of minute observation and her passion for her materials and dedication to her cra is obvious in the beauty of her pieces. e stories behind each work add to their value for the viewer and, although digital processes may be taking over for some artists, the world is a richer place for containing real artists like Olivia. I think she’ll do her subject great justice. Olivia Gill at e Mount House Gallery: 7 November – 12 December 2014 www.oliviagill.com olivialomenechgill.wordpress.com www.alisoneldred.com Nicola Read is a eelance writer with a strong interest in houses, history and heritage. She has recently returned to the UK aer 13 years in Singapore and is currently working at Stonehenge as a Gallery Interpreter and Neolithic House Builder

‘Austin’ – bronze (14 x18cm)

‘Gaud’ – pen & ink and watercolour on Bockingford e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Royal Peculiars 4: e Clerk of the Parliaments David Beamish (B3 1965-69) Like Charles Macfarlane, whose article on the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms appeared in issue No 114 of the Marlburian Club Magazine, I too was ‘collared’ by the Editor and honoured to be asked to contribute to the series entitled ‘Royal Peculiars’. In my case it was at the reception hosted by Lord Goodlad (SU 1957-61) at the House of Lords in November 2012, reported on p21 of the same edition. n the 21st century the Clerk of the Parliaments can best be described as the principal adviser to the House of Lords and in effect its ‘chief executive’. I was however formally appointed (in April 2011) by Her Majesty the Queen by letters patent, and not by the House itself. e office can be traced back to the late 13th century, and the form of the declaration which I made on taking up office suggests that in former times the Clerk was rather more the servant of the Sovereign than of the House of Lords. I declared that if I had knowledge of anything “prejudicial to” Her Majesty then “I will resist it to my power and with all speed I will advertise Her Grace thereof ”. Only at the end does the declaration say anything about supporting the House of Lords: “I will well and truly do and execute all things belonging to me to be done appertaining to the Office of Clerk of the Parliaments”.

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In addition to that royal connection, I can claim to be close to a genuine ‘Royal peculiar’, as my office looks out on Westminster Abbey, where the Dean still enjoys the privilege of sitting on the Steps of the rone in the Chamber of the House of Lords. My most visible role is in the Chamber, where I call on business at the start of each sitting. ree clerks, in 18th-century court dress with wing collars and white bow ties, sit at the Table of the House. My colleagues wear a barrister’s wig, but by tradition mine is a judge’s ‘bench’ wig (without the curls on a barrister’s wig). 46

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My colleague the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod and his deputy the Yeoman Usher wear breeches, tights and buckled shoes, but I reserve those for special occasions, in particular the State Opening of Parliament and the formal presentation of Humble Addresses to the Sovereign in Westminster Hall, most recently in 2012 for the Diamond Jubilee. Since 1967 the Royal Assent to Acts of Parliament has normally been notified separately in each House without any ceremonial, but on those occasions (normally at the end of a Parliamentary session) when the Commons are summoned by Black Rod to the Lords’ Chamber, I pronounce the Queen’s Royal Assent on her behalf using the Norman French formula “La Reyne le veult”. (For Acts providing money for the Crown, there is a rather longer formula, beginning “La Reyne remercie ses bons sujets”, but sadly I have not yet had an opportunity to use it.) Since the mid-20th century the Clerk of the Parliaments has been appointed from among the body of clerks serving the House, and in September 2014 I will have served in the House for 40 years, having joined in 1974 aer completing a postgraduate law degree at St John’s College, Cambridge. At that time the long-term future of the House of Lords was in some doubt – in 1977 the Labour Party Conference voted for its abolition by 6 million votes to 91,000 – but more recently the debate has been about reform rather than abolition, and almost entirely about reform of the composition of the House; its role as a second chamber complementary to the House of Commons is now widely accepted. In 1999 most of the hereditary peers le the House, but otherwise reform proposals have foundered for lack of consensus on what to put in place of the currently constituted House. During my time working for the House it has become more active and more influential. Correspondingly, the number of staff has risen from 300 to about 500. In 1974 the offices of the House were all within the Palace of Westminster (and quite a large part of the House of Lords’ end of the Palace was occupied by staff of the Lord Chancellor’s Department), but now the House also occupies three nearby buildings, with over 200 staff based in the largest of those, Millbank House.

A learned article written in 1959 at the time of the appointment of one of my predecessors noted that he had 51 staff, though the small number was partly because at that time he had no responsibility for Black Rod and his staff (such as Doorkeepers), the Library, or catering, except as ‘Accounting Officer’ for the House of Lords Vote. I sometimes envy my predecessors’ very different working life – no emails expecting instant responses, and few of the paraphernalia of modern public service management such as management boards, audit committees, business plans and risk registers! But there are compensations, such as the flourishing network of contacts with my counterparts elsewhere in the UK, in the Commonwealth (mainly through the Society of Clerks-at-the-Table in Commonwealth Parliaments) and worldwide (through the Association of Secretaries General of Parliaments). ere is even an Association of European Senates, which in 2013 held its annual meeting at Westminster. We have particularly good links with our opposite numbers in Canada, both in the federal parliament in Ottawa and in the provinces and territories, and I have been lucky enough over the years to attend conferences hosted by the legislatures in Ottawa, Alberta, and all three of the territories in the north (the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Iqaluit). e ‘royal’ and ceremonial elements of my role are perhaps less significant than in the case of the offices previously featured in this series, but I consider myself fortunate to have had a ringside seat on some notable occasions. When Her Majesty the Queen visited Westminster on the occasion of her Diamond Jubilee in 2012, I had the privilege of presenting to her some of my colleagues on the House of Lords staff. Other distinguished visitors to Westminster Hall in recent years have included Pope Benedict XVI, Barack Obama, and Aung San Suu Kyi. I am (so far) the only Marlburian to have held the office of Clerk of the Parliaments, though two Marlburians have held the equivalent office in the House of Commons: the Clerk of the House (though he is described in formal documents as the Under Clerk of the Parliaments!). Sir Courtenay Ilbert (B2 1852-60) was Clerk of the House from 1902 to 1921, and Sir Edward Fellowes

“I am (so far) the only Marlburian to have held the office of Clerk of the Parliaments, though two Marlburians have held the equivalent office in the House of Commons.”

David Beamish (B3 1965-69)

(B2 1909-14, Club President 1964) from 1954 to 1961. Marlburian clerks during my time have included John Rose (C1 1947-53) in the Commons and Clive Mitchell (SU 1958-63) in the Lords; other Parliamentary colleagues have included Sir Peter Jennings (B3 194852), Serjeant at Arms of the House of Commons from 1995 to 1999, and the late Group Captain Myles Duke-Woolley (CO 1930-34), Yeoman Usher of the Black Rod (Black Rod’s deputy) from 1973 to 1979. Finally, readers will be glad to know that there is an active group of Marlburian members in the House of Lords, the most recent arrival being one of the ‘Lords Spiritual’, James Newcome (TU 196671), Bishop of Carlisle. Current Marlburian ‘Lords Temporal’ include the Chairman of Council, Lord MallochBrown (C1 1967-71), Lord Janvrin (B1 1960-64, Club President 2013), Lord Boswell of Aynho (C2 1956-61), Lord Brooke of Sutton Mandeville (LI 1947-52, Club President 1993) whose father Henry, Lord Brooke of Cumnor, was also a Marlburian life peer (LI 1916-22, Club President 1971), the Earl of Caithness (B3 1962-66), Lord Goodlad (SU 1957-61) and Lord Wright of Richmond (C3 1945-50). e Marlburian Club Magazine

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e Croquet Man Eleanor Pontin (MO 1996-2001) meets near neighbour and international croquet player for over 25 years, William Ormerod (LI 1950-55) “Heaven is playing croquet on a summer aernoon, in an English country garden, having had a good lunch, and in anticipation of a good dinner!” Auberon Waugh the boys, cycling to their weekend cricket matches against the local village teams. When William was bequeathed the captaincy of the Littlefield Village Cricket Team, Mr Jennings would conspicuously leave half an hour before the boys and turn a blind eye to their pub visits on the way back, humorously announcing on return: “Ormerod – we know where you’ve been!”

met Dr William Ormerod on a crisp February evening in the Dorset village where he now lives. A legend in the game of croquet, he has led, I was to discover, a fascinating life in which croquet has both defined and created multiple opportunities.

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William first played croquet aged eleven, when his family lived in Bristol. Due to a knee injury that never successfully healed, his father took up croquet as a substitute for cricket, inspiring the rest of the family to play alongside him. When William took up the game he therefore adopted a profound cricket-style (where one holds the mallet to the side), which he maintained throughout his career. William joined junior house e Priory in 1950, moving on to Littlefield in 1951, when his father gave his housemaster, Reginald Jennings, a set of hoops and mallets and the boys their first taste of summer croquet on the house lawns. Mr Jennings was something of a hero to 48

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At 15, William played his first croquet tournament, in Parkstone, Dorset, against a Miss Hedges, the aunt of Lady Barbirolli (international oboist Evelyn Rothwell, wife of conductor Sir John). e family all played croquet and were, according to William, “terribly keen on the game”. Miss Hedges was a talented cellist and she and William bonded over a mutual love of music; one memorably wet day he recalls her remarking, “Oh William, let’s not play this silly game, let’s go inside and play the cello!” For many of us croquet is a somewhat relaxed summer game. It has few rules (if any) and is usually played in a somewhat inebriated fashion aer a Pimm’s-fuelled lunch. In this variation of the game the main event oen involves avoiding the inevitable molehill. However it is interesting to discover there are actually three official types of croquet: Garden, Golf and Association croquet. ere are also over 100 croquet clubs in the UK and many more worldwide. Garden croquet is a game in which one never ceases to learn; significant patience is needed in the early stages, when the balls oen fail to go where intended. Golf croquet is a simpler form of the game, played in gardens or on croquet lawns, whilst Association croquet is a very

competitive internationally-played sport, where the lawn must be completely flat and molehill-free, offering players the opportunity to travel the world and almost uniquely allowing both men and women to compete on equal terms. William’s croquet while at Marlborough mostly took place during the summer holidays, when he entered and won various competitions. e highlight was to be in 1956, during his first year at Cambridge, when New Zealand’s croquet team visited Britain and William was asked to play for England. His first international matches were therefore played when he was only 19, at the Roehampton Club in London and in Budleigh Salterton in Devon, with the English team proving victorious. Despite this exciting experience, William completed his medical training at Cambridge, continuing a remarkable family tradition by becoming the sixth generation of doctors on his father’s side since 1789. In 1963, another international croquet match was this time held in New Zealand, involving Australia, New Zealand and England. Despite recently qualifying, William (the secondyoungest player) still travelled to participate, and England once again triumphed. He remembers visiting Auckland, Dunedin, Christchurch, Timeroo and Nelson with great fondness. He also re-met one Gordon Roland, a tobacco farmer from Nelson, in the Marlborough area of the South Island. William had first met him in England in 1956 when Roland was playing croquet for New Zealand. Roly, was on his honeymoon at the time and his new wife was busy persuading him to


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dig up his cherished tobacco plants in favour of vines. William notes with a chuckle that although it took around a decade to get re-established, it was thanks to a croquet player’s wife that New Zealand’s internationally acclaimed wine industry was revived! Initially joining a medical practice in Bristol, in 1965 William helped set up another at Parkstone, in Poole, Dorset, mainly, “because they had a decent croquet club!” He had only been there a few years before he found himself asking the senior partner’s permission for three months off to attend a tournament. One of the other doctors was a keen sailor with aspirations of sailing the Atlantic; he was delighted that William had set the precedent for asking permission for leave.

has played for Dorset, but now also enjoys the more informal Golf version of the game.

e 1969 Australian Tournament took William to all of the major Australian cities, his favourite being Melbourne. England once again secured victory, their first on Australian soil. However the GP Practice that had started patient-less in 1965 now had over 3,000 on its books and, with William carrying out night and weekend calls as well as daily duties, it was increasingly difficult for him to focus on his game. 1974 saw his penultimate appearance for England, a home fixture they again won, while his final involvement saw him face the USA in 1981, when the US were endorsing croquet in a big way; once again England proved victorious. Since then William

When asked for his favourite memories, William fondly recalls watching the young, largely Edwardian men who, even on the hottest day, would insist on playing in a full three-piece suit. He also remembers the ladies in beautiful silk dresses and large hats, adding elegance to the occasion. He played several times with two other OMs, Jack Dibley MC (LI 1906-10) and Major Frank HillBernhard (B1 1909-12). Bernhard was a fine croquet player who had been an international fencer in foil and épée in the 1950s. William comments: “I had many games with Jack and Bernhard – both using cunning croquet tactics!”

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William Ormerod (LI 1950-55)

In Bristol in the late 1950s, there was a leading player from Bath named Captain Vaughan-Jenkins. His wife used to attend every game with him, but insisted on sitting in their Bentley regardless of the temperature, studiously reading the newspaper and completely ignoring the croquet. Consequently, Captain Vaughan-Jenkins played regularly with a lady named Daisy Linton, who always wore elegant silk dresses and large, flowery Edwardian-style hats. When the Captain died, the arrangement was for William and Daisy to be picked up straight aer playing croquet on the morning of the funeral. When Daisy reached the funeral, she felt somewhat overdressed, so removed her hat, which was covered in its usual silk roses, passing it to a young undertaker and substituting it with a silk scarf more appropriate to the occasion. However, when the coffin made its entrance, her hat was carefully positioned on top, the young undertaker having mistaken it for a funeral wreath! William remembers that it prompted much laughter, despite the somewhat black humour involved. It was a pleasure to spend the evening talking to William about croquet and I send him my thanks for his time and company, and the New Zealand wine. Eleanor Pontin read eology and English Literature at Cardiff, and is now working as part of Apple’s Leadership Team in the UK


R O L L O F H O N O U R 1914 MARLBURIANS WHO GAVE T HEIR LIVES IN 1914 AS A RESULT OF T HE GRE AT WAR L R I C H M O N D ( P R 1902-0 5) M E L H C L A R K E (A 1897-9 9) C B G O DWI N ( B 3 1898-1900 ) F G G T H OY T S ( P R 1882- 87) C EV AWD RY (C 2 1903- 08) E K B R A D B U RY (S U 1894-98) L S L AT E R (C 1 1889-92) H P S WA I N E ( B 2 1904-07) H B BA RT R A M (C 3 1891-96) H W R O S EV E A R E ( B 3 1908-14) M R S WE ET-E S C OT T ( B 3 1902-05) TG M E AU T Y S (C 1 1902-07) C H H A N S O N (C 3 1886-91) C S WO O L L C O M B E ( B 2 1909-13) A E B R A D S H AW (C 2 1896-99) W TC D AV I D S O N ( B 1 1887-91) A G T I L L A R D ( L I 1888-93) WH G D O D S ( P R 1905-08) C G M C A RT E R ( B 3 1893-1900) WL L O R I N G ( B 3 1882-86) WC H C R E E (C 1 1895-90) R M A S E F I E L D ( B 2 1884-90) E L TA L B OT (C O 18 97-19 00) E H H L E E S (A 1889-9 0) H K F O S T E R ( B 1 1909-12) WH F E R R A R ( B 2 1889-93) L S G U R N EY-WH I TC H U R C H (C 1 1894-9 8) F W H U N T ( B 3 1894-97) A J B P E R C I VA L (C 3 1885-87) R G I F FA R D (C O 1898-1901) AU M O’ B R I E N ( C 3 1895-9 9) G M M A I T L A N D ( L I 1893-97) M C D AY (C 3 1905-10) T H D R A K E (C O 1897-1901) R P H U G H E S (C 3 1901-06) G G M A R S H A L L ( L I 1899-190 2) J B M WA R D ( L I 1909-10) L P WA G H O R N (C 2 1905-08) H S B E C H E R ( B 3 18 88-92) R H U T TO N ( B 3 1905-10) S D U N C A N ( B 1 18 78-82 ) AW R O B E RT S O N - G L A S G OW (C O 1894- 97) V J D A R BY S H I R E ( P R 1904-07) A A M E R C E R ( L I 1888-92) H A G R A N T ( C 3 18 92-94) G H H EWET S O N ( D AY B OY, 2 T E R M S 1902) G M N H A R M A N (C 1 1886-90) B H G S H AW ( B 2 1907-11) WH V C A M E R O N (S U 1896-1900 ) H I M O N EY ( B 2 1897-190 0) A M RU N D A L L ( B 3 1892-95) C T WA L DY ( B 3 1906-09) C B L O R I N G ( B 3 1885-89) J R BW WE E D I N G (C 1 1894-190 0) D H WI G G I N ( P R 1910-13) G R W Y L D ( B 2 1891- 94) R P M I L E S (C 2 18 94-97)

2 3 AU G U S T 1 9 1 4 2 6 AU G U S T 1 9 1 4 2 6 AU G U S T 1 9 1 4 2 6 AU G U S T 1 9 1 4 2 7 AU G U S T 2 0 1 4 1 SEPTEMBER 1914 14 SEPTEMBER 1914 15 SEPTEMBER 1914 16 SEPTEMBER 1914 20 SEPTEMBER 1914 20 SEPTEMBER 1914 29 SEPTEMBER 1914 1 1 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 1 2 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 1 3 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 1 3 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 0 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 1 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 3 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 3 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 4 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 4 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 4 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 2 8 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 3 0 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 3 1 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 3 1 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 3 1 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 3 1 O C TO B E R 1 9 1 4 1 NOVEMBER 1914 1 NOVEMBER 1914 1 NOVEMBER 1914 3 NOVEMBER 1914 3 NOVEMBER 1914 4 NOVEMBER 1914 4 NOVEMBER 1914 4 NOVEMBER 1914 6 NOVEMBER 1914 6 NOVEMBER 1914 7 NOVEMBER 1914 13 NOVEMBER 1914 13 NOVEMBER 1914 17 NOVEMBER 1914 17 NOVEMBER 1914 24 NOVEMBER 1914 26 NOVEMBER 1914 28 NOVEMBER 1914 18 DECEMBER 1914 20 DECEMBER 1914 20 DECEMBER 1914 20 DECEMBER 1914 20 DECEMBER 1914 21 DECEMBER 1914 22 DECEMBER 1914 23 DECEMBER 1914 24 DECEMBER 1914 30 DECEMBER 1914

MONS CAMBRAI L E C AT E AU FONDANT LE PIRE MONS N é RY RIVER AISNE

FRANCE B E L G I U M ( P OW ) L A BA S S é E BOUT DEL VILLE GIVENCHY L A BA S S é E YPRES YPRES FRANCE LE QUESNE BELGIUM YPRES YPRES YPRES MESSINES YPRES YPRES BELGIUM EAST AFRICA EAST AFRICA BELGIUM YPRES N EU V E C H A P E L L E YPRES HOOGE B ET H U N E IRAQ H M S B U LWA R K L AV E N T I E N EU V E C H A P E L L E F E S T U B E RT FRANCE F E S T U B E RT L A BA S é E FRANCE FLANDER S GIVENCHY FRANCE

AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED AGED

26 29 30 29 20 33 38 24 36 19 26 25 41 18 32 39 29 22 32 46 32 42 30 38 19 38 34 33 43 30 32 35 24 29 26 29 19 23 38 23 48 49 24 39 36 37 42 21 32 31 36 23 43 32 19 37 35

F U RT H E R R E A D I N G As part of its Great War commemorations, the College has made available online the entire contents of the Roll of Honour, both photographs and citations, along with e Marlburian magazines for the years 1900 to 1925. ese are accessible at: archive.marlboroughcollege.org. e collection is fully searchable and will be a great resource for anyone interested in OM involvement before, during and aer World War I. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Marlborough Legends: John Bain: a remarkable beak Dr Terry Rogers, College Archivist Before I retired from teaching, the initials ‘JB’ prompted me to think of John Betjeman. However one does not have to spend long in the College Archives before becoming aware of a remarkable beak called John Bain, a man much loved by both his colleagues and generations of Marlburians. orn in 1854, Bain won a scholarship to Winchester before going on to New College, Oxford to distinguish himself as a classicist. His love of Greek and Latin verse stayed with him for life but he did not restrict himself to academe, enjoying sport and being particularly good at football. He was appointed to Marlborough in 1879, surprisingly perhaps teaching mainly Lower School forms. Aer four years he resigned, probably because he thought he ought to train for a more lucrative profession, but he was clearly depressed at leaving MC, as shown in the following extract from a poem which he published at the end of the 1883 Summer Term:

B

Only exams now then we’ll be away, Billy! What do you think of it, eh Billy, eh Billy? ink it a case now for hip-hip-hooray, Billy? Rum? Well it is – but I feel a bit low, Billy. Glum? To a goose I could scarcely say “Bo”, Billy. Laugh, if you can, but I feel its no-go, Billy. And fiy years hence, our two heads will be gray, Billy. Gray as a badger! Eh, what’s that you say, Billy? Dead? Well perhaps – well a-day, well a-day, Billy. ings will go on, too, when we are away, Billy. ings will go on very much as today, Billy. We shan’t be missed; there are plenty to stay, Billy.

5 John Bain (R) crossing Court c189

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Bain was reappointed to Common Room in 1886 and, aer a brief spell teaching the Lower Sixth, spent most of his remaining 27 years teaching the Army Class, preparing Marlburians aiming for careers


in the Army for their Sandhurst and Woolwich entrance exams. ese boys were generally not the brightest, but he took most of them to his heart. In turn they seem to have respected him not just as an eccentric and lovable character but also as someone who understood and cared for them. Nor were such emotions limited to his pupils for it is clear that he was on excellent terms with scholars such as Charles Sorley (C1 1908-13) and Siegfried Sassoon (CO 1902-04), maintaining a correspondence with both of them – and many of his Army Class pupils too – long aer they had le MC. ere is clear evidence in particular that Sorley rated Bain both as a friend and poet, and aer the war Sassoon visited Bain in retirement on at least one occasion. It is quite plain that John Bain had a deep affection for the College, but was equally in love with the town (which he would oen describe as “the Toun of Touns”) in addition to the surrounding Downs and Forest. He le MC in 1913 to retire to St David’s in West Wales. He married late and was lucky enough to have a son (Joseph, C1 1941-46), who was educated at MC during WWII and went on to spend the latter part of his career teaching at Winchester, reversing his father’s route! But reading almost daily of the deaths of Marlburians he had known personally saddened JB’s retirement. He undertook to write a poem in honour of each such boy who was killed in WWI and by 1919 no less than 105 OMs had been so honoured, the poems being published in ones and twos in e Marlburian. I am told by current beaks that their literary quality is not great, but Bain’s poems show not only that he knew these young men, but loved them and mourned their passing. In short, they make poignant reading. In e Marlburian of 24 November 1915 two poems are printed. e first is Charles Sorley’s tribute to his near contemporary Sidney Woodroffe (B1 1908-14) who had been killed on 30 July 1915, winning a VC in the process. Immediately following this is John Bain’s epitaph of Sorley, who had been killed in Flanders on 13 October 1915.

e Downs are blown into disarray, e stunted trees seem all astray, Looking for someone clad in grey And carrying a golf club thing.

Surely we knew it long before, Knew all along that he was made For a swi radiant morning, for A sacrificing swi night shade. CH Sorley 9 September 1915 TO THE MEMORY of CAPT CH SORLEY Scholar, Downs lover, Poet Sweet, singing voice om oversea, Lover of Marlborough and her Downs, Sure now thy Spirit, wandering ee, Is hovering near the Toun of Touns. ere where the bents and grasses wave, And winds roar round the Hoary Post – No wormy earth, no gloomy grave Shall hold thy homing eager ghost. From some bright corner of the sky O hearest thou the praise we give? Who knows? To live may be to die; To die (who knows?) may be to live. More than the most was thine to spend For Mother England, Freedom, Truth; Gladly thou gav’st, dear poet iend, e splendid promise of thy youth.

Anonymous Haply in “C” House porch anew, He “snuffs the breeze” and takes the view Of Court with boys and masters filled And eaves where martins used to build, And greets – alas! Nor me, nor you. – John Bain is dead. Harold Brentnall (CR 1903-44)

JB Shortly before John Bain died in the Autumn of 1929 he heard that there was controversy at MC concerning the siting of two captured guns on the grass in Court. Apparently some were arguing that this was militaristic and unfitting. In August the Master, George Turner (Master 1926-39), received a letter from JB enclosing the following poem, together with a note explaining that these were almost certainly the last verses he would ever write: ae guns that glower sae grim an’ rude ey cost us dear thae guns; We bought them with the gude red blood O Marlborough’s bonniest sons. An’ shall we hide our guns awa’ To please an aesthete’s ee? Nay, lad, wi’ pride we’ll let them bide For a’ the world tae see! Bain had made his views crystal clear and the guns remained in situ!

IN MEMORIAM – SCW, VC

John Bain’s death provoked an outpouring of tributes, of which the following brief extracts (one anonymous and the other two from distinguished and long-serving beaks) seem the most evocative:

ere is no fitter end than this, No need is now to yearn nor sigh. We know the glory that is his, A glory that will never die.

ere’s still a horse on Granham Hill, And still the Kennet flows, and still Four-Miler sways and is not still. But where is her interpreter?

“We tend to think of Victorian times as periods of smug self-satisfaction… But for us, Billy, you made things easier; You made us laugh when we were ready to cry. anks for that, Billy, JB, and good-bye. May earth lie lightly on you!” Lewis Upcott (CR 1878-1919) John Bain deserves to be better known, but he is but one good example of many wonderful characters who have lived and worked in the College over its 170 years and who, by the sum total of their efforts, have created the unique ethos and traditions of Marlborough. Bain loved both people and place and in these days where large schools seem ever more like exam factories run on business principles, perhaps JB has some messages for us which we neglect at our peril. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Marlburian VCs: 1914 “Who’s for the Guns?” Captain Edward Kinder Bradbury, VC David Du Croz (CR 1996-2007)

n 31 August 1914 during the retreat from Mons, a brigade of the Royal Horse Artillery, with the Queens Bays, 5th Dragoon Guards and the 11th Hussars, bivouacked on the edge of the small village of Néry, some forty miles north-east of Paris. Unknown to them the German 4th Cavalry Division was camped on the plateau overlooking the village, and in the early hours of the following morning, having discovered the presence of the British forces, the Germans launched a devastating attack. Outnumbered by more than two to one the brigade held its ground, thanks in large part to the bravery of the men of ‘L’ Battery whose concentrated fire on the German position from just three, and very shortly just one of their guns, drew German artillery fire onto themselves and away from the British cavalry, who were thereby able to repulse the attacks until reinforcements arrived and forced the enemy to retreat.

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e Battery Captain was 33-year-old Edward Bradbury (SU 1894-98). Aer an apparently unremarkable career at school, he entered the Royal Military Academy at Woolwich and saw service in South Africa towards the end of the Boer War. He was made a Captain and was based at Aldershot, from where he had sailed to France shortly aer war was declared in August. A professional soldier, he formed part of the British Expeditionary Force’s attempt to halt the “right hook” of the German Schlieffen Plan through Belgium, an attempt which despite heroic resistance at Mons had failed to halt the enemy’s advance – “little” it may have been, but far from “contemptible”. When the German attack began at Néry, the British brigade was preparing to move out. eir guns had been lined up in the open the night before, and the horses were already being brought out of their overnight stabling for harnessing and saddling. Many of the men were still washing, and Bradbury was with his fellow officers beside some haystacks on the edge of the field. e combined effect of rifle, machine-gun and artillery fire, with bursting shells and flying shrapnel created instant pandemonium, in the midst of which the Battery Commander was knocked unconscious. e men instinctively took cover amongst the haystacks, in a sunken road along the edge of the field, and in the buildings of a nearby sugar factory. It was at this point that Bradbury took charge, and shouting “Come on! Who’s

for the guns?” he led the charge out of cover into the open to bring the guns of L Battery into action. Amongst the men who joined Bradbury at the guns was Lieutenant Jack Giffard (CO 18981901). Between them they managed to get three of the guns into operation and returned fire on the German position on the high ground above the village. Giffard’s gun had only managed to let off eight rounds before it was knocked out and Giffard himself badly wounded. e second gun was also soon immobilised, leaving just Bradbury and Sergeant Major Dorrell and Sergeant Nelson manning the only surviving operational weapon.

“It was at this point that Bradbury took charge, and shouting “Come on! Who’s for the guns?” he led the charge out of cover into the open to bring the guns of L Battery into action.”


e Germans had twelve guns bombarding the village, in preparation for a double pincer cavalry flanking attack which was meant to encircle and wipe out the whole of the British brigade. e fire from Bradbury’s gun was so severe and accurate, however, that soon all German guns were ranged on that one weapon, affording the Queen’s Bays, Dragoons and Hussars enough respite to organise themselves for defence and counterattack. Bradbury, Nelson and Dorrell continued firing an estimated 160 rounds before reinforcements arrived, despite two of them being seriously wounded. Bradbury had one leg shot off just below the hip and the other below the knee shortly aerwards, while Nelson suffered a bad chest wound. A fourth soldier who had joined them, Bombardier Perrett, was also seriously wounded. e following account by a corporal of the 1st Middlesex arriving to relieve them tells the end of the story. “Nelson had found some unwounded men who brought a door from the village and laid Bradbury on it. e Captain ordered them to cover up his lower body with a saddle blanket to hide his ghastly stumps, and made them promise to return for the wounded Perrett. On his way to the first-aid post they passed the Commanding Officer of the Bays, to whom Bradbury still managed to call out with a wry grin: ‘ey’ve hotted us up a bit, haven’t they, Colonel!’ ere was nothing that could be done for him, and knowing he was doomed, he asked to be taken inside the cemetery walls so that the other wounded should not witness his agony. And there among the tombstones of the departed peasantry, died a very gallant gentleman of the Royal Horse Artillery.” Edward Bradbury is buried in that same cemetery along with five other of those who died that day. He was awarded the VC “for gallantry and ability in organising the defence of L Battery against heavy odds at Néry.” Dorrell and Nelson were also awarded the VC and promoted to commissioned officers. e heroism of “the affair at Néry” soon became widely known and much illustrated, with paintings by Matania and Woodville, articles in e Illustrated London News and e Sphere, and writing by Arthur Conan Doyle, with Bradbury appearing in a series of cigarette cards by Wills. It was just the sort of story of individual bravery and collective courage that the British Army needed to boost recruitment and underpin the war effort in its early days. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Charles Hamilton Sorley’s Sonnet ‘To Germany’ Michael Ponsford (CR 1987-2013) Charles Hamilton Sorley (C1 1908-13) declared that Marlborough had given him ‘five years that could hardly have been more enjoyable,’ so it is something of a puzzle why, in December 1913, with a scholarship to Oxford already secured, he decided to leave two terms early. e had made good friends in C1 and enjoyed the company of a few of his beaks – among them John Bain (CR 1879-83 & 1886-1913), who taught the Army Class (see p52), and Pat O’Regan (CR 1894-95 & 1896-1922), the history master who, along with Bain, had nurtured his poetic instincts; and Sorley had come to love the countryside to the north of Marlborough with something like a Romantic passion. His mother said that her son found freedom in his last two years at the College, but he retained some disquiet about the public school system, and felt it necessary to explore life beyond the school gates: ‘Public school life is aer all only a rehearsal,’ he wrote, declaring he preferred ‘the real thing to the rehearsal.’ His father, Professor William Sorley, agreed, and sent his son to the lakeland town of Schwerin in northern Germany, where he was to improve his German before going up to Oxford.

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Charles Hamilton Sorley (C1 1908-13)

Sorley had never paid much attention to his German lessons at Marlborough (his beak, JM Lupton (CR 1891-1927), described him as ‘a bit of a handful’), and

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he found the rapid, idiomatic language of the Beutins, his host family, utterly unintelligible at first. Yet, within a few weeks of arriving in Schwerin, he felt completely at home. He explained his new perspective in a letter to the Master (e Rev St John Wynne Willson, 191116) in February 1914: ‘e language is so glorious. oughts that appear vapid or sentimental in English are glorious when clothed in German. at’s what I find.’ He describes his feelings aer an evening walk around the town and returning to his lodgings with the Beutins: ‘And when I got home, I felt I was a German, and proud to be a German… I felt that perhaps I could die for Deutschland – and I have never had an inkling of that feeling about England, and never shall… it’s the first time I have had the vaguest idea what patriotism meant – and that in a strange land.’ Twenty months later Sorley would be dead, shot by a German sniper as he moved up to the front line of the Battle of Loos. Aer a four-month sojourn in Schwerin, during which a close attachment


developed between himself and Frau Beutin, his German teacher, Sorley moved on to the ancient University of Jena, southwest of Leipzig. Despite its radical reputation, Sorley did not look forward to life in this provincial town, but he soon found Jena, too, much to his liking, though he neglected his studies; amongst his wider reading, he returned to Richard Jefferies’ descriptions of the countryside and villages of the Marlborough Downs. He would have been aware of increased Anglo-German tension, but there was no suggestion that a cataclysm was on the horizon. Even at the end of July he responded nonchalantly to demonstrations on the street and increased militarism of the newspapers: ‘perhaps this is only a German sabbatical liveliness.’ An old Marlborough schoolfellow, Arthur ‘Hopper’ Hopkinson (CO 1908-13), visited him in August and they undertook a walking tour together, Sorley showing off to his provincial friend his affection for Germany and her ‘massively beautiful’ language. e tour was cut short on 1 August with the declaration of war; the two friends, bewildered and alarmed by the growing confusion around them, made their way via slow train to Antwerp and then home. Within four days of his arrival in England, Sorley enlisted to fight against the country he had come to love. Such is the context for this remarkable sonnet which Sorley sent home in April 1915, but which his father says could only have been written in the summer of 1914. It is not one of his best-known poems, but it is a remarkably mature examination of the state of hostility between the two countries the poet held most dear. ere is none of the jingoism or anti-Teutonic hysteria that marked the writings of so many of his contemporaries at this time; instead, there is the

measured sense that this conflict is inevitable, a collision of Germany’s grand political ambition ‘bigly planned’ (and how telling is the awkwardness of that adverb ‘bigly’) and England’s narrow selfinterest, the ‘tapering paths of our own mind.’ e foot-soldiers are fighting on an ideological battleground, ‘through fields of thought,’ as well as on the fields of spilt blood, young men facing death; a pervasive Biblical imagery of the blind leading the blind draws together the sonnet’s octave, concluding in those powerful monosyllables where plainness of speech is paramount: ‘And in each other’s dearest ways we stand,/And hiss and hate. And the blind fight the blind.’

material result of the conflict, it will purge these two virtues of their vices, and efficiency and intolerance will no longer be incompatible.’ e emphasis in the sonnet’s sestet is on that repeated phrase, ‘When it is peace,’ and the sounds of these lines are warmer, more comforting, suggesting that a richer understanding will emerge: ‘we’ll grasp firm hands and laugh at the old pain.’ Until then, though, the countries must accept the harshness of war, evoked through Sorley’s characteristic imagery of scourging weather: ‘the storm,/ e darkness and the thunder and the rain.’

In the sestet, the blind incomprehension of the conflict gives way to a more optimistic glimpse of the future. It is as if Sorley is convinced that the war is a necessary process of purgation. As he wrote to Arthur Hopkinson later that year: ‘Each side has a virtue for which it is fighting… I hope that whatever the

Hilda Spear: e Poems and Selected Letters of Charles Hamilton Sorley (Blackness Press, 1978)

Further reading:

Jean Moorcro Wilson: Charles Hamilton Sorley: a Biography (Cecil Woolf, 1985) e College intends to host a Sorley Colloquium in Marlborough in 2015

To Germany

You are blind like us. Yo ur hurt no man designe d, And no man claimed th e conquest of your land . But gropers both throug h fields of thought confi ne d We stumble and we do not understand. You only saw your futu re bigly planned, And we, the tapering pa ths of our own mind, And in each other’s dear est ways we stand, And hiss and hate. An d the blind fight the blin d. When it is peace, then we may view again With new-won eyes ea ch other’s truer form And wonder. Grown m ore loving-kind and wa rm We’ll grasp firm hands and laugh at the old pa in, When it is peace. But un til peace, the storm, e darkness and the th under and the rain.

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OM News... President Elect Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72) has been nominated as President of the Marlburian Club 2015-16. One of four girls to join C1, where she was a contemporary of the Chairman of Council, Mark Malloch Brown (C1 1967-71), it was an experiment never to be repeated. A lack of space in the housemaster’s residence rather than any collective nefarious activity led the four to the Master’s Lodge, where they lived under the watchful eye of the Master’s wife, Angela Dancy. Olivia went on to Cambridge, where she read Natural Sciences before embarking on a career in medical publishing and journalism. She worked on various national newspapers (e Times, Observer and Independent) before returning to publishing. Most recently she was Editor of e Pharmaceutical Journal – the first woman to take the role, the first non-pharmacist and only the 12th Editor since it was founded in 1841 – two years before Marlborough. Olivia now runs effective writing courses for anyone who finds the process daunting. She was the first old girl to join the Council of MC in 1989 when the school started to take girls from 13, became a trustee of the Marlburian Club Charitable Funds in 2001 and took over the chairmanship of them from John Manser (PR 1953-58) in 2014. Olivia lives in London and has two children in their 20s.

Michael G Barrett MBE (B2 1937-42) and his wife Margaret, née Botterill, celebrated their Diamond Wedding on 15 August 2013 in Horsham, West Sussex. Sam Pope (LI 1949-54) has kindly alerted us that the Royal Marines have dedicated a sports pavilion to Capt Antony Easterbrook (C1 1943-47) at their Commando Training Centre at Lympstone, Devon. Captain of Athletics and Rugby at MC, Easterbrook joined the Marines in 1952, serving in the Special Boat 58

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Squadron before becoming one of the RM’s foremost Physical Training Officers. He also represented the Marines in cross-country and pentathlon. In June 1960 he was the first choice to command the Royal Marines Commando Display Team, which played an important part in the British Exhibition’s Military Tattoo in New York. He selected and trained participants as well as designing the spectacular assault course. e display included several courageous descents down an 85 foot high Commando Slide, carried out by Easterbrook himself. Dressed as a city gent complete with bowler hat and umbrella, he would descend the Commando Slide in dramatic fashion waving the umbrella to astonished spectators below as he went. At the bottom he would be served a G&T by a waiter before calmly walking off as if nothing had happened. e display was an outstanding success, but in Madison Square Gardens, on 1 July 1960, due to a faulty piece of

equipment Easterbrook tragically fell to his death whilst making the breathtaking descent. Michael Sackett (C3 1947-53) was awarded a BEM in the Queen’s Birthday Honours in 2013 for services to Mendip Citizens Advice Bureau.

Neil Stratford (PR 1951-56) was presented with the insignia of Commandeur de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Ambassador in London in November 2013. Aer leaving MC, Neil spent two years in the Coldstream Guards and read Classics at Cambridge before joining the Courtauld Institute in 1963. An expert in Romanesque sculpture, in 1969 he became a lecturer at London’s Westfield College before being appointed Keeper of Medieval and Later Antiquities at the British Museum in 1975, a post he held until 1998. Neil was also the Leverhulme Senior Research Fellow at the British Academy in 1991, where he


worked on the international project establishing the Corpus de la sculpture de Cluny. In retirement he became a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton and in 2002-03 was visiting Professeur d’Histoire de l’Art du Moyen-Âge at the École des Chartres. A two-day colloquium was held at the College in January 2014, to mark the 25th anniversary of the death of writer and novelist Bruce Chatwin (B2 195358). Entitled ‘Bruce Chatwin and the Nature of Human Restlessness’, the three speakers – Chatwin’s biographer, author and journalist Nicholas Murray; Jonathan Chatwin, author of Bruce Chatwin, Anywhere Out of the World; and Susannah Clapp, Bruce’s editor – explored his life and writings with the aim of enlightening their audience of Lower Sixth English students. A full write-up of the event, written by Nicholas, can be found in the News section of the College’s website: www.marlboroughcollege.org

Andrew Harvey (CO 1956-61) has kindly tipped us off about the fascinating career path of Robert Hunt (C3 1959-63). Robert was commissioned into the Royal Green Jackets, but aer a full career with them including many tours to Northern Ireland during the troubles, le to pursue a second career in the City. However since 2000 he has followed a most successful third career as a portrait sculptor, working both in the round and – his speciality – in bas relief.

Mark Rylance’s production of Much Ado About Nothing at e Old Vic featured Michael Elwyn (B3 1956-61) playing Leonato alongside James Earl Jones and Vanessa Redgrave. Elwyn’s other recent stage appearances include the role of former Prime Minister Anthony Eden in Peter Morgan’s e Audience at the Gielgud eatre, starring Helen Mirren, which he will be recreating on Broadway this autumn. e Editor also caught up with him in June 2014 in a Herefordshire wood, where he was playing the lead role in a World War I ‘experience’ play by Owen Sheers: Mametz; an extraordinarily memorable and moving evening in which the audience as well as the actors literally went ‘over the top’. Following a career in banking and finance, since 2004 Patrick Browning (LI 1957-61) has practised as a Clinical Hypnotherapist. He has also

It has been another great year for e Red Lion at Chisenbury: owned by John Manser (PR 1953-58), who wisely engaged an OM chef, Guy Manning (C2 1990-95). e pub was declared the Good Food Guide’s Pub of the Year 2014, won its first Michelin star in late 2013, and also opened its own five-bedroom boutique guest house, e Troutbeck, just across the lane. Where else could the Marlburian Club hold its highly successful 2013 Wiltshire Dinner but at e Red Lion? (see p14) www.redlionfreehouse.com

Robert is a Council member, Honorary Secretary and Trustee of the Society of Portrait Sculptors, in 2004 won the Olin-Stones Award for best relief sculpture in the SPS’s Cork Street exhibition and last year was awarded the Royal Mint commission for the 2013 Britannia Twentieth-Ounce Gold Proof coin (ref BR13G20 for interested OM numismatists). It shows Britannia, seated, with an owl on her lap, the owl representing wisdom. www.roberthuntscuplture.com e Rev Julian Browning (LI 1964-69) has been Hon Assistant Priest at All Saints, Margaret Street, London W1, since 2009.

issued a series of apps for iPhones and iPads on topics such as selfhypnosis, fear of flying, sleep, anxiety, confidence and alcohol dependence. www.browning-hypnosis.co.uk e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... is a great resource for those interested in Art, and Charles’ blog about his life in the Arts can also be found at www.charlessaumarezsmith.com/blog Four OMs happened to meet at the General Synod in November 2013, which was attended by 110 bishops. e Rt Rev James Newcome, Bishop of Carlisle (TU 1966-71) was joined by e Rt Rev Richard Frith, then Bishop of Hull, now Bishop of Hereford (B3 1962-67), e Rt Rev Colin Fletcher, Bishop of Dorchester (C3/TU 1964-68) and e Rt Rev Nicholas McKinnel, Bishop of Crediton (SU 1968-71). Stephen Browning (LI 1967-71) has formed a new consultancy network, Quartet, which is helping arts organisations adapt to the challenges created by the new funding climate. He had previously worked in senior management positions in a number of major arts organisations in the UK and overseas, including the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Hugh Toler MBE (TU 1967-71) was elected Master of the Worshipful Company of Broderers in spring 2014. e Broderers, otherwise known as e Brotherhood of e Holy Ghost of the City of London, was formed to promote and protect the cra of embroidery, a major City trade in the

Charles Saumarez Smith (C1 1967-71), the current Chief Executive and Secretary of the Royal Academy of Arts in London, has just launched a new website, www.charlessaumarezsmith.com where students and researchers can find his articles, filmed lectures, books, radio appearances and portraits. is

David Risk Kennard (B3 1967-71) has been a professional artist, living and working in West Dorset, for thirty years. While at Marlborough he flourished in the art school under the direction of Richard Shirley-Smith (CR 1966-70), and described the art history lectures as ‘fantastic’. He went on to Bower Ashton in Bristol, where

drawing trees became his particular forte; David draws the inspiration for his art from the landscape. Brought up on a Cotswold farm, he has a close relationship with the land and the trees and water, the stones, the buildings and humans that have formed it. Some of David’s large engraved wood panels were exhibited in December 2013 in Winchester Cathedral and will be shown in London in October 2014. He has recently finished three panels of an estate in west Dorset drawn and engraved onto applewood. David is married to Angelica and they have three grown up sons. www.riskkennard.co.uk / 01308 485529 In February 2014, Stephen Rudgard (C3 1971-75) began a four-year appointment as Representative of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

Photo © Benedict Johnson

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Middle Ages. ough fires and bomb damage have destroyed the hard evidence of their existence in the 13th century, the Broderers are thought to have existed long before that, making them one of the oldest of the City Livery Companies.

eatre director Simon Dormandy’s (Simon Stokes (C2 1971-75)) latest fringe production of Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, at the Arcola eatre – a converted paint warehouse in Hackney that is creating waves in the Arts world


helicopter in mid-air). His recollections of being shot at point blank range by terrorists in Saudi Arabia added further to his young audience’s wonder at what he continues to achieve despite having been le partially paralysed. (See also p96)

Simon Dormandy’s (Simon Stokes (C2 1971-75)) Waiting for Godot

– received excellent reviews in the national broadsheets for its fresh approach and sheer originality. Starring Totally Tom (Tom Stourton and Tom Palmer), stars of BBC ree’s Live at the Electric and E4’s Comedy Lab, the show was praised for the skill with which it circumvented some of the Beckett Estate’s strictures about how the play must be staged. Dormandy’s production was said to have taken the play “back to its comedy roots”. Opera Australia announced the appointment of Simon Mordant (B1 1973–77) to the Board of Directors in February 2014. He has been a practising corporate adviser in Australia since 1984 having trained as a Chartered Accountant in London. In March 2014 Hugh Pym (C1 197377) was appointed the BBC’s Health Editor, having previously been BBC News’ Chief Economics Correspondent

since 2009. Before that he stood in as Economics Editor during the financial crisis while Stephanie Flanders was on maternity leave. He has worked at

BBC News since 2001 and positions before that included a spell as political correspondent at ITN. Hugh is “honoured to be appointed to this new post. I grew up close to the NHS as my late father was a GP in a West Country town and I have always admired the hard work and commitment of health staff. e future shape and direction of the NHS, with financial and demographic pressures, is one of the major issues of our time. I look forward to covering this agenda along with important new developments in patient care and research. Serving BBC audiences on TV, radio and online in these areas will be an exciting challenge.”

Mark Skeet (PR 1974-78) has been a screenwriter in Hollywood for 20 years, working with Universal, Paramount, Working Title and the BBC amongst others. His credits include Jason and the Argonauts with Dennis Hopper, Vanity Fair with Reese Witherspoon and the international TV series Titanic: Blood and Steel with Derek Jacobi. He published the first Time Out city guide to Barcelona and his first novel, Saving Picasso, was brought out in 2013 (see p108).

Having retired aer 30 years in the City, Peter Yarrow (CO 1973-78) is now running a charity set up to help teach English for free in remote areas of Vietnam. He is keen to recruit potential gap year students on a wholly not-for-profit non-commercial basis; please contact the Club Office if you are interested.

Brigadier Robert Lowth (C3 1976-80) is serving for the next two years as Military Defence Attaché in Baghdad, following a year spent learning Arabic at the Forces Language School in Beaconsfield. His wife Catherine, née Wellings (LI 1979-81) will meanwhile keep the home fires burning, continuing her career as Financial Controller of Remarkable Group, a PR and Marketing Company based in Winchester.

Frank Gardner (LI 1974-79), BBC Security Correspondent and author, spoke to a packed Mem Hall on 6 May 2014. Fondly introduced by Martin Evans (who took credit for having had a seminal influence on his acclaimed career success), Frank’s talk included references to his recent reportage of gun crime in Los Angeles and drug trafficking in Colombia and held his audience spellbound with short news clips and dramatic photos displayed on a screen behind him (including one of him sitting on the tail ramp of a C130 transport plane as it re-fuelled a

Mezzo-soprano Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81) made her debut with e Bach Choir, conducted by David Hill, in St Paul’s Cathedral in the autumn of 2013, in the world première of David Goode’s Blitz Requiem. Behind her in the Choir was long standing member David Picton-Turbervill (SU 1977-82), while Laurence Davies (C3 1980-85) played in his capacity as Principal French Horn of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. e concert was broadcast on Classic FM, and was very well reviewed. www.singersdirect.co.uk e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... Space drama Gravity picked up seven prizes at the 86th Academy Awards, with Tim Webber (B1 1978-83) collecting the Oscar for best visual effects. Tim, who supervised them, collected the award alongside three other members of his team at the Hollywood ceremony held on 2 March 2014. He also gave an interview to BBC R4’s Today programme, which can be heard through the Club website: www.marlburianclub.org/news

Annabel Sutherland, née Cochrane (B2 1987-89) has followed up her 2013 cycle ride from London to Paris with another on behalf of the Coram children’s charity, this time from London to Cannes. e minimum

Award winning film producer Damian Jones (TU 1978-82) brought out two further blockbusters in 2013/14. e Powder Room is a “girls’ night out” comedy, starring Sheridan Smith, Jaime Winston and Oona Chaplin, while Belle tells the true story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the illegitimate mixed-race daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral who is raised by her aristocratic great-uncle. Goodbye Christopher Robin, which will tell the story of AA Milne, his son Christopher Robin and the creation of Winnie the Pooh, is in the pipeline. Anthony Story (BH 1980-82) has set up a website with accompanying book for startup businesses. www.onethingiknow.co.uk compiles hard-earned insights from creative entrepreneurs into a series of articles which aim to pass their experience on to the next generation. As the site points out, “most founders set out with a mission to produce unique, inspiring work – not to wade through spreadsheets – and while there’s no end of business advice around these days, it usually doesn’t consider the specific issues faced by creatives.” An essential visit/read perhaps for budding OM entrepreneurs.

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How to Train Your Dragon 2, the second film based on the books created by Cressida Cowell (BH 1982-84) received a fantastic reception at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival: a five minute standing ovation. www.variety.com also gave it a massive thumbs up: “Writer-director Dean DeBlois has given DreamWorks Animation its strongest sequel yet – one that breathes fresh fire into the franchise… Braver than “Brave”, more fun than “Frozen” and more emotionally satisfying than so many of its live-action counterparts, “Dragon” delivers.” Set five years aer the previous story ends, this latest adventure vastly expands the world and characters Cressida created. Some of the background habitats also rank “among the most incredible environments ever depicted in animation… DreamWorks’ desire to extend the “Dragon” franchise has propelled the creative team in the most admirable of directions, resulting in what just may be the mother of all animated sequels.” www.cressidacowell.co.uk

expected of each rider was c. 80miles for 6 days – challenging enough – but Annabel succeeded in doing the full 1,500 km, which required 200 miles on three consecutive days. In doing so she raised over £3,500 for an excellent cause. For her next exploit she will be riding from Land’s End to John O’Groats in September 2014 for the British Paralympic Association. www.virginmoneygiving.com/annabel sutherland Katie Beney (MO 1989-91) was lucky enough to complete Leg 4 of the Clipper Round the World Yacht race for her employer, PSP Worldwide Logistics, which included voyages from Albany in Western Australia to Sydney, NSW, the legendary Rolex Sydney Hobart Race, and Hobart to Brisbane. She kept a blog of her experience, which can be found at www.pspkate.tumblr.com


Tamara Lohan, née Heber-Percy (TU 1989-91) was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours List 2014 for services to the Travel Industry. Tamara and her husband James started Mr & Mrs Smith, a hotel booking service that specialises exclusively in boutique and small luxury hotels from around the world, in 2003 (see p13). Henry Cottam (C1 1987-92) is interested in forming an OM horse racing syndicate, which could take two forms: 12 owners each taking a £5000 share, or more pledging smaller stakes. He is already following the potential of several flat racehorses based with leading and esteemed trainer Roger Charlton, whose Beckhampton Stables are based near Marlborough. Do get in touch with Henry if you are interested in joining. henryyogi@hotmail.com Following the triumph of his Peking to Paris Rally adventure last year with partner Michelle Jana Chan (TU 199092), superyacht designer Mike Reeves (C1 1989-94) of Claydon Reeves has been hitting the headlines again with the public unveiling of their limited edition 50 launch, the Aeroboat,

which puts reconditioned and fuelinjected Rolls-Royce Merlin V12 engines, taken from WWII Spitfires, into fully customised hulls. e engines generate over 2,200hp, giving a speed range of 75-95 knots as well as a historical bent to totally modern cra, which look pretty amazing. Certainly a far cry from the Larks sailed by Marlburians on the Ashton Keynes gravel pits in the days of yore. www.claydonreeves.com It was good to see previous Magazine author Catherine Brumwell, née Redpath (NC 1991-96) at the 2014 Summer Drinks Party. She and her family have now le Moscow, about which she wrote in 2011, and are now based in Vienna, where her husband Anthony is the Military Defence Attaché to Slovakia, Slovenia and Croatia.

Laura Irwin (CO 1994-96) is now Membership Director of e Birley Group of private Members’ Clubs in London’s Mayfair, which includes the iconic Annabel’s, celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year. Laura is happy to hear from any OMs who might be interested in Membership: 020 7629 2350.

Mike Reeves (C1 1989-94), superyacht designer – pictured is the limited edition 50ft launch, the Aeroboat

A trio of OMs: Luke Kauntze (C2 1991–96), Jules Pannett (BH 199196) and Richard Hunt (C1 1991-96), completed the 100km Trailwalker challenge in a time of 14 hours 10 minutes. e OM team finished seventh and were the second civilian team to finish, raising money for Oxfam and the Gurkha Welfare Trust.

Susannah Tresilian (NC 1992-97) (kneeling) spent some of the spring in Rwanda and Burundi leading a project she has set up under the title ARIADNE. She worked with and interviewed two particularly extraordinary female theatre directors who are working in post- and current conflict zones. is will be the starting point for a much larger project that will cover female theatre directors in many more of these stricken countries. As a theatre director and BBC radio producer herself, ARIADNE combines

Susannah’s two professions in a very exciting and innovative way: collaborating both artistically and creatively, as well as creating journalistic resources profiling these extraordinary women. www.susannahtresilian.com e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... Tessa Packard London is the debut jewellery label by founder and creative director Tessa Packard (TU 2001-03). Tessa’s approach to jewellery is two-fold: to create classic, wearable pieces for all ages but equally to push the boundaries of what is deemed classic and everyday into edgier waters. Good design and narrative context are, however, the real

Naomi Kerbel (NC 1993-98) was shortlisted for the Women of the Future Awards. Naomi was one of six shortlisted in the Media category, which was announced at a ceremony held at the Marriott Grosvenor Square Hotel in November 2013. More good news followed in early 2014, when Naomi was promoted to Business News Editor of Sky News.

charities as he went. is ‘only’ took him 6-7 weeks; once he reached Mexico he continued south through Central America – still mostly by bike – before returning to the UK in late August to take part in the Lonach Highland Games. www.willgoeswandering.com

Andrew Shepherd (LI 1993-98) and Alethea Steven (NC 1994-99) will be following on from their company ACS Random’s acclaimed 5* sell out production of Much Ado About Nothing at London’s Park eatre with a chilling version of Shakespeare’s iconic tale of revenge and murder, Hamlet, from 2-15 December 2014 at the same venue. e classic tragedy is turned into a terrifying Victorian ghost story, for something a little darker this festive season. Book tickets at www.parktheatre.co.uk/whats-on/ hamlet. Andrew and Alethea have got exciting plans for expansion this year, so find out more about ACS Random and get in touch through www.acsrandom.co.uk As sabbaticals go, Will King (B1 19952000) worked pretty hard during his five-month break in the early summer of 2014, cycling solo c.3000 kms down the west coast of the USA from Vancouver to San Diego/Mexico and raising money for and awareness of the Cystic Fibrosis Trust & Anthony Nolan 64

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Rosie Wintour (MM 1996-2001) is a founding member of e Pico Players, an orchestra formed of people in London looking to reignite their musical talent. ey plan to perform two or three concerts a year and their

first concert should have just taken place (3 October) in St Michael’s Chester Square. If you reached c. Grade 8 in your instrument once upon a time, want to play in an orchestra which encourages a professional attitude towards music-making within a social and friendly environment and are willing/highly enthusiastic/aching to give up your Monday evenings to orchestral rehearsals, then follow @ePicoPlayers on Twitter or email thepicoplayers@gmail.com

cornerstones behind her creative principle. Her work has been featured in a number of press articles, including in the Evening Standard. www.tessapackard.com Road safety is always a hot topic; Emily Brooke (TU 2002-04) continues to receive publicity for having designed a piece of technology to help keep cyclists safer. Emily’s bike light projects a laser image of a green bike onto the ground about five metres ahead of the cyclist and has been profiled in the technology section of the BBC website (see p12). e dedicated work of OMs continues all around the world: Fiona GrevilleHeygate (EL 2000-05) is now working in Zanzibar. Aer graduating from Birmingham and completing foundation years in Bristol, Fiona has been working as a volunteer Doctor in Kivunge Hospital and for the HIPZ (Health Improvement Project Zanzibar) charity. www.hipz.org.uk


Tom Perkins (TU 2000-05) has successfully, albeit eventfully, travelled unassisted (mostly on two wheels) through 26 different countries from the UK to Cape Town, South Africa, covering over 20,000 kms in 501 days. His travel cookbook, Spices & Spandex, was inspired by his epic journey and the culinary experiences he enjoyed en route and documents some of the recipes, cultures, characters and challenges he met along the road. www.thenomadickitchen.com Aer having spent a year helping launch Boris Johnson’s Fund for Young Musicians in City Hall, since 2012 Ottilie Windsor (NC 2000-05) has been producer of Nevill Holt Opera.

is involves everything from casting shows to Box Office, PR, fundraising, the day-to-day running of the business and planning of future seasons as well as project managing the construction and opening of a new opera house for 2015. Her first production of Mozart’s e Magic Flute in Summer 2013 was met with local and critical acclaim and sold out. She also curates the exhibitions of sculpture that fill the grounds around the Nevill Holt eatre and the collection of Modern and Contemporary British works that hang in the house. e collection was recently the subject of a major solo exhibition at the Djanogly Gallery in Nottingham and its contents are currently on loan to some of the most important exhibitions of the year at e Tate, Tate Britain and Sotheby’s. Jack Whitehall (B1 2001-06) was named ‘King of Comedy’ at the 2013 British Comedy Awards. It was the second consecutive year he has won the prize, which is voted for by the public, and saw Jack beating off rivals Alan Carr, David Mitchell, Graham Norton,

Tom Perkins (TU 2000-05)

Lee Mack and Sarah Millican. Martin Evans (President of e 1843 Society (CR 1968-)) also attended the launch of Jack and his father Michael Whitehall’s book Him and Me at the Ivy Hotel in London in October 2013 (see p103). Adventurer Peter Fleck (PR 2003-08) followed up his astonishing success in the Yukon Quest in 2010 [see Edition 111] by taking part in an attempt to break the world record for rowing across the Atlantic in March 2013. One of a team of eight oarsmen (two shis of four), they made the 2,598 mile crossing in 35 days, 12 hours and 41 seconds, only narrowly missing the record of 32 days. Poor weather, damaged equipment and freak waves were blamed for holding up their boat, e Avalon, which had been sponsored by Cirencester Agricultural College, where Peter was a student. Jamie Gibson (C2 2004-09) was named Newcomer of the Year at the Leicester Tigers Player of the Year awards dinner at Welford Road at the end of April. Aer a barnstorming debut season following his switch from London Irish the previous summer,

he made 24 starts and two substitute appearances during the 2013/14 season which included the Aviva Premiership semi-final. Aer being included in England’s training squad at the end of the season, he was handed a starting role in the 39-29 defeat to the Barbarians at Twickenham in early June in front of a 50,000 crowd. His aernoon was shortlived however, following a nasty clash with Joe Rokocoko. Owen Farr’s (CO 2005-10) volunteer work in Romania for the Ratiu Foundation included a chance meeting with Foundation Director Nicolae Ratiu (CO 1961-65). e Foundation was created to promote and support projects that encourage education and research into the culture and history of Romania. Owen worked there for five weeks in an extra-curricular capacity as part of his studies in International Hospitality Management at Oxford Brookes University. Dr Adam Burns (CR 2011- ) continued to build Marlborough’s growing reputation as a centre for educational research and research-led education by convening a one-day postgraduate symposium on behalf of the British Educational Research Association at the College on 12 August 2013. Dr Burns and ten visiting postgraduates from Cambridge, Birmingham, Exeter and Reading presented their ongoing educational research, which covered topics as diverse as web-based teaching and learning in a Nigerian polytechnic to the motivations and aspirations of undergraduate English majors in Chinese higher education institutions. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... e OM Reading Competition e OM Reading Competition was devised to make young Marlburians aware of their cultural heritage. Originally, the Shell was invited to read extracts or whole pieces of work by OMs who have been published, but the tendency for the same pieces to be read out necessitated a change. In its present format, each form draws the names of two OMs in a lottery, and then have to use works from one or both to draw inspiration for their own original work, be it a poem, short story, piece of descriptive writing, short play, sketch or even a song, which they then have to read/perform to their peers. e best from each Form then compete against each other for the cup, a beautiful, eighteenth century Italian ornamental drinking vessel donated by e Marlburian Club. is year two

Apologies

pieces won, both inspired by Bruce Chatwin’s (B2 1953-58) In Patagonia. e winners were Ollie Cutts (LI), reading his own piece entitled “I am going to die”; the other a piece read by Anna Pembroke (MO), but written by Seb Callender (SU).

Despite four proofreaders working tirelessly on Edition 114, a few errors did slip through. Our apologies are therefore due to Richard Russell (B1 1943-48), whose excellent article on the Pre-Raphaelite connection was listed on the contents page as being by Richard Barker; to Andrew Barnes (B1 1973-79), stalwart Committee member, whose name was misspelt on p15, and to Toby Good (B2 1988-93), whose daughter Lilly unfortunately got missed out of last year’s birth announcements.

inking of visiting MC? OMs are more than welcome to visit the College, but for security reasons please make Reception (next to the Norwood Hall) your first port of call, to sign in and collect a Visitors’ Badge.

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Engagements, Marriages & Births Engagements Gavin Hooper (BH 1987-92) to Ingrid Brown Katie Ratner (EL 1993-97) to Oliver Goad Andrew Shepherd (LI 1993-98) to Angela Galbraith Dickon Broadhurst (PR 1996-2001) to Hannah (Poddy) Booth John Allott (PR 1997-2002), twin son of Nicolas (CR 1986-), to Emma Roscow Georgina Hickling (NC 1997-2002) to Douglas Russell-Lowe Edward Atkin (C1 2000-05), son of Rupert (LI 1971-76), to Holly Etchells (NC 2001-06) Christopher Bishop (PR 2000-05), son of Steven (PR 1969-73), to Coco Brenninkmeyer, sister of Edward (CO 2001-03) Harry Vickers (SU 2000-05) to Emma ornton Jones Ed Colclough (B1 2000-05) to Kate Clark

Births To Benjamin Norton (B3 1987-92) and his partner Nicole Porter, a son, Harvey Francis Porter-Norton, on 2 December 2013

To Jack Broadhurst (C1 1993-98) and his wife Laura, a daughter, Martha, on May 2013 To David Chase (PR 1994-99) and his wife Jessica, a son, Alexander

To Toby Good (B2 1988-93) and his wife Claire, a daughter, Lillian (Lilly) Poppy Saxty, on 19 May 2013

To Henry Preston (C2 1995-2000) and his wife, Zareena, a son, Adam, on 8 March 2014

Kelly Morshead (MO 2003-07) to Kym Osborne

To Daniel Hughes (C2 1989-94) and his wife Amy, a daughter, Kathryn Elizabeth, on 2 August 2013

Marriages

To Robin Wong (C1 1990-94) and his wife Ellie, a son, Frederick Ellis, on 3 October 2013

To irza Deboo, née Craze (SU 1997-99) and her husband James (TU 1992-97), a son, Peter Alan, on 12 September 2013; a sister for Ruth

Joanna Hubbard (NC 2001-06) to Duncan Chiah

Luke Atwell (SU 1991-96) married Charlotte Pledger on 1 April 2013 Alexander Evans (C1 1992-97), son of Mark (B2 1953-58), married Eleanor West on 7 December 2013 Iona Leask (NC 1994-99) married Barry Logan on 20 July 2013 George Allison (TU 1998-2003), son of Clifford (SU 1966-70), married Ekaterina Savchenko on 21 Oct 2013 Arabella Alden (MM 2000-05), daughter of William (TU 1968-72), married John Trofemuk on 12 Jan 2013

To Dr Christopher Luby (BH 199095) and his wife Loreen, a son, Nathaniel Martin, on 4 February 2013 To Jo Ashley-Down, née Green (MO 1990-95) and her husband Jim (BH 1991-96), a daughter, Catherine Anne, on 12 September 2013; a sister for Elizabeth

To Oliver Hextall (PR 1997-2002) and his wife Charlotte, a son, Oscar James Patrick, on 25 November 2013 To Jake Meyer (C3 1997-2003) and his wife Saskia, a daughter, Ottalie, on 15 August 2014

To Richard Ford (TU 1991-96), a son, Edward, on 4 April 2014

To Henrietta Peterken, née Ford (EL 2002-07), daughter of Lavinia, née Wilson (B1 1972-74, CR 1995-) and Peter (CR 1988-), and her husband Alexander, a daughter, Poppy, on 4 September 2013

To Katie Coakes, née Waite (EL 199297) and her husband Alistair, a boy, Dylan Oliver, on 13 October 2013

For more details of the above, please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ announcements e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Deaths Kenneth C B Mackenzie (B3 1923-27) Roger Washbourn (CO 1924-29) see obituary Arthur S G Garrett (B2 1929-33) Edward H Ratliff (B2 1928-33) John B Birkett (PR 1930-34) George D Hughes (B1 1930-34) omas E Llewelyn-Lloyd (SU 1931-34) James P Cooper (C2 1931-35) C E James Eagles (C2 1931-35) see obituary Peter E Blackburn (PR 1932-36) John Attenborough (CO 1934-37) Philip D Stenning (B1 1932-37) Robert M Carr (CO 1933-38) see obituary John Travers Cosgrove (B2 1934-38) see obituary Kenneth S Dunlop (B3 1934-38) John L Cloudsley-ompson (formerly ompson) (SU 1935-39) see obituary Frederick N Hicks (C1 1934-39) Michael H Bayon (B2 1935-40) Peter F Boreham (B2 1936-40) Kenneth J L Coles (PR 1935-40) William H Davies (B1 1937-40) omas Hughes-Davies (B1 1937-41) Patrick M Sutcliffe (PR 1936-41) George Alexander (PR 1938-42) David C Y Dickson (L1 1938-42) Martin J Froomberg (PR 1938-42) Henry F Spurrier (C2 1938-42) Anthony W Weatherall (LI 1938-42) William H Batten (SU 1939-43) Anthony W Furse (B3 1939-43) Alan Brooke-Turner (PR 1939-44) see obituary James Gibson (PR 1941-44) James H Greathead (B1 1940-44) Terence C S Knox (CO 1940-44) Timothy E Moore (C3 1939-44) John W Nuttall (C3 1939-44) Richard D Bedford (C1 1941-45) John F Cutts (C2 1940-45) Humphrey C Gentilli (CO 1940-45) 68

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John D Grantly (PR 1941-45) Richard W Nuttall (C3 1941-45) John A Baker (LI 1940-46) see obituary Roger S Hawley (C2 1941-46) Richard S Insall (C3 1943-46) omas M Crompton (PR 1943-47) John P H Goodison (C3 1943-48) Alec G W Hutton (C3 1943-48) Robert T Smith (B1 1943-48) see obituary John Pedley (C3 1944-49) E H Gethin Bradley (B3 1946-50) Andrew J Marx (C2 1946-50) Jeremy H Williams (B2 1946-50) Andrew W Gulland (B3 1946-51) William H Marshall (PR 1946-51) Colin F Dixon (B1 1948-53) Colin R M Prentice (C3 1948-53) see obituary T Jock Craven (B3 1950-54) Patrick W Knatchbull (B1 1950-54) Michael Sanderson (C2 1950-55) John E Spreckley (CO 1950-55) Michael S Wilson (C3 1953-56) Richard D M Gregory (B2 1952-57) Anthony R Turner (B1 1953-57) Richard D Trimingham (C2 1954-59) David A Hepburn (B3 1956-60) Richard A Chapman (C3 1957-61) Robert M Harding (B1 1958-62) Howard D Talbot (B2 1961-62) Dormer B Treffry (SU 1964-66) Angela Dancy (Wife of John Dancy, Master 1961-72) see obituary Piers A Wedgwood (B3 1968-72) see obituary Victor L Lyon (PR 1969-73) Annabel P Freyberg (SU 1977-79) see obituary James W Fiennes (A2/C1 1977-83) John ( Jack) Asbury (Bursar 1976-84) see obituary C Patrick Reeves (B1 1981-86) see obituary


Obituaries Angela Dancy, née Bryant (Wife of John Dancy, Master 1961-72) n the wet and windy afternoon of 18 October 2013, over 150 people gathered in Mousehole in Cornwall, to celebrate Angela Dancy’s life in the place she and John (Master 1961-72) lived in their retirement. Angela was central to the “experiment” of inviting girls into the sixth forms of boys’ independent schools, with Marlborough leading the way in 1968. The first three cohorts were dependent on Angela’s support and encouragement, which ensured that the experiment turned into a permanent arrangement, and a model copied widely. She could be brisk and direct as well as warm, and generations of OMs – both girls and boys – should be grateful that her approach worked and girls stayed.

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At the memorial service we learnt that her parents were Cornish, that she regretted not being able to go to university, that she married John in the war, and they were together for nearly 70 years until she died on 30 August 2013. e eulogy was given by their middle child, Mark, who recounted how Angela was able to develop a parallel career to John’s: working for ISIS (the Independent Schools Information Service); being a tenacious

governor of Bryanston School; teaching generations of Mousehole children, as well as a great grandson, to read; singing and pottering about in boats. We also learnt that she was a supreme homemaker – in every sense, redesigning their Mousehole house to accommodate their family and friends. For Angela, life was meaningless without love, reflected in two poems by John Tessimond read during the service. We also heard the moving final paragraph of a letter she sent John on 25 April 1944, when their future was still uncertain. John and their three children, Jonathan, Mark and Nick (Nicola (B2 1968-69), one of the first girls at MC) were at the service with their own children. ey gave everyone the warmest welcome – the most fitting legacy of a loving and influential woman. Olivia Mantle, née Timbs (C1 1970-72)

John Cloudsley-ompson (SU 1935-39) rofessor John Cloudsley-ompson, who died in October 2013, was a desert naturalist who carried out extensive research in the Sahara on how creatures adapt to its challenging conditions. He also saw distinguished service in the Second World War as a

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‘Desert Rat’ tank commander in North Africa, and in Normandy where, aer the D-Day landings, he confronted one of the most feared officers of the Afrika Korps, Michael Wittmann, in an area critical to the Allies’ advance. Following demobilisation Cloudsley-ompson completed his zoology degree at Cambridge and in 1950 was appointed a lecturer at King’s College, London. His interest in the natural world had been greatly boosted by his wartime desert experience; the study of how creatures survive such harsh conditions became a life-long passion. In the 1960s he was seconded to Khartoum University and became keeper of the Sudan Natural History Museum, where his research encompassed scorpions, centipedes, spiders, woodlice and crocodiles. He wrote over 50 books concerning the environment, animals and social conditions of North Africa and also collected many Sudanese artifacts. In 1972 Cloudsley-ompson returned to the UK and the Professorship of Zoology at London’s Birkbeck College (Emeritus 1986). An acknowledged world authority in his field, during his long career he served variously as Chairman of the British Naturalists’ Association and President of the British Arachnological Society, the British Society for Chronobiology and the British Herpetological Society. In 1993 he was awarded the Peter Scott Memorial Award for outstanding services to the understanding of natural history. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Jack Asbury (Bursar 1976-84) ack, who died in September 2013 aged 92, served Marlborough with great distinction for eight years. He hoped to join the Royal Navy as a Seaman Officer, but this ambition was thwarted by poor eyesight, so he had to settle for a commission as an RNVR Paymaster. Determined to be close to the action and the chain of command, during a distinguished career he was variously a Cipher Officer, served with Admirals Sir Andrew and Sir John Cunningham in Allied HQ Algiers (during WWII), assisted with the planning of the invasion of Sicily (for which he was Mentioned in Dispatches), and Sports Officer of a Naval land base before ending up as Secretary to the Military Committee of NATO. All these roles would later stand him in extremely good stead at Marlborough.

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Arriving as Bursar in 1976, Jack was soon given a chance to show his mettle, when he uncovered evidence of fraud in the Catering Department and improper procedures in the awarding of contracts in the Estate Department. He faced both problems head-on and showed he was not afraid to take tough decisions. With no HR Department, Jack and his faithful secretary Hermione Budge were responsible for most of that work, especially for the non-teaching staff. Considering them his ‘Ship’s Company’, Jack quickly gained their confidence and trust as a firm but fair employer, ready to listen. He persuaded them to sign up for a new Pension Scheme and, as George Johnson said recently, “ey are now all very grateful for that.” In those days the Bursar was also Secretary to Council. College finances were tight: Marlborough was undercapitalized and almost entirely dependent on fee income, but in the inevitable tugs of war between a spending Head and a saving Bursary, Roger Ellis (Master 1972-86) confirms that good sense always prevailed in the end. Two Council members were also senior City chartered accountants; Jack not only survived their scrutiny but was never caught out! 70

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Jack’s first Summer School presented a formidable challenge: losing his Catering Manager two weeks beforehand. Jack immediately rang RAF Lyneham, to ask if they had a senior catering officer who might be able to help. e School’s first lunch queue found Hugh Deacon (known as “Wings” to generations of Marlburians), immaculate in blue blazer and RAF tie, greeting all the ‘punters’ and landing himself a permanent job as College Catering Manager. As the Summer School’s devoted Chairman, Jack actively involved his family in it as well as himself: his wife Peggy (admin/queries/complaints), daughter Sarah (children’s activities) and even his future son-in-law (barman). Each Sunday Jack would personally welcome new arrivals, greeting any attractive ladies particularly warmly. One such excitedly mentioned this to the woman in the ticket kiosk. “Do you know Jack?”

Peggy paused before replying, “I ought to; I’ve been married to him for 30 years!” It is largely due to Jack that Summer School flourishes now; it grew enormously in popularity during his Chairmanship and he was instrumental in engaging those who have taken it to yet greater heights. It was during Jack’s tenure that e Trevalga Estate was bequeathed to Marlborough. Knowing it could prove a mixed blessing, he deliberately developed a good relationship with the Trustees and took great interest in it, visiting frequently and meeting the tenant farmers. He also served on the Executive Committee of the Bursars’ Association and as a governor of Wellington, before retiring to Crantock Beach, where he was still bodysurfing and crabbing at 80+. Brian Williams (CR 1962-94) For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries


Bob Carr MBE

Charles ( Jimmy) Eagles

(CO 1933-38)

(C2 1931-35)

rigadier Bob Carr, who died in April 2013, was one of the very few soldiers rather than airmen to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross during the Second World War. Despite being a keen amateur pilot, Carr was commissioned into the Royal Artillery in July 1939 as a gunner officer, but volunteered to fly single-engine aircra as an Air Observation Pilot. is meant flying over enemy territory, seeing what was invisible to forward observation officers and successfully breaching enemy security.

ieutenant-Colonel Jimmy Eagles, who died in August 2013, was a 5th generation Royal Marine who had a challenging war which included commanding a searchlight Battery in Egypt, a posting to India with an AA Regiment and redeployment to Kent to defend London from the onslaught of Hitler’s V rockets; his tally of flying bombs was 122. Posted to France and then Belgium in 1944 to provide air defence for the advancing allies, in one 4-week period his team shot down 796 V rockets. On New Year’s Day 1945, his gunners also brought down four aircra and, unusually, sank a midget submarine off the coast of Ostend. Jimmy Eagles was born in 1918, three weeks aer his father, Major Charles Eagles DSO (C2 1897-1901) had been killed during the Zeebrugge Raid in which 9 VCs were won. Aer the war he served on the staff of the C-in-C South Atlantic and was finally Assistant Adjutant General to the Commandant General Royal Marines. In 1967 he retired from the Marines and was appointed to e Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms (e Queen’s Body Guard) where he was appointed Standard Bearer in 1981and LVO in 1987. A man of unfailing charm, Eagles was also greatly respected for his integrity, sharp wit and humour.

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A member of 654 (AOP) Squadron, he was inevitably a prime target for enemy fire; survival rates for such pilots was poor. During the autumn/winter of 1943-4, Carr completed many hazardous sorties in Salerno and Monte Camino, oen at low altitude and over tricky terrain, observing and reporting the fire against enemy positions while trying to escape being shot down himself and frequently suffering from exhaustion. Post-war Carr remained with the army, serving in Egypt, the War Office as Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General, on the staff at the Imperial Defence College and, finally, from 1965, as Commander Royal Artillery Lancashire and Cheshire Division in North-West District. He retired from the Army in 1968 and spent the rest of his working life with Hambro’s Bank. He is survived by his wife and their son and daughter. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or www.telegraph.co.uk

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Charles Macfarlane (CO 1967-71) For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or www.telegraph.co.uk

Alan Brooke Turner (PR 1939-44) lan Brooke Turner, who died in October 2013, was a diplomat who served in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe during the Cold War. His first posting to Moscow (1962-65) was as Cultural Attaché; culture proved crucial to the thaw in East-West relations in the 1960s and Brooke Turner brought many of Britain’s leading actors and artists to Moscow. Already a French and German speaker, he was taught Russian in Cambridge during four years in the RAF, but his 1951 double first from Balliol, Oxford, was in Latin and Greek. Brooke Turner joined the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1951 and was part of the UK delegation to the Nuclear Tests Conference in Geneva. His first posting to Moscow followed short stints in Warsaw, Jeddah and Lisbon and, as a great lover of antiquity, he later enjoyed further postings in Rio de Janeiro and Rome – in the latter as Director of Studies at the Nato Defense College. His second Moscow posting (1979-82) would be dominated by the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. e 1960s thaw in AngloSoviet relations had ended; it was a time of great tension. Brooke Turner was appointed CMG in 1980 and his final posting was as Ambassador to Finland. From there he watched glasnost unfold under Gorbachev across the border in the Soviet Union. On retirement he became director of the Great Britain/East Europe Centre (now the British Association for Central and Eastern Europe) from 1985 to 1995. He is survived by his wife and their two sons and two daughters. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or www.telegraph.co.uk

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Annabel Freyberg (SU 1977-79) nnabel Freyberg, who died of cancer in December 2013, was a muchloved writer and journalist of great talent and intellect, whose style betrayed a fondness for the bohemian. Aer winning a scholarship to Christ Church, Oxford, where she read English, she was variously arts editor at e Evening Standard, interiors editor of the Telegraph Magazine and a contributor to e World of Interiors, writing on subjects as wide ranging as travel, cookery, interior design, country houses and, most movingly, the decline and tragic death of her own daughter, Blossom, aged only 9, from mesothelioma – with which Freyberg would herself be diagnosed merely weeks later. During Blossom’s illness, Freyberg campaigned tirelessly for Kiss It Better, a national appeal launched by Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity to raise money to fund research into the causes and treatment of childhood cancer. She married fellow writer Andrew Barrow in 2000; he and their son survive her. Matthew Sturgis’s (LI 1974-79) excellent obituary can be found on e Guardian’s website.

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Roger Washbourn

John Travers Cosgrove

(CO 1924-29)

(B2 1934-48)

hen Roger Washbourn died in December 2013 aged 102, he was almost certainly the Marlburian Club’s oldest member. Following Marlborough, Washbourn read Zoology at Trinity, Cambridge, before becoming a Teaching Scholar in Birmingham University’s Zoology Department and Assistant Keeper at the British Museum of National History. He was commissioned into the Royal Artillery during World War II, reaching the rank of Lt Colonel (Honorary Major). On demobilization he joined the British Council, for whom he worked variously in Antwerp, Stockholm, Helsinki, Bristol and London until he retired in 1972. He was by then Controller of the Books, Art and Sciences Division. Washbourn retired to East Anglia; an avid birdwatcher, he became closely involved with the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, edited a celebratory book, Nature in Norfolk, a Heritage in Trust, for the Queen’s Golden Jubilee in 1976, and was named the NWT’s Honorary Vice-President in 1977. He was also President of the Norfolk Association for the Disabled, and Secretary of the Committee that established the first Norwich Cathedral Visitor Centre. He was awarded the OBE in 1972.

ravers Cosgrove, who died in December 2013, was a sapper officer with 244 Field Company RE and was awarded an MC in Germany in 1945; his father too had earned both an MC and a DSO. On 4 March 1945 Cosgrove was taking part in 53rd (Welsh) Division’s advance on Wesel.

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Ordered to go to Issum, where an attempt to lay a bridge had failed and a large armoured force was held up, on arrival he came under heavy artillery fire. e officer meant to be laying the bridge was a casualty so Cosgrove took charge, directing armoured bulldozers for three hours under intensified mortar and shellfire until the constructed Scissors bridge was useable. e citation for his Immediate MC


stated that his initiative, courage and resource had played a vital part in the continued advance, and that he had “added to an already brilliant record of service yet another outstanding example of personal bravery”. It was also said that Cosgrove “found mines like a pig finds truffles”… For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or www.telegraph.co.uk

Patrick Reeves (B1 1981-86) at Reeves, who died from cancer in January 2014, was an entrepreneur who, with business partner Rohan Blacker, founded up-market food delivery business Deliverance in 1997 and sofa.com, an eponymous online retail operation, in 2006. With no catering experience, the pair attracted top chefs from China, ailand, India and Italy to an industrial unit in

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Battersea, and within a few years were feeding several thousand customers at home each evening, before moving on to concentrate on improving the whole buying experience for customers purchasing sofas. In both ventures Reeves displayed determination, enthusiasm and humour (he claimed to have founded the companies so that he could sit on sofas eating takeaways), along with a generosity and sense of responsibility that drove him to champion the underprivileged in his spare time. Reeves was also a highly skilled sailor, poker player, ski racer and general adventurer. In his twenties he crossed the Atlas Mountains by bike, and in 2010 also cycled 1200 miles to Italy to raise funds for a remote Afghan village school. He also actively supported the Jamie’s Farm project, provided grants to small businesses, and provided employment for the young. He is survived by his wife. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries See also OM Entrepreneurs section in Edition 111 (2010)

Piers Wedgwood (B3 1968-72)

orn in Kenya, Piers Wedgwood became the fourth Baron Wedgwood of Barlaston in 1970 aged only 15, upon the tragically early death of his father from a cardiac arrest. Wedgwood’s first encounter with the factory that bore his name was one Easter holiday, when he worked there as part of his A level Business Studies preparations. After leaving Marlborough he enjoyed a brief career in the Royal Scots before returning to the company, where he learned all aspects of the Wedgwood production process from the bottom up before eventually assuming the role of a brand ambassador. Over the next 40 years he helped the company expand into markets in India, China and Russia, while also serving as a Trustee of the Wedgwood Museum. He was also active in the House of Lords. In 2001, having suffered a heart attack himself, Wedgwood founded a charity to fund the placement of automatic external defibrillators in schools and communities in the USA. Over 180 have since been provided. Sadly a further heart attack killed him in January 2014, aged 59; his wife and daughter survive him.

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For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or www.thetimes.co.uk e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Robert Smith

Colin Prentice

(B1 1943-48)

(C3 1948-53)

obert Smith, who died in February 2014 aged 84, was Secretary of The Marlburian Club from 1989 to 1996, continuing his involvement with the Club until shortly before his death by attending both the Wiltshire Dinner and Club Day in the autumn of 2013.

rofessor Colin Prentice, former Professor of Medicine and Head of the University Department of Medicine at Leeds General Infirmary, died in February 2014. Prentice read Medicine at Cambridge, where he was President of the Medical Society, graduating in 1959. Following house appointments and a period of National Service spent at a hospital in Laos (where he survived 33 days as a captive of communist Pathet Lao guerillas), he spent much of the next twenty years in a series of posts in the University Department of Medicine at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, where he was made Reader in Medicine in 1979. During his years in Glasgow, Prentice built up

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An engineer by profession, Smith had enjoyed a distinguished career that took him all over the world including many years in the Middle East in Beirut and Bahrain, but he returned to Marlborough in retirement, setting up a business with his old friend Chris Davies (B3 1943-46). A great conversationalist with a dry and ready wit, he was immensely loyal to the College, anonymously endowing a fund to enable members of Common Room to undertake training to further their careers, which have and will continue to benefit many beaks. He was also one of this publication’s most valued proofreaders, remaining sharp-eyed and keenly intelligent to the end and picking up errors requiring intimate knowledge of matters Marlburian that others would inevitably miss. He was also most kind and generous with his time within the Marlborough community and had many loyal friends. His wife Anne predeceased him; he leaves a son (Richard TU 1975-80), and daughter. See also Letter to the Editor, p77 74

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an international reputation for his work on blood coagulation before, in 1983, being appointed to his post in Leeds. There, in addition to extensive clinical responsibilities for patient care as an Honorary Consultant, he continued to be prominently involved in research, collaborating in over 300 papers on diseases involving abnormal bleeding or blood clotting leading to thrombosis. One of his conclusions was that Aspirin should be considered routinely in all surgical and medical groups at high risk of thrombosis. Prentice also served on numerous national and international scientific committees, including as editor of the journal Thrombosis Research. He retired in 2000. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or www.telegraph.co.uk


him a Blue; he also qualified for Junior Wimbledon. Post-war he taught classics and sports at St Faith’s Preparatory School in Cambridge, coaching many of his pupils into major scholarships to the top public schools, before he moved to one himself in 1970: London’s St Paul’s.

John Baker (LI 1940-46, President of College Council, 1981-93) he Rt Rev John Baker, who died in June 2014 aged 86, was Bishop of Salisbury from 1982 to 1993, having previously served as a canon of Westminster Abbey, its Treasurer and Sub-Dean, as Rector of St Margaret’s, Westminster and as Chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons. While at St Margaret’s he arranged a lecture series on the Northern Ireland ‘problems’, later visiting Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin himself in 1995, where he stated: “England should repent publicly of the wrongs it inflicted on Ireland in the same way that Germany did over the Holocaust.” Baker became well known for taking on controversial subjects and for speaking his mind. An able theologian and acclaimed author (e Foolishness of God (1970)) is an acknowledged classic) Baker began his theological career as an academic: he was an assistant lecturer and later visiting professor at King’s College, London and also spent 14 years as Fellow, Chaplain and Lecturer in Divinity at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. He chaired the committee which looked into the theological and moral aspects of nuclear warfare, its final report, e Church and the Bomb (1982), advocating unilateral British nuclear disarmament; he was vehemently against battery farming, and also upset his local constabulary when he criticized their handling of anti-nuclear demonstrations. He was publicly prepared to criticise his own cathedral’s Dean and Chapter for their fundraising

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activities, and chaired the House of Bishops’ working party set up to consider “Issues in Human Sexuality” – ie homosexuals in the Church. at report proposed that homosexuality might in some circumstances be acceptable within the laity, but could never be permissible among the clergy. It is said that he later regretted this position, taking up a more liberal position. A commanding figure at 6 4in, Baker was an admired teacher and preacher; he was awarded a Lambeth DD in 1991. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or the main broadsheet websites

ere too he proved a hugely successful classicist, games coach and counsellor. Growing up in Cambridgeshire, Bayon was a keen gardener from youth. It was no surprise therefore that on retirement in 1982 he set up the commercial enterprise Mike Bayon Garden Design, which specialised in combining foreign and indigenous plants into the modern English garden. He also became a wellrespected magazine gardening columnist.

Mike Bayon (B2 1935-40) ike Bayon, who died in May 2014 aged 92, completed 52 bombing operations during WWII, for which he was awarded the DFC. He later became a charismatic schoolmaster and inspirational garden designer. Bayon joined the RAF in November 1941, passed out top of his class and was posted to Bomber Command’s Pathfinder Force. With 128 Squadron Bayon and Australian pilot Doug Swain flew high-flying Mosquitos over German targets, oen acting as a decoy for enemy night fighters or inflicting damage on significant industrial centres. e war had interrupted Bayon’s time at Peterhouse, Cambridge, where his skills in rugby and hockey only just missed

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For forthcoming Memorial Services please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ memorialservices

For recent obituaries please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ obituaries

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Letters to the Editor Dear Madam... Madam

Madam

Richard Hardy’s article on ‘Jumbo’ Jennings [Edition 114] brings back many wonderful memories of my time in his form in the mid 1950s.

I was very interested in two items in Edition 114. First, there was the excellent article on Marlborough’s PreRaphaelite legacy. One of the Spencer Stanhope murals in the Chapel, the one depicting Abraham nearly sacrificing Isaac, was known as the “Dive Bomber” in my time, referring to the angel hovering over the scene. ere is another connection between the PreRaphaelites and the College in that Sir Geoffrey Millais Bt (LI 1955-58), greatgrandson of the Pre-Raphaelite painter Sir John Millais, was a contemporary of mine at MC. I believe his father Sir Ralph Millais Bt (LI 1919-22) also attended the College*. Sir John Millais was of course the artist of many famous paintings including “Christ in the House of his Parents” and “Bubbles”.

RAUJ (CR 1927-66) knew everyone. So much so that I compiled and still have a list of over ninety names dropped by him during lessons. He would also award one old penny (which would buy a top quality cigarette) to anyone who made a remark which particularly appealed to him. I still have three of the pennies collected from the winners – probably in exchange for a cigarette. ere were many other red herrings. Bradshaw could be quoted by heart and his knowledge of the highways and byways of England was considerable. He was kind enough to provide me with two ways to reach London avoiding Slough. at, of course, was before the M4 was built. RAUJ’s reading of Browning’s poems and ‘Wiggy’ Gough’s reading of PG Wodehouse still ring in my ears nearly sixty years on. I lived through wonderful times at Marlborough, made perfect as none of the staff seemed particularly concerned about getting me through exams, and I was able to stop playing most competitive games at the age of fourteen. Peter R Davies (C3 1953-56)

Madam I le Marlborough in December 1952, took the examination for and was awarded a History Scholarship by Trinity College, Oxford in January 1953, did my National Service, went up to Trinity in October 1955 and graduated in 1958 with a Second in Modern History. Fast forward to 76

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Ingrid Carding (mother of Christina, LI 2003-05), John Allan (SU 1948-52) and Peter Gutteridge (PR 1957-61) collecting their MAs at Greenwich in July 2013

September 2010, when, already long retired from my solicitor’s profession, I commenced an MA Degree Course in Maritime History at the University of Greenwich, which I successfully completed in October 2012. e award of MA was formally conferred at a ceremony in the Old Royal Naval College Chapel in Greenwich on 24 July 2013. A remarkable instance, I thought, of how the seed planted by Hubert Wylie (CR 1927-59) in the History VI all those years ago was still capable of bearing fruit sixty years later. Coincidentally, and also rather remarkably, one of my seven colleagues on the Course was another (rather younger) OM, Peter Gutteridge (PR 1957-61). Another was Ingrid Carding, the mother of an OM daughter (Christina, LI 2003-05), so I reckon Marlborough was well and creditably represented. I thought some old members – especially any of my contemporaries who are still around – might be interested to read and possibly be edified by this piece of admittedly personal trivia. John Allan (SU 1948-52)

Another article pays tribute to the embroidery skills of masters’ wives in the 1950s. Many of us still also remember their heroic efforts acting as temporary nurses during the great Asian Flu epidemic in 1957 when at least half the school went down with the flu and many dormitories were assigned as sick bays. Richard Hough (SU 1955-60) *e Editor adds: Sir John’s son, the missing link in the chain, was OM Sir Geoffrey Millais Bt (CO May-Dec 1875).

Madam Having noticed in Edition 114 that at a function a talk was given on Marlborough during the War but that this only would have covered from 1941, I wonder how much about the summer of 1940 and our contribution as members of the Local Defence Volunteers (LDV) is recorded? is began on our return from the OTC Summer Field Day, presumably on 14 May, when the order was given to the Parade in Court “Standfast everyone over 17”. en, when those younger had


it’s too soon for a woman to run the show, and that the Club should be given the chance to think about it a little longer.” But it was too late; the vote was passed. However it soon became clear that the questioning and challenging of change was something Robert saw almost as a duty. We got on extremely well, rapidly came to a position of great mutual respect and later that year Robert even invited me to the Marlborough Dining Club. But he did love playing Devil’s Advocate. From my election onwards, when any alteration in custom was mooted my first thought would be how we would be able to argue the case with Robert. He was enormously gracious in defeat, but completely undeterred in his determination to make those in authority apply the greatest rigour to all their decisions, without exception. Spencer Stanhope’s “Dive Bomber” – see p76, letter from Richard Hough (SU 1955-60)

been dismissed, we were told we were now members of the LDV. e Summer term was then marked by our duties. roughout the rest of the term the College contingent each night manned a road block on the Bath Road below Cotton House with the duty of stopping and checking all vehicles – how any of us would have reacted if we had been confronted by two or three German parachutists, dressed possibly as nuns, in the back of any lorry was fortunately never tested! As an individual this duty came round about every 10 days and we were rewarded by being excused lessons next morning. We were also deployed regularly in the aernoons to dig slit trenches and anti-tank ditches as part of possible defences if invasion should come. It all added considerably to memories and I remember particularly how cooperative and understanding most drivers of lorries were, especially when, if they were coming from the London direction, they would also have been stopped by the Town’s LDV road blocks already. Indeed throughout the country that summer there was a wonderful spirit of everyone getting on with things and being in it together – a spirit which to me was only replicated again during last year’s Olympics. e other special thing perhaps to be remembered about 1940 is that instead of playing Rugby at Lords, the XI took on Haileybury – Cheltenham like Rugby having opted out of coming up to London. e match was played on two

wonderful sunny days and was notable for Marlborough by our captain, JR Sale (PR 1934-40), scoring 93 and 57 in two fine innings. Sadly Sale was to be killed on active service as an RAF Pilot Officer just over a year later. As a postscript, aer the term was over everyone was deployed for at least a fortnight to help with the harvest, in the old fashioned way – this was before combine harvesters and other improvements – or on tasks connected with forestry. Toby Sewell (B2 1936-41)

Readers It was with particular personal sadness that I heard that Robert Smith (B1 1943-48) [see obituary p74] had succumbed to cancer in February 2014. I first encountered Robert at 2003’s AGM, when he objected to my election as the Club’s next President. He won the support of only one other in the room, but nevertheless unnerved me by confirming all my own anxieties about being relatively young (those were the days!), totally undistinguished and the first woman to take the reins in the Club’s history. at he was a former Club Secretary added fuel to the fire; I thought it best to beard him asap – over lunch an hour later. “It’s nothing personal,” he reassured me, with a mischievous twinkle. “I just think

I shall greatly miss his wise counsel, charm and eagle eye. With his passing the Club has unquestionably lost one of its staunchest and truest friends and the Magazine one of its pickiest and best proofreaders. Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81, President 2003-04, Editor of the Marlburian Club Magazine)

Madam For some years I have been meaning to write to say how much I appreciate the MC Magazine. Ever since John Uzielli (CO 1950-55, Club Secretary 19962001) (I think it was) first raised the standard it has gone from strength to strength. During your editorship I have developed the habit of reading it from cover to cover – something I cannot say of any other magazine. Congratulations and thank you! I attach some vignettes of beaks of my time. You might find parts worth publishing? When I think back to the many beaks that contributed to my happy memories of MC they all had some memorable quirk, if that is the right word. EHD: Edwin ‘Spud’ Dowdell (CR 1922-62) Spud was housemaster to my father Peter (B1 1924-29), uncle David (B1 1935-40) and me (CO 1949-54). My grandmother, a very dominant lady reckoned she taught him how to be a housemaster. Certainly he seemed e Marlburian Club Magazine

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comfortable in her company which, as a bachelor of many years standing by the time I arrived, could not be said of all women. My mother, a self-confident Swede, found herself in EHD’s study one winter’s aernoon. As the outside light faded he relied solely on the light of the fire to continue discussions. is convinced her he was too shy to switch on the light; it was one of the few times my mother felt embarrassed. Spud, I was once advised, earned his nickname when he took some of his students to see his vegetable patch. Pointing at the potatoes, he whispered, “You can hear them growing…” He had a habit of greeting one with a serious look that made one suspect he thought one had done something wrong, but when he received an explanation his grin seemed a mixture of relief and delight. I was never sure whether the serious look was an act or genuine. At house prayers one week we sang Jerusalem on three consecutive evenings. Looking serious, he asked why. When we explained that we sang Jerusalem each time we won an inter-house cup he grinned with delight. As we were ‘Cock House’ (probably called something different these days) that year, Jerusalem featured a few more times before the end of term. I had three personal experiences of this quirk of Spud’s. I never displayed any academic prowess; in fact in my first year at MC I was second from the bottom of the lower fourth – the bottom form (some years ago, here in Australia, I caught up with the fellow who was bottom). Spud called me into his study to discuss some fortnightly test results. “Tennant,” he said with his serious look, “you were top in physics…” Silence. I suspected he wanted an explanation. “Sir,” I said, “it was all about fridges, and I understand how they work.” His face lit up with that relief-cum-delight look. On another occasion he summoned me to discuss my GCE O level results. “Tennant, you scored 99% in your German to English translation…” Silence. “Sir,” I explained, “if I couldn’t understand a German word I would say it quickly to myself and it would sound like a Swedish one, so I knew what it meant.” A look of delighted relief. e final occasion was when I returned from Bisley Week three days late. I was captain of the VIII that year and our results had been much better than they had been for years. e shooting master suggested I stay on and compete in the Queen’s Hundred. I qualified and may 78

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have been the first schoolboy to do so. Spud called me to his study and looking very serious said, “Tennant, you’ve been AWOL!” I was about to explain that I thought the shooting master had obtained permission when, unable to maintain his ‘serious’ look, his face broke into beams of delight as he congratulated me. When girls were to be admitted to MC he wrote to me, “there will soon be girls in Cotton House!” I could hear his disapproval as I read the words. It was doubly amusing for me as I knew of his shyness of women and, having experienced my early schooling in coeducational Sweden, I considered it an excellent move. RAUJ: Reginald ‘Jumbo’ Jennings (CR 1927-66) I have an endearing picture of Jumbo riding his bike each morning from Littlefield to school. ere was a large basket strapped to the handlebars. His back would be ram-rod straight and as he approached the College gates his right arm would shoot out its full length, at right angles to his torso and parallel to the ground. No one could be in any doubt as to his intentions. At the beginning of one term he glared at us from his high desk, his hands gripping either side. “You’re all dying,” he announced. Aer what seemed a long silence he continued, “every second you are getting one second closer to your death.” It was an odd start to the term for a class in their mid-teens. He once told a small group of us that, of all his former students who came to see him during World War II, those who thought they wouldn’t come back, didn’t. He was wonderful at keeping in

touch. He was my form-master for only a year, yet when I became engaged he took the trouble to write to congratulate me. He must have spent much of his time keeping in touch and would have given a boost to many OMs. GC: Geoffrey Chilton (C2 1910-15, CR 1920-59 & 1961) Geoff helped me enjoy Julius Caesar (Shakespeare’s version). He had a peculiar habit of making farting noises with his lips. Sometimes it was to emphasise a point, at others it could have been a diversionary tactic. As the scoutmaster, on ‘scout days’ he would wear his uniform to class. Being well over six feet tall, his spindly pale legs and knobbly knees looked, to us schoolboys, incongruous. He must have suspected our reaction; on those occasions his farting noises would likely have been a diversionary tactic. ARDW: Donald Wright (CR 1953-63) He brought history alive for me. 19th century European history became more about personalities than dates and events. I have a vivid memory of him drawing a picture on the blackboard of Blucher with his helmet and cigar. It was a threshold moment for me. FHPB: Francis ‘Floss’ Barber (CR 1937-75) He taught geography to the modern sixth. is Form was made up of those who had no bent for any specific form of academic specialization; its members ran much of the school. Yet over the years Floss was reputed to have achieved an A Level pass for all his students. He had a knack of making geography fascinating. PDHG: Peter Godey (CR 1949-58) I had always wanted to be able to play a

The author and Cotton House Boxing Team 1954. Back row L to R: EH.Dowdell, Esq, RA Garvey, DS Fletcher, R Everington, FVD Tennant, CJT Bateman, TR Negus, AP Hesse, ED Price. Front Row: SM Evans, RW Brittain, RE Coote, JCC Allan, JR Watson, TBL Glover, DM Slatter


musical instrument. At my prep school I had struggled with the violin to no avail. At MC I decided to try the piano. Peter was my teacher as well as the shooting master. In the last lesson of the year he looked at me and said, “Tennant, I think you should focus on shooting.” He did me a great favour. FLC: Leslie Coggin (CR 1926-62) FLC taught me Russian. I found Latin a drag and discovered that if I studied Russian I could reduce my Latin lessons by one a week. I was the only member of his class. Coggin had a reputation for absent-mindedness. He was once seen walking across Court in the rain with his umbrella under his arm and a bundle of books held over his head. On another occasion he travelled to London for the day and, returning on the last train, found his garage doors open and his car missing. e police eventually reported where it had been found – in London and with the engine running. “Of course,” Coggin admitted, “that’s where I le it.” I enjoyed my Russian interludes. Our lessons were very relaxing and much of the time Coggin would be working on other projects whilst I completed a Russian exercise. We tended to forget which lesson I was studying. Consequently I found myself repeating some a few times. All I can recall of my Russian studies is the chorus of the Song of the Plains, as sung by Paul Robeson. I am still able to mimic it but never did and still don’t have the slightest idea what any of it means. Frank Tennant (CO 1949-54) P.S. e last time I visited MC was when my sisters and I carried out my father’s wish to have his ashes scattered on Granham Hill. During his days at MC he oen sat there and sketched. As we carried out his wishes the wind changed and blew the ashes over one of my sisters. at would have appealed to his sense of humour.

Madam Charterhouse was mentioned in your last edition and this reminded me of a visit there one summer in the late ‘50s. I was useless at cricket (Captain of C1 3rds) but prepared to have a go at other ‘summer sports’. is particular summer I was in the same dormitory in C1 as the Captain of Athletics, Ian Argyle (C1 1953-58). Ian was putting together a team to go up to Charterhouse and was

short of two high jumpers. He’d heard me shooting my mouth off about winning the high jump at my prep School (Oakley Hall in Cirencester), so before I knew it I was selected. Here I must own up to the fact that I hadn’t been near a high jump pit in the intervening three or more years and that the Oakley Hall high jump hadn’t taken much winning.

eel-dives straight down into the low water. When Ian and I surfaced and got our breath back, the opposition was 5 yards up the pool.

I had deep misgivings on the bus and my worst fears were confirmed when the master convening the event called us to order. Field events in those matches had only two ‘strings’ from each school competing so there were just four of us mustering at the pit. e two tall, lithe Carthusians bounded up in smart tracksuits (I didn’t own one) and the referee asked us what height we’d like to start at. High jump heights have of course long since gone metric so I don’t recall what the original heights were, but I seem to recall I had a sort of ‘barrier’ at about 5’0”. e Carthusians suggested something like 5’2” to start but I think I managed to get the bar set at about 4’11”. Unfortunately my fellow Marlburian competitor was equally inept and aer three manful attempts (and failures) each at the opening height, we were both out of the competition before the Carthusians had even taken their tracksuits off. Marlborough ‘nul points’!

Madam

ereaer I reverted to the swimming team, where I was better qualified as a result of two spells in Malta when my father’s Naval appointments based us there. e team was sent to Bradfield for a match. In those days Bradfield had an open-air pool in attractive surroundings but the water was fed in naturally from a diverted stream. I guess with normal English rainfall this was usually fine but this particular summer had been very dry with little rain. Again we were just two competitors from each school and my fellow competitor was Ian Alston (PR 1957-62), a classy swimmer. As we came to our marks for the 50 yards Freestyle, we both looked down: there was a 4/5 drop down to the water level. We hadn’t time to think about this and on the command ‘Go’, Ian and I launched ourselves into our usual racing dives, hung in the air for what seemed like about 5 seconds and then fell into the water in enormous belly-flops, completely winding ourselves. e Bradfield swimmers were alive to this problem and executed neat sort of

Once again Marlborough ‘nul points’! Nicko Franks (C1 1955-59)

Sir Nigel Gresley (C1 1918-20)

e Gresley Society, which exists to study the life and works of this celebrated railway mechanical engineer, has obtained the necessary permissions to erect a statue of him at London’s King’s Cross station. It will be sculpted by Hazel Reeves, SWA, FRSA. It is planned to unveil it on 5 April 2016, the 75th anniversary of his death, but first the Society needs to raise money for this exciting project. e total cost is expected to be £95,000, and Old Marlburians are invited to contribute generously to the fund. Full details, including provision for credit card payments, may be found on the website of the Gresley Society, to be found at www.gresley.org. A maquette of the proposed statue by Hazel Reeves, entitled Sir Nigel Gresley and Mallard, is shown against the wall at the station where it is proposed to erect the statue. Andrew Dow Vice Chairman, e Gresley Society e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Chance encounters: OMs of brief acquaintance A N O N Marlburian (B3 19??-??) e first unknown OM I encountered was in the incredibly slow ‘up’ li at South Kensington tube station. I was 18 and, possibly for the first time, wearing my OM tie. was quietly reading my paper when a loud voice boomed, “You were at Marlborough too, were you?” I looked up to see this rather regimental old gentleman, also wearing an OM tie. He had obviously aimed his question at me. I’m also sure that everyone in the crowded li was looking at me. As I desperately tried to reduce my height to less than 4, I mumbled in the affirmative. My hopes for the power of prayer were unfulfilled, as he continued, “Which house were you in?” With an even quieter mumble I told him that I had been in B3. I don’t recall which house he’d been in. All I do know is that it was an ‘out’ house. I remember that because he then engaged me in an excruciating (and loud) discussion about the merits of ‘out’ houses compared to ‘in’ houses such as B3. I tried to make the conversation as one-sided as possible but good manners forced me to contribute occasionally, even if only monosyllabically. Eventually, I was able to escape into the streets of South Ken. I dread to think what would have happened had I been in the ‘down’ li. Any train going anywhere would have sufficed.

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Later that year I enrolled on a Business course at a London college. At registration I saw an OM face I recognised. Sitting down a few seats away I was surprised when he moved next to me and enquired if I was an OM. Having spent much of my time at MC trying not to be noticed, this was unexpected. He had been a year or two ahead of me and I remembered that he had been in the XV. Nevertheless, we found ourselves in the 80

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have put in a good word for me and I moved in. It was only later we discovered that we were both OMs. He had been three or four years ahead of me, in B2. Owing to the circumstances we spent quite a bit of time together. My abiding memory is of his efforts to teach me how to mix a ‘Bullshot’, an invaluable skill. He also had a dangerous sense of humour! e last I heard of him he was living in France. In 1980, when checking-in at the Sheraton Hotel in Kuwait, I noticed the name on a guest’s registration card. It was that of the Middle East manager of my company’s main competitor. Although a worldwide industry, the number of people involved outside the UK was very small. I therefore phoned him later and invited him for a drink (and yes, Kuwait was dry, but all things were possible). Eventually, we established that we were both OMs. He had been at MC a few years before me, in Preshute, I think. I believe he now lives in Spain.

same class and subsequently co-authored a research project investigating the economic cost of the Torrey Canyon disaster. Not only did we achieve an A grade, but we were the ‘best in year’! At the end of the course we went our separate ways – he was set on the advertising world; I wasn’t. Curiously enough, we met again, by chance, about ten years later in the bar of the Bahrain Hilton. I seem to recall that he was with at least one OM then. In 1977/8 I lived in Beirut in Lebanon and at one stage was forced to evacuate my apartment. In the bar of the Commodore Hotel I met someone who told me that there was an empty flat in the building where he lived. He claims to

My final chance OM meeting was also in 1980, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. I was invited to accompany a colleague to a business contact’s home for a drink (see above for Kuwait). On the way there my colleague used a nickname that I had had, briefly, at MC. When I asked how he knew it, he said that he had been told it by our host. Sure enough, when we arrived I found our host had been only a term or two in front of me, but in B2. He also had a nickname, which he didn’t much like. I thanked him roundly for digging up old bones and drank rather more of his whisky than I should have. Aer leaving the Middle East I spent the next few years based in the UK but working in Africa, where I don’t recall meeting any OMs. Is there some conclusion to be drawn from this?


“...I found our host had been only a term or two in ont of me, but in B2. He also had a nickname, which he didn’t much like. I thanked him roundly for digging up old bones and drank rather more of his whisky than I should have.”

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Letting the Gini out of the Bottle Academe: a world lost to OMs, is explored by omas Crump (SU 1943-48) It is an interesting fact that, since the 1980s, in a country with more than 100 universities and nearly 2.5 million students taught by more than 180,000 academic staff, Marlburians going on to university will seldom, if ever, be taught by OMs, nor indeed by former pupils of other comparable schools, i.e. those represented at the Headmasters’ Conference (HMC). ince I entered MC in 1943 aged 14, a lot of water has flowed under the bridge. e stream carried me through three universities: Cambridge, Michigan and UCL, and a working life as, successively, an army officer, barrister, clergyman and academic.

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In my last term at school (Lent 1948) four boys out of 25 in Summerfield became academics, as did another three contemporaries (out of about ten) on the maths side. Nine contemporaries were also sons of either Fellows of the British Academy (FBA) or the Royal Society (FRS). At Cambridge in the 1940s, at least one out of the fewer than fiy professors, two heads of colleges and half dozen university readers (including Sir Austin Robinson, the first OM to be elected FBA, in 1942) were OMs. Even in the 1970s the Provost of King’s and the Masters of Peterhouse and Trinity were OMs (Sir Edmund Leach (B3 1924-28), Sir Grahame Clark (C1 1921-26) and Lord ‘RAB’ Butler of Saffron Walden (CO 1916-20) respectively). In the 102 years from 1886 to 1988, 25 OMs were elected FRS, a rate of one every four years or so. e election of 13 OMs as FBA over the 54 years from 1942 to 1996 was at much the same rate. Of all these only five FRS and one FBA still live and the only one not retired is aged 59. en, sometime in the 1980s, ‘schluss’, as the Germans say: almost no OMs became academics, notwithstanding the vast increase in university enrolment and, derivatively, academic staff numbers. 82

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Academics now out number Anglican clergy by about ten to one. A hundred years ago, when the position was reversed, OMs were well represented in both classes: not any more. In Cambridge, with more than ten times as many professors as sixty years ago, not a single one is an OM, and nor is an OM head of any one of the thirty-odd colleges. Of course Cambridge, with less than 1 per cent of UK student enrolment, is just one out of more than a hundred extremely diverse universities – and the present

survey does not extend beyond professors and heads of colleges. Even so, is there any reason to believe that OMs are better represented at either UK universities other than Cambridge, or at lower levels in the Cambridge academic hierarchy? is is possible, but unlikely, and that for a number of good reasons. ere are two lines to explore: first, the background and aspirations of present MC pupils, second the 21st century world of UK universities. Both cases, needless to say, invite comparison with the situation


in the mid-20th century as already outlined. en, while significantly fewer OMs went on to university, the majority of these did go to Oxford or Cambridge. In the 1940s many professionals qualified without the university education which today is taken for granted. For a trainee position in commerce, finance and industry, a good degree now counts for much more than it did fiy years ago, while far more graduates enter the home and foreign civil service. In Oxford and Cambridge, however, one factor – admission from state schools – counts for far less than is commonly assumed. From schools belonging to the Headmasters’ Conference (HMC), such as MC, 20,000 to 30,000 go on to university in any one year. is is somewhere around 5% of the 500,000 odd university entrants nationwide. While political correctness, if nothing else, must incline Cambridge admissions tutors to prefer candidates from non-HMC schools, their admissions criteria leave them relatively little scope for doing so. Fewer than 8,000 prospective university entrants have three (or more) A-levels with the 2.5 A* average required by Cambridge. at some 40 per cent come from HMC schools is a factor over which Cambridge has little if any direct influence; in practice a significant majority of Cambridge applicants who cross the threshold are actually admitted wherever they come from, for to quote one Cambridge admissions tutor, “untapped state school potential” is scarce. (If Cambridge lowered the threshold, the flood of applicants would become unmanageable.) Turn now to the 24 Russell universities, today’s choice aer Oxford and Cambridge. With nearly 400,000 undergraduates the admissions threshold – inevitably lower – is attainable by the majority of Marlburians. But what occupations do they choose aer graduation? Whatever these may be, they seldom include a career in academe. Why not? e answer is not to be found in increased competition from non-HMC schools. My thesis is simple: taking into account inflation over the last 40 years or so, fees at HMC schools have increased four-fold. Traditional UK professionals now send their children to state secondary schools when 70 years ago they would have chosen

an HMC school. It is pre-eminently such parents whose sons 70 years ago became academics. Who then now takes their place at MC? e admission of girls is part of the answer, but there is more to it than that. MC parents now belong to categories that counted for little in mid-20th century UK. Substantial numbers – including many non-UK citizens – enjoy well-paid employment abroad, with children’s school fees part of the remuneration. And then there is private equity, wealth management – you name it – all offering remuneration more than sufficient to cover fees at MC. UK university employment is a real can of worms. Since the 1980s academe offers little to an OM aspiring to anything close to the life-style of the parental home. e direct follow-up to the essential PhD is a poorly remunerated short-term postdoc, with tenure distant and uncertain. How then are UK universities still able to find 180,000 academic staff ? For many world-wide, UK academe is the best game in town. A post-doc from a developing economy – exempt from the tight UK immigration rules – has got his foot in the door. On the other side, for UK undergraduates ending up with second class honours – as do any number of OMs – there are endless opportunities in business and the professions, far less precarious and far better paid than almost anything in academe. Few, if any, Marlburian undergraduates at Cambridge consider entering the profession of those who then teach them. e disconnect is striking and OMs, if choosing aer graduating a life in the sort of world in which they grew up, must still accept that its defining characteristic is its historically unprecedented affluence. is is not shared by academe. Paradoxically very few of the 180,000 academics teaching in British universities would have qualified for admission to Cambridge as undergraduates. e UK now finds its future academics in the enormous expansion of graduate studies nationwide. Where one studied as an undergraduate then matters less than the class achieved in the final examinations. A-levels no longer count. In this recruitment process – which extends to any number of academics from outside the UK – one is not likely to meet many OMs. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Looking ahead anks to the UK Health and Safety Inspectorate with its demands not to overload the creaking Memorial Hall together with the strange disjointed rhythm of end of year public exams, a Chairman of Marlborough Governors nowadays seems to preside over a lot of Prize Days. But with that comes the opportunity to bifurcate one’s thinking about different school years. horizons can be closed down by the pressure of exams. So, the message to these younger cohorts was Seize e Moment. Take as full advantage as you can of what is on offer. You won’t have this privileged choice again.

or the leavers, whose Prize Day comes first, there is a chance to talk of their future beyond the comfortable Wiltshire environment that physically will largely have contained their ambitions till now. ere the discussion is whether, from this idyllic semi-rural setting, we sufficiently prepare our young men and women for the intellectual, moral and emotional challenges of the rough and tumble global futures that they now face. I think Marlborough continues to score highly. e curiosity, the values, the intellectual, sporting and artistic attainment and the confidence these instil continue to serve its graduating class well. Our graduates are ready to go out literally into the world.

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For the years below, however, when their Prize days come there is the need to report the occasional hint of disappointment among leavers. A sense of regret was discernible among some of opportunities missed; of the years having raced by without full advantage having been taken of the astonishing menu of activities the College offers outside the classroom as well as in it; too quickly extra curricular 84

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But to students and parents with some years of Marlborough to go there was more to convey: a determination to further strengthen our academic performance with a rigorous focus on classroom performance and results; but at the same time we should resist allowing our educational offering to be reduced to the three A level battery hen formula that some University admissions offices seem to demand; strengthened dialogue between students, parents and beaks on individual performance and results is needed to make sure every girl and boy is being helped to meet their full potential. is re-pointing of academic performance comes as we have to think hard about the exams we offer as A levels are re-launched by the Government with a promise of more exacting standards but possibly narrower syllabuses. e revolution in British education laps at the doors of an institution like Marlborough. As I reported last year we cannot be immune to it. Over the year our plans have been taking shape for an endowment campaign to be launched in the coming months. We want to do what we can to re-widen access to the school and to make it affordable again for some of the professional families whose education Marlborough’s founders had in mind in 1843 but who have increasingly been defeated by today’s fee levels. We want, also, to reach children of ability for whom a Marlborough education could be life changing and who previously would have had no means of accessing it.

We believe a campaign like this, which will depend heavily on the support of OMs, will reconnect our school more firmly to our Founders’ Mission. At the same time our programme of renewing the physical plant of the school will continue. Houses are getting a faceli and more. e Memorial Hall and Science Block remain critical priorities. And this physical refurbishment reflects a more general jauntiness in the air at Marlborough. I cannot count how many OMs and parents have told me the excitement they and their children feel at the leadership of Jonathan and Emma Leigh. Just two years in, Jonathan is already proving one of Marlborough’s great Masters; the College is buzzing with energy and girding itself for the next leap. And, oceans away, part of that future is already visible as under Bob Pick’s forceful leadership we engineer another part of the new vision for the college, our Malaysian campus. So heady days. e progress on all fronts is evident but so are the challenges. We have big ambitions for our two schools, meeting them will take leadership as well as clear-sighted understanding of the challenges they face.

Mark Malloch Brown (C1 1967-71) Chairman of Council


e Master’s Review e 70th Anniversary of D-Day incorporated a major moment for Marlborough on the Today programme. David Briggs (PR 1941-45) was interviewed about his part in the war. Moulded by the Marlborough climate and, in particular, through discussions with his friend, Frank Sadler, he explained his fundamental conscientious objection to the horrors of war. espite this, he felt the entire need to contribute to humanity and thus was severely endangered by his work as a stretcher-bearer on the beaches. Somehow, this moving evocation of a belief, combined with genuine service encapsulates just what Marlborough represents at a time when we are entering the four year period of anniversaries associated with the horrors of the First World War in which Marlborough lost no fewer than 749 men.

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ments whereby we can evaluate progress on an annual basis. As one of the country’s biggest boarding schools, Marlborough’s impact on the economy, local and beyond, is a considerable contribution to the independent sector. Annually, the Independent Schools Council (ISC) which represents those in private education make a contribution to

the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of nearly £10 billion, more than the City of Liverpool or the BBC. ey also provide 227,000 full-time equivalent jobs in Britain; one for every two ISC pupils. Furthermore, more than £3.6 billion in tax revenues are flown to the Exchequer every year whilst the annual savings for the tax-payer are in the order of £3 billion.

Much of our term has started the inevitable focus towards the positive thinking which comes out of learning from the events of history. Roseveare Sunday was named aer the Senior Prefect of July 1914, Harold Roseveare (B3 1908-14). News of his death was being broadcast even as the new academic year began in September 1914. 715 Marlburians walked 13 miles in a whole school event which was combined with some charitable organisation. e Everest Lecture, given by David Walsh (C1 196065) will launch the immediate programme virtually 100 years to the day of the fateful assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand. ereaer, next term, we will see an initial series of themed events put together by a Committee under the careful lead of David Du Croz (CR 1996-2007). It has been a time of planning. During the autumn, we will embark upon our strategic plan which will carry us through the next five years. On the one hand this will reaffirm who we are whilst, on the other, it will acknowledge the need to be aware of current educational thinking and interpret it. Essentially it is a stock take, with sharpened concentration on what makes us unique, but developing our objectives inclusive of a series of measuree Marlburian Club Magazine

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“e strategic plan sets up seven major pillars. ese are designed to promote leadership and service, as well as to offer a amework where character is developed. ey promote rigour, develop respect and encourage the responsibility to ‘give back’.”

Beyond that, there could be said to be an additional contribution of £1 billion to the GDP, which arises from the high academic performance of ISC pupils. is is a powerful backdrop within which to advance our vision, not least because Marlborough’s impact is so considerable. e strategic plan sets up seven major pillars. ese are designed to promote leadership and service, as well as to offer a framework where character is developed. ey promote rigour, develop respect and encourage the responsibility to ‘give back’. e College motto, ‘deus dat incrementum’, will promote a programme of social outreach and understanding of our position, both within and beyond Marlborough. With the unique selling point being to encourage full, true, coeducational boarding, the main pillars are seen as being anchored in the spiritual basis of

the community. From this, Marlburians will be challenged by a broad academic community to develop their intellectual abilities to the full. e wider interests must provide an opportunity for sporting excellence, health and fitness for life, creativity in music, drama and the visual arts, and the spirit of adventure. is will be pursued in the widest sense in the co-curriculum. Pastorally, whilst demonstrating overall empathy for others, Marlborough’s social responsibility includes widened access of partnership with other schools, both local and international, so, what is already an increasingly effective partnership with Swindon Academy will be broadened whilst we look for more exchanges along the lines of the extremely successful one which has recently taken place with Waterford Kamhlaba in Swaziland. Lastly, Marlburians will be encouraged to see education as a life-long continuum. Anyone who joins this widened school community will have a sense of carrying out what they learn here through the contribution they will make in later life. With the Development Office now a major part of our plan, we will look at our financial endowment as a core that we need to build. Beyond that, there is going to be a sharp focus on the much needed upgrade of the Memorial Hall so that we can all be brought together as a school in one place whilst our characterful and celebrated Science Block will also need transformation. All of this will happen in addition to the continual upgrade of the stock of our 15 Boarding Houses funded through the operational surplus we make. Five of those Houses have already been completed and the rolling programme continues; an investment of £70 million all told. Today’s Marlborough promotes a forward thinking legacy to nurture the individual whilst being conscious of the wider meaning of what it is to be Marlburian. As ever it remains a hugely enjoyable privilege to be Master, full of challenge, of course, but enduringly rewarding.

Jonathan Leigh Master (2012-) 86

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College Admissions and Academic Results 2014 or Shell entry the College uses an assessment system that seeks to select children with academic, sporting and artistic appetites and abilities that suggest they will make the most of their time at Marlborough. e process relies mainly on interviews at the school and reports from prep schools heads. If you are interested in sending your child to the College, please contact the Admissions Assistant, Louise Smith, on 01672 892302 in the first instance, indicating that you are OM so that this can be taken into account at the time of assessment.

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Scholarships and Exhibitions A wide variety of scholarships and exhibitions are available to all children

Academic Results am pleased to report on a fantastic set of results for the College’s pupils at (I)GCSE, A level, Pre-U and IB.

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Back in early July, we received our excellent IB results: all of our fieen candidates passed the Diploma, with four of them achieving over 40 points out of a possible 45 (for comparison, 40 points carries more UCAS points than 4 A* grades at A level). e average score of 36 points was the highest since Marlborough began delivering the IB (and it carries the same number of UCAS points as 2 A*s and 2 As at A level). Mid-August saw the publication of A level and Pre-U results, and again the story was a hugely impressive one. Almost one in five entries at A level and Pre-U scored at or above A* level. All twenty-two of our pupils who were holding Oxbridge offers will take up their places at Cambridge or Oxford, and

(whether offspring of an OM or not) at 13+ and 16+ entry. Details of all such awards, including values, dates, qualifications and examination procedures, may be obtained from the Admissions Department. e Scholarship Prospectus may also be viewed on-line at www.marlboroughcollege.org

or not) to send their children to the College. To apply to either e Marlburian Club Charitable Trust or e Children of Clergy Fund please contact Peter Bryan, Deputy Master and Director of Corporate Resources, on 01672 892 390 or pnb@marlboroughcollege.org

e Marlburian Club Charitable Trust makes funds available for various purposes but most commonly assists OMs with a child at the College who experience unexpected hardship. It also gives grants to College leavers pursuing GAP Year projects involving an element of service to others. e Marlborough Children of Clergy Fund, in accordance with the intentions of the College’s Founders, assists ordained members of the Church of England (whether OMs

Can you offer a work placement or internship?

all eight of our pupils who were holding offers for medicine also achieved their places. Our pupils’ average UCAS score was an outstanding 365 (for comparison, 3 As at A level would score 360). Our leavers also achieved a greater proportion of A*-A grades and A*-B grades (or their Pre-U equivalents) compared with last year’s which, against a backdrop of aggressive grade control and the loss of January modules, was hugely impressive. e last piece of the jigsaw – the (I)GCSE results – came in late August. We were hugely proud of our pupils’ GCSE points average, which matched last year’s all time high – equating to 5 A* and 6 A grades per pupil on average. Again, at a time when steps continue to be taken by boards to halt grade inflation, this was definitely worth shouting about. Of our cohort of 162, ten pupils achieved straight A* grades across all of their subjects. A further sixteen fell short of this full house by just one grade, and over a fih of the year group were

e Guidance Department is keen to support sixth formers and young OMs taking their first steps towards a career. If you think you or your organisation may be able to offer work experience or internships please contact Guy Nobes in the Guidance Department who will be delighted to give you more information: egn@marlboroughcollege.org

awarded ten A* grades or more. Aer the very successful year for Marlburian Oxbridge applicants in the Upper Sixth (mentioned above), we were very pleased to note that a third of our Hundred pupils achieved the eight A* grades that we feel puts them in a very strong starting position for future Oxbridge applications. Of course, all of these great achievements are down to the attitude, application and performance of our girls and boys, but as ever, I know they would like to join me in thanking their tremendous teachers who, as well as being wonderful classroom practitioners, have supported them in so many other ways throughout their time with us. A Marlburian education is about so much more than just the academic, as we all know; it is great, therefore, to see that the this side of life continues its inexorable forward march apace. We look forward to even bigger and better things! Jaideep Barot Deputy Head (Academic) e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Common Room Leavers e Marlborough team was shown into the Head’s study, an immensely large room with a number of chairs ranged around Miss Lancaster’s massive desk. Fixing Terry with a beady eye, Miss Lancaster asked if he considered girls’ education as important as boys’. “Yes, I do,” replied Terry. “Well that’s where you’re wrong, Dr Rogers,” replied Miss Lancaster. “Girls’ education is much more important!”

Terry Rogers (CR 1964-2014) erry Rogers retired at the end of August 2014 aer 50 years of devoted and outstanding service to the College as a science teacher, Head of Chemistry, meteorologist, housemaster of two Houses, Second Master and, finally, as a much respected and professional Archivist.

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Terry met his future wife, Hilary, when they were students at Queen Mary College, London and, aer they married, they pursued post-doctoral research in Chemistry at the University of Chicago, where Terry worked in the research team of a Nobel Prize winner. In 1962 they returned to the UK for Terry to teach at Millfield, accompanied by their Ford Rambler Estate car, which continued to serve them for many years as a greenhouse! In 1964 John Dancy (Master 1961-72) invited Terry to teach Chemistry at the College and within three years he was appointed Head of Chemistry. In partnership with Brian Williams (CR 1962-94), a fellow chemist, he spent many hours of detailed work producing one of the best A level Chemistry Practical books of the century. e Chemistry Department at that time was renowned in the College, much helped by Chief Technician Ivor Radford. Roger Ellis invited Terry to be Michael Dain’s (CR 1951-88, HM B1 1971-75) 88

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successor as Housemaster of B1 in 1975; he had a good grounding in the skills required, having previously been the sole House Tutor of C3. e five B1 years were among the happiest that Terry and Hilary spent at the College, endorsed by numerous OMs and House Tutors fortunate enough to be in B1 with them. Terry has always been a good listener, a useful trait in a Housemaster and a skill which came into its own both when he took over Preshute on Michael Birley’s (B1 1934-39, CR 1970-88, HM PR 1970-80) retirement and when he succeeded Michael Dain as Second Master. Preshute, as an ‘out’ house, was quite different in character to B1, but Terry and Hilary thoroughly espoused their new challenge and gave the boys and girls in their care every support in a happy and successful House. As long ago as 1978, Roger Ellis had set up a committee under Terry’s chairmanship to consider the feasibility of introducing co-education throughout the school. Sadly, the time was not right but nearly a decade later, in 1987, David Cope (Master 1986-93) asked Terry to act as Co-Education Coordinator for the detailed planning associated with the introduction of girls into the lower school. Terry and his committee visited various co-ed schools and ‘girls only’ Wycombe Abbey, then being run by the very able but formidable Miss Pat Lancaster.

Terry became Second Master in 1988 and served under two Masters: David Cope (1986-93) and Edward Gould (1993-2004). During those eight years Terry was invited to apply for the Headship of another major school but, loyally, stuck to his job. Brian Wallis (CR 1969-97) sums up that time well: “No-one of his generation at the College could have listened more carefully, advised so sagely, encouraged so much and worked so hugely on the school’s behalf – and all done regardless of the time and effort involved.” e final chapter in Terry’s College life was his succession of David West (Archivist 1985-96) as Archivist in 1996. Here Terry’s love of history and attention to detail could mix with a scholarly blend of intelligence, curiosity and meticulous care, combined with great good humour. Many Marlburians have benefited from his talks and tours of not only the school but also the tower of his beloved St Peter’s Church where, for many years, he chaired the St Peter’s Trust. Hilary has been a constant support to Terry throughout and was a particularly good Housemaster’s wife. ey both entertained pupils, parents and colleagues with unstinting, warm hospitality and of course, good humour. is is particularly clear in Terry’s case: he has been an ardent supporter of Portsmouth Town FC since boyhood! Another shared interest was partownership of a racehorse, Touch of Winter, trained by the renowned Kim Bailey, which they both enjoyed enormously and which also needed, at times, a good sense of humour. Hilary, attending a race meeting without Terry, made a bet on another horse, which


romped home! Such was her delight and exuberance that she spent her considerable winnings on champagne, much to the delight of her fellow owners but chagrin of her absent husband! All in all a splendid innings of 50 NOT OUT; Marlborough College and their two sons, Christopher (C3 1977-82) and Jeremy (C3 1978-83) and their respective families are rightly proud of Terry and Hilary. We salute them both.

the continuation of such work. It was Neil’s recognition of this that underpinned his service to the College: his belief that relationships must be cultivated and valued; that shared vision and educational service are more important than bottom lines and balance sheets and that friendships can’t be forged in telephone campaigns, but through the investment of time.

Martin Evans (CR 1968-)

It will not have escaped readers’ notice that a lot of material from the Archives appears in the pages of this publication every year. Since I took on the Editorship from Martin in 2008, I have had the enormous pleasure of plaguing Terry at all times of year, day and night, to pick his encyclopaedic brain for information, material and advice on all matters to do with the College’s entire history. It has been nothing less than a pleasure; the email exchanges always witty and tolerant, and the smile when I even invade his lunchtime space in Common Room both unannounced and uninvited, extraordinarily ready. TER: thou art a veritable gem. ank you, on behalf of the Marlburian Club Magazine and its current Editor, for all your unstinting efforts on our behalf in the Archives and the proof reading room. You will be sorely missed. Madam Editor (2008-)

Neil Croucher (Foundation Director 1999-2013) n St Paul’s Cathedral a plaque commemorating Sir Christopher Wren reads: Lector, si monumentum requiris, circumspice (Reader, if you seek a monument, look around you). Reader, if you seek Neil Croucher’s legacy to Marlborough, look around you; the Swimming Pool, Henry Hony Centre, Art School and new Heywood Block were all partly funded by development activities under his tenure as Foundation Director.

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However schools are not about buildings but people: pupils, staff, parents, friends, families and alumni, all of whom ensure

Aer attending Chichester High School Neil joined the police, in 1968 he instead decided to focus on the service side of public service. By 1980 he was working for the Social & Industrial Ministry of the Diocese of Bristol, working on grassroot, parish-level schemes to create jobs, social housing and husband the Church’s resources, investments and properties in a socially conscious, accountable and responsible way. Working closely with the Bishop, Neil put the Deanery and Diocesan Development Office on a genuinely modern and sustainable footing, part of his skill and strength of character lying in the reconciliation he achieved between the world of finance and his own deeply-held Christian faith and values of service and compassion. He also studied for ordination, though eventually resolved instead to become an extraordinary minister and lay reader. When news of the Ethiopian famine broke in 1983, Bristol diocese was quick to respond, sending £500,000 for immediate use. Neil was part of the Bristol churches task force sent out to Ethiopia, where he worked alongside Michael Buerk on the now famous film showing the desperate humanitarian

need of the Ethiopian and Eritrean people and the political and economic origins of their plight. In 1995 Neil became involved in the transformation of Bristol’s Harbourside, work that required £30 million of commercial and philanthropic giving. Finished by 1999, Neil was ready for new challenges when David Williamson (Bursar 1994-2009) and Richard Fleck recruited him to redesign Marlborough’s fund-raising. Marlborough has perforce lived on its wits for capital development. With neither a major landowning stake nor the backing of a Guild or royal charter, what we spend we have to earn or raise; Neil fronted that initial fund-raising drive. en, when the Foundation was formed Neil began cultivating an understanding of Marlborough’s belief in the value of what it does educationally. If friendships could be forged across generations and continents, then surely the money would follow. OMs were vital; Neil’s patience, sociability and natural warmth meant they were nurtured and involved. Out of this slow, delicate work came the generosity of Reggie Wills (Ivy House) and Henry Rose (the cricket pavilion renovation). But this was also the period of internationalism: of Russian pupils and visits to Moscow. Alongside funds secured for bricks and mortar have also been those for opportunity: several pupils from differing backgrounds (both UK and abroad) have been enabled to come to Marlborough and are still coming because of the Development Office’s work, which was started by Neil. Neil has not simply served behind the scenes either. Attached to Summerfield for nearly 10 years, he was the tutor of choice for many. Nick Sampson (Master 2004-12) once spoke to the prefects about quiet, modest service in a spirit of compassion to one’s fellows. He told them never to forget that Marlborough is made up of exceptional people with extraordinary stories. He challenged them to find one who had worked under fire and held the hands of dying children as he baptised them in the morning then buried them in the aernoon…: that person was Neil Croucher. Kate Cayley (CR 1988-) e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Development Plan e College’s Development Plan is one of the most significant capital programmes to be implemented by any independent school. e Plan started in 2011 and stretches over twelve years. Over this time nearly £90 million will be spent and virtually every significant building will be affected. ree years on from 2011 and progress remains on track with over £20 million of work already achieved. he Development Plan considers the needs of the College under its three essential pillars: academic, boarding and pastoral and co-curricular. e College already has a portfolio of many fine buildings and so the emphasis of all parts of the Plan is to work sensitively with each building to restore it and to make it fit for the educational needs of the future.

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Academic

“e College is renowned for having an unrivalled co-curricular provision which stretches through the arts, sports, activities and service. e Development Plan ensures the best opportunities for development in a co-curricular sense will continue to be provided to our pupils.”

It is essential that Marlburians are provided with the best places in which to study in order to enhance their learning. e first years of the academic side of the Plan have focussed on the renovation of the important classroom buildings within Court, Museum Block and North Block and the improvement of information technology throughout the campus. Museum Block will be completed this August, a project that has not only covered the restoration of the fabric of the building and all of the classrooms, but also the transformation of the Garnett Room to a beautiful public room with full conferencing facilities, which has already enabled real time projects to be established with other schools and institutes around the world.

to the web. e new Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) will hugely improve the way in which pupils can research and learn, all of which will be available from anywhere there is wi-fi access. One of the flagship projects is the review of the College’s science provision. In 2013 GBS architects were commissioned to carry out a feasibility study to recommend the best way to proceed. GBS concluded that the magnificent building, formed out of Newton’s inspiration for light and air, presented a unique core on which to base our science faculty. Malcolm Reading Consultants have been appointed to run a competition in which four leading architects will be invited to present their proposals to meet this exciting brief. e successful architect will be appointed in November.

Boarding As a full boarding school the College’s houses lie at the centre of the pupils’ life. e stock of houses spans from C1, based in the former 18th century coaching house through to more modern purpose-built accommodation in C2, C3 and Mill Mead. e initial

In 2015 work will start to renovate the Memorial Library and North Block classrooms. e classrooms will be carefully restored to keep their traditional beauty and form, whilst being fully equipped to accommodate the latest technology. Substantial investment has enabled a move to Apple-based front end hardware throughout the campus. ere are now over 1,000 MacBooks and iPads supported by the network which is entirely wireless with super-fast access 90

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C3 refurbishment


North Block

Garnett Room

programme of minor facelis and, for example, the work to B1 alone is costing in excess of £3 million. By September the following houses will be completed: Ivy, C3, Mill Mead, B1 and Littlefield. In 2015 work will start on the final phase of the refurbishment of Turner and the first phase of Summerfield. In 2017 works will start on Preshute and Barton Hill. Astros

requirement of the Development Plan was to purchase and renovate the Ivy House enabling the College to grow to over 900 pupils and to achieve a balance of 60:40 boys to girls. Since then the boarding house programme has continued apace and, by September, a third of the houses will have been refurbished in just over three years. e scale of the boarding house programme in itself is substantial and represents a commitment in excess of £40 million. e approach to each house refurbishment is completely bespoke, seeking to ensure the traditions and characteristics are preserved, whilst trying to redress the effects of some of the earlier alterations such as to improve facilities and circulation. e approach is very much towards an appropriate level of provision and so there are no lavish en-suite facilities. Equally this is no

Co-Curricular e College is renowned for having an unrivalled co-curricular provision which stretches through the arts, sports, activities and service. e Development Plan ensures the best opportunities for development in a co-curricular sense will continue to be provided to our pupils. Recently the Pavilion was completely refurbished, thanks to a benefaction by Mrs Jane Rose in memory of her late husband Henry (C1 1953-57) and the two all-weather pitches were re-surfaced and re-lit. In 2015 the Old Gym will be adapted through the incorporation of a mezzanine floor to provide a state of the art fitness centre with separate studios and a sports bar. ere are also plans to consider the construction of a second sports hall and to provide further allweather facilities. Health and Safety legislation has required that the numbers to be accom-

modated in the Memorial Hall should be restricted to the extent that the College cannot gather together as a whole. Simon Henley (CO 1981-85) of Henley Halebrown Rorrison was commissioned in February 2014 to review the Hall and draw plans for its restoration and modification so that once again it could accommodate the whole school. e feasibility study for the building also considers how the backstage provision can be improved so that there is an increased scope for more performances. All of this work is taking place at the same time as the centenary commemoration of the Great War during which 749 Marlburians, beaks and staff fell. ey are remembered on the Hall’s walls. e College’s Development Plan is ambitious and far-reaching. We are already well under way and there can be little doubt that not only will there be much happening in the years to come, but once everything has been completed the College will be even better placed to meet the challenges and opportunities of the future.

Peter Bryan Deputy Master and Director of Corporate Resources e Marlburian Club Magazine

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A Legacy for Life As the Upper Sixth ‘fly the nest’ each summer, little do they know that their Marlburian journey is only just beginning. e sense of friendship and community forged at school is the foundation for a lifelong legacy of belonging and support which reaches far beyond the years spent at the College. e OM family offers guidance and opportunity at each stage of life from university to the workplace and beyond. his sense of a ‘Legacy for Life’ is one of the central pillars of the College’s ‘Strategic Plan’ and is promoted through the work of the Development Office, which has under its umbrella the Marlburian Club and fundraising. While historically there has been a clear divide between the two, it is our genuine belief that the engagement and enrichment of being an active member of the OM community promotes the sense of belonging that in turn fosters a culture of giving back. It is our aim to build this understanding at the earliest opportunity and sustain the relationship across the generations.

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During the past twelve months the Marlburian Club has organised and hosted an impressive range of activities, providing networking opportunities and social events to meet up with old friends. Formal dinners, regional and international gatherings, drinks parties, talks, cultural and sporting events all feature in the OM Club calendar. In the pipeline we look

Communication Communication is key and in this ever-changing digital world it has never been easier to keep in touch and stay connected. It is vital for OMs to play their part by keeping contact details up to date either by using the online facility on the Marlburian Club website or by email, telephone or post. With an accurate database the Development Office will keep the wider OM community informed of events and activities throughout the year. Please call Kate O’Connor on 01672 892384 or go to www.marlburianclub.org/members

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A glimpse of the future: The Memorial Hall

forward to a new YMF initiative in the form of an online art auction and a significant range of milestone events to mark the WWI commemoration. e Summer Drinks party hosted at Stationers’ Hall in the City was a perfect example of an OM reunion at its finest, with over 300 attending from a span of eight decades. On this occasion the informal and relaxed atmosphere with fine wine and canapés in plentiful supply created the perfect setting to circulate and reunite many old faces. Turning attention towards fundraising, the College is poised to embark on a new and ambitious appeal campaign with the dual aim of building a bursarial endowment alongside two major capital projects to renew the Science Department and the Memorial Hall. e privilege of a Marlborough education entails a responsibility to give back and the knowledge that, in order to improve that education, the College must remain both


OM Summer Drinks Party

amenable to and affordable for the widest possible cross-section of pupils. Marlborough College’s seeks to reach exceptional pupils who would not otherwise be able to experience the diverse opportunities provided by a Marlborough education. To achieve this goal the bursary campaign will seek to develop and extend endowment funds such that bursarial support to pupils can be extended and the College’s vision of social inclusivity and wide opportunity can be advanced. e exciting capital projects to renew the Science department and the Memorial Hall form part of the College-wide £90m investment planned for the next 12 years. While many elements of the refurbishment of the buildings, including the upgrade of the boarding houses, will be met through fee income, these two exciting projects will rely wholly on fundraising to meet their financial goals. Each project is in the early stages of development with architectural plans

Director of Development Jon joined Common Room in September 1981 having completed a BEd Hons in Physical Education at St Luke’s College, Exeter. Following a two-year teaching exchange with Geelong College in Australia, he was appointed Director of Physical Education in 1988. Jon coached hockey at Marlborough from 1981 through to 2013 with various stints as Master in Charge of both boys and girls. Alongside his teaching Jon pursued a successful hockey coaching career at club and international level. Aer short

Artist’s impression of the new science facility

under consideration and the OM community will be kept well informed as the projects unfold. It is with this sense of belonging that we hope all members of the Marlborough community will feel included, connected and supported and will share a mutual responsibility for the future well-being of the College. is might be with the gi of time or knowledge sharing, or perhaps supporting bursaries or Capital projects through gis and donation. Together, through this wider culture of philanthropy, we can sustain the ‘Marlborough Legacy for Life’ and guarantee this special education for future generations.

Jon Copp Director of Development

periods with Bath University and the Oxford Blues, he took up the coaching position at Reading HC and went on to lead Great Britain twice at the Olympics: in Atlanta (1996) and Sydney (2000). In 2001, Jon returned to the College as Director of the Summer School which, over the past decade he has successfully developed into the market’s leader. More recently he has also assumed responsibility for wider commercial activity as Director of Enterprise, before stepping up to his current position as Director of Development in January 2014.

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Meet the team e Marlborough College Development Team provides support for both e Marlburian Club and the Foundation. e team offers a broad base of experience in communications, event management and fundraising for the benefit and development of the College. MCW Evans (CR 1968-) President of the 1843 Society Martin Evans was educated at Liverpool College. He was a Kitchener Scholar at Bede College, Durham University and was President of the Union. He was appointed to Marlborough College in 1968, where he taught English and History and was Master in Charge of the Debating & Political Societies and OC Marlborough CCF RN Section. Martin was Housemaster of A2 (1977-82) and C1 (1982-94). is was followed by roles as Prep School Liaison Officer (1994-2001) and President of Common Room (1995-2000). Martin was Secretary of e Marlburian Club from 2001 to 2013.

Jane Gow (B3 1982-84) Communications Manager Jane joined the Development Team in August 2010 following a successful career in educational publishing, where she worked for over 20 years. Her connection with the College is life-long: her father David Green (CR 1962-95) taught History and was Master in Charge of Cricket for many years before becoming Director of the Summer School (1981-93). She has been a tutor in Summerfield since 2001.

Ian Leonard Digital Archive Officer Ian joined the Development Team in July 2012 and is now the Digital 94

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Archive Officer. He was previously a Government photographer with e British Museum, e Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England and latterly with English Heritage. Ian’s expertise lies in managing the alumni database and digitizing archive materials. You may also meet him behind the camera at alumni events.

Kate O’Connor Development & Alumni Co-ordinator Kate joined the Development team in September 2013 from St John’s Academy, Marlborough where her role as Events Co-ordinator included managing e eatre on the Hill and the development of St John’s facilities as an artistic community resource. Previously PA to Lady Hollick and Administrator of e Hollick Family Charitable Trust, Kate worked in Publishing as Editorial Co-ordinator at Transworld, part of the Random House Group.

Jan Perrins Development Manager Jan joined the Development Team in December 2010, moving from a fundraising and PR role in the charity sector. She previously worked as a journalist on daily newspapers and spent four years with a Communications company. Jan was

promoted to Development Manager in September 2013. She is a member of Independent Development Professionals in Education and also holds the Diploma in Fundraising from the Institute of Fundraising.

Chris Tanner Website & Social Media Officer Chris arrived at Marlborough in November 2013, joining the team aer 11 years in professional sport as Media & Communications Manager at Swindon Town Football Club. His role with Swindon included that of Press Officer, Programme Editor, Social Media Manager, Video Editor and Website Editor. An innovative and experienced media professional, he is responsible for our websites and Facebook, Twitter (@MarlboroughCol, @OldMarlburians) and LinkedIn pages.

Clare Russell (CR 1980-) Archivist Clare Russell joined Common Room to teach Classics many years ago and recently retired to take over the College Archives from Dr Terry Rogers. In 1989 she was funded by the College to attend Oxford University and Taipei Normal University to learn Mandarin Chinese for a year, and she has also taught Italian. She has tutored in C2, Mill Mead and Turner Houses and has regularly found herself teaching the children of her early students. She is heavily involved with the College’s WW1 Commemoration programme.


1843 Society Members of the 1843 Society were blessed with beautiful weather for their annual lunch, enjoying drinks and canapés in the Master’s Garden before sitting down to lunch in the Adderley. he Society recognises those who have made a bequest to the College. It meets at least once a year and 62 guests, who included those interested in finding out more and attending for the first time, were welcomed by the Master, his wife Emma and 1843 Society President, Martin Evans.

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Guests were entertained with a splendid musical recital from music scholars Helena Mackie (MO Re) and Sarah Mattinson (MM Re). Some extended the day watching the Marlborough Blues play cricket on the XI, which provided a gloriously sunny end to a thoroughly enjoyable day. Perhaps you would like to consider leaving a bequest to Marlborough. It is a positive way of making a huge difference to the lives of many and also a very tax efficient way of giving.

Mrs Emma Leigh and Anthony Carr (B1 1948-52)

How do funds raised from the 1843 Society make a difference? One of the College’s main ambitions is to significantly increase the number of ‘life changing’ and ‘top up’ bursaries, to offer a Marlborough education to those who would otherwise not be able to attend. Other current goals include two capital projects, described by Jon Copp on p 92. We recognise the critical contribution that members of this special Society make to Marlborough; you will be invited to events at school to enable us to say thank you and we will keep you informed of developments both inside and outside the classroom. e next event will be an invitation to the Carol Service in Chapel in December.

If you are interested in finding out more about the work of the 1843 Society and would like to meet or speak to Martin Evans, the 1843 Society’s President, please call Jan Perrins, Development Manager, on 01672 892439 or email jperrins@marlboroughcollege.org

“One of the College’s main ambitions is to significantly increase the number of ‘life changing’ and ‘top up’ bursaries, to offer a Marlborough education to those who would otherwise not be able to attend.”

The 1843 Society Committee

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Development Events e last 12 months have seen a number of events organised by the Development Office. Here are some of the highlights. Some of the most memorable events in the College Calendar are the Carol Services in Chapel. is year the Master and his wife welcomed members of the 1843 Society to a Drinks Reception before the service. It was a truly unforgettable evening, providing a fitting and spiritually upliing start to Christmas.

Romeo and Juliet e Development team joined forces with the Drama Department last year to organise a black tie Gala Performance of Romeo and Juliet. We are exceptionally proud of the standard of drama and music students at Marlborough and the production provided an ideal opportunity to showcase this incredible strength and depth of talent to OMs and parents. e evening began with a Drinks Reception, followed by dancing to a live band, before the drama erupted from a table within the auditorium; the

audience truly felt they were seated amongst the action as tables had been set up around the set. e cast of David Kenworthy’s production of Romeo and Juliet embodied the true liveliness and vigour of the famous piece whilst still managing to sober the audience with the devastating results of its riotous events.

Frank Gardner OBE OMs were invited to join pupils to listen to BBC Security Correspondent and author Frank Gardner OBE (LI 197479) speak on his life and work in May 2014.

e play included some wonderful music from the supporting band. It was an incredibly well designed and confidently performed piece, which entertained the audience throughout whilst staying true to perhaps Shakespeare’s most well-known play.

Frank was fondly introduced to a packed Memorial Hall by Martin Evans (CR 1968-), before giving a fascinating insight into the world of a broadcast journalist. Frank’s recollections of being shot at point blank range by terrorists in Saudi Arabia (which le him paralysed from the waist down) served to add to the audience’s wonder at the impressive range of reporting he continues to do. He held the audience spellbound with short news clips, and the dramatic photos displayed behind him, including one of him sitting on the tail ramp of a C130 transport plane as it refuelled a helicopter in midair, gave his anecdotes added impact. We are hugely grateful to Frank for so generously volunteering his time. 96

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Sports & Club Reports OM Cricket Club – e Marlborough Blues ummer 2014 witnessed excellent victories over Sherborne and Downside, hard fought draws against Hurlingham, e Guards and Radley, narrow defeats to St Edward’s and Eton and more convincing ones to e School, e Flashmen and Westminster. Although not as successful as one would have hoped, the season nevertheless saw a growing number of younger OMs turning out, which bodes well for the future. Individual highlights included superb centuries from Andrew Wilson (TU 2003-08) at Hurlingham and Stuart Wilkinson (SU 2004-09) against the Radley Rangers and a breathtaking 84 from 41 balls by Jordan Butler (SU 2011-13) against the Wiltshire Queries before rain ruined things.

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OM Beagling he 62nd season of Beagling at the College culminated with the Lawn Meet in Court, which was attended by about 50 supporters including founder member Richard Bateman (B2 1947-52). e hounds spent the aernoon in full cry around Temple Farm and the Manton Estate before Countess Goess-Saurau treated us to a sumptuous tea. On the previous Saturday the Norwood Hall staff provided an excellent end of season dinner in the Common Room Dining Room for 40 of us, including current Captain of Beagling, Miles McKechnie (C3 L6). Aer the meal, guest speaker Jonathon Seed treated us to a humorous and thought-provoking speech.

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As usual, Master of Hounds Max Rumney encouraged students to get involved in whipping-in and local landowners, many of whom provided wonderful teas, warmly welcomed us. anks to kennel huntsman David Gaylard and his daughter Becky the hounds are in great shape and we look forward to the 63rd season of Beagling at Marlborough. Any OMs who wish to subscribe to the hunt are encouraged to get in touch. Secretary Sean Dempster (CR 1994-) 01672 892 240 smdd@marlboroughcollege.org

In the Cricketer Cup the Blues lost a high scoring first round encounter at home to e Stowe Templars. e visitors posted a competitive 291 for 9, with healthy contributions from former Northamptonshire pros Rob White and Ben Howgego. Veteran Alec Cunningham (C3 1970-74) and off spinners Will von Behr (B1 2007-12) and Andrew Wilson were the pick of the bowlers. In reply the home side mustered 268 for 8 in a spirited run chase. Crucially skipper Ed Kilbee (C2 2001-06) was run out for 70 when he looked set and a scintillating 56 from 40 balls by von Behr proved too little too late as the Blues fell 23 runs short. Some consolation can be sought in

Jordan Butler smashes a 6 on his way to a breathtaking 84 from 41 balls against the Wiltshire Queries

the knowledge that the strong Stowe side went on to reach the semi-finals. Poignantly, on 8 June a Blues XI led by Seamus Moorhead (B3 1981-86) and made up mostly from the 1980s era took on the Dilettantes, a side of similar vintage led by Mike Munro, an Old Clionian, in memory of the late Dominic Barker (B3 1981-86) and Mark Sidley (B3 1981-86), both members of the 1986 XI. Both the Barker and Sidley families were present as well as a number of guests, including Philip Lough (CR 1981-96), the Master in Charge of cricket in 1986. At the end of the day Mark’s children, Jake and Oscar, presented the winners’ shield to the victorious Dilettantes captain. It was a special occasion to remember two old friends. Secretary Mike Bush (TU 1993-98) 07773 901 484 michaelbush1979@googlemail.com

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Sports & Club Reports Cricket results

OM Football

V St Edward’s Martyrs (A) 4 May - Lost by 6 wickets Blues 246 for 8 from 50 overs (Ed Kilbee (C2 2001-06) 72*, Oliver Bishop (PR 2000-05) 69) St Edward’s 247 for 4 from 49.2 overs (Mike Bush (TU 1993-98) 3/43)

he OMFC secured a third consecutive promotion taking them up to Division 1 of the Arthurian League. Promotion, coupled with winning the prestigious Junior League Cup, ensured it was another memorable campaign.

V Hurlingham (A) 11 May - Match Drawn Blues 365 for 6 dec (Andrew Wilson (TU 2003-08) 130, Andy Bush (PR 1995-2000) 54, Harry MacDonald (PR 2003-08) 49*, Rory Stewart-Richardson (TU 2002-07) 48*, Ivo Cunningham (B1 2004-09) 48). Hurlingham 188 for 8 (Tom Graham (C2 2001-06) 3/58, Harry MacDonald 2/41) V Sherborne Pilgrims (H) 18 May - Won by 2 wickets Sherborne Pilgrims 137 all out (Mike Bush 4/13, Alex Armstrong (C1 1996-2001) 4/20). Blues 138 for 8 (Mike Bush 35*) V Dilettantes (H) 8 June - Lost by 37 runs Dilettantes 176 all out (Stuart Kerr (SU 1983-88) 4/34, Seamus Moorhead (B3 1981-86) 3/25). Blues 139 all out (Ali Robinson (PR 1983-88) 55, Pete Shone (B3 1980-85) 52) Cricketer Cup 1st Round V Stowe Templars (H) 15 June - Lost by 23 runs Stowe 291 for 9 from 50 overs (Andrew Wilson 5/74, Ed Kilbee 2/29). Blues 268 for 8 from 50 overs (Ed Kilbee 70, Will von Behr (B1 2007-12) 56) 2nd Prize Day V School (H) 27 June - Lost by 8 wickets Blues 125 for 7 from 30 overs ( Jonathan Grant (B3 1975-80) 32). School 126 for 2 from 21 overs V Flashmen (H) 6 July - Lost by 214 runs Flashmen 294 for 7 from 50 overs (Ali Stokes (BH 2005-10) 3/62, Ed Rothwell (TU 2005-10) 2/46). Blues 80 all out (Andy Bush 34) V Wiltshire Queries (H) 7 July - Match Drawn, Abandoned due to rain Blues 205 for 2 ( Jordan Butler (SU 2011-13) 84, Will von Behr 79*) V Old Westminster (A) 14 July - Lost by 7 wickets Blues 150 all out (Ed Rothwell 34*). Westminster 151 for 3 ( James Caldwell (CO 1995-2000) 2/35) V Downside Wanderers (H) 27 July - Won by 9 wickets Downside 99 all out (Will von Behr 4/7, Ed Kilbee 2/2, Jamie Davies (PR 2000-05) 2/10). Blues 105 for 1 ( Jamie Bill (C1 1998-2003) 60*) V e Guards 2 August - Match Drawn Blues 298 for 8 dec (Tom Pascoe (C2 2005-10) 75, Henry Wallers (TU 2001-06) 57, Ed Nicholson (SU 1997-2002) 42, Alex Foot (SU 2001-06) 35, Hugh Twort (TU 1995-2000) 31*). e Guards 253 for 9 (Tom Montagu-Pollock (C2 1996-2001) 3/26) V Radley Rangers 3 August - Match Drawn Radley 285 for 3 dec. Blues 243 for 8 (Stuart Wilkinson (SU 2004-09) 102, Mike Bush 46*) V Eton Ramblers 17 August - Lost by 6 runs Eton Ramblers 182 all out (Alex Armstrong 2/29, Dom Brown (C1 2007-12) 2/34, Alec Cunningham (C3 1970-74) 2/35, Will von Behr 2/40). Blues 176 all out (Will von Behr 62, Fraser Clarke (TU 2004-09) 30) 98

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Pre-season a touring party of 15 OMs graced sunny Lisbon in September for a challenging long weekend. Harry von Behr (B1 2001-06) engineered a friendly against a combined Benfica U18s team and their veterans. James Allan (C3 200005) will never forget having to mark Fernando Chalana, a 54-year old Benfica legend who was in the 1984 UEFA European Championships ‘Team of the Tournament’ and twice won the Portuguese Player of the Year Award. A combination of poor ball retention, a summer of indulgence and the warm temperatures saw the visitors go down 2-1. A couple of league wins and draws led to an element of complacency entering the ranks. Going into 2014, defeats to both Charterhouse and Foresters in the Arthur Dunn Cup saw our season on the brink of ending before it had begun. However, six straight wins saw the OMs on the rise and playing with renewed confidence, vigour and maturity. Avoiding the customary ten pints on a Friday night from about February onwards was a serious catalyst. Nick Horowitz (C3 2002-07), Tom Forsythe (BH 1999-2004), Harry Bristow (C3 1999-2004), Alan Hamilton (C2 200304) and von Behr were mainstays in a steadfast rearguard. e pace and enthusiasm of Alex Azis (CO 2004-09) showed just why it was worth OMFC waiting for him to finish his further education. Combined with the addition of 20+ goals-a-season Rob Guppy (C3 2002-07) and superb wing play from Harry Harvey (C3 1998-2003) and Niall Alcock (C2 1999-2004), the OMs were looking anything but blunt going forward. Key dates in the second half of the season included a loss at Charterhouse where serious questions were asked of one another; a serious up-turn followed. Customary thrashings of Old Aldenhamians and a superb win in the semi-

finals of the Junior League Cup against Millfieldians meant the OMs had the season in order. e OMFC produced one of the most superb performances of recent times on 12 April in the JLC Final. A dedicated, hardworking side fizzed with intent and passing ability, showing the old footballing hierarchy that is Charterhouse that OMs are a force to be reckoned with. ere was no luck in this match – in fact quite the opposite, as the OMFC was denied a clear goal through a refereeing howler. e OMFC was superb from the first to the last minute. Joel Hughes (C3 1999-2004) put the finishing touch on a great move from Jack Webb (C1 1991-96) to open the scoring, and Horowitz bundled over the line to secure the trophy. A tricky away game at Lancing Old Boys was a nervy encounter, but the makeshi side crawled over the line in the first of their remaining must-win games. Injuries were played through, weekends away cancelled and it was all hands to the pump for the final game. Win and we were up, lose and it would depend on Old Cholms’ result. It could only be Charterhouse (and the Charterhouse side that had walked the league!) in our way. A 4-1 OM win featured a fantastic Guppy hat-trick and a key goal from George Brown (BH 2002-07) which, twinned with domination of the supposed best side in the league at Fortress Lincoln, saw the OMs claim their place in Division 1. At the final whistle, a jubilant OM side assessed what they had just achieved with pride and a deserved sense of accomplishment that has galvanised this group of players. Managers Black and Hare had promised the OMs at the start of the season that commitment, application and teamwork would result in winning trophies and winning is fun. If you are keen to get involved please don’t hesitate to contact either Dan Black (daniel.black@amlin.com) or Joe Hare. As long as you’re committed, enthusiastic and enjoy a post-game pint, we would love to hear from you! Secretary Joe Hare (C3 1999-2004) joe.hare@dtz.com


OM Girls’ Hockey OM Golfing Society

team of OM women, spanning seven year groups, processed onto the newly-laid AstroTurf on Sunday 23 March 2014 to take on the highly successful First XI Girls’ Hockey Team.

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his has been another very full year for the OMGS with a calendar bulging with fixtures – matches against other schools and clubs, tournaments and meetings where we play amongst ourselves for an impressive array of silverware.

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is year we were keen to do two things in particular – the first was to encourage more Old Marlburiennes to become involved in OM Golf, and the second to try to get a bumper attendance at our Autumn Meeting in Deal in September. e first is yet to show a rush of new members but we are aware it will take time; as to the second we are hopeful that this year’s Autumn Meeting (heavily discounted to encourage attendance) will be a success. Robin Swann (B3 1962-66) was our Captain 2013/14 and threw himself into the role with great enthusiasm and leadership. Paul Sheldon (B3 1967-71) has just been sworn in for 2014/15; is it a coincidence that a seemingly high proportion of active OMGS members were in B3?! We were disappointed to lose in the first round of the Halford Hewitt to Trent in the closest of matches. Ably led by our non-playing Captain Tim

Terry Baker (C3 1953-58), Paul Farrant (C2 1969-71), Chris Dowling (B2 1966-72), Richard Jukes (PR 1950-53) and Charles Prendergast (CO 1965-69)

Martin-Jenkins (B3 1961-65) we had a side capable of going the distance; all we needed was a couple of wins to get our momentum going… next year perhaps. Finally, at our AGM we let Malcolm Cornish (C2 1966-70) retire as our Treasurer aer many, many years in office. Appointed as Captain of e Berkshire (another feather in the OM cap), carrying on as Treasurer as well was too much to expect of him. His contribution has been enormous over the years; thank you, Malcolm. Secretary Adrian O’Loughlin (B3 1965-69) 01483 302 748 adrian@gooserye.com

ithout straying too far into the realms of sporting cliché, the only way to sum up the annual OM v College game of 2013 was that it was a game of two halves. e Boys XI started strongly, dominating possession and the pace of the game, something considerably too high for we OMs to keep up. is meant that at half-time the Boys were leading 3-1 and looking comfortable. However half-time brought a regroup and the OMs came out fighting for the second half. Special mentions should go to Jamie Davies’s (PR 200005) superb holding role in the middle of the pitch, James Lyon-Taylor’s (CR 2006-) confident stick-skills running the ball from central defence and Gareth Playfair’s (CR 1998-2007)

Words of wisdom in the dugout brought the OMs back with renewed vigour and some great feeds down the pitch led to two goals for the OMs (we won’t mention that they were ultimately scored by our Marlburian ringer!), allowing the visitors to equalise with 15 minutes le. A hard fought battle in defence kept the skilful Marlburians out and the OMs were relieved as the final whistle blew. We had no reserves! A great result all round and we look forward to this event becoming a regular annual fixture in the College calendar. ank you to Jon Copp and Jamie Davies for umpiring and to all the supporters cheering both teams on from the sidelines. Matilda Kay (EL 2002-07)

OM Boys’ Hockey

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e weather le a lot to be desired, with the bright early sunshine overtaken by heavy hailstorms, which kept both teams on their toes. e OMs kept the ball safe, playing passes around their young adversaries, but unfortunately two early goals were conceded (the first with a diving finish) leaving the score 2-0 to Marlborough at half-time.

sometimes-questionable aerial balls up the pitch. is strong second half performance allowed the OMs to add two unanswered goals (all of which might possibly be considered the poorest struck goals of all time) and lead a full time score of 3-3.

Secretary Becca Naylor (MM 2003-08) 07743 472 615 becca_naylor@hotmail.com

ere were brief suggestions of extra time or a penalty shootout, but ultimately it was decided that a draw was the fairest result for both sides. I would like to thank all the players – both College and OM – for giving up their time to play. A special thank you must also go to the umpires for their support of the fixture. Secretary Charlie Gregory (C3 2003-08) charles-gregory@hotmail.co.uk Claire Fisher (EL 2009-14) squeezes the ball past Gabriella Rose (EL 2007-12) e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Sports & Club Reports OM Masonic Lodge he Old Marlburian Lodge is made up of ex-pupils and masters of Marlborough College. It is affiliated to e Marlburian Club, and is also an active member of the Public Schools Lodges Council, a group of 32 Public School Lodges. is group has an annual festival, which was held in Repton in 2014 and will be held at Wellington College in 2015. Members of any one lodge regularly visit other lodges within the group, promoting active social interchange between people from many public schools.

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e Old Marlburian Lodge meets three times a year in London, with an additional yearly visit to the Lodge of Loyalty in Marlborough. It is in good health, with a broad age range, and is very happy to welcome new members. Please contact the Secretary to find out more, or look at our website which also has links to other sites with further information on freemasonry. Secretary Julian Soper (LI 1979-81) julian.r.soper@mac.com

One of the principal aims of Masonry is to raise money for charity. Our Lodge divides its charitable giving between causes linked to Marlborough College, Masonry in general, and other charities. We also provide a Bursary for OMs in their Gap Year and value the interesting reports from the recipients. Freemasonry has become a lot more open than it used to be, and there is a lot of information available on the Grand Lodge website about Freemasonry in England: www.ugle.org.uk

OM Real Tennis wo OM pairs took part in the Cattermull Cup (Old Boys handicap tournament) in January 2014. Richard Brown (C1 1966-71) and Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73) qualified from their qualifying group but lost in the quarter-finals to the eventual winners, a much younger pair from Rugby.

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Andrew Bishop (PR 1970-75) and Charlie Mercer (LI 2000-05) struggled with a less than generous handicap but provided stiff opposition to Messrs Brown and Bishop in the qualifying group. In the Henry Leaf Cup, the Old Boys Open, Andrew was partnered by

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David Dickson (C3 1967-72), but they found a much more experienced pair from Harrow too much to handle and fell at the first hurdle. It is hoped that next year some of the much lower handicap players will be available to represent the College in these tournaments; there is even talk of an OM tennis evening at Lord’s if sufficient support is forthcoming. Please contact Steven Bishop for more details. Secretary Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73) 07802 500 274 smwbishop@yahoo.co.uk

OM Rugby: e Malones he Malones Rugby Club welcomes all OMs who would like to pull their rugby boots out of retirement for a few matches a year. e Club is a great way to stay in touch with other old boys whilst playing a few fixtures a year, reliving the rugby glory days. At the time of writing, already planned is an annual Under 21s old boys tournament in London in August (2014) as well as this year’s big event: the 150 year anniversary of ‘e Governors Cup’ against Clion at Marlborough in October 2014. is will be a return fixture where we hope to recover the trophy following a hardfought loss last year. ere will be a great weekend of rugby from the College on the Saturday followed by the old boys’ clash on the Sunday. We are always looking for new players and there are no other qualifications for playing needed other than being an OM! If you are interested in playing please get in touch; we look forward to hearing from you.

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Secretary Tom Geddes (TU 2004-09) tomcgeddes@hotmail.co.uk Chris McKane (CO 1959-64) captained the 1963 undefeated Rugby XV. A professional journalist, Chris wrote an article for e Times about the team’s spirit aer its 40th anniversary reunion, which perfectly captures the exhilaration of victory as well as the lasting impact of being part of a successful team. It makes a charming read and can be found through the Sporting Groups page of www.marlburianclub.org


OM Rifle Club 2013/14 he highlight of the year was Richard Jeens’ (BH 1994-99) win in HM e Queen’s Prize on 19 July 2014 during the international championships at Bisley. Richard becomes only the fourth OM winner of the Prize, 30 years aer David Richards (B3 1972-76) and 10 years aer his brother Henry (BH 1995-2000). Richard still holds the title of World Long Range Champion, so now we can truly say that he has joined the greats of our sport. Not to be outdone, Richard’s youngest brother, Ed (BH 1998-2003), who was second in e Queen’s Prize last year, won one of the individual competitions and was a member of the successful GB team in the Kolapore match. Other international caps were won by Bill Richards (C1 1977-79) (GB and England), Richard and Ed Jeens (Wales) and Sandy Gill (BH 1996-2000) (Scotland).

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On the club front the OMRC came first in the Rifle Clubs’ Match – concurrent with the first stage of e Queen’s. e Captain, Patrick Pelly (B3 1968-72), showed his skill in not selecting Richard Jeens for that match: it clearly had the desired effect! In the Bank of England Match, concurrent with the Grand Aggregate, OMRC finished a close second to a powerful Old Epsomian team.

Victorious HM The Queen’s Prize 2014 winner Richard Jeens and his son David being carried aloft at Bisley in the traditional manner

OMs finished highly in a number of the individual competitions (for which the entry is +/- 850), with three in the top 50 and a further three in the top 100 in the Grand Aggregate. Special mention however must go to Josh Mayer, from the School VIII, who finished 137th in the Grand Aggregate: a momentous achievement. In fact five pupils stayed on to shoot in the Bisley championships – the largest number for a long while. In the annual competition for Old Boys’ clubs (the Veterans) we entered 5 teams (25 shooters) for the first time in three

The winning OMRC team of the 2014 Rifle Clubs competition at Bisley. From l to r: Ed Jeens, David Richards, Patrick Pelly (captain), Bill Richards (missing: Ed Dickson (SU 2005-07))

(my Vice Captain) and our coach Johnnie, both now sadly departed. ose present were Anthony Hamilton (C3 1969-74), Andrew Howes (C2 1969-74), Charles Holt (CO 1970-75), John Hayward (TU 1972-77), James Hardy (C1 1972-76), Habib Rahman (B1 1971-75) and myself (all VIII), Toby Green (IX Man) and David Richards (Cadet Pair). Charles Brooks’ 1974 team reunited. From l to r: David Richards, Andrew Howes, Habib Rahman, Charles Brooks, Toby Green (in front), John Hayward (in rear), Anthony Hamilton, James Hardy, Charles Holt

years, but sadly did not come away with any medals. On this occasion the ‘Captain’s Curse’ struck – our ‘B’ team beat our ‘A’ team! ere were five highest possible scorers on the day, Bill Richards with 50.9 being the top OM and winner of the Vezey Trophy, whilst the Patron’s pots were won by Charles Brooks (PR 1969-74), Geoff Robinson (CO 1961-65) and Toby Green (C3 1971-76). Following the Veterans’ match we hosted 36 for our Annual Dinner. Our guest of honour was Marlburian Club Past President and current Chairman, Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73). One of the themes of the Dinner was the 40th reunion of my 1974 shooting team at Bisley – the first of the VIIIs coached by Johnnie (REW) Johnson (B2 1919-23), that started a remarkable sequence of 20 or so years of MC never being out of the top 10 in the Ashburton Shield. In 1974 we finished 3rd, our only loss throughout the whole year. Nine out of the 11 original team members attended – a fantastic turnout. We toasted absent friends: Richard France (C3/BH 1970-75)

e Club continues to support and foster shooting at MC, and much enjoys doing so. e VIII achieved its best result in the Ashburton for a long while. Our full bore matches against the school in September 2013 and May 2014 ended in victories for the OMRC, with top scorers Tom (TAD) Lilley (SU 1999-2004) and John Hayward (TU 1972-77) for OMRC and Josh Mayer and Sam Day for the school, whilst our small bore matches in the Gunner Range at the College in November 2013 and March 2014 ended with the usual victories for the school. We wish every success to Dominic de Vere (BH 1987-92), who will be on his second GB team tour to Canada in the autumn, and to the six OMs still in contention for selection to the GB team for the World Long Range Championships taking place in the USA in 2015. Lastly we congratulate our Club Patron Tony de Launay (PR 1960-64) on his being elected England Captain for the 2015 National Match. Charles Brooks (PR 1969-74) President, OMRC Secretary Habib Rahman (B1 1971-75) 01749 899 529 laverley@tiscali.co.uk e Marlburian Club Magazine 101


Sports & Club Reports OM Tennis everal friendly tennis matches were set up over the summer of 2014, mainly taking place on weekday evenings at London’s Queen’s Club on grass (though with one or two indoors elsewhere). Opponents included Old Westminsters (Won 3:1), Old Wellingtonians, Mjolnirs, Old Etonians, Old Wykehamists, Old Carthusians and UCS Old Boys, the main aim being to enjoy a few sets of tennis in the summer sunshine, followed by a few drinks.

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Matches were open to all levels; if you would like to dust off your tennis racket and play in any such matches next summer (2015), please contact the Secretary or Greg Caterer (gjcaterer@gmail.com) Hopefully see some of you on a tennis court soon! Secretary Richard Spender (C2 1989-94) spenderr@gmail.com

OM Courtiers Squash he Courtiers’ Londonderry Cup chances were ended by Harrow in the first round. e highlight of the rest of the season was the well-supported Harold Radford Rosebowl tournament, in its 50th Anniversary year. Seven OMs, two beaks and six pupils contested the trophy. Alex Wildman (C2 1984-89) eventually won, narrowly beating Marius Baldrey (CR 2009-), who was in his second consecutive final. All OM entrants are welcome for the 2015 Rose Bowl, to be held in early January.

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Secretary Alex Wildman (C2 1984-89) 01367 870144 / 07768 681604 alex@brookshirecapital.co.uk

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OM Sailing Association he Arrow Trophy is an annual independent school regatta that takes place in the Solent every October. 2013 was a good year for the OMs: we didn’t crash the boat and even managed to win a race! As ever the crew was a mix of young and old, experienced and beginner. We had the honour of being skippered by the Club’s President Elect Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67) on the Saturday who did his best to share his considerable sailing knowledge with the crew and prepare us for battle against some very experienced opposition. Our overall performance was best described as mixed, from the highs of winning a race to the lows of very nearly coming last – none of which diminished the overall experience of the weekend: some excellent racing in fine weather combined with good food and drink at the Saturday evening dinner in Cowes.

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Sadly this Magazine’s publication date means we are always reporting a year behind. But by the time you read this I hope we will be putting together a crew for the 2015 event.

We have a number of ‘practice weekends’ throughout the summer and the occasional dinner. If you are interested please contact the Commodore. James Meredith (B2 1988-93)

2013 Crew: Edward Gregg (C2 1988-93) James Meredith (B2 1988-93) Neil Jeffries (ringer) Mark Wright (C3 1998-2003) Bob Milner (C1 1956-61) Charlie Kendrick (C1 1998-2003) Mike Dana (B3 1959-63) Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67) Commodore Charlie Kendrick (C1 1998-2003) charlie.kendrick@rbc.com


On the Shelves The Unicyclist, the Vicar and the Paediatrician by Peter (LI 1979-81) & Joseph Sidebotham Published by Matador, £8.95 ISBN-13: 978-1780885155

e unique, heartwarming and true story of Joe, a teenage unicyclist, who sets out on the ultimate challenge of travelling the length of Britain from Land’s End to John O’Groats on one wheel. He is accompanied by his paediatrician father, Peter, desperate for a bit of father-son bonding; and by David, their sexagenarian vicar, complete with a broom strapped to his recumbent tricycle, making his own pilgrimage on wheels. e trio’s adventures include mechanical failures, unexpected ambulance journeys and other adversities, all in aid of the Lullaby Trust (formerly the Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths), to which part of the book’s sale proceeds will be given.

invading France in 1940. On 25 May Lord Gort, the British commander, decided to move 5th Division north in order to plug a growing gap in his Army’s eastern defences. Over the next three days the division fought a little-known engagement, the Battle of the YpresComines Canal, to hold the Germans at bay while the rest of the BEF retreated towards Dunkirk. e book describes the British Army of 1940 and outlines the early stages of the campaign before explaining the context of Gort’s decision and why it was made. en, using British and German sources, it shows how the British doggedly defended their line against heavy German attacks, and

demonstrates that the Expeditionary Force was far more than the badly equipped and undertrained army presented by many historians. is fresh look at the campaign also casts new light on other aspects such as the impact of the Luwaffe and the Dunkirk evacuation itself.

The Road to Dunkirk: Memories of My Life at The British Expeditionary the College Valley Force and the Battle of the by Martin Letts (B2 1948-51) Ypres-Comines Canal, 1940 Published by Trafford, £7.28

recalls how he bred and trained the formidable hounds that eagerly hunted this challenging countryside and would become the basis of numerous English and American packs. He describes how Marlborough helped spark his interest in field sports, while also recalling a host of passionate people with whom he’s spent many days in the hunting field, sometimes in their best moments and sometimes in moments they’d rather forget. e book is edited by John Strassburger, for 20 years editor of e Chronicle of the Horse and now its Foxhunting editor.

Him & Me by Jack (B1 2001-06) & Michael Whitehall Published by Michael Joseph, £18.99 ISBN-13: 978-1405910903

Him & Me is a hugely entertaining and irreverent account of a unique relationship between a father and son. Written in two distinctive styles, it reflects the largerthan-life personalities of its authors,

ISBN-13: 978-1466954397 by Charles More (B2 1960-65) Published by Pen & Sword Aviation, £25 ISBN-13: 978-1848327337

An important reassessment of a critical period in the British Expeditionary Force’s fight against the German armies

Aer nearly fiy years as MFH and huntsman of the College Valley Hunt, Martin Letts retired only when he could no longer follow his hounds through the steep rocky country found in England’s northern hills. In his new memoir Letts e Marlburian Club Magazine 103


On the Shelves Jack and Michael Whitehall. ‘is book is a portrait of the pretty odd relationship I have with my elderly father. It’s given me an opportunity to share memories of him losing his temper with foreigners on holidays, being rude to my mother’s family at Christmas and failing epically during the fathers’ race at my prep school. He’s also written some stories about me, but can I just say, before you read anything, that I recall being a calm, well-behaved and learned child, not the intellectually subnormal, malcoordinated dipshit that he paints me as. Nor am I, as he suggests inside, a sex addict, a flasher or a Scientologist.’ [ Jack] ‘How dare Jack refer to me as elderly! People always tell me how young I look for my age. In this book, I have at last been able to recount the many occasions when I have been let down by my only son. He failed on the stage, the sports field and he even screwed up the interview for his first boarding school by pretending he had mental health issues. Despite being practically illiterate, he tells stories about me, strewn with grammatical errors and peppered with endless exaggerations and lies. I was a kind, doting father, who guided his son through his formative years with love, care and respect.’ [Michael] Packed with anecdotes, some embarrassing and indiscreet, many warm and touching, Him & Me is lavishly illustrated with family photographs and Jack’s original illustrations. Friends, relatives, neighbours, teachers, actors, none are safe once Jack and Michael have opened up the Whitehall archives and shared their hilarious memories with us.

Blood and Sand (new edition) by Frank Gardner (LI 1974-79) Published by Bantam Books, £9.99 ISBN-13: 9780857502438

Incredibly, June 2014 marked the 10th anniversary of the attempt on BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner’s 104 e Marlburian Club Magazine

life. To mark the occasion his best selling memoir is reissued with an extended new chapter recounting his return to Saudi Arabia for the first time since that near fatal day, 6 June 2004, when Frank and cameraman Simon Cumbers were in Riyadh filming a report on Al-Qaeda and were confronted by Islamist gunmen. Simon was killed outright. Frank was brought down by shots in the shoulder and leg. As he lay bleeding in the street, a figure stood over him and pumped four more bullets into him at point blank range. Against all the odds, Frank survived. is is his remarkable account of the agonising journey he has taken since then – from being shot and le for dead to where he is today, partly paralysed but alive, travelling and reporting for the BBC once more.

It’s a journey that began 25 years earlier when a chance meeting with explorer Wilfred esiger inspired what would become a lifelong passion for the Arab world – a passion that would lead to his becoming a BBC journalist, that would send him on the journey that came to dominate – and nearly end – his life: his coverage of Al-Qaeda. Honest, moving, inspiring, Frank’s story both reveals a deep understanding of the Islamic world and offers a compelling analysis of the on-going ‘War on Terror’ and what it means in these uncertain times. Now updated, this reissue of Blood & Sand marks a watershed in the author’s life as he recalls his emotional return to Saudia Arabia for the first time since that fateful day 10 years ago.

Where My Wellies Take Me by Clare & Michael Morpurgo, illustrated by Olivia Lomenech Gill (MM 1990-92) Published by Templar Publishing, £17.99 ISBN-13: 978-184775442

Pippa loves staying with her Aunty Peggy. She loves going for walks, whether it’s sunshiny or cold – long, wandering walks where her wellies take her. Follow Pippa into the beautiful countryside as her day unfolds, and the wildlife, animals and people she encounters are complemented by relevant poems from some of our greatest authors, personally chosen by Clare and Michael Morpurgo. Part poetry anthology, part child’s scrapbook, this is a truly lavish project designed to instill a love of language in young children. (See also p43)

e Ten ousand ings by John Spurling (B3 1950-54) Published by Gerald Duckworth & Co Ltd, £16.99 ISBN-13: 978-0715647318

In the turbulent final years of the Yuan Dynasty, Wang Meng is a low-level bureaucrat, employed by the government of Mongol conquerors established by Kublai Khan. ough he wonders about his own complicity in this regime – the Mongols, aer all, are invaders – he prefers not to dwell on his official duties, choosing instead to live the life of the mind. Wang is an extraordinarily gied artist. His paintings are at once delicate


An English Baby Boomer: My Life and Times by Neil GM Hall (SU 1961-63) Published by Muncaster Press, £11.99 ISBN-13: 978-0952741220

and confident; in them, one can see the wind blowing through the trees, the water rushing through rocky valleys, the infinite expanse of China’s natural beauty. But this is not a time for sitting still, and as e Ten ousand ings unfolds, we follow Wang as he travels through an empire in turmoil. In his wanderings, he encounters, among many memorable characters, other master painters of the period, including the austere eccentric Ni Zan, a fierce female warrior known as the White Tigress who will recruit him as a military strategist, and an ugly young Buddhist monk who rises from beggary to extraordinary heights. e Ten ousand ings is rich with exquisite observations and John Spurling endows every description – every detail – with the precision and depth that the reallife Wang Meng brought to his painting. But it is also a novel of fated meetings, grand battles and riveting drama, and in its seamless fusion of the epic and the intimate it achieves a truly singular beauty. A novel that deserves to be compared to the classic Chinese novels that inspired it, e Ten ousand ings is nothing short of a literary event.

in north-west Pakistan and living in Istanbul. How did his 18-year-old ginger tomcat come to be buried in the Anglican churchyard in that fabulous and mysterious city? Other travels in the USA and Europe add grit to this eccentric tale. As Neil’s later life unfolds, eastern philosophical influences surface. Jokes, poetry, quirky tales, Baby Boomer popular history – political and social – plus blissful nostalgia abound in this charming book.

Near the Motorways (10th edition)

Baby Boomer Neil Hall’s very early days include life at an ex-Nazi U-Boat Base in occupied Germany, followed by dreamy times in 1950s England as the sun sets on e British Empire and before turbulent teenage years ensue at Marlborough. e successes and vicissitudes of running a business in London are tantalisingly peppered with a legion of quirky characters – the famous and not so famous. A brush with an Ambassador to the Court of St James’s adds high drama. Publishing his first book for his eldest son, the writer and journalist, Tarquin Hall, and dabbling in Hollywood filmmaking with his younger son, Alexander, spice up life… a few of the happenings in Neil Hall’s ordinary, but extraordinary, life. Perhaps, the not so ordinary is time spent in the wilds of the tribal territories

by Hugh Cantlie (C1 1941-46) Published by Cheviot Books, £14.95 ISBN-13: 978-0953992096

With some seventy-three changes this newly revised edition features even more affordable places as alternatives to service stations. Each entry will provide a meal or a quiet rest just five minutes from a motorway junction. e author

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On the Shelves has personally visited and selected over 200 entries in the guide, which are included for their ambience, friendliness, imaginative menus or peaceful surroundings. ey do not pay for inclusion so each is chosen solely on merit. Each entry is illustrated by a pen and wash drawing by the author, for ease of recognition. Special mention is made of the welcome for dogs and children and of any nearby places of interest. (See also p13)

Sidney Chambers and the Problem of Evil (Grantchester Mysteries 3) by James Runcie (B2 1972-77) Published by Bloomsbury Publishing, £14.99 ISBN-13: 978-1408850992

It is the 1960s and Canon Sidney Chambers is enjoying his first year of married life with his German bride Hildegard. But life in Grantchester rarely stays quiet for long. Our favourite clerical detective soon attempts to stop a serial killer who has a grievance against the clergy; investigates the disappearance of a famous painting after a distracting display of nudity by a French girl in an art gallery; uncovers the fact that an ‘accidental’ drowning on a film shoot may not have been so accidental after all; and discovers the reasons behind the theft of a baby from a hospital in the run-up to Christmas, 1963. In the meantime, Sidney wrestles 106 e Marlburian Club Magazine

with the problem of evil, attempts to fulfill the demands of Dickens, his faithful Labrador, and contemplates, as always, the nature of love.

e Executioner’s Daughter by Jane Hardstaff (LI 1982-84) Published by Egmont, £6.99 ISBN-13: 978-1405268288

The third in ‘The Grantchester Mysteries’ series – six detective novels spanning thirty years of British history – these four longer stories are guaranteed to delight the many fans of Canon Sidney Chambers.

Take Your Last Breath by Lauren Child (B1 1982-84) Published by Harper Collins Children’s Books, £12.99 ISBN-13: 978-0007334100

Ruby Redfort: Undercover agent, code-cracker and thirteen-year-old genius – there’s nothing average about her. Only this time it’s an adventure in the wild, and it’ll take all Ruby’s got just to survive… The third book (of a promised six) in the ice-cool Ruby Redfort series, this time tigers are

rilling adventure for children set in the underbelly of the Tower of London and on the ames in Tudor times. Moss hates her life. As the daughter of the Executioner in the Tower of London, it’s her job to catch the heads in her basket aer her father has chopped them off. She dreams of leaving, but they are prisoners with no way out. en Moss discovers a hidden tunnel that takes her to freedom, where she learns that her life isn’t what she believes it to be and she doesn’t know who to trust. Her search for the truth takes her on a journey along the great River ames. Could the answers lie deep in its murky depths?

e Whole Cow: Recipes and Lore for Beef and Veal by Christopher Trotter (B1 1970-75) Published by Pavilion Books, £25 ISBN-13: 978-1862059894

roaming the streets of Twinford, and it looks like someone has deliberately released some very rare and very dangerous animals. Things are going to get wild – and Ruby is going to get badly lost in the wilderness. The question is: will she ever make it out alive? Well, as always, you wouldn’t want to bet against her…

A highly acclaimed companion volume to e Whole Hog, this book is much more than just a cookbook. It is a unique blend of historical, geographical and culinary interest, together with clear explanations of how to cook the different cuts of beef and veal and over 100 delicious recipes from chef Christopher Trotter. It is a celebration of


anxiety and pain. Why and how sex, war, history, death, insecurity, hatred and loss – all the good stuff – make people laugh.

practitioners, academics, students and researchers, and all those in the child protection field.

Improving Child and Family Against All Odds Assessments: Turning by Michael Faunce-Brown (B1 1949-52) Research into Practice Published by iUniverse.com, £11.95 ISBN-13: 978-1475937329

the cow and all its variants. e book not only gives us every which way to cook with beef and veal, but also gives the history and importance of great and rare breeds, butchers’ recommended cuts and true head-to-tail eating. It includes the latest on ethical veal, which has attracted huge press coverage of late. Ethical veal has returned in force for consumers, its welfare-friendly credentials writ large across the blackboard. A must-buy for any meat enthusiast.

by Danielle Turney, Dendy Platt (CO 1966-71), Julie Selwyn & Elaine Farmer. Published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers, £25.99 ISBN-13: 978-1849052566

A Good Bullet by Freddy Syborn (B1 2000-05), illustrated by Jack Whitehall (B1 2001-06) Published by Short Books Ltd, £9.99 ISBN-13: 978-1780721699

“Doctor, doctor, what do you call a book about comedy that tries to be funny, argumentative, wide-ranging, silly, weirdly personal and fairly wellresearched?” “Doomed to failure.” Bullets are violent. Jokes are violent. Can either be used for good? What is “good”? A Good Bullet will make next to no effort to answer the last question because it’s too hard. But it will have a crack at asking why and how jokes commit violence. Why and how they amuse us with things that otherwise cause us

e quality of the assessment of children in need has a significant impact on outcomes for the children concerned. Good assessment contributes to better outcomes, but poor assessment can have tragic consequences. Understanding what makes a good assessment is vital. is book brings together findings from 10 years of UK research that shed light on different aspects of child and family assessment, and examines the evidence for what works in promoting the best outcomes for children. It covers thresholds for assessment and intervention, what information should be collected in assessments, and assessments in different contexts. It also examines key aspects of practice and the factors that can help or hinder good quality assessment. ese areas include analysis, critical thinking and reflection; engaging with children and families; and inter-professional working. Structural, procedural and organisational factors are also considered. In summarising the research, this important book provides key messages on the links between assessment and outcomes for children, and offers implications for policy and practice. Essential reading for social work

Tom Hartley, 17, fights for survival, orphaned and alone on sixty thousand acres of Queensland cattle property. “Kind” Kit helps him escape being put into Care, repairs the house, then enslaves him. He is a willing pupil of a barmaid and practices with the girl sent to help him. He fights off a depraved land grabber and joins the army in 1942 resisting the Japanese in Singapore. Aided by three soldiers, two pretty girls and an Indonesian boy, they wipe out an airfield and cause mayhem behind enemy lines. He must get vital war plans 3,000 miles to Australia in spite of a traitor. Action comes thick and fast; a mix of tragedy, impossible hurdles and a touch of Romance. e final turn of the screw awaits Tom on his return, as the bank manager goes off with his savings and traps him to await his fate.

Public Schools and the Great War by Anthony Seldon & David Walsh (C1 1960-65) Published by Pen & Sword Military, £25 ISBN-13: 978-1781593080

e book examines the impact which the Great War had on the Public Schools and the sacrificial contribution made to e Marlburian Club Magazine 107


How We Invented Freedom & Why It Matters by Daniel Hannan (BH 1984-89) Published by Head of Zeus, £20 ISBN-13: 978-1781857540

the 1918 victory. e war consumed about 22% of all the public schoolboys who fought, while the survivors were scarred by the loss of so many friends. Based largely on source material from school archives and histories, it moves from the naïve excitement of the summer of 1914 to the many moving stories that emerge from the carnage of the Western Front. It looks at school life in those war years, boys with their futures on hold and the prospect of death always very close, headmasters and staff devastated by the loss of so many young lives. About one distinguished headmaster, who died in January 1919, it was said that ‘the War killed him as straightly and surely as if he had fallen at the front’. e book ranges across many topics including the selflessness and pride of Public Schools across the British Empire and in Ireland; the role of the Officers Training Corps in militarising a generation; the letters written from the Front to teachers; the pride taken by schools in the VCs etc won by Old Boys; the statistical terms in which the Public Schools’ contribution can be David Walsh (C1 1960-65) measured; the co-author of Public Schools and the Great War ways in which schools commemorated the war, and still do today. Finally the legacy of the war is examined, both the effect on the schools themselves but also the contribution made by writers and artists to the disillusionment of the inter-war years. 108 e Marlburian Club Magazine

is book tells the story of freedom and explains how it is a uniquely ‘British’, rather than ‘Western’, invention. It shows how the inhabitants of a damp island at the western tip of the Eurasian landmass stumbled upon the extraordinary idea that the state was the servant, and not the master, of the individual. is revolutionary concept created security of property and contract which, in turn,

1940 Olympic Games in Barcelona. Enter Richard Clare, a British veteran of the International Brigade, returning to Spain in the hope of being reunited with his lover. row in Pablo Picasso, contemplating defecting to the West and a packed cast of secret agents of every stripe and you have all the ingredients of a classy espionage thriller. e vignettes of Barcelona are sharp and evocative.

Jewels of Somerset & Keeping Somerset Churches Alive led to industrialisation and modern capitalism. For the first time in the history of the species, a system grew up which, on the whole, rewarded production over predation. e system was carried across the oceans by English-speakers – sometimes colonial administrators, sometimes patriotic settlers – where in Philadelphia 1787, it was distilled into its purest and most sublime form as the US Constitution. Freedom is the key to the success of the English-speaking peoples and this book teaches us to keep fast to that legacy and, in our turn, to pass it intact to the next generation.

Saving Picasso by Mark Skeet (PR 1974-78) Published by Matador, £7.99 ISBN-13: 978-1780881966

Mark Skeet’s absorbing debut gives European history an ingenious tweak. Franco has been killed by a bomb, the communists have won the Spanish Civil War and the world is gathering for the

by Hugh Playfair (CR 1960-68) Both published by and sold in aid of the Somerset Churches Trust, £12.50 + £5 p&p

Two lovely and lavishly illustrated books on Somerset churches, involving superb photography and interesting script. Jewels of Somerset deals with stained glass in parish churches from 1830 while Keeping Somerset Churches deals with worship, pilgrimage and community in the county. Available from Hugh Playfair, Blackford House, Blackford, Yeovil, Somerset BA22 7EE / 01963 440611. Please enclose delivery address and cheque for £17.50 payable to ‘Somerset Churches Trust’.


Advertising he Marlburian Club Magazine is an A4 full colour annual publication circulated to over 10,500 OMs of Marlborough College, one of the UK’s leading independent boarding schools. Marlborough attracts pupils from across the southeast and southwest of England, with the majority of the alumni being found within the same region.

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e Magazine is also circulated to all 900 parents and guardians of current pupils at Marlborough College. Our research indicates the Magazine is read by between two and five AB1 readers per copy, and that it is kept for the whole year.

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is quality publication has always attracted very high quality advertisers. Each year we receive very positive feedback and year-on-year advertisers choose to book with us again.

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Advertising Sales Kate O’Connor, Development and Alumni Co-Ordinator, e Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire SN8 1PA Tel: 01672 892 384 Email: advertisingsales@marlboroughcollege.org

DISCOUNTS FOR OM OWNED AND LOCAL BUSINESSES

Your Network – Your Way Stay connected to your Old Marlburian community… your way Update your profile and join affiliated clubs and groups through the Members’ Area of the Club website… www.marlburianclub.org/members Join the Marlborough College alumni LinkedIn group

New Distribution Policy Only one copy of the Magazine is now being sent to each household. Members sharing an address may request their own copy or receive alerts for the online version through www.marlburianclub.org/magsubscription or the Club Office.

Online Click Like on e Marlburian Club Facebook page

is Magazine can be read on mobile devices and online www.marlburianclub.org/magazine

To receive e-newsletters update marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org with your latest email address

Wherever they are in the world, the Club is delighted to send OMs their copy of the Club Magazine. Mindful of using subscription funds wisely, we would be grateful if you could keep your record up to date with your latest address, either by updating your Profile on the Club Website, or by contacting the Club Office directly.

e Marlburian Club Magazine 109


Crossword Competition crossword by Alberich (C1 1976-80). Closing date: 31 March 2015. Please send completed entries to: Kate O’Connor, The Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire, SN8 1PA or scan and email to marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org

We were delighted to receive several correct entries for both of 2013’s crosswords (see below). e winner of the Moderate, the last puzzle set by the much-lamented late Tony Hall (B2 1943-48), was Charles Chamberlain (A2/B3 1953-57), while the winner of the Difficult, set by Alberich, was Charles Hastings (C1 1961-65). Both received a prize of cufflinks and the Club’s congratulations.

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110 e Marlburian Club Magazine

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2013 Crossword solutions

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Ten answers are members of a set and their clues are without definition. The remainder of the set and a unifying link between all its members appear in six clues, and need to be removed before solving.

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Brickie wants cheese in a couple of minutes (5) Could be Mars bar wrapper (4) Oliver Goldsmith perhaps making contribution to much effect (4) Most of rowing team le to open up locker? (8) Version of Aeneid omitting one name for the Muses? (6) Quarrel in springtime? (4) Bob recollected phaetons and other carriages (9) Son could possibly follow daughter, I fear (6) American writer nets millions (8) Two monarchs, one leader? It goes over one’s head (8) Speaker’s big and sturdy (6) Prince always provides harbour for one vessel or another (9) Hide problem? at’s imprudent (4) Envelope needs special seal when unopened (6) Type of yacht to be leaky at sea? at’s not unknown (8) I will plunge into river? Not half ! (4) Choice of borders for Yorkshire long ago (4) Note about Nineteen Eighty-Four initially riled Orwell? (5)

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Hockey team’s aer affordable London street (9) With part-exchange, was able to enter bar (5) Ales may ferment producing enzyme (7) Worcs town very briefly appearing in last bits of Graham Greene (e Quiet American) (7) One plots against part of church, meeting resistance (9) Light transport vehicles sold on the Internet? (5) Garish covers of stylish Fay Weldon novel entertain learner (6) Aer first of midday tea breaks nick a criminal (9) Exaggerate where government’s authority lies (9) I sleep in front of telly regularly, inappropriately (7) Spot-welder missing Tuesday? (7) Kelvin stands in for second bass in Figaro, perhaps (6) Place shown on street map’s a public square (5) Teacher’s no time for Buck Rogers? (5)


tHe marlburian ColleCtion 2014–2015

H i g H q ua l i t y m e m e n to e s o f marlb orougH College Ideal for birthday, Christmas or anniversary gis all profits from the Collection will go towards increasing bursaries and scholarships for a catalogue please telephone: 01672 892498 online at: shop.marlboroughcollege.org


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Marlburian Club Magazine 2014  

Marlburian Club Magazine 2014  

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