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NUMBER 114

WINTER 2013

e Marlburian Club Magazine Cover story: Peking to Paris or bust! Adventurers Michelle Jana Chan and Mike Reeves hurtle from Peking to Paris in a vintage car


Contents Features 07

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Rob Peal compares notes with other top OM graduates throwing themselves in at teaching’s deepest end

Totally inspirational John Bateson

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i’ll never forget...

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e Gunner Range

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My house

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oM entrepreneurs

Peking to Paris or bust! Adventurers Michelle Jana Chan and Mike Reeves hurtle from Peking to Paris in a vintage car

royal Peculiars 3: e gentlemen at arms Charles Macfarlane explains his role as one of HMQ’s “Nearest Guard”

BarChick, Zapper, Lichfields Ltd, Green Jersey French Cycling Tours

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Marlborough College and the Pre-raphaelites Richard Barker throws the spotlight on Marlborough’s Pre-Raphaelite heritage

rauJ: engine Driver Richard Hardy recounts the day ‘Jumbo’ Jennings put a steam locomotive through its paces

Marlburian Dynasties e Azis Family

Peter Hammerton on Littlefield

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oMs Teach First

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an actor’s life for Me… Andrew Shepherd meets thespians Paul Brooke and Ed Cooper-Clarke

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Successfully engineering good Careers Prof James Meredith surveys Marlborough’s finest engineers, past and present

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Marlborough legends: e Common Room Embroiderers

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oM Dambusters 60 years aer the iconic WWII raid, Dr Terry Rogers acclaims the Marlburians involved in its success

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e Marlborough–Swindon link e College’s educational out-reach work from 1882 to the present day

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Cover photography © Nikita Khnyunin

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Cinderella Trees

west meets east: Marlborough College Malaysia one year in

Prof Roger Leakey’s answer to the problem of malnutrition and poverty in Africa

Harry Wills reflects on his experiences as a Graduate Assistant in the new school

one to watch Alexandra Jackson meets rising educational star Nicola Huggett, the new Head of Blundell’s School

100 ose were the days Patrick Compton recalls the sound of leather on willow at MC in the 1970s and at other times

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Upfront From the Chair is year Letters to the Editor

The Club 14 e Club Secretary 17 Club Events 38 OM News 48 Engagements, Weddings & Births 49 Deaths 50 Obituaries 102 Sports & Club Reports The College 79 MC Foundation 80 1843 Society 81 Looking ahead 82 A change at the top 83 e Master’s Review 85 College Admissions Procedures 86 College News liTerary 94 Book Reviews 111 Short story: Nobody notices me 113 Crosswords

The Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire SN8 1PA Telephone +44 (0)1672 892 385 marlburianclub@marlboroughcollege.org www.marlboroughcollege.org Editorial and advertising enquiries: Telephone +44 (0)1672 892 385 Editor: Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81). Editor Emeritus: Martin Evans (CR 1968-). Editorial Board: Alexandra Jackson (CO 1974-76), Harriett Jagger (PR 1976-78), Rob Peal (BH 2001-06), Jane Pendry (Alumni Relations Manager). Design: Andy Rawlings. © The Marlburian Club 2013

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Upfront It’s been a long time coming, but all the jigsaw pieces are perhaps now finally in place. We have a Bursar (or rather a Director of Corporate Resources), Master, Second Master and now…praise be, a Director of Development. One or other of those has been on his/her way in, out or nonexistent for the last three or four years, and it is exciting to think that the excellent appointees to all posts have now got the chance to move Marlborough forward in a more clearly structured way than the recent years of flux have permitted. All have been introduced to you in previous editions except the last, Rachael Henshilwood, who you will find popping up at various intervals in this. e have also said some additional goodbyes this year, which may have less direct significance to the Club, but deserve equal recognition. Sir Hayden Phillips has been a most engaging Chairman of Council and a great supporter of the Magazine, and Lord (Mark) Malloch-Brown has a hard act to follow. As we go to press we also watch Martin Evans neatly side-step from Club Secretary into the Presidency of the 1843 Society, a capacity in which I am sure many of you will encounter him with even more greater frequency than you did when he was stretched to full tilt by the Club. ank goodness he therefore doesn’t warrant a goodbye as such, merely an enormous thank you for his incalculable contribution to the Club over the past 12 years.

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“Martin was of course my most illustrious and inspirational predecessor as Editor of this tome and I owe him much.” Martin was of course my most illustrious and inspirational predecessor as Editor of this tome and I owe him much. He remains (as his new appointment demonstrates) the fount of all knowledge in matters Marlburian, and as we all know, has an address book to die for. Who needs 4

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Debrett’s when they have Martin? I’m hugely relieved that he will still be readily accessible, for his advice is invaluable and the Club will surely wish to continue to avail itself of it. Congratulations Martin, and we look forward to continuing to see you at events, if in a different guise. Whilst on the subject of advice, as always thanks continue to be due to all who proffer it on the magazine’s behalf: the Editorial Board (Martin Evans, Alexandra Jackson, Harriett Jagger, Rob Peal, Jane Pendry), contributors (see pp1-116), subjects (ditto), proof-readers (Terry Rogers, Robert Smith), designer (Andy Rawlings) and back-up personnel ( Jo Brailsford-Finnis, Jane Gow, Ian Leonard). I also think it is time that the particular contribution to the Magazine and indeed the Club generally, of Jane Pendry was acknowledged “up front”. Over the last few years Jane has been a constant in an ever-changing world, and has devoted more time than anyone to the Club without exception. ere is nothing she hasn’t been required to do, she has been tested to her limits and has not been found wanting. Jane, we salute you! So what news of the Magazine? You will see that we have brought publication forward to match the school year rather than the calendar one, and we are also – at long last – available online (www.marlburianclub.org). So if you want to do your bit for the planet but stay

in touch, you can now opt out of receiving a paper copy (marlburianclub@ marlboroughcollege.org). Do keep reading us though; literally hundreds of OMs feature in the following pages, and if one article doesn’t float your boat, another might. We strive to satisfy all tastes and in that we reflect the Club itself, so do make the most of both and keep in touch. I continue to live in hope that a successor Editor might emerge from the ether, but meanwhile send you my warmest best wishes.

Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81) Editor


From the Chair At last year’s AGM the Club took the decision to establish the position of Chairman, in addition to that of President. e rationale supporting that decision was to provide a greater degree of continuity in the management of the Club as well as closer co-operation with the College and the Foundation. evelopments over the past twelve months have vindicated that decision. Not only has the Club been increasingly active in supporting a wide range of new initiatives for OMs but the personnel changes which have taken place, notably the arrival of Rachael Henshilwood as Director of Development and the retirement of Martin Evans as Secretary and his translation to President of the 1843 Society, mean that the Club is going through a period of rapid evolution.

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“e role of Chairman is to help bridge the gap between the Club and the Foundation, equal partners with the shared ambition of securing the future of Marlborough as the UK’s best co-educational boarding school.”

On the matter of appointing Martin’s successor, the Committee has decided to bide its time but it has agreed that a long standing, or recently retired, member of Common Room should be co-opted on to the Committee to act as a liaison with Common Room and the College. When Rachael has determined her staffing arrangements and responsibilities, we will be better able to identify the role of Club Secretary and at that stage the co-opted member might take on the role, or a better candidate for the job have been identified.

A number of OMs have expressed concern that these changes signify a move to subsume the Club within the College administration. I want to assure you all that, as long as I am Chairman, that will not happen. It is in the interests of the College, particularly at a time when it is implementing a significant development plan, to have a strong, thriving and, most importantly, independent Marlburian Club. e role of Chairman is to help bridge the gap between the Club and the Foundation, equal partners with the shared ambition of securing the future of Marlborough as the UK’s best co-educational boarding school.

Steven bishop (PR 1969-73) Chairman of the Marlburian Club

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is year It is an honour to have been elected President of the Marlburian Club 2013-14. When I was approached, I learnt that Christopher Martin-Jenkins (B3 1958-63) had already accepted the position but was seriously ill and might not be able to take it up. As I had known CMJ at school (my older brother Simon as his contemporary knew him far better) and as one of countless thousands who had revelled in his wonderful cricketing commentaries over so many seasons, I find myself stepping up to the plate – or, perhaps better, taking guard at the crease – with a deep sense of sadness at his untimely death. have not been an assiduous OM, but it is a good moment to try to put something back aer all these years. At a time when there is so much going on nationally across the whole field of education, my re-engagement with the College has revealed not only that the school is in great shape but also that, with a new Chairman of Council, new Master, new Head of Development and a new role of Chairman of the Club, there is, I sense, another wave of reinvigoration and renewal about to wash down the Old Bath Road. I hope that the Club can play a role in this. It remains an essential means of keeping OMs in touch and friendships alive, now made infinitely easier through the internet and social media. It can provide networking opportunities and advice for Marlburians whatever their

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career, profession or calling – likely to become more not less important in the tight, competitive jobs market of the foreseeable future. It is also a resource for the financial development of the College where OM philanthropy must have a growing contribution to make to the continuing success of Marlborough. I hope that I might be able to give all three objectives something of a nudge during my time as President. ank you for giving me that opportunity.

robin Janvrin (B1 1960-64) President of the Marlburian Club


Totally inspirational: Beaks who hit the spot Mezzo Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81), regular performer with international ‘Early Music’ ensembles the Academy of Ancient Music, Monteverdi Choir, English Concert and Choir of the Enlightenment, recalls the role John Bateson (CR 1973-98) played in shaping her future

y inspirational beak taught Modern Languages I think; I’m not actually sure. I was doing A Level Music, History and Maths, though the latter rapidly gave way to English. I first came across MJB in Chapel Choir, where he sang countertenor – a new breed to me, freshly sprung as I was from an all-girl school. He’d been unwell, wasn’t in good voice and the encounter was unremarkable. So whence the inspiration?

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In a bid to broaden our education beyond A levels, MC at that time (Michaelmas 1979) required every sixth former to study an additional Special Subject, to be chosen from a list of beaks’ pet passions. Regrettably I don’t remember the other goodies on offer for I didn’t look further than “Handel’s Messiah (MJB)”. I don’t think I had by then even clocked who MJB was, I just knew that Messiah was a work I should know more about, even though as an A level Musician it was not the most mind-broadening option I could have chosen. It would though affect my entire future. (Michael) John Bateson had been at Oxford with soprano Emma Kirkby. Pre-Raphaelite in appearance, with

flowing locks and a fondness for Schiaparelli-style crushed velvet gowns, Emma was the darling of both the fledgling ‘authentic’ music movement led by academic Christopher Hogwood and – one can’t help suspecting – John. Her pure treble sound enhanced by adult femininity was utterly bewitching and, released earlier that year, Hogwood’s recording of Messiah with the Academy of Ancient Music showed off her immaculate coloratura to dazzling effect. John was a committed Evangelist for both the cause of historical performance and the unassailable talent of EK; his mission was conversion, his medium the Special Subject, his targets: us.

Soprano Emma Kirkby Photo: Clive Barda

His classes, held in Benjamin ompson’s (C3 1976-80) attic room above Kennedy’s Tuck Shop on the corner of the High Street, not only taught us about Messiah through repeated playing of the recording and explanation of its particular interpretation, but also introduced us to the whole concept of historically informed performance in Baroque and Classical repertoire. e rapid tempi, exceptional accuracy, spare, vibrato-less sound of the

small original instrument orchestra and comparatively tiny forces of Christ Church Choir - all apparently recreating how Handel would have first heard his work - were revelatory and, backed by John’s enthusiasm, irresistible: we were his! I even gave the disc to my parents, stalwarts of the Oxford Bach Choir, for Christmas. ey were stunned by it: this was a first taste of Michelin-quality nouvelle cuisine for singers brought up on meat-and-two-veg. Having one eye on a choral scholarship, I was overjoyed when theory spilled over into practice. John’s Special Choir, a hand-picked bunch of like-minded geeks including many from the Messiah class, over the next year greedily ploughed its way through Taverner, Sheppard, White, Byrd, Tallis and a myriad of others, oen one-to-a-part and with as little vibrato as possible. John fed us repertoire then unknown to many experienced pros, taught us transposition and clefs, and tried unavailingly to control our zeal as we overthrew performance quality in favour of quantity. It worked: I duly sang my way into Cambridge and have sung for my supper ever since, oen in the Early Music domain. Fittingly, one of my first engagements was with Hogwood and the AAM and as I write I have just worked with the combo again. As a soloist I also sang Handel’s La Resurezzione in King’s alongside Emma Kirkby and in one of David Willcocks’ ‘Messiah From Scratch’ concerts in the Royal Albert Hall. John was much in my mind during the latter as I stood midarena surrounded by 5000 singers pelting out the Hallelujah Chorus. “Not quite his style,” methought, “but I wouldn’t have got here without him.” e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Now Johnny, or to be more formal Col REW Johnson* (B2 1919-23), was an OM well into his seventies and definitely of the old school. His entire life had been spent shooting and now he was organising it as a council member of the National Rifle Association. Not only was he hugely knowledgeable but also very enthusiastic, always encouraging us tyros with tales and tips. ere was something reassuringly impressive about shooting against Old Boys at Club Day and seeing their Great Britain shoulder flashes. I know this motivated quite a number to go on and shoot at an international level.

I’ll never forget... e Gunner Range Placed between the Science Labs and the Armoury, the Gunner Range, named aer an OM cricketer killed in the Great War (John Gunner, C1 1898-1902), was a green corrugated iron building some thirty yards long, where I spent many of my Tuesday, Wednesday and ursday aernoons during the Winter and Spring terms. I would slide in there hoping to find a seat next to the cast iron radiator. he shooters would be lying on a platform some six inches high covered with thick brown coconut mats, wearing orange ear defenders and elbow pads over their blue school jackets whilst concentrating on their brightly lit target twenty five yards away. Aer the crack of the last shot faded, they would clear away the empty cartridges, put their .22 rifles in the rack, and then and only then go to collect their targets. e next six pupils would lie down in turn, get comfortable and check their telescopes. Once everything was safe they were each given a wooden block with twelve bullets, two sighters and ten to count, before Johnny, the shooting beak, gave permission to shoot.

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One of the things I remember learning in the range was the importance of consistency. Johnny would get us to do “pokey drill”, which was repeatedly practising putting the rifle into our shoulders, loading, pulling the trigger and unloading to build up our muscles and improve our routine. Time and again this really paid off when we were shooting shoulder to shoulder with other schools. Also, it was in large part the reason why we did so well in league competitions. I remember one of the annual competitions was run by the magazine Country Life and consisted of shooting at a countryside scene where the individual shot could not see the actual one-inch target and had to be directed by a coach from behind. I regularly coached and I am sure that this has saved me many arguments when giving directions over the years! Yes, I have some fond memories and learned much in the Gunner Range where Johnny was a tremendous inspiration. It is a huge testament to him that so many of us have gone on not only to enjoy the sport but also to ensure that those Great Britain shoulder flashes continue to inspire the current generation of Marlburians. James “Fuzzy” Talbot (PR 1974-78) Captain of Shooting 1977/78

*e College Archivist adds: REW Johnson was a wonderful man with a long record of shooting at international level. In retirement he lived in Wiltshire and tirelessly coached and encouraged all boys who were remotely interested in shooting well into his 80s. He must have been over 90 when he died.


My House: Littlefield Peter Hammerton (LI 1997-2002) When I was asked to write this article my brain did two things. Firstly, panic slightly as it struggled to remember Littlefield in enough detail to write something worthy of reading (11 years had passed since I last resided there). e second was a rush of emotions caused by snap shots of formative teenage years flooding in, more of which appeared during my recent visit to the new and improved but ‘still comfortingly familiar’ Littlefield. n arriving at Littlefield for the first time no one could describe it as beautiful. Anyone who knows it will be aware that is was designed during a controversial era in British architecture. It has a somewhat austere and dated appearance and I used to refer to it as “the prison” when the inevitable time came to return to school at the end of the holidays.

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However, once settled in, you realised it was not a prison, it was a homely house to live in. I am still not entirely sure how the process of house allocation works, but I always felt in my case they got it right. I would guess that many of my contemporaries feel the same, a good handful of whom are still close friends. Littlefield always had a colourful mix of boys and girls from a broad range of backgrounds. Now undergoing some quite serious cosmetic surgery, it has a more modern and contemporary interior. A very good job has been done updating the bedrooms. ere has also been a complete re-fit of the basement which consists (to the best of my memory) of two TV rooms, a computer room, an old ‘new’ Library, not to forget the table tennis table, plus a couple of very smart bedrooms exclusively reserved for well behaved members of the sixth form. It is pleasing to see that some of the more period areas remain unchanged, such as the Dining Room, mostly wood-lined, with bench tables and photos on the walls. We would gather here at 7.30 every morning to consume breakfasts fit for a king, or two if a pink chit had been issued. One of the key differences and benefits of being in an outhouse was the morning time spent chatting exclusively with your own co-inhabitants before lessons began.

However, for me the fondest item remaining is the piano, still sitting alone in the corner of the dining room, waiting to serve its purpose. I used to play this tuneful upright almost every night, composing silly songs with friends. Somehow I do something similar for a living now. I am very pleased to see that, over a decade down the line, Littlefield still retains its homely atmosphere and distinctive musk, evoking many fond memories. e renovations seem to be just what is needed to keep the house up to date and I hope many more generations of Littlefieldians will enjoy their time there as much as I did.

Peter Hammerton is now a music industry aficionado: consultant at Sony Music UK, songwriter, producer and founder of the Mode Showband. www.modeband.com e Marlburian Club Magazine

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RAUJ: Engine Driver Richard Hardy (C3 1937-40) Hubert Wylie (CR 1927-59), my legendary Housemaster, was a man for whom I had an enduring respect and who wisely supported my choice of a railway career starting in January 1941 with a hard life on the shop floor in Doncaster Locomotive Works, for which Marlborough had prepared me well. But Hubert had also been talking to another great Housemaster, a certain RAUJ (CR 1927-66), who had an abiding interest in railways and to whom Hubert sent me to listen and to talk. From those small beginnings there developed a mutual interest which blossomed into friendship many years later.

Above: The ‘Maestro’ at work under the cheerful supervision of Driver Bert Hooker. RAUJ has his hand on the well-opened throttle, 73037 is hard at it climbing Hinton Admiral bank with a heavy train, whilst on Reginald’s face there is an expression of pure joy! Above right: Southampton Central Station on the down journey to Bournemouth. Our engine is a beauty, the perfect introduction for RAUJ, a smooth riding flyer of the ‘Merchant Navy’ class, originally built in 1942. We are filling the 5000-gallon water tank, more than enough to take her through to Weymouth. The two men from such different worlds are already completely relaxed in each other’s company.

ounded in WWI, Reginald Jennings had been fascinated by the route taken by the hospital train which took him from Dover to Plymouth: the direction of travel changed three times, but when and where? He liked nothing better than making long journeys using remote branch lines and he was saddened by the closure of the line through Marlborough in 1961. At the top of the private path from the Bath Road into Littlefield he placed the old station sign for Wilby, a tiny halt on the Mid-Suffolk Railway closed in 1952, to the bafflement of unwary visitors who assumed they had come to the wrong house.

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By the 1960s, the steam locomotive was doomed but Reginald Jennings still had not achieved his ambition of travelling with the driver and fireman of a steam 10

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locomotive at high speed. e trouble was that one could never pin him down, until 1966 when I told him that it was his last chance. He took it and there he was at the country end of Basingstoke station waiting for us on the 9.30am from Waterloo and to receive a welcome into our private world of the footplate that he never forgot. e driver was Bert Hooker of the Nine Elms depot in Battersea, in his early 50s, a first class engineman and railway man in every way. His young fireman, Alan Newman, who was in later years to rise up the ladder, was taking it easy as far as Bournemouth as I was keeping myself fit doing the firing, which, I may say, is as much an art as is the driving of a steam locomotive. So we sat Reginald on my seat and young Alan explained to him what was happening and that we should soon be


up to 85-90 mph down the grade from Litchfield Tunnel, a brief stop at Winchester and more high speed until we were on the doorstep of Southampton, where we had to stop exactly in the right position to take on water. en it was on to “Brock” and fast to Bournemouth Central, where our guest’s day really began. Bert took RAUJ into an empty messroom on the station while his mate went to make the tea and by the time I had washed (for I was pretty black), I found the great man and Bert Hooker sitting side by side, deep in conversation, eating their sandwiches and addressing each other by their Christian names. Now this was 1966 when such apparent familiarity was unheard of yet here it was, as natural and unaffected as if they had known each other a lifetime. By and by, we walked across to the up platform, our train ran in and we relieved the Weymouth men who opined the engine was “alright but a bit of a rough old nag”. Certainly she proved to be “a rough ’un” but strong and free-running, for we were on the footplate of a very useful class of engine, a BR 5, 73037, yet so different to the smooth running ‘Merchant Navy’ that we had brought down from Waterloo. We were to stop at all stations to Brockenhurst and I was doing the driving when Bert came across and whispered in my ear in his Cockney style: “Ritchit, shall we let Reginald have a little drive?” Good for Bert, for it was a question I would never ask of a driver.

When I told Reginald he was going to be the driver from Christchurch, he said he daren’t do it, but we soon prevailed, Bert stood behind him, told him exactly what to do and literally held and guided his hand on the brake valve when running at speed into the stations. And I got the camera out and captured forever the pure joy on the face of the Marlborough man as he got the hang of things and the happy, serene look on the face of his instructor. We reached Brockenhurst exactly on time and I relieved Reginald so that he could relax on the fireman’s seat and enjoy the ride through the New Forest to Southampton whence he would catch a train across to Salisbury and home, having enjoyed the experience of a lifetime. As for Bert, this was far from being the end of his story, for he was invited to the Jennings’ home in Salisbury where he got on extremely well with Miriam and her family. When the diesels came and there was time to spare at Salisbury, he would slip up home for breakfast when he was on the early turn. And then Robert Avery (CR 1968-90) and the MC Railway Club discovered that they had a real railwayman in their midst and invited Bert to speak about his railway life; to say that he held his audience spell bound is putting it mildly. I was at the back of the room watching and listening to a natural speaker who brought everything he said to life, for he too was enjoying the experience of a lifetime! In fact as we arrived in the

aernoon, there had been time to wander round C3 and I was able to reconstruct for Bert the scene in the early days of the war. For example, there was one very large dormitory with a species of bathroom next door. e baths were of copper set in a standing wooden frame and filled by a can. You sat in the bath with your legs dangling outside and to empty it, the plug was pulled and the water ran away across the sloping floor. Bert was thunderstruck! Reginald Jennings died on 3 September 1987 and Bert Hooker took it hard, for he had an infinite respect for the older man. So, a few weeks later, we took the train from Waterloo to Salisbury and unhurriedly walked on towards the great Cathedral where a service was to be held in memory of the life of the legendary Marlborough schoolmaster. It was indeed a memorable service, arranged by his children, Robert and Sarah, and Bert was deeply impressed and moved by Peter Brooke’s (LI 1947-52) address. A large congregation, all of whom had known him intimately, packed the chancel. But there was one who was different: Bert Hooker Engine Driver, who had welcomed RAUJ aboard his engine and then insisted that, under his guidance, he should take charge of the locomotive working a heavy passenger train. e instant rapport between the two men had been remarkable and it held strong to the end.

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OM Entrepreneurs Zapper e Founder: Ben Hardyment (C2 1984-88) e Business: Online buyer of books, CDs, DVDs, games and gadgets in return for cash e Beginning: Having sold a DVD rental-by-post business, Webflix, to LoveFilm, the lessons learned were taken on into another high volume, low margin enterprise this time built with proprietory technology e Eureka Moment: Becoming the UK’s top seller of used copies of e Da Vinci Code e Dough: Boot-strapped until website launch, then business angels for seed funding. Winning a record investment offer from BBC’s Dragons’ Den didn’t hinder the next round... e Keys to Success: Any business is challenging - competition always hammers the margins. Early failure is therefore helpful. en, critically, start again in a similar field: lessons will have been learned. Only experience gives true confidence; potential investors need to see that in spades e Present: 1,000,000+ books, CDs, DVDs and games bought and sold via website and iPhone app e Future: Becoming an exciting UK export success story with launches in the US, Europe and Asia. Sufficient in-house technology now in place to enable zapper to become a global ‘BuyBack’ brand: the race is on! e Nitty-Gritty: www.zapper.co.uk

Green Jersey French Cycling Tours

e Dough: Private funding; as with all start-ups, endless bills before it started coming back in!

e Founder: Charlie Bladon (C1 1984-89)

e Keys to Success: Leaving nothing to chance; believing ‘acceptable’ is not acceptable; questioning whether everything possible has been done?

e Business: Cycling holidays along the best roads that our Continental cousins can offer. Both scheduled rides and bespoke trips - surprising, the number of people who want these. Also niche Battlefield tours by bike e Beginning: Waking up one morning and resolving not to be the one who regretted not doing it followed by late nights in the attic and notebooks full of ideas and figures e Eureka Moment: Aer the Beijing Olympics, when the number of cyclists increased massively. e market appeared on the streets virtually overnight

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e Present: Busy, busy, busy cycling is now mainstream e Future: In 2014, a 200-rider event along the Western Front in aid of ABF e Soldiers’ Charity, leaving Horse Guards on the exact centenary of the outbreak of World War I. Riders and sponsors welcome! Followed by global domination of the leisure industry e Nitty-Gritty: www.greenjerseycycling.co.uk


Lichfields Ltd e Founder: Ed Tryon (C1 1993-98) e Business: Prime central London property search and acquisition e Beginning: March 2007 e Eureka Moment: Switching from sales agent to buying agent in 2005, a move born from a desire to provide a more personal level of service to clients. e industry was in its infancy at this time and there was an opportunity to become the market leader in a sector with huge growth potential e Dough: e company was founded jointly with Tom Lichfield, a lifelong friend, with £100,000 of seed equity in

the form of directors’ loans, since repaid. Lichfields has been self-funded and in profit since 2011 e Keys to Success: A strong reputation for delivering the very best service, a proven track record and emphasis on developing closer relationships with developing markets, specifically Russia and China e Present: Lichfields was named Spear’s Wealth Management Property Advisor of the Year 2012/13 e Future: e launch of a prime central London residential property fund within the next five years e Nitty-Gritty: www.lichfields.com +44 207 100 0550

BarChick e Founder: Tatiana Mercer (EL 1998-2003) e Business: A principally web-based guide to the best bars in the world, begun in London but now covering 50+ cities around the world – including New York – and staffed by over 100 BarChicks (including Daisy Blount (MM 1998-2003) & Louise Corbin (MO 2000-05)). BarChick also contributes to over 20 publications worldwide, from the Evening Standard to EasyJet and Maxim e Beginning: Quitting a job in finance to start a bar guide... a bit of a risk! e Eureka Moment(s): Being offered a column in the Evening Standard early on and Tatiana being voted one of the 1000 Most Influential Britons in 2012 e Dough: A very generous and patient business angel in New York e Keys to Success: Understanding what people want, keeping things up to date, having fun, plus a team of very hard working people (including many OMs) e Present: An amazing new app with more than 30,000 downloads: more bars, more cities, more fun e Future: making sure BarChick is the best bar guide in the world e Nitty-Gritty: www.barchick.com

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e Club Secretary It certainly does not seem twelve years since I succeeded John Uzielli as Club Secretary but it has been a pleasure and privilege to work with, and get to know, so many OMs during that time. Although I am now exchanging the role for the Presidency of the 1843 Society, I hope that particular aspect of life will not change!

here have been many memorable events over the years, ranging from the Garden Party to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of girls arriving at Marlborough in 1968 (the same time as I arrived in Common Room) to innumerable Dinners, Receptions, Leavers’ Reunions, Past Presidents’ Lunches, overseas visits and sporting events. On a more sombre note, I was also particularly proud to attend the unveiling of a beautiful brass plaque in St. George’s Memorial Chapel in Ypres, dedicated to the 749 Members of MC Boys, Beaks and Staff - who gave their lives in e Great War 1914-18. More recently it was also a great privilege to represent the Master and the College, alongside the President who represented the Club, at the Memorial Service for Christopher Martin-Jenkins (President Elect) held in St Paul’s Cathedral in April 2013, as part of the congregation of 2,300.

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I have worked with 6 Masters: John Dancy, Roger Ellis, David Cope, Edward Gould, Nicholas Sampson and Jonathan Leigh and have also enjoyed working with some illustrious Presidents, both male and female, during my period in Office, as well as some excellent and dynamic Committee Members too. I also edited six editions of the Club Magazine before handing over to the more youthful Susanna Spicer, who is doing such a fine job. 14

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Huge thanks must go to Steven Bishop, the current President, and to Jane Pendry, the Alumni Relations Manager, who have both helped make e Marlburian Club more professional enabling it to reach many more Members. I would also like to thank the Master, Jonathan Leigh, for encouraging me to take up the role of President of e 1843 Society, which

“I have thoroughly enjoyed my time as Club Secretary and made many good iends amongst the OM Community.”

aims to thank those who have been kind enough to think of Marlborough in their Wills. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time as Club Secretary and made many good friends amongst the OM Community. To have been associated with such a fine school and its alumni since 1968 has been a great honour and privilege.

Martin Evans (CR 1968-) e Club Secretary

Diary dates ursday 21 November 2013 North West Area Dinner Port of Liverpool Building, Liverpool ursday 5 December 2013 Film, TV & eatre Industry Reception e Only Running Footman, London Monday 16 December 2013 2012 Leavers’ Reunion e Atlas, Fulham, London Tuesday 14 January 2014 Insurance Industry Reception Lloyd’s Building, London Sunday 6 April 2014 SW France Lunch Le Castera, Haute Garonne, France Wednesday 5 March 2014 Annual Dinner Royal Automobile Club, London

ursday 24 April 2014 Edinburgh Dinner e New Club, Princes Street, Edinburgh Monday 19 May 2014 “Vino & Victuals” Stationers’ Hall, London ursday 5 June 2014 Gloucestershire Dinner yme Manor, Southrop Sunday 28 September 2014 Club Day and 50 Years Plus Reunion Marlborough College Details of all Club and affiliate events can be found on the website. www.marlburianclub.org/events/ calendar


A Different Hat Martin Evans (CR 1968-) steps down in October 2013 as Marlburian Club Secretary and dons a different guise as President of The 1843 Society. Immediate Past President and current Chairman of the Club Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73) and Alumni Relations Manager Jane Pendry jointly pay tribute to an irreplaceable Club figure, on behalf of innumerable devoted OMs. Martin Evans has star quality he words ‘a difficult act to follow’ don’t come close to describing our Club Secretary. Martin is approaching the end of his 45th year at the College, during which he has been a teacher of History, English, Chinese (reputedly), a House Tutor in most houses, a Junior House Master, Senior House Master, Corps Commander (Naval section), Master in charge of debating, Head of Prep School Liaison, President of Common Room, Club Secretary… the list goes on. Above all he has been a friend and mentor to countless boys, girls, fathers and mothers who have passed through Marlborough.

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Martin famously loves the aristocracy, grand titles and post nominals, but he is also genuinely interested in everyone he meets, forming instant bonds with waiters in restaurants, small children, elderly OMs and yes, even lords. A phenomenal memory for names, faces, and biographical details, his instant recall of obscure facts never ceases to astound. It is impossible to repeat one of Martin’s stories. Too much would be lost in translation. Full of embroidery, elaboration, colour and humanity, and always with exquisite timing, Martin’s tales take on an epic quality but oen include some small topical reference or human detail that make them compelling. Everyone’s gis are also their curse and Martin’s are no exception. is can sometimes make him irascible but he is quick to apologise and set things right again. His easy charm and sincerity inspire instant forgiveness, and usually much laughter too.

MCWE with members of the Club Committee before the June Meeting: Olivia Timbs (C1 1970-72), Ian MacKichan, Treasurer, (PR 1974-79), Harry Vickers (SU 2000-05), Steven Bishop, President (PR 1969-73), Andrew Baines (B 1973-79), MCWE, Ivo Clifton (SU 1981-86), Colin Cooke-Priest (LI 1952-57), Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81) and Robin Janvrin (B1 1960-64). Committee Members absent from the photograph are James Abell (C3 1975-79), Roger Backhouse (C3 1974-79), Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67), Andrew Grant (1977-81), Imogen Hendricks, née Skeggs (BH 1979-81), John Manser (PR 1953-58), Patricia Morison (C1 1970-72) and Jack Naylor (C2 1975-80)

We are delighted that, when Nick Sampson put the suggestion to him, Martin agreed to retain his links with the College by becoming the first President of e 1843 Society. His wealth of experience and knowledge of all things Marlburian, not to mention his wit and repartee, will remain an invaluable asset to the Club and the College. Which is just as well, as Marlborough without Martin just wouldn’t be the same. Cartoon of MCWE by Past President Alan Gillett (C2 1944-48) e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Life at the centre Many of you have commented that e Marlburian Club seems to be more lively and active these days. You are right. orgive the business speak, but a recent benchmarking exercise showed that OMs are now more engaged with e Marlburian Club, the College and each other than ever before, with alumni engagement having grown by an incredible 65% since 2009.

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Last year, over 760 of you took part in our first online survey; we took note of what you had to say. For example, 67% of OMs who responded were interested in joining specific industry networking groups with many actively wanting to support current pupils and young OMs with their careers in these challenging times. Consequently we launched the OM Finance & Banking (p22) and the OM Film, TV & eatre (p25) Groups earlier this year. Further groups covering Engineering, the Creative Arts, Medicine, Law, Insurance and Small Businesses & Entrepreneurs are in the pipeline. We aim to stay in regular touch, through the Magazine and Summer Update, ClubConnect e-newsletters, surveys and targeted emails, but we are delighted so many of you contact us through the wonders of modern technology, as well as by phone, email and letter.

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In between times, you may like to keep abreast of Members’ and Club News by subscribing to an RSS feed on www.marlburianclub.org, clicking ‘Like’ on www.facebook.com/ eMarlburianClub or joining our Marlborough College Alumni group on LinkedIn. Did you know you can also update your record and post your own news directly on the website yourself ? Nothing beats meeting face to face of course. Every year, over 60 events are organised by the Club Office or one of our 50 volunteer Affiliated Club Secretaries ‘on the ground’ and I very much hope our paths will cross in the coming year or very soon thereaer.

Jane Pendry Alumni Relations Manager


Club Events SW Area Lunch 23 September 2012 Despite pouring rain, 34 OMs from the South West and representatives from the College enjoyed a very convivial lunch at the Somerset home of Past President Tony Hill (CO 1949-53). 2012’s President, Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73), welcomed OMs of all ages, many of whom were attending their first Club function for many years. He also welcomed Dr Chris Stevens, the Second Master, who answered a range of College-related question. Steven also thanked Susan Boss, mother of Barnaby (CO 1986-91), and Valerie Everard, who co-hosted the event. Major Terence Knox (CO 1940-44) was the senior OM present, with fascinating stories to tell of life at MC during the war. He was joined by two other wartime pupils: John Mercer (C2 194348) and Peter Tennant (B1 1943-47). Jenny Balfour-Paul (B1 1968-69) and Simon Michel (C1 1965-69) had both been part of a group travelling through Afghanistan and India 30 years ago and hadn’t met since! e youngest present was Charles Caton (B1 1997-2002), who went on to play in the Malones v Old Clionians Match at Clion the following Saturday.

Anthony Carr (B1 1948-52) and SW Secretary, Robert Drewett (C3/BH 1972-77)

Peter Tennant (B1 1943-47), Second Master, Dr Chris Stevens and Corisande Tennant

Photography © Anthony Robinson

Janny Balfour-Paul (B1 1968-69) and MCWE

Michael Hender (SU 1952-56) and John Mercer (C2 1943-48)

Cecilia Bishop, Robin Mackay (LI 1962-66) in the background, and his wife Marianna

Terence Knox (CO 1940-44) and David Dufour (B2 1946-50)

Joan Donovan, co host and sister of Tony Hill (CO 1949-53), Susan Boss and Kay Pavitt e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events e Governor’s Cup 29 September 2012 Over 90 OMs and guests attended a celebration of the oldest inter-School Rugby fixture in England, first played in 1864 between the Rugby XVs of Clion and Marlborough; the 2012 Governor’s Cup was decisively won by Marlborough. As part of the day’s celebrations, the Malones also played the Old Clionians. Despite new kit and a well-fought game, the Old Clionians won but the Malones have challenged them to a return match next year, when we hope honour will be restored. OMs attended lunch in an elegant marquee, where a display of photos of earlier XVs prompted fond memories and lively discussion. Jane Gow, née Green (B3 1982-84), was delighted to spot her father, David (CR 1962-95) in the photo of the 1964 line up. e oldest member present was Gale Coles (B2 1945-49) who came to see his great nephew, Tiger Foot (SU 2009-), play. Gale was able to identify a photo of his great uncle, Harry Graeme Vassall (B1 187982), a legendary player who represented both Oxford and England in the early years of the sport. OMs, current parents and pupils enjoyed a hugely memorable day and were delighted to have shared Clion’s special commemoration.

Tiger Foot (SU 2009-), who played for the current XV, with his great uncle Gale Coles (B2 1945-49) 18

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Ed Gregg (C2 1988-93) and England Rugby Coach, Stuart Lancaster

Mark Foulds (B3 1983-88), Trent Ward (C1 1977-82 ), MCWE and Chris Ward (C1 1979-84), Trent’s cousin

Members of the XV from the Clifton Centenary game in 1964, with the touch judge’s flag from that match, at the Clifton / Marlborough 150th anniversary of the fixture. L to r: standing Nic Ratiu (CO), Philip Matthews (B3), James Glancy (PR), seated Jon Thornton (B3) and David Allen (C1), who unearthed the flag and other memorabilia from the 1964 game. Bottom far right, David Badenoch (LI 1963-66), from a later XV.

The OM Malones playing Old Cliftonians for the Governor’s Cup


Club Day 6 October 2012 2012 saw one of the most successful Club Days yet, with over 280 OMs and guests attending. At the AGM, members voted for a change in the Constitution, passing a motion to appoint a Chairman whose role will be to ensure that Club Members’ interests are fully represented within the Marlborough Association. Following the Master’s speech at the Reception in e Marlburian Social Club, the sight of the OM Beagles gathering in Court before their Meet delighted all. A hearty roast lunch in the Norwood Hall was then followed by College tours by pupil guides, and exhibitions of MC in the 1980s/90s and Rare Books in the new Heywood Building. Former Head of History, David Du Croz, delivered a talk and film on ‘e Real Marlborough Castle’ to a packed Ellis eatre and the day finished with a ‘40 Years On Brasser Reunion’ organised by Club President, Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73), and the current Head of Brasser, Alex Arkwright (CR 1995-). Conducted by the legendary Bob Peel (CR 1960-91), the concert thrilled players and audience alike and aerwards the Common Room bar buzzed with enthusiastic Brasser players, some of whom had not picked up an instrument or visited the College for many years. Finally, the Beaglers, celebrating their 60th Anniversary, held a Dinner in the Common Room Dining Room, rounding off a particularly memorable day.

Club day visitors mingling with The Beagles in Court

Bob Peel (CR 1960-91), former Head of Brasser, with OMs and pupils gathered for the Brasser Reunion

OM Beaglers join Palmer Marlborough Beagles in Court

Rev David Campbell (CR 2012-), the Master and Rev Charlotte Bannister-Parker (C2 1979-81)

Millmead 2001 Leavers’ Reunion 27 October 2012 Rosie Wintour organised a very successful reunion of the 1996-2001 Millmead cohort when housemates caught up on the last 11 years over a delicious lunch hosted by Lucinda Greasley’s parents, Sharon & Roger, in Ramsbury. Olivia Reade’s engagement to Tim Jeans was celebrated, along with the birth of Lucy Murdock, nee Parker’s (MM 1996-97) second child, Noah Frederick, who was only 5 days old!

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Club Events Hong Kong Reception 31 October 2012

South East Asia Dinner

Many OMs, parents, and prospective parents gathered at the Hong Kong Club for a reception organised by OM HK Club Secretary, Chua Guan-Hock (B1 1978-82) to greet the new Master, Jonathan Leigh, and his wife Emma. e Master updated everyone on developments at both Marlborough in England and in Malaysia. e evening reception was preceded in the aernoon by a very well attended event in the China Club’s Library, when MC Malaysia’s Master, Robert Pick, was able to provide much information about the new school to all interested parties.

2 November 2012 e 2012 South East Asia Dinner was held at Marlborough College Malaysia with a guest list that included Wiltshire Master Jonathan Leigh and his wife Emma, former Wiltshire Master Nicholas Sampson (Master 2004-12), members of the Council and over 80 OMs from across the region. ey joined MCM’s Master, Bob Pick (CR 1980-2012) and his wife Ali, for the first of what they hope will be many OM events at the newly opened school. e generosity of CJ Lim (C2 1970-75), Club Secretary Malaysia, who provided Domaine Leflaive wines, and of H-Y Lau (C2 1970-75), Club Secretary Singapore, whose interpretation of the Marlburian spirit included a gi of four bottles of fine Scottish mature malt whiskies, ensured the evening was a hit.

East Sussex Dinner 16 November 2012 e President Steven Bishop addressed 17 fellow OMs at the Star Inn in Waldron for the fih annual East Sussex gettogether: drinks and dinner concluded with the usual rousing rendition of e Old Bath Road. ose present included Gale Coles (B2 1945-49) and John Anderson (C3 1949-54) and Rob (BH 2000-05) and Imogen (EL 19962001) Williams, representing the older and younger membership respectively. e Club Secretary was also a guest this year. e first event was initiated by Jeremy Coltart (PR 1950-54), but 2012’s dinner was arranged by Robin Bather (B2 1955-60). If you would like to attend in future, please contact him on robinbather@hotmail.com

President Steven Bishop leads the singing of the Old Bath Road. Michael Virtue (C2 1949-54) is seated on the left 20

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Yvonne Parmenter, Tunku Abiddin,Henry Jeens (BH 1995-2000) and Izzy Pyper (MO 2002-05)

Emma and Jonathan Leigh and Tig Mooney, Head of Marlborough Malaysia Prep School

Al Fresco Drinks Party in Dubai 21 November 2012 Departing from their usual more formal dinner format, Club members in Dubai this year gathered for a Drinks Party, overlooking the waterways of the ‘Venice’ of Dubai. e get-together was as usual a great success, particularly appealing to younger OMs in the region, although William (C2 1984-89) and Miranda Wells, née Lescher (B3 1987-89) are planning a more formal event for 2013.

Back row, Edwin Lawrence (C3 1990-95), Jonathan Peters (C2 1971-76), William Wells (C2 1984-89), Oliver Williamson (C3 1993-98) Front row, Miranda Wells (B3 1987-89), guest Edwina Higham and Henry Adair (C2 1996-2001)


Reception at the House of Lords 29 November 2012 An extremely large turnout of OMs, wives and other guests attended a Reception at the House of Lords, coming from as far afield as Australia, Brazil, Italy, France and... Aberdeen. An excellent evening began with tours of the Houses of Parliament, followed by wine, canapés and fine company in the Peers’ Dining Room. President Steven Bishop introduced Lord Goodlad (SU 1957-61), the host of the evening, who in turn introduced the Master, Jonathan Leigh, who briefly summed up his first term at Marlborough. It was good to have other OM Peers there too, and David Beamish (B3 1965-69), Clerk to the Parliaments, in his 18th century uniform.

The Atlas in Fulham

2011 Leavers 17 December 2012 Peter Beresford-Stooke (C2 1955-60), Miles Stockwell (C2 1957-61) and Alexander Kennedy (SU 1956-60)

Host Lord Goodlad (SU 1957-61) and Lady Goodlad

Roddy Wells (C2 1972-77) and Jack Naylor (C2 1975-80)

Gervase Poulden (B1 2002-07) and guest

Richard Sudworth (LI 1955-59) and his wife, Bridget

President Steven Bishop welcomed over one hundred 2011 Leavers to e Atlas in Fulham for what is traditionally the loudest OM event of the year. He and the Club Treasurer, Ian MacKichan (PR 1974-79), finally slunk away at 9pm; rumour has it that many of the others were subsequently spotted in a West End club. Benedict Kay (PR 2006-11) writes: “is was our first reunion since leaving Marlborough and it gave us a real taste of the Marlburian Club’s hospitality and friendliness. e turnout was impressively high, with only a few faces missing… Attendees came from as far afield as New Orleans and Hong Kong with news of the wider world. It was terrific to hear about the wide range of things OMs had been getting up to since leaving school, which varied from university, to film school, to studying abroad. A few prosperous ones were even earning their living! It was lovely to catch up with everyone and it was particularly nice to see how everyone still enjoyed each other’s company even though we have all begun different lives. e drinks were flowing freely, for which we were all grateful, and everyone seemed to be on top form…e evening was rounded off nicely with an eloquent toast from Phoebe Hall (MM 2006-11), who thanked the Marlburian Club and all the attendees for making it a night to remember.” e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Club Events OM Banking & Finance Group Launch 29 January 2013 e OM Banking & Finance Group was launched with a magnificent reception at Buck’s Club, Mayfair, with over 50 OMs from the worlds of banking, accountancy, wealth management, broking, trading, hedge fund management, equity finance and insurance present. e Master, Jonathan Leigh, thanked the new OMB&FG Secretary, Imran Tyabali (LI 1989-94) and spoke of his plans for the College. President Steven Bishop then explained the background of this carefully segmented group, which has been made possible by recent investments in technology and the Club website. For further information please visit www.marlburianclub.org/financegroup

James Hender (SU 1985-90), Chris Page (LI 1965-70), Richard Brown (C1 1965-70) and Committee Member, Andrew Barnes (B1 1973-79)

Careers ‘Speednetworking’ Event 26 February 2013

Chris Bishop (PR 2000-05) discusses a career in equities with pupils

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Jan Perrins, Development Officer, with Past President Sarah Hamilton-Fairley (B2 1974-76)

Charlie Cottam (C1 1982-87) and Christopher Jack (C1 1971-77)

James Montgomery (C1 1999-2004), Chris Bishop (PR 2000-05) and William Hutton (BH 1999-2004)

e Marlburian Club and Careers Department’s first career ‘speednetworking’ event le pupils buzzing. Club Committee Member Harry Vickers (SU 2000-05) gathered a team of 15 young OMs to support the initiative, which aimed to help Marlburians in the Hundreds explore and discuss career options. Ed Colclough (B1 2000-05) (Insurance), Charlie Kendrick (C1 1998-2003) (Wealth Management), Hugo Adair (C2 1999-2004) (Accountancy), Chris Bishop (PR 2000-05) (Equities) and Zinka Bozovic (EL 2000-05) (Financial PR) represented the Finance & Banking

Industry; different aspects of science and engineering were covered by Matt Humphrey (C1 1994-99), James Lydiate (SU 2002-07) and Henry Price (CO 2006-11), while irza Deboo (SU 1997-99) shared her experience as a GP in the Marlborough Practice. Julian De Segundo (C2 1999-2004) and Rebecca Naylor (MM 2003-08) spoke about Law, while Alex Greer (C2 1998-2003) and Chris Bovey (SU 2000-05) covered Marketing and Sports Event Management respectively. Feedback from both pupils and OMs was very positive and we hope to repeat the event next year.


Marlborough College Malaysia official opening 24 February 2013 Marlborough College Malaysia was officially opened by HRH Raja Zarith Sofiah Binti Almarhum Sultan Idris Shah, consort to the Sultan of Johor, on 24 February 2013: a historic occasion. e invitation-only event for over 900 guests saw 300 dignitaries including the Menteri Besar of Johor, YAB Dato’ Haji Abdul Ghani bin Othman, His Excellency Simon Featherstone (the British High Commissioner to Malaysia), the Rt Hon Francis Maude (Minister of the Cabinet Office), the Council of Marlborough College UK, the Council of Marlborough College Malaysia, approximately 500 founding parents and pupils, OMs and other friends of MCM meet to celebrate the day.

HRH Raja Zarith Sofiah is greeted by Sir Hayden Phillips, Chairman of Council, Marlborough Wiltshire

“Marlborough is thrilled to have a presence in Iskandar Malaysia. We have been delighted with the response to the College and the opportunities it presents for future generations of Marlburians. We have always believed in a well-balanced, all round, holistic education where young people are aware of their surroundings and their responsibility to society. Our new school, which has outstanding facilities, caters for both day (age 4-18) and boarding (age 9-18) pupils and is part of the family we are proud to call Marlborough,” said Robert Pick, MCM’s first Master.

John Manser, Chairman of Council, MCM, looks on as HRH Raja Zarith Sofiah unveils the opening plaque

Lion Dance celebrating the Chinese New Year and to bring good luck to the new school

The Master, Bursar and Council of Marlborough College Malaysia

The celebratory lunch

HRH Rajah Zarith Sofiah and the Master chat with MCM pupils

The Outreach charity cake sale

MCM’s choir entertains the guests

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Club Events e Marlburian Club Annual Dinner 2013 6 March 2013 e Annual Dinner was as usual held in the elegant surroundings of the Royal Automobile Club. Both David (B3 1955-59) and Tim Martin-Jenkins (B3 196165) attended and appreciated the minute’s silence held in memory of their late brother Christopher (B3 1958-63), who was due to have been the Club’s President this year. e Master, Jonathan Leigh, updated guests on the College and Past President Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81), celebrated a significant birthday. A table of former XV members organised by James Glancy (PR 1961-65) and another of the current OM Football Team enlivened the evening, and the spread of ages attending and the number of OMs organising tables was terrific. Just under 130 attended; an excellent turnout.

Charlie Laughton (TU 1994-99), James Allan (C1 2002-04), Will Harvey (PR 2006-11), Dan Black (C3 1999-04), Harry von Behr (B1 2001-06), Barney Harris (B1 2001-06), Alan Hamilton (C2 2003-04)

Air Marshal Ian Macfadyen (C2 1955-60) and his wife Sally

Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81), Jane Pendry (ARM), Katrina Ure (B1 1979-81)

Hugh Toler (TU 1971-77) and Charlie Macfarlane (CP 1967-71)

Mini Reunion in Turkey 22 March 2012

Back row: Rafe Courage (C1 1977-81), Jules Irens (C1 1982-86), MCWE, Martin Spurling (B3 1979-85) and John Wilkinson (CR 1967-1993). Front row: Barbara Spurling and Theresa Courage

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e presence of the Club Secretary and John Wilkinson (CR 1967-93) in Istanbul led to a delightful Drinks Party in the city’s imposing Pera Hotel (where Agatha Christie wrote Murder on the Orient Express) attended by Julian Irens (C1 1982-86), now Political Consul in Istanbul,

Rafe Courage (C1 1977-81), Deputy Consul General, and Martin Spurling (B3 1979-85), CEO of HSBC in Turkey. Rafe and Martin were accompanied by their wives and the party continued over dinner at a local restaurant. Julian kindly hosted Martin and John for the night and the three subsequently attended the Palm Sunday Service in Istanbul’s English Church, where John volunteered to play the organ, to the delight of all.


OM Film, TV & eatre Group Launch

LinkedIn Link-up

4 April 2013

Aer starting the Marlborough College Alumni LinkedIn group in October 2008, Tom Tuke-Hastings (BH 199095) felt it was high time his 650 members had the opportunity to meet in person. So with the help of colleague Jo Furnival (LI 2002-04), an area was reserved in Monument’s Clause Bar and the champagne was put on ice.

e inaugural OM Film, TV & eatre Event at e Only Running Footman in Mayfair, organised by Douglas Ronald (B2 1964-68), was a great success with almost 30 attending, including OMs, parents and three current pupils interested in a career in the creative arts. Some arrived on the way to or from work, including Jack Whitehall (B1 2001-06), who popped in prior to a live performance nearby, and Carola Stewart (LI 1970-72) who appeared in great style towards the end of the event having come directly from filming. Damian Jones (TU 197882), producer of Oscar winning film e Iron Lady, made a surprise appearance too. If you would like to join the OM Film, TV & eatre Group, email jpendry@marlboroughcollege.org

9 April 2013

Over thirty people turned up over the evening, with alumni ranging from ‘71 to ‘05 leavers and many in between. It is hoped this will be the first LinkedIn link-up of many. LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional network with over 120 million members. It connects trusted contacts and helps members exchange knowledge, ideas, and opportunities with a broader network of professionals. If you are a member, do click-on and join Marlborough College Alumni.

Past Presidents’ Luncheon 23 May 2013 e Past Presidents’ Lunch was once again held at Buck’s Club, Mayfair and hosted by the current President, Steven Bishop, and his wife Cecilia. e Master and Mrs Leigh were guests and he kindly spoke about the College. e President detailed the Club’s excellent progress and paid warm tribute to the Club Secretary, Martin Evans, who in October 2013 exchanges his Club post for Presidency of e 1843 Society. John Worlidge, the senior Past President present (1987-88), kindly stood in for the genuine Senior Past President Sir Eric Yarrow (1984-85) and also thanked the Club Secretary for all he had done for the Club’s Presidents over many years.

Ben Gutteridge (B3 1994-99), Oliver Azis (LI 200106) and Freddie Waters (CO 2001-06)

The Master addresses the Club’s Past Presidents

Peter Bedford (President 1988-89) and Tony Hill (President 2010-11)

Damian Jones (TU 1978-82) and Tom Jelinek (CO 1998-2003)

Jack Whitehall (B1 2001-06), Theodore Neilson (CO 2009-) and MCWE

John Worlidge (C2 1942-46) addresses the Past Presidents

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Club Events Young Marlburian Fund Launch

Rugby XV First Tour Reunion Dinner

4 June 2013

8 June 2013

On a perfect summer’s night, OMs and friends between the ages of 18 and 40 gathered at Tonteria, Sloane Square in June to raise funds for the Young Marlburian Foundation’s bursary scheme to help a talented child, currently not within the private system, be educated at Marlborough. ere was a fantastic turnout, with everyone there keen to give something back. From the open bar of frozen margaritas to the Marlburian ability to ignore the threat of work the next day, the event was a huge success, raising over £12,000. It’s not too late to donate to this excellent cause: visit www.marlburianclub.org to find out how.

18 of the original 24 1989 Rugby XV members - the first team to go on tour joined nearly 200 current Marlburians and parents for a sumptuous dinner in the Norwood Hall to raise funds to take 40 pupils on a rugby tour of Singapore and Eastern Australia next year, to play against some of their best rugby schools.

e OMs, sympathetic to the cause, were particularly generous with their bids in the fundraising auction and the target figure was reached. e Rev Daf Meirion-Jones (PR 1983-88) paid very eloquent tribute to team member Rupert Spurling (B3 1982-87) who died prematurely 3 years ago and is very much missed, but otherwise the evening was an extremely cheerful one. For a fuller, very amusing account of the evening by Mark Foulds (B3 1983-88), please visit www.marlburianclub.org/affiliates

Back row: Mike Chapman (LI 1982-87), Charlie Troman (C3 1983-88), Richard Thomas (CO 1983-88), Tom Cheshire (BH 1982-87), Nick Cook (C1 1983-88), Daffyd Meirion-Jones (PR 1983-88), Jim Petter (PR 1983-88). Middle row: Mark Riley (C3 1982-87), Harry Reeves (C1 1982-87), Bill Barnes Yallowley (C2 1982-87), Alex Northcott (B1 1982-87), Adam Knight (C2 1983-88), Nick Mak (B1 1983-87), Stuart Kerr (SU 1983-88). Bottom row: Mark Foulds (B3 1983-88), Chris Ludlam (CO 1983-88), Stuart Thomson (CO 1984-88), David Crawford (B3 1983-88) and Jim Evans (B2 1982-87)

B3 1941-47 Biennial Reunion 15 June 2013 Antonia (SU 2002-04) and Tessa (TU 2001-03) Packard, whose Young Marlburian Foundation Committee organised the June fundraiser

Littlefield Reunion 23 June 2013 Over 60 former members returned to their old house to inspect the recent renovations at a specifically Littlefield-orientated reunion, which was a tremendous success. For full details and slideshow please visit www.marlburianclub.org 26

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Generations of Marlburians are familiar with the ancient Sun Inn in Marlborough’s High Street. Recently refurbished and renamed e Marlborough, it reopened just in time for the biennial reunion of veteran B3 members. 16 OMs who le the College between 1945 and 1951 and nine of their wives attended. Organiser David Henson (B3 194548) briefly welcomed the assembled company and Tom Davies (B3 194145) later gave an interesting insight into FM Heywood (Master 1939-52).

Heywood became Warden of Lord Mayor Treloar College on leaving Marlborough; Tom was one of his housemasters. We were also delighted to be visited by the Club’s President, Secretary and Alumni Manager during the course of the aernoon.

David Henson (B3 1945-48)


Marketing/Languages (Gillette) David Whitlam

2013 Careers Fair OMs and parents provided much support for the Marlborough College Careers Fair on 4 March 2013 attended by the Lower Sixth. Representatives from the most popular employment sectors were invited to give a series of three seminars each to small groups of pupils, whose appreciation of the aernoon was great. ose taking part included:

Medicine/Surgery (NHS) Dr Bee Martin (Parent) Psychology (e Priory Group) Dr Judith Miller (Parent)

Advertising (Brandstory) Chris Harvey (Parent)

Engineering (Siemens Wind Power) Will Sheard (LI 1997-2002)

Architecture (Henley Halebrown Rorrison) Simon Henley (CO 1981-85)

Graphic Design (Sunhouse Creative) Tom Maurice (TU 1988-93)

e City (Evercore Partners) Anthony Fry (Parent)

Hospitality & Event Management (Laureate Education) Jan Champney

Chartered Accountancy (Spofforths) Andrew Dunlop (Parent)

Investment Management/Stockbroking (Rathbones) Ivo Clion (SU 1981-86)

Consultancy/IT (HCL) James Spender (C2 1987-92) / Graham Biggart (C1 1971-76)

Law (Osborne Clarke) Robert Drewett (C3/BH 1973-77) & Fi Mason

Public Relations (Tulchan Communications) Andrew Grant (B3 1979-81 & Parent)

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Peking to Paris or bust! Michelle Jana Chan (TU 1990-92) and Mike Reeves (C1 1989-94) race half way around the world, followed from afar by Imogen Hendricks, neé Skeggs (BH 1979-81) e Peking to Paris Motor Challenge was first run in 1907 by Prince Borghese, an Italian industrialist, politician, explorer, mountaineer and racing driver. In 1907 there were almost no prepared roads, most people would not have seen a car before and roadside help with possible breakdowns would be minimal: pause for thought. It was another 90 years before it was re-run, and 2013’s was only the fih of these rallies, which are billed as one of motoring’s greatest adventures.

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Endurance Rally Association

.ru Nikita Khnyunin www.khnyunin

rews of both Vintage and Classic cars embark on a seriously eccentric and wacky race across some of the world’s most inhospitable regions and through a few politically shaky areas: the route takes participants through China, Mongolia and the Gobi desert, then into eastern Russia, travelling north of Kazakhstan into the Ukraine and through Eastern Europe to the grand finale in Paris.

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Many entrants are in cars over 70 years old, embarking on a rally of 7,610 miles (12,247km). Crazy? “Definitely not,” say OMs Michelle Jana Chan and Mike Reeves, who competed in the 2013 Rally for 33 gruelling days. Michelle is a freelance writer and broadcaster who posted some fabulous articles in e Daily Telegraph throughout; Mike, her partner and co-driver, is a co-founder of yacht designers Claydon Reeves. ey were one of 96 crews from 26 countries taking part. e third member of their team was ‘Shiner’, Car 38, an immaculately restored and rally-prepared classic 1940 Ford V8 Coupé. Bought on eBay from Danny in Michigan, unseen, she was shipped to England in a very dilapidated state, but aer leaving Marlborough, Mike had taken a 4-year degree in California in Car Design. Rally rules decree that whilst some of the interior of the cars may be

modernised for safety (seat, steering wheel and seatbelts), everything else, including the engine and all mechanical parts, must be of the period. Mike points out, “cars of that age are so simple, everything is laid bare when you open the bonnet; it is self-evident when they go wrong.” Or should be… Whilst Shiner was being prepared and painted a beautiful Old English white with a bold red and gold Chinese dragon on one side and a French red, white and blue Coq Gaulois on the other, Michelle and Mike spent a year making their own preparations. ey honed their driving skills on gravel in the Atacama, mud in the Masai Mara, sand dunes in Namibia, ice in Val d’Isere and undertook a crash course in intensive navigation to help see them through some of the more “thinly” mapped parts of the globe. From the beginning Michelle was upbeat and bullish. "Eat our dust!" she exclaimed beforehand. "We may be relatively young and inexperienced but we’re in it to win it…” is team wasn’t just there for the ride. e starting flag fell on 28 May at the Juyongguan section of China’s Great Wall. As Shiner purred through the Beijing smog to the start, modern cars slowed to give her the thumbs up. e couple’s competitive spirit meant that not only did

“Michelle and Mike had built a road cage into Shiner. But no one was prepared for this tragedy: a local man had fallen asleep at the wheel of his VW Polo, crashing head on into Car 39, a 1970 Chevrolet driven by two Britons.”

Nikita Khnyunin

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they want to win for themselves, but beat the Chevrolets, in true Ford-Chevy rivalry tradition; Chevys had also won the last two rallies. eir start felt good, much better than that of the Canadian team in a 1928 Ford Phaeton - who never made it, having got lost on the way from the hotel and the 1927 Vauxhall 14/40 that became the first car to leave the race, having to be hauled away by truck with a totally seized engine just a few hours from the start. By Day 3 Shiner had achieved 1st place, a position she maintained for 3 days. Both drivers said aerwards that losing that lead proved a real low point, but that it showed them how critical it was that they achieve a fundamental change of mindset. Success wasn’t going to depend on having a car that ran perfectly every day, but on embracing each situation as it emerged; the race wasn’t just about the fastest car, but about ingenuity in dealing with every situation. In one day in Mongolia they dropped from 1st to 6th place, thanks to extremely serious issues with Shiner’s suspension. Many teams had underestimated the grueling hardness of the rough Mongolian roads when traversing them at 120km/hr. Aer leaving Ulaan Baatar, and to prevent them getting bogged in a marsh, Michelle and Mike had had to “porpoise violently for about 100m.” ey knew they were smashing their suspension to pieces… and they were right. Shiner had to be towed by tractor to a local mechanic’s backyard, where they got help fixing the suspension and fashioning part of the gear stick, which at one point had come clean away. In Mongolia they had also had to fix a gear linkage and a cable to the accelerator, their suspension was shot and they had had no brakes for 40 km. ey also suffered many

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flat tyres, mostly due to a faulty pressure gauge - it felt like everything that could go wrong, had. A few emotional tears from Michelle marked the beginning of a very long period of exhaustion. Both drivers explained that every day they would be driving through unforgiving terrain only to have to spend most of the night, up to 10 hours, making repairs, before they could set off the next morning: “fixing…always fixing, fixing.” ey also found it nigh impossible to sleep whilst playing passenger. One day Mike, driving, stopped. Exhausted, he asked Michelle to take over. Having got out while Michelle shuffled over into the driver’s seat, he didn’t re-appear; Michelle found him curled up, fast asleep in Shiner’s shade and already snoring. On Day 12, in south-west Siberia, they received news that cast a shadow over the whole journey. Approaching a time trial, they heard it had been suddenly cancelled. Sketchy rumours began to filter through that there had been an accident. Two cars in Mongolia had already overturned but with no injuries; everyone knew the risks. Michelle and Mike had built a road cage into Shiner. But no one was prepared for this tragedy: a local man had fallen asleep at the wheel of his VW Polo, crashing head on into Car 39, a 1970 Chevrolet driven by two Britons. e driver of the Polo and a baby in his car were killed instantly, as was Emma Wilkinson in the Chevy, while her partner and co-driver suffered minor injuries. Emma’s two brothers were also taking part in the race in a 1926 Bentley; it was a highly emotional and sad day for everyone. Most wondered whether the race should be halted; some were even loathe

to drive on. But in the end all agreed the rally should continue. Shiner continued with more mechanical hiccups, of which Mike and Michelle managed to keep mostly abreast. No horn, indicators or windscreen wipers; both windscreens cracked and a side window broken; one cooling fan working only when it felt like it and more flat tyres. en with the end in sight, Day 28 proved another show changer. Somewhere between Kosice and Bratislava the team lost both gears and clutch. Try as they might, they couldn’t work out what was wrong, but one of the rally’s mechanics slid under Shiner and 3 hours later reemerged with the problem solved. ey were off again, but suffered serious time penalties, dropping from the lead to nowhere in the European Trophy that had been instigated as a separate prize. But the Alps would help them. e organisers had set up very competitive and ambitious times for the mountain runs. Competitors had to push their cars uphill at full power in high altitude and then descend with bad brakes, forcing them to use their gears. Cars not already ruined soon were! But Shiner did our OMs proud. ey may have not triumphed in the European Trophy, but on Day 33 they reached Paris, achieving a magnificent 3rd place in the Vintage category. e winner was a much-rivaled Chevrolet Fangio Coupé and 2nd, a Chrysler 75 Roadster. e prize for such a feat? A magnum of champagne. But what an achievement: completed, one of the greatest tests of endurance and human spirit on the circuit! So what now…another rally, or is Shiner now merely the family car…? e debate goes on.


Cinderella trees: a fairy tale solution to sustainability in Africa? Harry Vickers (SU 2000-05) is inspired and fascinated by the groundbreaking work of Professor Roger Leakey (B1 1960-64) have heard it said that Marlburians oen bravely take the route less trodden in tackling big challenges. Roger Leakey (B1 1960-64) is a shining example of this: he has come up with an entirely plausible solution to one of the great challenges facing humanity – how to farm sustainably in the tropics without destroying the environment and, while doing so, help li poor farmers onto the bottom rung of the cash economy. e severity of this particular challenge is illustrated by the fact that 70% of these farmers – who make up nearly half the world’s population – are malnourished and very poor.

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Roger’s method of tackling hunger and poverty in tropical rural communities is based upon a remarkable career spent turning culturally important wild fruit and nut trees into a new generation of crops. Arriving in Marlborough from East Africa in 1960, Roger found himself at the bottom of Shell E. Five years later, having discovered Biology, he le unclear where his career was going, but with a passionate wish to improve the lives of Africans. Now more than 50 years later, through

initiatives that run counter to conventional wisdom, that wish has borne fruit – literally. Many fruits unfamiliar to most people are becoming new tree crops. Central to his philosophy is the message that governments and development agencies need to take a fresh look at where agriculture is going. He argues that by applying horticulture to an array of little-known edible plants we can create new highly nutritious food crops and also capture the benefits of the bugs and beasts that live around them, which keeps the cycles of nature working properly and positively for mankind in general – especially in connection with processes affecting soil health and carbon sequestration. As the current Vice Chairman of the International Tree Foundation and former Director of Research of the World Agroforestry Centre, Roger has come up with a clear action plan that sees rural communities in tropical countries benefitting from what he calls “Cinderella” trees. ese are species which have until very recently been ignored by formal

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Equator Prize winning community in the Highlands of Cameroon show their enthusiasm for agroforestry

Researcher in Papua New Guinea propagating a Galip Nut tree

Farmers in Cameroon discussing Safou fruit

Harry Vickers recently co-authored the Little Forest Finance Book for the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and completed his Master of Environmental Science and Management degree at the Bren School, University of California in Santa Barbara. He is now working for Lightsource Renewable Energy as a solar project developer. Roger Leakey’s latest book, Living with the Trees of Life: Towards the Transformation of Tropical Agriculture, is published by CABI; ISBN: PB: 9781780640983 / HB: 978-1780640990; £59.95/£27.50

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science, in the same way that, as Roger puts it, “the beauty and talents of the hardworking Cinderella were ignored by the fun-loving ugly sisters”.

local people. Consequently, the approach being developed is one of participation by rural communities so that they can improve their lives in many different ways.

Roger’s extensive travels to remote forests and rural markets all around the world have contributed to his argument that Agroforestry could hold the key to resolving many of Africa’s problems. It started with a ‘eureka’ moment as he explored Kumba Market in the Southwest Province of Cameroon. In amongst the wonderful sights, smells and colours of the market, he found himself, “looking at stalls laid out with a wide range of unusual looking fruits, nuts, dried tree bark and other products” that he could not identify. He suddenly realised that he was looking at something that fitted naturally with the societal and environmental circumstances of the local people but which had enormous potential elsewhere. ese food products were coming from indigenous trees that required relatively low maintenance, were providing nutritious food to rural communities while simultaneously providing a vital ecological service. And yet, these ‘Cinderella’ trees were being ignored in discussions about food poverty in tropical countries, to the indigenous populations’ clear disadvantage. ere and then he resolved to become their ‘fairy godfather’. In doing so, he has spent the last 20 years conducting research which is now itself bearing fruits and becoming recognized both formally in scientific circles, but more importantly by tens of thousands of poor farmers in hundreds of communities, who now see realistic opportunities for a better life.

He points out the extraordinary fact that over 20,000 plants have edible parts and yet we have domesticated a little over 100 food plants from them. By turning this around he foresees better ways of producing food in areas of tropical forest and semi-arid savannahs; ways which are more sustainable, yet more intensive; which promote wildlife, and the tradition of culture of tropical peoples. His ideal is a highly adaptable 3-step model for agricultural practices – practices which already have the young people of a few communities saying that they now want to continue living in their home villages, rather than try to find employment in local towns and cities.

Having myself a strong interest in this field, my acquaintance with Roger’s work suggests to me that his research is unravelling secrets of new products for national and international food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical markets previously only known to local inhabitants. Roger is adamant, however, that the benefits from these developments must remain with the

For Roger, an approach to farming that embraces multifunctional agriculture is the key to small rural communities feeding themselves. By utilising trees and the traditional practices indigenous to rural tropical communities, evidence is emerging that that these communities are indeed able to achieve this, and that in the process they are helping to preserve their environment – and even our global environment – for future generations. ere is little doubt that the challenge of feeding an ever-increasing population on a finite planet will be a defining part of the 21st century. is challenge will be felt most painfully in Africa, where high poverty levels and a changing climate inflict famine upon millions. At a meeting of the UN Environment Programme Governing Council, Roger was asked by the late Professor Wangari Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize, if Africa would be able to feed itself in the future. He confidently responded, “Certainly, yes, it can.” Let us all hope he is proved right.


One to watch: Nicola Huggett Alexandra Jackson (CO 1974-76) meets the new Head of Blundell’s School Of late, female OMs have frequently hit the headlines if not for their twitter feed, then for their knack of choosing high profile husbands and partners – Carney, Cameron, Cambridge, Clough, Osborne, and, dare I say it, Bercow, spring to mind. Few people would sniff at the opportunity to have access to this sort of power and influence and, it is fair to say, several of these women are pretty successful in their own right too.

hat said, independently successful ones are harder to find, especially in the more conventional professions. (Note to Editor: expect backlash from indignant OMs keen to prove me wrong.) But Nicola Huggett, née Chambers (B1 1985-87), appointed in January 2013 as first female head of Blundell’s School in Devon, does much to make up for this surprising shortfall.

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In a neat coincidence, between 1992 and 2004, Jonathan Leigh, MC’s latest Master, was headmaster of this interesting school endowed in 1604 by Peter Blundell, a hugely wealthy clothier. Unfortunately for Blundell’s, little of this endowment for an entirely free school survives, although its generous spirit continues up to a point, allowing pupils living within 10 miles of the school gate to get a fih off their fees. Nicola Huggett is about as perfect as can be. Not only does this Oxford-educated mother of four look even younger than her 44 years, with a freshness and quiet confidence which would make even the most tentative parent hand over their children to her straight away, but she is also a marathon runner and international eventer. And she is very nice. How annoying is that? Huggett learnt about horses early on as her mother was a Berkshire Pony Club stalwart. Indeed, it would seem that this early influence explains much of her understated determination and drive. She herself admits that there is nothing more demoralizing than being eliminated at the first fence; learning to cope with this sort of disappointment is an invaluable life lesson, she says. Riding led to Huggett’s arrival in the B1 sixth form in 1985. Being driven past the College gates by her parents towing horseboxes whetted her appetite for what was within. But even so, for a girl from tiny St Gabriel’s in Newbury with 150 pupils in the whole school, Marlborough in the mid 1980s must have been a startling experience indeed. She stood amazed whilst, amongst other things, girls were marked out of ten in Norwood Hall and many boys could be seen to be more influential and powerful than their beaks. She learnt to keep her head down and watch. Although Huggett says, modestly, that she had an unremarkable career at e Marlburian Club Magazine

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“Not surprisingly, the recently graduated Huggett was in demand, rejecting offers om Andersen Consulting and PWC in favour of the graduate programme at advertising giant J Walter omson.”

Huggett strives for excellence in all that she does and leads by example. Even now, as Head, she likes nothing more than wandering into boarding houses in the evening, clad in jeans, to meet her pupils. Having Holby City actor, Tom Chambers, as a half-brother, who also won Strictly Come Dancing a few years ago, must be good for breaking the ice. Being able to see children in every aspect of their lives is essential, she says, adding that by knowing the whole child and acknowledging their interests, you can spot strengths and weaknesses that may not be apparent in the classroom. is approach, she thinks, is invaluable in understanding an adolescent’s potential.

Blundell’s School

Marlborough, there was already an independent, go-getting streak. Whilst at the College she learnt how relying on her own resources, even in small things, could get her where and what she wanted. us, by turning up for every hockey fixture, albeit as reserve, she regularly played in matches and, with better than expected A levels, won a place at Oxford to read PPE. If Huggett’s time at Marlborough made her aware of the opportunities life offered, by the time she got to Oxford she was well able to put into action what she had previously only observed. us at St Hugh’s she was variously captain of the Boat Club and chair of the ball committee whilst also captaining the University Riding Club. Successful multi-tasking was underway. Not surprisingly, the recently graduated Huggett was in demand, rejecting offers from Andersen Consulting and PWC in favour of the graduate programme at advertising giant J Walter omson. But London life was not for her. Huggett asked for a year out to explore other options and, whilst shadowing a teacher at a Newbury comprehensive, experienced a Damascene moment that convinced her that teaching was a hugely powerful tool and fun as well. “I don’t know why no one had mentioned it to me before,” she muses. us a PGCE back at Oxford followed, and very soon she was teaching politics at Haileybury, where her husband, Spencer, had been a pupil. 34

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During the next twelve years, when Haileybury became fully co-ed and adopted the IB, she learnt her trade thoroughly, becoming a housemistress and Head of Boarding while also starting her own family. In 2007, Huggett moved to Downe House as Deputy Head. She is unashamed about this seemingly contradictory move into the single sex fold, even if she is now safely back at a co-ed school. In her view there are strengths and weaknesses in both approaches: girls in single sex schools are more ambitious and drive each other harder and will be more inclined to opt for traditionally male subjects such as physics and engineering. She does concede, however, that they miss out on growing up alongside boys and the normality that this brings. Although Blundell’s has day pupils, flexi-boarders, weekly boarders and full boarders, Huggett is a firm believer in the underlying tenets of boarding school education. She observes that teenagers respond well to consistent boundaries set by caring professionals. Whilst acknowledging that every parent cares deeply for their child, she remarks that parents are frequently inconsistent with their children, especially those who do not see them every day. As for her own, Huggett’s 15-year-old daughter remains at Downe, whilst her 12-year-old son and 9-year-old twins moved to be with her at Blundell’s, which also has a Prep School. She wisely sends her husband to parent/teacher meetings.

Indeed, it is this interest in children which Huggett identifies as the single most important characteristic of being a good teacher. Love of subject comes second, she believes, as without the former, the latter will not follow on. One of Huggett’s great sadnesses as a head is that teaching per se can become a distant memory. To minimize this inevitability, she still teaches one class, and continues a tradition, established by Jonathan Leigh, of breakfasting with small groups of pupils most days. is detachment from the everyday life of a school is a problem for most heads, as schools become multi-million-pound businesses with economic, brand and marketing issues at the fore. Huggett’s time in advertising becomes entirely relevant in this context and begs the question as to whether a teacher or a business-orientated administrator/ marketeer is the more appropriate person to head a large school. From Blundell’s’ point of view, Huggett’s commercial awareness, helped also by having a businessman for a husband, must be particularly valuable. Nicola Huggett is an excellent example of how Marlborough showed a shy girl from a local day school what opportunities were there for the taking and is a fine role model for all Marlburians. She is certainly one to watch. And you heard it here first.

Alexandra Jackson is an erstwhile City analyst and financial journalist, now a Marlborough parent and JP.


OMs Teach First Robert Peal (CH 2001-06) Had I been told a few years ago that on finishing university I would become a history teacher in an underperforming Birmingham comprehensive school a stone’s throw from Spaghetti Junction, I would have been alarmed. In fact I would have assumed something had gone wrong during my degree. At that stage I had not heard of Teach First.

“Some days I felt that I didn’t stop sweating and I would be in constant panic mode, getting through on pure adrenalin.”

t is still hard to comprehend how Teach First has been so successful. It was founded in 2002, with the idea of taking graduates from top universities and sending them to teach for two years at underperforming, inner-city state schools. Participants are given six weeks of training over the summer holiday and are then thrown straight into work as a full-time teacher. Remarkably, there are seven applicants prepared to take on this daunting prospect for every place and Teach First has now placed more than 3,700 teachers in English schools. It is now the single largest recruiter of graduates

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from Oxford and Cambridge and the third largest graduate recruiter in Britain. Teach First is posed as a challenge. For those who take it up the promise is that it will make you stronger, but not before severely testing you. is has certainly been the case for Charlotte Duncan (EL 2002-07). Two years ago she was sent to teach in a secondary school on a deprived housing estate in Sunderland. “I literally thought it was a zoo when I first arrived,” Charlotte recalls. “I remember stopping as a loo roll was thrown over the balcony, and going to hide in a classroom.” e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Niall Alcock in action

Charlotte Duncan

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ere is a large variation in quite how ‘underperforming’ the schools Teach First participants are sent into can be. Some are well-run establishments but, from talking to Charlotte, it seems hers was not. “e school was closed down in 2005 and reopened as an academy, but it has been very turbulent. Last year we had four different head teachers. e first, who had encouraged Teach First to come to the school, disappeared overnight aer just six weeks.”

“e first year was tough,” remembers Roy. “Some days I felt that I didn’t stop sweating and I would be in constant panic mode, getting through on pure adrenalin.” Charlotte recalls the terror of an OFSTED inspection during her first year when she was observed taking a Year 10 bottom set. “e lesson before, one of the girls had called me a “blonde slut”, had thrown a folder at me and slammed the door so hard the clock fell off the wall and broke.”

Roy Anderson (C1 1999-2004) had a similar experience teaching Geography in a school in East London, at the end of the Docklands Light Railway. “As a community school we had a policy of accepting anyone, so it had become a bit of a sink school. If you got expelled from any school in Newham, you’d come to us. And getting expelled from a school in Newham takes quite some doing.”

For Teach First participants learning how to cope with these challenges can be one of the most difficult lessons imaginable. Roy told me how he initially tried to control his temper while all the pupils around him were losing theirs. “In fact I was most scared of myself. I’ve been sent off enough times in rugby to know I’ve got a temper that will come out of nowhere. So I desperately tried to compose myself and never show when I was angry. I then realised this wasn’t working, so my mentor advised me to come across angry without actually feeling it. It tested my acting abilities,

For Teach First participants the first few months are remembered as a blur of sleepless nights and shattered nerves. Every hour of the day is spent either teaching or worrying about teaching.


but classroom behaviour improved immediately.” Sometime during the first year the Teach First experience tends to switch from abject terror to a growing sense of reward. Charlotte was lumped with a lot of bottom sets in her second year and had very little idea what to do with them. “e kids were virtually illiterate and mostly getting Us. So my vision was to get them to feel they could actually achieve something - to leave the school knowing that they can finish something and feel proud of doing so. One pupil I teach named Dean spells virtually every word wrong, including his own name, which is really very sad. e first thing he wrote for me on Of Mice and Men was about one line long and barely legible. I think it was something along the lines of “Lenny likes rabbits”. A year later, I got five and a half pages from him and he moved from a U to a D. at for me was massive, and seeing how proud he was, that was wonderful.” Once they have learnt the ropes of their school it is astonishing what Teach First participants achieve. Niall Alcock (C2

1999-2004) started work as a science teacher in a school near Heathrow four years ago. During my training for Teach First, Niall led a session on classroom behaviour. As he later told me, “I made my expectations abundantly clear from day one. ey now know that it would be ill advised to mess around in my classroom or anywhere around me, because woe betide them if they do.” Each time Niall was set to leave the school he couldn’t quite bring himself to do so. e school is one of the one hundred most improved in the country and in four years Niall has risen to be Head of Science. “Knowing that you are working towards something that is drastically improving is really, really rewarding. I’m now in charge of nearly 1,000 pupils’ science education and 14 members of staff. Finding new systems and improvements for the department is extremely refreshing.” Whilst Teach First has been formed to improve education for Britain’s most disadvantaged school pupils, there are also valuable lessons to be learned by the participants. Speaking of his four years’

teaching Niall told me, “I think the experience has fundamentally changed my moral compass. When I was at university all I wanted to do was grow up and make loads of money. I think if I were now to look for any job outside teaching it would have to be something with some social conscience to it.” Of all the benefits of Teach First this aspect is I feel the most valuable. I am about to begin work at a political thinktank in Westminster, but the experience of working in a school just off Spaghetti Junction will be a continual presence in everything I think and do. In 1845, Benjamin Disraeli wrote of an England that comprised: “Two nations between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy; who are as ignorant of each other's habits, thoughts and feelings as if they were dwellers in different zones, or inhabitants of different planets.” ese two nations still exist today; in bridging the gap between them Teach First is doing an invaluable job.

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OM News... President Elect Richard Fleck (B3 1962-67) will be nominated as the Club’s President Elect at the AGM in October 2013. Having studied law at Southampton, he joined the city law firm Herbert Smith and was a partner from 1980 to 2009. He has been actively involved in the development of corporate and financial reporting and in the regulation of the accounting and actuarial professions, and is currently a director of the Financial Reporting Council. A keen sportsman, he played rackets at Marlborough, international squash at various levels and is an international sailor. He has been actively involved with Marlborough for many years as a member of the Marlburian Club Committee, a Trustee of the Marlburian Club Charitable Funds, a member of Council, Chairman and Trustee of the Marlborough College Foundation and member of the Council of Marlborough College Malaysia. He is married to Mary Gardiner and they have a daughter, Sara (PR 2003-05), and son, Peter (PR 2003-08). Richard was made a CBE in 2009.

Alfred St George Hamersley (C3 1862-66) one of rugby’s first internationals, has been inducted into the International Rugby Board’s Hall of Fame. IRB Chief Executive, Brett Gosper, made the presentation to the Master at Marlborough, where Hamersley first played ‘football’ under the interpretation of Rugby School rules.

One of Marlborough’s WWII heroes was honoured in September 2013 by a trek across Albania. Special Operations 38

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Distinguished Art dealer, Michael Wellby (SU 1942-46), who sadly died in 2012 (see obituary on p52), bequeathed his collection of nearly 500 unique Renaissance and Baroque gold and silver objects to Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum. Valued at over £10 million, Professor Tim Wilson, Keeper of the Department of Western Art, commented, “is is the most important accession of objects of this sort to any UK museum since the bequest of objects from Waddesdon Manor by Ferdinand Rothschild to the British Museum in 1898.” e Ashmolean plans to open a new gallery to house the collection. Photo reproduced by kind permission of the Ashmolean Museum. Veteran Councillor JB Jonas (B3 194348), will step down from his seat on Hexham Town Council in May 2013. James served as Mayor of Hexham from 2007 to 2009.

Executive Officer Lt Col Arthur Nicholls (C3 1924-29) was posthumously awarded the George Cross for his actions as German forces chased his ill-fated SPILLWAY mission through the winter of 1943/44. 70 years on, SOE historian Dr Roderick Bailey led a trek that followed the route outlined in Nicholl’s diary, the original mission having been carried out against regulations and as the enemy closed in.

Shell pupils visiting the Museum of East Asian Art in Bath early in 2012 and were delighted to meet Brian McElney OBE (B1 1946-50), who founded the museum in 1990. While Brian was practising law in Hong Kong


Dinner of the Burmese Oxford and Cambridge Society on 2 November 2012; the Society is being resurrected aer more than 30 years. From le to right: John Miller (CO 1952-56), Peter Corley (B2 1947-52), Julian Fane (LI 1952-56) and Peter Wong (B3 1958-62).

David Insall with Neri Tribesmen in Jebel Aswad. Photo: Dalal Darwish

he was drawn to the beauty of Chinese art, buying his first piece in London in 1955: a gilt brass seated Sakyamuni Buddha. His collection subsequently grew to include jades, ceramics, scholars’ studio objects and bronzes. Returning to England in 1983, Brian procured the funds for the restoration and refurbishment of the Georgian building that houses the Museum and generously donated his private collection to form its contents and associated UK educational charity. www.meaa.org.uk On 10 October 2012, Anthony Spender (PR 1953-57) and Martin Evans, the Club Secretary (CR 1968-), attended a lecture at the Royal Geographical Society given by Sir Mark Tully OBE (B2 1949-53) entitled e Mind of India. Philip Hamilton-Grierson (B1 1981-86) chaired the meeting. e Rt Hon Sir Henry Brooke (LI 1949-54), President of e Slynn Foundation, was awarded the CMG for services to justice reform in Albania in the 2013 New Year Honours. e Slynn Foundation was created in 1998 on the initiative of His Hon George Dobry CBE QC to fulfill a growing need for support, advice and training to young lawyers from countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Having been a hill farmer and conservationist from 1982 to 1993, David Insall (C3 1952-54) was appointed Conservation Adviser to Oman’s Ministry of

Newcastle University’s Medical School in Malaysia, situated in the EduCity development near Marlborough College Malaysia, has named one if its buildings aer Sir Christopher Edwards (LI 1955-60). e building houses the Learning Resource Centre, the Student Wellbeing Centre and the Library. Sir Christopher is Chairman of

Environment in 1994, a post he held until 2000. He was then appointed Head of the Oman Defence Studies Centre’s Defence Studies Department and was its Assistant Head of Research for five years, before becoming an Environmental Consultant with Majan Engineering Consultants LLC in 2005. He is currently serving on the team preparing Oman’s National Spatial Strategy. In 2010, aged 71, Chris Burns-Cox (C2 1950-55) chose to donate one of his kidneys to a stranger. Over 7000 UK citizens every year anxiously wait for a donated kidney to save or rejuvenate their lives. Chris writes, ‘Nearly a thousand people annually give a kidney to family or friends but far fewer give to a stranger.’ Around 160 others have also chosen to donate a kidney entirely altruistically and for Chris the experience was so positive that he and a friend started the charity Give A Kidney (www.giveakidney.org). Chris also gives illustrated talks on the subject: chris.burns-cox@virgin.net Four OMs travelling in Burma happened to meet at the Inaugural

Medical Education England, a new body responsible for advising Ministers on the education, training and workforce requirements of professionals in the medical field. He is also Chairman of the Council of the British Heart Foundation and of the Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust and a Senior Research Investigator at Imperial College. During his career Sir Christopher has also served as Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, as the first Principal of the Imperial College School of Medicine and, from 2001 to 2007, Vice-Chancellor of Newcastle University. James Cochrane (B3 1957-62) was made a CBE for his Services to Health in the 2013 New Year Honours. James has spent his professional career in the pharmaceutical industry. Having been a member of the main board of Wellcome PLC, he joined the board of Glaxo Wellcome PLC in 1995 and, aer retiring in 2001, became chair of the South West London NHS Strategic Health Authority, a post he held until e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... mid-2006. He was also Chairman of the British Red Cross until 2012 and on the Board of Medicines for Malaria Venture.

next door to a distributor for Mike Andrew’s best selling product, the GoodUse Microdesk: www.goodusecompany.com

‘Uncle’ Rob Harding (B1 1958-62) can be found performing his own amusing songs on YouTube. Several local live recordings and 10 professional recordings are available for purchase or downloading from iTunes, Amazon and elsewhere. Titles include ‘Penzance, Men’s Pants’, ‘She Takes Me to the Cleaners’, ‘Mammy Out De Light’ and ‘If Only the Pope had Wings’. www.s345770694.websitehome.co.uk

Michael Spens (B3 1964-68), Headmaster of Fettes College, returned to MC to preach in Chapel on 3 February 2013. Michael enjoyed a distinguished career as a Housemaster at Radley and Headmaster of Caldicott Preparatory School before moving to Fettes in 1998.

Chris George (C2 1960-64) on his first attempt at Ironman, won his age group at Tenby on 16 September 2012, qualifying him for his fih World Championships - not in his customary rowing boat - but with a swim, bike and run in Kona Hawaii. Ironman involves a 3.8km swim, followed by a 1km run to the Transition 1 up a hill from the north beach in Tenby, then a 180km bike ride that includes 2000m of climbing as a “warm up” for a full marathon. He hopes to raise £3m for e Pollock Trust. Mike Andrews (PR 1960-65), the NZ Club Secretary, dropped into Marlborough in January 2013. He reported that he had met Dai Suter (C2 1960-64) out in Australia, the two having met aer Tim Martin-Jenkins (B3 1961-65) gathered contemporaries together for Club Day 2010. By coincidence, Dai’s company is based 40

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A Memorial Meeting was held on 10 November 2012 at Leighton Park School near Reading, for Bill Spray (CR 1946-70), Leighton’s Headmaster from 1971 to 1981. e Club Secretary represented Marlborough, Bill’s younger son Chris (C1 1966-71) represented the family and a concert followed the Meeting. Despite being the great-nephew of Sir omas Beecham, Charlie Boston (PR 1966-70) has followed a different musical path, as a song-writer/ performer in the bluegrass style. He has played at the Edinburgh and Glastonbury Festivals and made seven CDs, three of them in Nashville. His albums have all received great reviews and he has won two UK Country Radio Awards. His band, e Olde Boston Tea Party, regularly performs around Dorset and Somerset. When not involved in musical activities Charlie is a chartered surveyor with Boston Radford, where his partners include David (BH 1979-84) and Simon (BH 1981-85) Radford. www.laramusic.co.uk

Michael Hutchinson (C2 1968-73), from Astrium, a leading global space engineering and communications company, ran sessions for Marlburians from the Shell to the Upper Sixth during Physics lessons and combined Michael’s first hand experiences of building satellites with challenges to pupils to think about and identify satellite parts he had brought in. www.astrium.eads.net

A selection of OMs including Chris Watson (C1 1970-74) and Club President Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73) very generously helped current Marlburians put together a commemorative tour brochure to help fund the Girls’ Sports Tour to South Africa in July 2013. 29 girls travelled to Cape Town and Johannesburg to play five hockey and four netball matches and the A5 publication was designed to both provide players with a lasting memory of the tour and promote girls’ sport throughout the school and parent body. It also helped raise money for sports kit and the Goedgedacht Trust, which helps improve the lives of local farmers in South Africa.


Angus Low (C3 1961-65), Secretary of the British Group of the International Association of Bridge and Structural Engineers reports that in May 2013 Ian Firth (C1 1969-74) was elected Chairman of the British Group. Ian had been Vice-Chairman for many years and in 2011 his initiative brought the Annual Symposium of IABSE to the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in Westminster. Spread over four days it attracted over 1000 participants from all over the world.

large international clinical trials and use. ese treatments and techniques have been successfully adapted for use in many parts of the developing world at minimal cost and he and his team have been awarded over 20 national and international prizes. On 28 April 2013, Marlborough College Malaysia welcomed members of the Potong Pasir Community Centre Flying Club to Marlborough College Malaysia. Singapore Club Secretary, Huan-Yeong Lau (C2 1970-75), talked about the hobby of building and flying model aircra and gave a brief introduction to aeronautics.

e Australian Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Senator Stephen Conroy, has announced the appointment of Simon Mordant AM (B1 1973-77) to the ABC Board. Simon is currently Co-Chief Executive of Greenhill & Co Australia, an independent corporate advisory firm. He is also Chairman of the Museum of Contemporary Arts Board, a Director of the Sydney eatre Company and the Australian Commissioner for the 2013 Venice Biennale.

Charles Grant (CO 1972-76) has been made a the CMG in the 2013 New Year Honours List for services to European and wider international policy-making. Charles is Director of the Centre for European Reform.

Simon Fanshawe (C1 1970-74) has been awarded the OBE for services to higher education. Simon, who studied law at Sussex, has been Chair of the university’s governing body since 2007, having served on its Council from 2001. On retiring from the post in July 2013, he was also delighted to be given an Honorary Degree by the university. He remains a non-executive director of the Brighton Dome and Festival and also served on the board of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Professor Peng Tee Khaw (B2 197075), of London’s Moorfields Eye Hospital, was awarded a knighthood in the 2013 Queen’s Birthday Honours. Professor Khaw is one of the foremost ophthalmologist researchers in the field of glaucoma and ocular healing. His long track record of innovative research includes developing new therapies, particularly for scarring. He has developed surgical techniques (such as the Moorfields Safer Surgery System) that have markedly improved the safety and outcome of glaucoma surgery, and developed new anti-scarring regimens based on laboratory research, leading to

Graham Biggart (C1 1972-76), Paul Cronshaw (B3 1972-76), Mark Gibson (C1 1971-76) and Bill Davies (C1 1971-76) visited Mas de Gigaro, Provence in 1982. In 2012 the OM friends reunited for a ski-ing holiday in Foux D’Allos, Haute Provence to relive their French adventure. All four also came to the 2013 Annual Dinner. Graham, a management consultant, also kindly supported the Careers Convention held the day before.

Amanda Berry, née Hutton (B2 197678), and her husband, Paul, recently decided to rekindle their travelling days. Amanda le her permanent teaching job in Cornwall, while Paul gave up his building business. ey downsized the house, abandoned the children (they are in their midtwenties!) and started a new life in Cambodia. Both work in Phnom Penh where Amanda teaches the British Curriculum in an international school. She would love to hear from any OMs passing through; contact the Club office if you are travelling to the region.

e Club received many warm messages following the untimely death of Christopher Martin-Jenkins (B3 1958-63) including one from Roger Pym (C1 1974-79). Roger sent this e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... photograph of John Innes (CO 196669), CMJ and himself at the Melbourne Cricket Ground taken on 31 December 2010. Major General James Bashall CBE (B1 1975-80) (le) and Lieutenant General John Lorimer DSO MBE (C1 1976-81) both attended the 68th anniversary of the Battle of Arnhem in Holland, where this photo was taken. James commands the 1st Armoured Division; John commands the 3rd Division; these are the only 2 operational divisions in the British Army.

Diana Carney, née Fox (SU 1981-83), hit the headlines in late 2012 when her husband Mark was appointed Governor of the Bank of England. With a First in PPE and a Masters in Agricultural Economics from Oxford and an MA in International Relations from the University of Pennsylvania, Diana is an influential environmental campaigner and runs an eco-products review site, Eco Products that Work, on which she describes herself as ‘a multitasking mother of four’. e Revd Dr Jo Bailey Wells (B1 1981-83) has been appointed Chaplain to the new Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. Jo said, “I am honoured and delighted to be joining Archbishop Justin’s team at Lambeth as he takes on a heavy but exciting mantle. I look forward to supporting him personally and pastorally - above all by praying for his 42

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Simon Henley (CO 1981-85) joined the Portland to Portland Charity Cycle Ride in the USA in June 2013. Together with a group of fellow architects and designers, planners and journalists he cycled 1,270 miles from Racine (north of Chicago) to New York City, through Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York to raise funds for Article 25, Architecture for Humanity and the Architects’ Benevolent Society. www.portlandtoportland.org/ charities/uk.virginmoneygiving.com/ Simon Henley flourishing in that role - and so to facilitating the wider flourishing of God’s people in God’s church.” How To Train Your Dragon author Cressida Cowell’s (BH 1982-84) star continues to rise: JK Rowling recently named her the author JK was most delighted to have been introduced to by her children. Cressida’s latest and tenth book in her best-selling Dragon series, How To Seize A Dragon’s Jewel, has recently been published by Hodder at £6.99 (see p96). Cressida is now an Ambassador of the National Literacy Trust, the only national charity dedicated to raising literacy levels in the UK. She will also be one of the four judges of the Blue Peter Book Awards. e Cartoon Network’s Dragon TV series launched in early 2013 and two further Dragon movies are scheduled for 2014 and 2016 following the box office success of the first in 2010.

Photography: Greg Bartley

Richard Hilton (B2 1982-87) our South African Club Secretary and owner of Greatest Cape, which organises tailored holidays in Southern Africa, launched his Top Ten Packages in 2013: a choice of fabulous trips that include safaris, luxurious hotels and intimate guest lodges. A boutique wine producer too, Richard is planning an OM wine dinner with other Cape winemakers for OMs in South Africa in the coming year, as well as other similar events.


Ben Hardyment (C2 1984-88) secured a record investment for his company www.zapper.co.uk aer a severe grilling in BBC 2’s Dragons’ Den. Ben achieved an investment of £250,000 from Dragon eo Paphitis, the highest investment ever extracted from a single investor in the Den’s history. (See p12) Dan Hannan MEP (BH 1984-89) spoke to a packed Politics Society meeting in the Garnett Room on ‘Why the EU is Doomed to Fail’ on 13 September 2012. Dan was interviewed by Matt Gow (CR 1997-), MC’s Head of Politics, and an excellent debate ensued.

Earth’. e race took place in -20C temperatures on the polar ice cap in Greenland. is was his first marathon, yet David came 8th out of 130 runners and was the first Brit to cross the finishing line in a time of 4:14:42. During training inside a butcher’s freezer near Oxford, David was reminded of many cold cross-country runs during his days at MC. His run raised over £17,000 for Help for Heroes and Cancer Research UK. www.davidmott.vc

Annabel Sutherland, née Cochrane (B2 1987-89) raised over £3000 for the Coram Foundation and other charities by cycling from London to Paris in June 2013. It’s not too late to support her: visit www.virginmoneygiving.com and look up her fundraiser page. On 20 October 2012, David Mott (PR 1986-91) ran the Polar Circle Marathon, known as the ‘Coolest Marathon on

Dennis Ng (B3 1986-91) revisited Marlborough in March 2013 to ‘top up’ the e Dennis Ng Oriental Studies Prize for pupils studying Japanese and Mandarin Chinese, first awarded in 2001. Dennis has been a passionate advocate of oriental language teaching at Marlborough since it began in 1989, a passion reflected in his own company, Education Strategies Consultants Ltd (Hong Kong). is is currently involved in a joint venture with a UK examination board and an online learning soware company which has led to the creation of the first Business

Annabel Sutherland, née Cochrane (B2 1987-89) showing off her temporary tattoos!

Chinese qualification in the UK. Dennis is also the Founding Director of Epic Asset Management Ltd (Hong Kong) and a keen supporter of Marlborough College Malaysia and other elements in the Iskandar Project. www.epic-am.net In May 2013, Gavin Hooper (BH 1987-92) was in one of two boats from Old Bristolian Rugby Club that crossed the English Channel in Cornish gigs to raise vital funds for CLIC Sargent. e charity, which Gavin works for and for whom Old Bristolians have raised over £200,000, provides as much support as possible to patients on their cancer journey as well as to their families, but currently can only offer support to two out of every three. www.uk.virginmoneygiving.com/team/OBschannelrowing2013 / www.clicsargent.org.uk

Olivia Lomenech Gill (MM 1990-92) has designed and illustrated the first collaborative book by Clare and Michael Morpurgo: Where My Wellies Take Me. Olivia is an accomplished artist, printmaker and illustrator about whom Michael Morpurgo wrote, “‘e first moment we set eyes on the work of Olivia Lomenech Gill we knew there was something very fresh and unique about her painting. What interested us at once was how all her pictures told a story.” Olivia visited Iddesleigh in Devon to get to know and sketch the local people before creating the unique scrapbook style story, punctuated with poems and full of spontaneity and inventiveness. www.oliviagill.com Zac Frost (LI 1988-89) and Guy Manning (C2 1990-95) appeared on BBC’s Countryfile in December 2012 in a feature on English Truffles. Zac is an experienced truffle hunter and Guy runs e Red Lion in East Chisenbury e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... where he recently gained his first Michelin Star. e Red Lion is owned by local benefactor John Manser (PR 1953-58 and Deputy Chairman of Council), who stepped in and bought it for the village some 12 years ago.

Andrew Shepherd’s (LI 1993-98) production company ACS Random rounded off an outstanding 10th anniversary season with a critically acclaimed production of their epic comedy e Shakespeare Conspiracy, which also included associate producer Alethea Steven (NC 19941999) and Will Bryant (SU 2001-06) in the cast. eir next production, a festive Much Ado About Nothing, plays at the new Park eatre in London from 3-15 December 2013.Tickets from www.parktheatre.co.uk/whats-on (See also p62)

e College’s Lent Event in February 2013 found a team of five OMs inviting pupils to rethink their attitudes to life, Christianity and God. Revd Charlie Skrine (C3 1988-1993), Charlie Gauntlett (C3 2003-08), Philippa Stansbury (EL 1999-2004), Jack Campbell (LI 2001-06), and Caitlin Stansbury (EL 2003-07) contributed to lessons and co-curricular activities and were delighted to give something back to the school that had given them so much. Marlburians were treated to thought-provoking explanations of highly relevant topics and the discussions prompted were gripping and insightful. Charlie Skrine also addressed a large audience in the Memorial Hall and preached at Choral Evensong, as well as giving voluntary talks during the week on the historicity of the New Testament and how God relates to humanity both good and bad.

Charlie Skrine

Elizabeth Stopford (NC 1992-97) continues to make “creative, psychologically-layered documentaries and films” with her company White Rabbit Films. Mind the Gap was the latest, shown on BBC1 in May 2013 as part of the BBC’s Why Poverty? season.

Phanella Mayall Fine, née Mayall (NC 1993-98) runs Refocus, providing career coaching to individuals and corporates across a wide range of industries and business coaching for start-ups and entrepreneurs. Phanella leverages her personal experience of successful career change to help clients through their own transitions: prior to qualifying as a coach, she was a banking lawyer at Slaughter and May and Linklaters, and an Equity Fund Manager at JP Morgan Asset Management. Phanella is also conducting postgraduate research into the career progression of female leaders in law and is an international speaker on careers issues, focusing particularly on women’s careers. Phanella@refocuscoaching.com Johnny Morant (C2 1995-2000) is now exhibiting his oil paintings in three galleries: two in London and one in Dorset. www.johnnymorant.com

Andrew Shepherd’s (LI 1993-98) production of The Shakespeare Conspiracy. 44

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Marlborough has long been associated with Everest. e successful 1953 expedition was led by John Hunt (C2 1924-28) and two other OMs climbed


with him: MP Ward (B2 1939-43) (Expedition doctor) and CG Wylie (B3 1933-37). Following their success they petitioned the Master for an annual and perpetual half-holiday to be granted to the school each year. e holiday became forgotten but has lately been recalled in the form of a lecture based on the theme of challenge. In 2013, the 60th anniversary of the conquest, it was fitting that mountaineer Jake Meyer (C3 19972002) delivered it. Whilst at MC Jake climbed extensively with Rupert Rosedale, former Head of OA, who lost his life in an avalanche on Ben Nevis in 2009. When only 14, Jake set himself the challenge of becoming the youngest person to climb the 7 Summits: the highest mountain on each continent. On the 4 June 2005 he achieved his dream, standing on top of Everest; becoming the youngest Briton at just 21 to conquer the world’s highest peak via the difficult North Col route as well as the youngest man in the world to complete the 7 Summits, and breaking several climbing records on the way.

Clare Cardy, née Newcome (NC 1999-2004) returned to the College to speak to current Marlburians about her work with charities over recent years. Having been helped by some outstanding pastoral care herself while at MC, she was motivated to help other teenagers struggling with adolescence and trained as a youth and community worker. She has since worked with many marginalised young people, for a charity in Oxford with young women affected by rape, sexual abuse and domestic violence and in London with

Fishing Boats, Ibiza, by artist Johnny Morant (C2 1995-2000)

Women on the Frontline, a charity offering a safe haven for those working in prostitution. She is currently training as a Gestalt Psychotherapist. Leicestershire CCC announced in the autumn of 2012 the signing of former Middlesex seamer Robbie Williams (BH 2000-05) on a one-year deal. Williams had been on trial with the club in the closing weeks of the 2012 season and appeared in the thrilling Second XI Final defeat by Kent, the county of his birth. Williams bowled with good pace and bounce on that occasion and generally impressed. He had taken 23 first-class wickets at under 33, with a best of 5-70. On his Middlesex debut, Williams also opened the bowling with England seamer Steve Finn and picked up 5-115 against Essex.

Jack Whitehall (B2 2001-06) was crowned King of Comedy at the 2012 British Comedy Awards. His debut DVD, Jack Whitehall Live, is also now available. www.jackwhitehall.com Alec Kingham (LI 2002-07), former Senior Prefect, Captain of Rugby, player in the England U16 and U18 Rugby teams, Dutton French Prize winner and first winner of the Dunford Cup, graduated from Durham in 2012 with a First in French and Spanish. He had also won a PwC Gap Year Scholarship and during his course was offered a job with JP Morgan, which he started in November 2012. A memorial sarsen stone has been erected in the College’s OA Centre in memory of Rupert Rosedale (CR 1999-2009). e initiative of James Lam (CO 2008-12) and supported by many OMs, it was dedicated on 14 April 2013 by Rupert’s widow Ulrika and children, who placed pictures by e Marlburian Club Magazine

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OM News... the stone while a number of young OMs spoke passionately and movingly of Rupert’s enthusiasm and inspirational teaching.

linger even aer close relationships have moved on.” Lottie was runner up in the Under 19 category last year and has written this year’s Marlburian Club Magazine Short Story (see p111).

Ted Haxby (BH 2005-10) is a member of Scotland’s premier all male a capella group e Other Guys. eir Christmas single, Christmas Gets Worse Every Year, reached No 2 in Amazon’s Classical Charts and No 99 in Amazon’s Hot New Releases within 2 hours of its release. www.otherguys.co.uk OM polo players may not have gone out as a team this year, but are individually continuing to make their presence felt. In May 2013 Freddie Dear (TU 2006-11) played in the Best of British under 21s at the third annual Polo at Marriners event, while Harold Hodges (CO 2005-11) rode in the Savills Team for the Best of British under 25s. Meanwhile Tabba Woodd (MO 200409) featured in HRH e Duke of Cambridge’s winning team in the Chester Audi Polo Challenge title held at Chester Racecourse. Lottie Pyper (MM 2007-12) won the Under 26 category of the 2013 Wills Writing Awards with her article “I had no idea.” Lottie, who is reading English at New College, Oxford, summarises the piece thus: “e appearance of a childhood friend on TV sparks a series of memories, bringing up vivid reminiscences and regrets. e story turns on the power of love and its ability to 46

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Neil Cleminson (CR 1989-2012), former Physics beak, has set up Oyster Education, offering a full package of tuition plus outdoor activities to individuals, small groups and students from overseas. He also offers educational consultancy and a boarding schools placement service. www.oystereducation.com A milestone for the Marlborough College and Bishop Cotton School, Simla (BCS) Student Exchange Programme was reached on 5 May 2013. e first two pupils from BCS in India were welcomed to Marlborough by MC International Liaison Coordinator, Mark McVeigh (CR 19912013). Bishop Cotton School Captain, Raghav Gandhi, and Prefect, Manvendra Tomar, were settled into their respective Houses for a good night’s sleep before tackling their new school routine the next day. Both settled in quickly. ey were recently visited by Hon Life President of the Old Cottonians Association (UK) Gay Niblett and the Marlburian Club Secretary, Martin Evans. Gay’s full written report appears in the Old Cottonians Magazine, http://oldcottonians.org/magazine/ is photograph of John Dancy (Master 1961-72), Bryan Hunt (C2 1930-35) and other Intelligence Corps officers, was taken in Sumatra in 1945. Bryan’s son, Roger (C2 1964-68), who

sent it, explained that his father had just taken the surrender of a Japanese regiment, only to re-arm the Japanese troops a few days later to help them defend the population against Communist insurgents; Roger still has a samurai sword. Bryan was later ordered to visit a town further along the coast but the only available air transport was a 2-seater Japanese Zero fighter plane flown by a Japanese sergeant whose last job, before the surrender, was as a Kamikaze pilot. Local maps were nonexistent so a World atlas was used to navigate. Roger likes to think this was perhaps his father’s C2 atlas! Bryan made over 60,000 miles of flights in 1944 and 1945.

e Marlburian Club Charitable Funds: e Marlburian Club College Fund made a grant to the College for sports prizes and, in 2012, granted £200,000 towards the costs of the acquisition and refurbishment of Ivy House, the new girls’ boarding house. e Marlburian Club Educational Fund includes the Herbert Windeler exhibitions for pupils with “all round” potential in academic, sporting or cultural fields and the Konstam awards, for Marlburians undertaking charitable projects in their gap years. ere were five holders of Windeler bursaries during the year; twelve Konstam awards were also given, worth between £200 and £600. e Roger Heaford Daubney Fund (Bursary Branch) funded one bursary to support an OM in financial hardship at University and made grants towards the cost of an elective in Soweto, South Africa for an OM studying medicine, and a charitable project in Cuba for an OM


studying languages. It also funded two exhibitions for Marlburians continuing to higher education. e Roger Heaford Daubney Fund (College Branch) helped the College with the cost of the departing Master’s portrait while e Marlborough College Common Room Fund helped three beaks undertake courses or projects to enhance their extra-curricular experience. Full details of the Charitable Fund Accounts may be found by visiting www.marlburianclub.org or applying to the Marlburian Club Office. James Jones (TU) won the Shell OM Reading Prize in April 2013 for his dramatic rendition of his own war poem based on Charles Hamilton Sorley’s (C1 1908-13) XXII. Shell pupils create and perform a written piece inspired by the poetry or prose of an OM. ose inspiring this year’s material included poets Siegried Sassoon (CO 1902-04) and John Betjeman (B2 1920-25), songwriter Nick Drake (C1 1962-66) and author Bruce Chatwin (B2 195358). e final takes place in e Ellis

eatre, and this year was adjudicated by the Master, Jonathan Leigh. He made constructive comments on each performance, noting delivery and quality of content, before finally announcing James as the winner - who was then presented with the magnificent Cellini-style cup by the Club Secretary. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the last XV to achieve a 100% record, the Club is delighted to be inaugurating the Silk Cup to commemorate their onetime coach: renowned schoolmaster Dennis Silk (CR 1955-68). DRWS was a Cambridge cricket blue who went on to play for Somerset and the MCC, of which he was President in 1992. He retired from first class cricket in 1961, taught English at MC, coached both the Cricket XI and the Rugby XV, and was a legendary housemaster of C1 from 1963 until he was appointed Warden of Radley in 1968. ere he served as Warden for 23 years, securing Radley’s position as a leading public school. It is therefore appropriate that the Silk Cup will be competed for by

Radley and Marlborough, and awarded to the school achieving the best aggregate rugby results across all teams in each season. Jim Sherritt, a long-standing member of College staff who worked in the Armoury and died in February 2012 aged 88, has been remembered in Marlborough town by the unveiling of a bench on e Green. e Club Secretary and the town’s mayor were both involved in the ceremony, held on Remembrance Day 2012, when Martin spoke about Jim in warm and affectionate terms.

inking of visiting MC? OMs are more than welcome to visit the College but for security reasons please make the Porters’ Lodge your first port of call, to sign in and collect a Visitors’ Badge.

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Engagements, Weddings & Births To Imran Tayabali (LI 1989-94) and his wife Melissa, a daugher, Arabella Jemima, on 24 April 2013; a sister for Oliver and Jessica To Michelle Jana Chan (TU 1990-92) and Mike Reeves (C1 1989-94), a daughter, Mara Chance Reeves, on 10 October 2012 To Sophie Dove (NC 1992-94) and her husband, a daughter, Arabella Rose, on 10 October 2008, and twins: Camellia Star Rose and Harriet Rose, on 20 July 2012

Engagements Edwin Lawrence (C3 1990-95) to Emma Loveday

Dr Amanda Peppercorn (NC 1992-97) married Dr Rodric Jenkin in 2012 Hugh Townsend (PR 1992-97) married Carolyn Heeley on 4 June 2011

Mark Hopper (C1 1990-95) to Elizabeth Muggeridge

Ben Gutteridge (C1 1994-99) married Natalie Alvarado on 6 July 2013

Alicia Fox-Pitt (MM 1994-99) to Sebastian Stoddart

Mark Tomlinson (C1 1995-2000) married Laura Bechtolsheimer on 2 March 2013

Simon Allott (PR 1997-2002), elder son of Nicholas (CR 1986-) & Mrs Allott, to Lucy Forrester Tessa Packard (TU 2001-03), elder daughter of the late Fred Packard (C1 1962-67) & Mrs Packard, to Henry Reid

Marriages James Finlay (C3 1952-56) married Mrs Rosemary Eberstein on 27 July 2013 e Civil Partnership of Simon Fanshawe (C1 1970-74) and Adam Isah was celebrated on 7 July 2013 Andrew Gough (C1 1989-94) married Nicola Bullard on 25 August 2012 Robbie Taylor (PR 1990-95) married Adele Kennedy on 9 February 2013 48

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Jake Meyer (C3 1997-2002) married Saskia Stoop on 13 April 2013 Elizabeth Swinn (LI 2006-08) married Neil Hamilton on 30 July 2011 Susannah Swinn (PR 2007-09) married Aaron Rickard on 7 July 2012

Births To Dr Christopher Ng (B2 1983-87) and Dr Regina Zuzarte, a daughter, Nicolette, on 18 November 2012

To Arabella d’Avanzo, née Youens (LI 1993-95) and her husband Luca, a daughter, Elisa Sofia, on 22 December 2012; a sister for Livia To Fiona Adriazola, née Cannon (NC 1992-97) and her husband Roberto, a daughter, Lila Mary, on 11 November 2012; a sister for William To Sarah Peldmanis, née Hunt (CO 1996-97) and her husband Mark, a son, Charlie, on 2 March 2013 To Dr Amanda Peppercorn (NC 1992-97) and her husband Dr Rodric Jenkin, a daughter, Solilia Rachel, on 8 November 2012 To Laura Terry, née Preston (MM 1993-97) and her husband Christian, a daughter, Lucinda Clare, on 10 April 2012 To Sam Rogers (B1 1992-97) and his wife Priya, a daughter, Maya MacKinnon, on 26 October 2012

To Ben Bradbury (C2 1988-93) and his wife Aliboo, a daughter, Indiana Scarlet Elzabeth, on 24 September 2012; a sister for Isaac and Agapantha

To HRH e Duchess of Cambridge, née Catherine Middleton (EL 1996-2000) and her husband HRH e Duke of Cambridge, a son, HRH Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge, on 22 July 2013

To Douglas Harmer (C1 1988-93) and his wife Amanda, a daughter, Felicity Eleanor Marigo, on 11 February 2013; a sister for Anabel

For more details of the above, please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ announcements


Deaths Hugh J Glanville (C1 1929-33)

Geoffrey M Simpson (B2 1945-48)

Anthony J Deane-Drummond (LI 1930-35) see obituary

John M Bridgeman (C3 1944-49)

Henry Ferrar (formerly Ferraboschi) (LI 1930-35) Douglas C Argyle (C1 1930-36) Charles W Bryant (C1 1931-37)

Ernle D Money (B2 1944-49) see obituary H Robert Stinson (B3 1944-49) see obituary Peter W Barrows (C3 1945-49) Richard A Paten (B3 1946-50)

Donald U Jackson (PR 1932-37)

Derek Edmonds (LI 1947-52)

Alexander E Moulton (C2 1933-38) see obituary

Nicholas A Penrhys-Evans (formerly Evans) (B3 1950-54)

Anthony C Dale (B3 1935-39)

Osborne M Tancock (C2 1950-54)

Stephen B Millar (B3 1935-39)

Iain B MacLeod (LI 1950-55)

John S Lloyd (C3 1937-42) see obituary

Malcolm C Harper (B2 1953-57) see obituary

John F Burdett (C2 1938-42)

Alec C Bond (B3 1954-57)

John E Hopkinson (C2 1938-42)

Philip E Spalding (C2 1953-58)

John H Willis (C2 1939-42)

A William Stephenson (LI 1957-61)

Penry H Williams (B2 1938-43)

Hugh P Chatwin (B2 1958-61)

Maurice Balme (CO 1939-43) see obituary

David N Hudson (LI 1958-62)

Martin H Rogers (B1 1939-43) see obituary Justin R de Blank (PR 1940-44) see obituary

Michael J Frye (PR 1959-62) Christopher D Martin-Jenkins (B3 1958-63) see obituary

Edgar D Hutchings (C1 1941-45)

Christopher M Tronchin-James (C1 1959-63)

Robert G King (PR 1941-45)

Donald C Gorrie (CR 1960-66)

Denys F Hodson (B2 1941-46) see obituary

Sophie C Hamilton (PR 1971-72) Imogen M Craddock (PR 1971-73)

Ian T Lewis (CO 1942-46) Michael S Wellby (SU 1942-46) see obituary Charles M Yates (C1 1944-47) Douglas N Cross (LI 1943-48) John W Scott (CO 1943-48) Edward H Tremlett (LI 1943-48) John S Greig (PR 1944-48) see obituary Brian T Wilde (B2 1944-48) e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Obituaries Anthony DeaneDrummond (LI 1930-35) ajor-General Tony DeaneDrummond, who died in December 2012, was one of the College’s most distinguished soldiers: he won two MCs during the second World War and escaped three times from enemy hands in stories worthy of Boy’s Own. While recuperating from injury he became British National Gliding Champion in 1956, flying for the British team in 1958, 1960, 1963 and 1965; he earned the DSO for leading an action in the Oman in 1959, was awarded a CB in 1970, served variously as Assistant Commandant at RMA Sandhurst, Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff and towards the end of his career as Colonel Commandant of the Royal Corps of Signals, which latter post he held from 1966 to 1971. He also published several books: Return Ticket (1951), Riot Control (1975) and an autobiography, Arrows of Fortune (1991). In retirement he became a director of the Paper and Paper Products Industry Training Board, established a business selling wood-burning stoves and restored antique furniture.

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For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries

Maurice Balme

Alex Moulton

(CO 1939-43)

(C2 1933-38)

aurice Balme, who died in December 2012, played a major role in ensuring the survival of Classics as a significant subject in school and university curricula. Oxford and Cambridge dropped Latin as a compulsary entry qualification in 1960. Balme, a master at Harrow for 33 years, with his colleague Mark Warman immediately published Aestimanda (Up for discussion), which took Greek and Latin extracts and presented them as subjects for literary debate, directly increasing the appreciation of classical literature within everyday classroom teaching. Balme was also instrumental in changing Classical teaching methods: in the 1960s he was a major contributor to the Cambridge Latin Course, while he also created the beginners’ Greek course, Athenaze (To Athens) - a grammatically based reading course published by OUP with a diverting narrative set in the fifth century BC. Athenaze is now the world’s best selling Greek course. A subsequent collaboration with James Morwood resulted in The Oxford Latin Course.

lex Moulton, who died in December 2012, was an entrepreneurial engineer best known for designing the revolutionary smallwheeled lightweight bicycle highly popular in the 1960s. The Moultons had been engineers for generations and were also heavily involved in the rubber industry, holding the licence for vulcanized rubber in the UK. Moulton was from childhood analytical, taking toys apart to find out how they worked. At MC he built a steam car to his own design and a steel dodecahedron; he went on to King’s Cambridge, the Bristol Aeroplane Co, and eventually into the family firm – where he specialized in Hydrolastic suspension systems later used in the Austin Mini, and Hydrogas, used in other Austin and Rover group cars. He set up his own company in 1956, and in 1959 approached Raleigh with his lightweight bicycle, designed to counteract petrol rationing during the Suez Crisis. Raleigh declined to take it on, resulting in Moulton launching it himself in 1964. Raleigh later bought the rights and the bike was manufactured until 1974. Meanwhile Moulton continued designing for the motor

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Memorial Service in St. Paul’s Cathedral for Christopher Martin-Jenkins

industry, winning a Queen’s Award for Industry in 1967 and a CBE for services to industry in 1976. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org/obituaries or www.telegraph.co.uk

Christopher Martin-Jenkins (B3 1958-63) hristopher Martin-Jenkins, internationally loved broadcaster and cricket correspondent and ‘the voice of summer’, who died in January 2013, was one of the best-loved figures in sports broadcasting. Twice the Corporation’s cricket correspondent (1973-80 and 1983-91), he was also cricket correspondent of the Daily Telegraph (1990-99) and of e Times (1999-2008). He served as President of the MCC (2010-11). At Marlborough, CMJ was Captain of Cricket and made 99 against Rugby at Lord’s. He later played in the Surrey 2nd XI, but it was while at school that he wrote to Brian

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Johnston asking how could become a cricket commentator: he joined the Test Match Special Team in 1973 and remained with it until his death. He was Editor of e Cricketer (1981-83) and its Editorial Director (1983-90), President of e Cricket Society (1998-2008) and altogether published or edited over 25 books including e Wisden Book of County Cricket (1981); Bedside Cricket (1981); Twenty Years On: Cricket’s years of

change (1984); Cricket: a way of life (1984); Grand Slam (1987); Cricket Characters (1987); Sketches of a Season (1987); Ball by Ball: The Story of Cricket Broadcasting (1990); The Compete Who’s Who of Test Cricketers (1983), The Top 100 Cricketers of All Time (2009) (see Edition 110) and, finally, CMJ: A Cricketing Life (2012) (see Edition 113). CMJ was elected President Elect of The Marlburian Club in 2011; his final illness tragically prevented him from taking up the post in 2012. e Marlburian Club President, Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73) and the Alumni Relations Manager, Jane Pendry, represented e Marlburian Club at CMJ’s Memorial Service in St. Paul’s Cathedral on 16 April 2013 while Martin Evans, the Club Secretary, represented the Master and Mrs Leigh. Many OMs were present in the Cathedral and at the Reception aerwards, held in the Pavilion at Lord’s. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org or any of the national broadsheet websites See also letter on p71 e Marlburian Club Magazine

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(Henry) Robert Stinson (B3 1944-49) obert Stinson died in early April 2013. An accomplished athlete in his own right, Stinson spent over 50 years in various roles supporting the sport, most notably by serving on the British Amateur Athletic Board (BAAB) and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). A recipient of the MBE for his work, Stinson was also awarded the Veteran Pin of the IAAF in 1989, their Silver Order of Merit in 2001 and was appointed an IAAF Honorary Life Vice President in 2003. Further tributes can be found on the British Athletics and European Athletics websites: www.britishathletics.org.uk/ media/news/march-2013/05-04-13robert-stinson/and www.europeanathletics.org/news/ latest-news/ 496-general/11871-europeanathletics-mourns-passing-of-robertstinson.html.

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Denys Hodson

(PR 1940-44)

(B2 1941-46)

ustin de Blank, who died in December 2012, was a restaurateur and grocer whose simple, high quality approach helped transform popular gastronomic taste in Britain in the 1970s. He also supplied the Queen with wholemeal bread while his Elizabeth Street delicatessen was hugely popular with the SW1 coterie. He later opened a restaurant in Duke Street, which later expanded into Elizabeth Street, and formed an alliance with Searcy’s, gaining catering contracts for the Institute Of Contemporary Arts, the National Gallery, the British, Natural History, Science and Imperial War Museums, the Barbican Centre and Kensington Palace. With his second wife he also opened a country house hotel in Norfolk, Shipdham Place, which won an Egon Ronay star. In 1994 the Elizabeth Street shop was forced to close, crushed by rising rents and growing competition. He sold the majority shareholding in the business but in 1997 started again, opening gastropub e Stamford in Hammersmith, the Justin de Blank Bar and Restaurant in Marylebone Lane, and a joint venture in Victoria with Jonathan Choate. Blank was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 1995; he is survived by his wife and their three daughters.

enys Hodson, who died in January 2013, was an inspirational arts administrator. Diverted from a career in advertising, at 42 he was appointed controller of arts and recreation by amesdown (later Swindon) Borough Council, where he remained for 22 years. Hodson created an outstanding arts and recreation department, appointing innovators and risk-takers who provided Swindon residents with vibrant, accessible and forward-looking cultural opportunities. Hodson twice served as chairman of Southern Arts and chaired England's Council of Regional Arts Associations, skilfully negotiating the minefields of regional cultural politics. A director of the Oxford Stage Company, a governor and deputy chair of the British Film Institute and, in 1987, vice-chairman of the Arts Council, he played a crucial role in brokering relations with the regional arts boards in a period of some turmoil in the arts funding system from 1989 to 1990. He was made a CBE in 1981. In retirement, he chaired the Voluntary Arts Network and also succeeded in bringing about the restoration of the exceptional medieval stained-glass windows in his local church in Fairford, Gloucestershire, for which he raised more than £1m.

For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org

For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org

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Ernle Money (B2 1944-49)

East Anglian Daily Times

Justin de Blank

rnle Money, who died in April 2013, was a barrister, a conscientious MP for Ipswich in the Heath government of 1974, winning his seat by a majority of 13, and a passionate lover of and campaigner for fine art. Money was a key player in the successful campaign to save Titian’s

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Death of Actaeon for the nation, had resigned as secretary of the Conservative backbench arts committee over the Heath government’s introduction of museum charges and was briefly Shadow Arts Minister. He was also a published author: e Nasmyth Famiy of Painters was produced in 1970 (with Peter Johnson) and he was close to completing a substantial work on the Baroque in England when he died. Money was also a collector of Scottish paintings and Scott’s novels, while ‘on the side’ he chaired the Ipswich Town Supporters’ Club from 1974 to 1980. He was also a trustee of Gainsborough’s birthplace, a columnist for the East Anglian Daily Times, and for twenty years the Fine Arts Correspondent for the Contemporary Review. He was also fluent in Esperanto. Money was appointed CBE in 1996. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org or www.telegraph.co.uk

‘being in business’ Greig was a pioneer promoter of modern management practices, recognising the increasing need for corporate governance and the benefit of encouraging wider ownership of a company’s equity amongst its staff. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org

John Greig

John Lloyd

(PR 1944-48)

(C3 1937-42)

ohn Greig, who died in January 2013, joined the family firm of WT Greig Ltd in 1950. A visionary who foresaw immense opportunities, he worked his way up the company, becoming Chairman in 1973. A year later he led the merger with Fester, Fothergill & Hartung that created Greig Fester. Its Chairman for over twenty years, Greig presided over a rapidly expanding global business that became one of the leading independent international reinsurance broking houses. Joining the Council of Lloyd’s in 1986, in 1991 he became one of its two Deputy Chairmen. A fraught period in Lloyd’s history, Greig was deeply affected by the misery suffered by many Names. A founder member of the Worshipful Company of Insurers Greig was its Master in 1992 and Chairman of the City of London Club 1988 to 1991. On retirement in 1995 he became Greig Feister’s first President and, following its merger with the Benfield Group, Benfield Greig’s first Honorary President. Interested in the business of

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been deliberately causing damage behind the German lines; the Germans’ savage retaliation exactly coincided with the arrival of the British. SS troops carefully trawled the entire area, directly machine-gunning and bayoneting the inhabitants. e late autumnal weather was bitterly cold and night patrols came across the shocking evidence of their atrocities, which were nothing short of a massacre. On 27 December Lloyd was commanding a carrier platoon defending a tiny hamlet when they were attacked at daybreak by SS ski troops firing bazookas. e house being held by the right-hand section was demolished; only two men succeeded in getting back to platoon HQ. For nearly an hour the Germans, who started with the upper hand, were set on wiping out the whole position and forced forward. Lloyd, manning a Bren gun, rallied his men and in fierce close-quarter fighting led the remainder of his platoon with such courage that the enemy were forced to pull back. He was awarded an immediate MC. Post-war, Lloyd returned to Trinity Cambridge to read History before entering the world of business, becoming sales director of a small electronics company – Perdio – in 1959. Perdio brought out the first portable transistor radios; Lloyd’s marketing skills were proved by the rapid expansion of the company and need to build two factories to cope with demand. He le the electronics field as the Japanese entered it, retiring to Somerset and becoming closely involved with St John Ambulance. He also served as a JP for more than two decades, was High Sheriff of Somerset in 1976 and became a Deputy Lieutenant in 1986. For full obituary, please visit www.telegraph.co.uk. See also letter on p71

For forthcoming Memorial Services please visit aptain John Lloyd, who died in February 2013, won an MC for his actions in Italy in 1944. On 30 September the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards headed into the Appenines, via the foothills of the Monte Sole Massif - part of Hitler’s Gothic Line. A partisan group had

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www.marlburianclub.org/ memorialservices

For recent obituaries please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ obituaries

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Ashmolean Museum

Michael Wellby (SU 1942-46) ichael Wellby was born in 1928 into a family of silver dealers. At 18 he joined his father’s business, HS Wellby in Halkin Arcade in Knightsbridge. During the 1940s and 1950s, he started dealing in German silver - at the time unpopular and undervalued - realising that pieces he could pick up for little more than melt value were extremely fine examples of silversmithing. In the 1960s he moved the business to Graon Street, Mayfair, where it became a required stop for any visiting continental dealer or collector. During a long career, Wellby also built up a highly important private collection of European silver and Works of Art, which he has most generously bequeathed to Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum (see p38).

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Bombay. He later returned to Nigeria as Deputy High Commissioner in Kaduna; his last overseas posting was as High Commissioner to e Gambia. He is survived by his wife, one son and three daughters, including Emmeline (now Ledgerwood, TU 1984-86).

Malcolm Harper (A1/B2 1953-57)

Communications Director. Aer marrying Ann in 1966 he moved to Africa, where he monitored the work of Oxfam and smaller charities across 12 countries in East Africa. Africa remained in his blood for the rest of his life. Harper led Oxfam's emergency team, (the first to arrive) to Cambodia in 1979 to help rebuild the country aer the devastation and deaths of 2 million people wrought by Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge regime. Oxfam said: “Malcolm Harper was greatly appreciated by those who worked with him for his many talents and qualities as, primarily, a humanitarian who treated all men and women as equals, a witty communicator, colleague, fellow cricketer and friend. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him.” In 1981 Harper le Oxfam to become director of the United Nations Association of Great Britain (UNA) where he stayed a further 22 years. In later years he raised £30,000 to help clear minefields in Mozambique and £100,000 for a new cricket pavilion in his home village of Charlbury. He was awarded the CMG in 2000. For full obituary please visit www.marlburianclub.org. See also article in Edition 108.

er reading history and theology at Cambridge, Malcolm Harper, who died in May 2013, considered ordination. But he decided he could make more of a difference working internationally for peace and development. He joined Oxfam in 1963 as Emergencies Officer and

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Martin Rogers (B1 1939-43) artin Rogers, who died in December 2012 aged 87, served in the Lincolnshire Regiment and was Education Officer in Palestine before going up to Jesus, Cambridge in 1947 to read Law. Post university he joined the Commonwealth Relations Office (later to become the Foreign and Commonwealth Office ) and served in Karachi, Lagos, Ottawa, Jamaica and

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For forthcoming Memorial Services please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ memorialservices

For recent obituaries please visit www.marlburianclub.org/ obituaries


OM Dynasties: e Azis Family Robin Azis (CO 1973-78) Life is full of highly strange coincidences; this is the story of the Azis family’s association with Marlborough. Numbering only three generations we are not the longest Marlburian dynasty, but we do have an interesting link with Johor, where Marlborough College Malaysia now stands. zis, that’s an unusual surname, where on earth does it come from?’; how oen I have been asked that question. ‘And how do you spell it?’ ‘A for Alpha, Z for Zulu, I for India, S for Sierra. It’s from Johor in Malaysia - the southern state just above Singapore.’ Typically I will then receive a letter addressed to Robin Azzis, Robin Azes, Robin Asiz or - my favourite to date - Robin Asif… as if.

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e story begins in 1941, when my grandfather, YMB Ungku Abdul Aziz bin Abdul Majid decided to send his three sons to Marlborough. Menteri Besar (Prime Minister) of Johor and nephew of the Sultan, he knew Britain well and was keen to give his children a British education. His grandfather, Sultan Abu Bakar, was a renowned anglophile: he had spent much of his life travelling around Europe and became a great friend of

Queen Victoria and it was his (Abu’s) grandfather who had agreed to sell Singapore, which was owned by Johor, to the British in 1823. If only his advisors had suggested a lease, à la Hong Kong! My grandfather chose Marlborough rather than Eton because he had met an OM who persuaded him it was a better school. For some reason Aziz was changed to Azis in the UK. My uncle, YM Ungku Osman bin Abdul Aziz (CO 1942-46), known as Osman Azis in the UK and Bunny to his friends, was the first Marlburian. A keen rugby player who played for the XV, he went on to read law at Pembroke, Oxford, rowed for the Isis eight and pursued a career in law. My father, YM Ungku Mansur bin Abdul Aziz (CO 1944-48), known as Guy

Mansor Azis, followed him. Another keen sportsman, he too played for the XV and went on to read law, but played rugby for Pembroke and chose to go into business. YM Ungku Abdul Majid bin Abdul Aziz, known as Nigel Majid Azis (CO 195357), was more creative than his brothers: he became an architect with his own practice. e second generation consisted of me (CO 1973-78) and my brother, Nick (CO 1979-84); Nick won the prize for being the only Azis to be Head of House. Finally came the third generation: my sons Oliver (LI 2001-06 – what a rebel!) and Alex (CO 2004-09), and Bunny’s grandson, Arthur (CO 2006-11). I chose this photograph because it shows my father Guy, aged 6, with his father (second le), Sultan Ismail of Johor, and his son Mahmud Iskandar, at an event in Johor Bahru in 1936. It was probably taken a few miles away from Marlborough Malaysia. If my father had known then that he would be sent to Marlborough College, in far off England, and that his sons, grandsons and great nephew would follow suit and furthermore, that of all the places in the world to choose, Marlborough would set up a second College in the then scrubland at the southern tip of Johor some 75 years later…you simply couldn’t make it up. What’s more his cousin Mahmud (far right) became Sultan Iskandar of Johor in 1981 and the huge Iskandar development area, where Marlborough Malaysia is situated, is named aer him. Was this destined to happen? As if.

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Marlborough College and the Pre-Raphaelites Richard Russell (B1 1943-48) William Morris (Aa 1848-51), arguably the most worthwhile of all OMs, le in 1851. e Pre-Raphaelite Movement began in that decade as Morris began to follow his bent when at Oxford. Here he met his life-long friend, Edward Burne-Jones, whose son Philip was, surprisingly, sent to Marlborough in the 1870s (C3 1874-78). homesick there, but he was popular, being a good storyteller. He said he learned nothing because nothing was taught. What he did learn was a love for the rhythm of the countryside, for Savernake Forest, Avebury, and the Mound. He visited churches from which grew his concern for old buildings. Morris le in 1851. He was not directly involved in the Rebellion that year but the rioting, flogging, fighting, explosions, fireworks, mindless violence, and the arrogance towards the townspeople encouraged by the public school ethos, all this gave him some of the basis for his later Socialism.

‘The Flying Fortress’ mural by Spencer Stanhope in the Chapel

“Marlborough is famous for its poets, particularly Sorley, Sassoon, Betjeman and MacNeice, all of the twentieth century. I suggest that the list should start with Morris.”

ears later, in 1886, Burne-Jones Snr and Morris were to be commissioned by George Bodley, chief architect of the second Chapel, to create together the Scholars’ Window. Another PreRaphaelite artist, Spencer Stanhope, painted the twelve large murals of Biblical scenes.

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Morris père bought the nomination for William to go to Marlborough in 1848, five years aer its foundation. He paid the full annual fees of thirty guineas, clergy parents paying twenty. Earlier, Morris had read all Scott’s Waverley novels by the time he was seven: for him, Scott must have been like Harry Potter today. Crab, as Morris was known at Marlborough, was unhappy and

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It is a coincidence that CR Ashbee, a follower of Morris in the Arts & Cras Movement, and organiser of the Guild of Handicra in the East End and then in Chipping Campden, was at Wellington when they had their Rebellion in 1880. e life and great achievements of William Morris are well known and recorded and I am not going to summarise his life here. e Victoria & Albert Museum recognised his importance by including his statue, among twenty-four statues of British sculptors, painters, architects and crasmen, along the Museum’s facades in 1906. e centenary of his death in 1996 was recognised by the Museum staging a magnificent exhibition of his work as writer and poet; businessman; political and environmental activist; painter; furniture and domestic designer (all those lovely wallpapers and fabrics); calligrapher; and printer. What other expublic schoolboy has had his life marked


William Morris by George Frederic Watts, Oil on canvas 1870 Š National Portrait Gallery, London îƒŤe Marlburian Club Magazine

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“e most interesting piece of artwork within the College, now that the Gainsborough has gone om Adderley, is the Scholars’ Window on the south side of the Chapel.”

by a record-breaking exhibition with 250,000 visitors? Morris was also to become an inspiration for members of the College Press. ey visited his lovely house at Kelmscott and saw his books. Marlborough is famous for its poets, particularly Sorley, Sassoon, Betjeman and MacNeice, all of the twentieth century. I suggest that the list should start with Morris. He, and omas Hardy, did so much else that their considerable output as excellent poets is easily forgotten. Morris was asked to be a candidate for the Oxford Poetry Professorship but declined. While deserved, it was not his kind of thing. It is not fair to mention Philip BurneJones, also an OM, in the same breath as Morris. His father, Edward, was one of the main, and last, of the Pre-Raphaelites. While the great men were life-long friends from Oxford days, Edward became one of our greater painters, a darling of Society, and was created a Baronet. Morris, the Socialist, would never have accepted such a title. He was surprised that his friend’s son should be

The Scholar’s Window. Designed by Burne-Jones and made by William Morris

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sent to his old school where he had learnt nothing and been unhappy. Be all that as it may, Philip Burne-Jones was a member of C3, 1874-78. He went on to Oxford; became an artist; wrote With the Army in Brittany; succeeded to the Baronetcy in 1898; and died, unmarried, in London in 1926. ere is a good painting of him, with his sister, by his mother. While Philip’s work may not be distinguished, he has paintings in the National Portrait Gallery including an interesting one of his father. He specialised in small portraits. He did not have to work, and suffered from being his father’s son. Philip Burne-Jones was probably in WS Gilbert’s mind when writing this verse for Bunthorne in Patience: A pallid and thin young man, A haggard and lank young man, A greenery-yallery, Grosvenor Gallery, Foot-in-the-grave young man! Virginia Woolf, on her honeymoon in Venice, spotted him in St Mark’s Square. ‘He looked dissipated and lonely,


like a pierrot who had grown old and rather peevish.’ Marlborough’s first Chapel was built in 1848. It was a plain building, but it was a priority with the school’s principle aim being the education of the sons of the clergy. Edward Blore was the architect. He was fashionable but known as ‘Blore the Boor’. Schemes to extend the Chapel failed so it was demolished in 1884, and the current Chapel built on the same site in 1886. e fine architects, Bodley & Garner, chose the apsidal form for the East end, with its large reredos in the Anglo-Catholic style of the day. It was gilded in 1951 by Sir Ninian Comper, and redecorated recently. It is said that John Betjeman much admired the architects’ colour scheme of greens and browns. Spencer Stanhope, a second wave PreRaphaelite artist, painted the murals, echoing the general colour scheme. His work generally was criticised by Edward Burne-Jones for having lapsed into being derivative, and it was said that this inhibited his originality. He had worked

with Morris, Burne-Jones et al on the famous early Pre-Raphaelite paintings in the Oxford University Debating Hall. Much later he worked again with Bodley on two American churches in Florence, where he finally settled and died in 1908. e chapel is dedicated to St Michael and All Angels, and the twelve scenes depict angels. ere are six scenes on each side, Old Testament on the north and New Testament on the south. Naturally they acquired nicknames. e one of Isaac and Jacob was ‘Appendix operation’, and the one opposite the organ was, variously, ‘Pie in the Sky’, ‘Forced Landing’ and ‘Flying Fortress’. Other names will be welcomed. e most interesting piece of artwork within the College, now that the Gainsborough has gone from Adderley, is the Scholars’ Window on the south side of the Chapel. It was funded by donations from OMs and features the biblical boys Samuel and Timothy. is was one of many stained glass windows designed by Edward Burne-Jones and made in the Morris & Co workshops in Merton

The second Chapel today

under Morris’s supervision. e combined skills of Old Marlburian and Marlburian Parent are at their best here in Marlborough’s Chapel. I am very grateful to Fiona MacCarthy for her splendid biographies of William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones; to Niall Hamilton for his well-researched booklet on the Chapel; and to the ever-helpful Terry Rogers.

MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE

SUMMER SCHOOL For further information and to receive your copy of the latest Summer School brochure, please contact us at: Marlborough College Summer School, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1PA Telephone: 01672 892388 Fax: 01672 892476 Email: admin@mcsummerschool.org.uk

www.mcsummerschool.org.uk Marlborough College is a Registered Charity No. 309486 incorporated by Royal Charter to provide Education

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Royal Peculiars 3: e Gentlemen at Arms (Queen’s Body Guard) Charles Macfarlane (CO 1967-71) I regularly attend the marvellous OM Annual Dinner at e RAC in Pall Mall. is year, while chatting to old friends, our wonderful Editor, Susanna Spicer, hove into view and collared me with the opening gambit “Ahhh, Charlie – I want you as one of my Royal Peculiars!” am not oen rendered speechless, but no suitable reply came to mind to parry this totally unexpected and unusual opening gambit and I waited in trepidation for the follow up. Susanna then explained that, as a member of e Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms (commonly known as e Queen’s or Her Majesty’s Body Guard or, even more simply, just as ‘e Body Guard’), she would like me to write an article in the series on ‘Royal

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Peculiars’. Regular readers of the Club Magazine may remember two excellent articles in previous editions relating to OMs who occupy unusual Royal posts: one a Gentlemen Usher (Rear Admiral Colin Cooke-Priest, LI 1952-57) and the other a Herald (David White, LI 1977-80). us, having been reeled in by Susanna like a fish with no fight, I am honoured to be your third Royal Peculiar.

I have been privileged and lucky enough to be in the Corps since 2006. I would be a rich man if I were given a pound every time the subject of e Body Guard comes up in conversation and I am asked questions like “who are you?” or “what do you actually do?” us, the chance to write an article like this provides an excellent opportunity to give an insight into a small unit that is virtually unknown to most people and yet has a long and distinguished history of serving incumbent Monarchs. Henry VIII started it all when, early in his reign, he established a Royal Guard from the higher echelons of his subjects. It exceeded in magnificence and expense any other contemplated by his predecessors as Henry was keen to show his much wealthier enemy, King Louis XI of France, that anything he could do, Henry and England could do better!


e Body Guard’s first ‘blooding’ was at the Battle of Guinnegate on 16 August 1514 – commonly known as the ‘Battle of the Spurs’ due to the speed with which the French Cavalry spurred on their horses to quit the battlefield. So pleased was Henry with his Guard that they were henceforth on duty at every possible great occasion during his reign, most notably at e Field of Cloth of Gold in 1520 when they played a glittering part, competing with and besting their French prototype, the Garde du Corps.

e role and duties of the Corps nowadays is strictly ceremonial. With the exception of Her Majesty’s Garden Parties, where Members officiate wearing a morning coat, the unique uniform is worn on all other duties. ese always include attendance on Her Majesty for State arrivals at the start of a State Visit at either Windsor Castle or Buckingham Palace, e State Opening of Parliament in e House of Lords, e Garter Service at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, an annual service of one of the great Orders of Chivalry at St Paul’s Cathedral and e Queen’s annual evening reception held at Buckingham Palace for the Diplomatic Corps. On duty days, Gentlemen report to Gieves & Hawkes, Savile Row (where the uniforms are held and maintained) to change. At the given hour, to the surprise of Londoners and tourists going about their normal business, up to 30 men in ‘full rig’ with helmet feathers flying and swords and spurs clanking are seen leaving the shop and squeezing into a rather scruffy army recruiting bus, to be whisked away to their duties under a police motorbike escort.

Charles Macfarlane (CO 1967-71)

Today, e Body Guard consists of 5 Officers and 27 Gentlemen. Appointment occurs between the ages of 52 and 55 with retirement on your 70th birthday. e selection process is simple and discreet; the Monarch makes the final choice from a shortlist submitted to her by the incumbent officers. To be eligible, candidates must have served 12 years as an officer in one of the teeth arms of the Army (or Royal Marines), seen active service and risen to at least the rank of Major. e Body Guard HQ is based in St James’s Palace, where a small Mess houses the Corps Standard, Ceremonial Axes and the Officers’ Sticks. It is also home to the myriad of historical objects connected with the Corps and is the base from which the Corps is administered. e HQ and all the duties are under the direction of the Lord Chamberlain’s office but the day-today command of the Officers. A key individual who carries the splendid title of e Axe Keeper administers the every day practicalities; nothing would work without him! True to his title, he also looks aer the 300-year-old pole-axes carried by Gentlemen when on duty.

“e Body Guard’s first ‘blooding’ was at the Battle of Guinnegate on 16 August 1514 – commonly known as the ‘Battle of the Spurs’ due to the speed with which the French Cavalry spurred on their horses to quit the battlefield.”

Photography: Alec Mills

Henry called his chosen men “Speres” or “Men at Arms” but they soon became known as “Pensioners”, denoting that they were members of the King’s Household and giving them a table at Court. To demonstrate that his Guard were not just a bunch of privileged ‘hangers on’, Henry decreed that each Pensioner should have a personal Archer, a Demi-Launce (a foot soldier armed with a short spear), a Custrell (a sword carrying attendant) and a great horse: all this at the expense of the individual! us, self-evidently, being a member of e Body Guard was no sinecure; it meant expense as well as honour and duty. Fortunately, the former is less onerous today but the latter is a strong a prerequisite for selection.

One highlight of recent years was the Quincentennial celebration of the foundation of the Corps in 1509. A fine June day heralded the occasion. e morning started with a service in the Queen’s Chapel at St James’s Palace, attended by Corps members in full uniform accompanied by their families and a few special guests. is was a very moving occasion, which started with the little-known ancient custom of paying

spur money to the lead chorister; a way of elegantly overcoming the fact that spurs should not be worn in Royal Chapels. is was followed by a stirring sermon from Richard Chartres, Bishop of London and, aer the service, a unique parade in Colour Court within St James’s Palace, during which Her Majesty, accompanied by Prince Philip, inspected every individual before presenting a new Riband and attaching it to the Corps’ Standard. e Riband is embroidered with “e Nearest Guard – 1509-2009” and now always hangs from the Standard, whether on or off parade. e Royal Party then sat for a formal photograph to mark the occasion before everyone was entertained to lunch in e State Apartments. All in all a simply unique and intimate occasion which was summed up by Prince Philip, who departed with a cheery wave saying, “see you all again in 500 years’ time!” e Editor is aware that the expression Royal Peculiar normally refers to one of the churches that falls under the jurisdiction of the monarch rather than a bishop; it is used here both loosely and with tongue in cheek! e Marlburian Club Magazine

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An Actor’s Life for Me… Andrew Shepherd (LI 1993-98) meets two OM thespians Perhaps the soundest piece of advice the 19th Century’s greatest actor, Sir Henry Irving, ever got, was given to him just before he embarked on his illustrious career. Samuel Phelps, the man who inspired him to act, told him in their first meeting: “Sir, do not go on the stage…it is an ill requited profession”. rving ignored this wise counsel, as did his son Harry - arguably the first OM to make a name for himself as an actor. is article explores two later generations of OM actor reflecting on and looking forward to their careers respectively. Firstly it asks why they also chose to turn their backs on other opportunities a good Marlborough education offers and instead enter a notoriously hard profession and secondly, if the acting profession has changed over the years.

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Paul Brooke (C2 1958-62) carved out a very successful career as a character actor for over 40 years, but never really wanted to act. “I was one of the very few who was dragged kicking and screaming into it and aer a while, when I was making a comfortable living - I was very fortunate

Paul Brooke

“e first decade was spent mainly on the stage, including four years at the RSC and a memorable season at the Wyndham’s eatre in a company led by the great Paul Scofield, both a brilliant actor and wonderful mentor.” 62

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in my career like that - I caved in and thought, well, this is what I am, whether I like it or not!” His chosen profession would have been arts administration, but aer reading Philosophy at King’s College London, he was deemed too highly qualified. Undeterred he joined some friends setting up an experimental theatre company in Brighton, working for free, to boost his CV and prove his commitment. It was a company where everyone did everything, and having acted at school and university Paul ended

up in the cast. e play transferred to London and an agent who said she could get him acting work despite his lack of ambition, approached him. A few months later, skint, he asked her to give it a go. Extraordinarily, every part he went up for in the early days he got, probably because he wasn’t particularly concerned if he was cast or not. It was the beginning of a remarkable career of almost constant work. e first decade was spent mainly on the stage,


including four years at the RSC and a memorable season at the Wyndham’s eatre in a company led by the great Paul Scofield, both a brilliant actor and wonderful mentor. His luck continued when he landed the role of Henry Beamish in a TV adaptation of Malcom Bradbury’s e History Man. A series which everyone in the industry saw, he was still being offered roles some 20 years later on the back of his performance. Paul never returned to the stage, maybe because it was such an exhausting first 10 years, but if you can think of the TV show he was probably in it: e Black Adder, Love Hurts, Sharpe, e Alleyn Mysteries, Kavanagh QC, Lovejoy, Annie’s Bar, A Dance to the Music of Time, Midsomer Murders, Doc Martin, Dalziel & Pascoe, Foyle’s War, e Alan Clark Diaries, Minder, e Royal, Mr Bean and My Family to name but a few. He also found time for films: For Your Eyes Only, Agatha, Greystoke, Saving Grace, Alfie, Bridget Jones Diary, Roman Polanski’s Oliver Twist and Star Wars: Episode IV: Return of the Jedi. Despite his preference for another career, it’s not true to say that he didn’t have the “acting bug”, although his housemaster, Bill Spray (CR 1946-70) did everything he could to stop him, for he was considered a bright boy who wasn’t fulfilling his academic potential. Fortunately he was also taught English by Michael Davis (CR 1949-85), who gave him the encouragement he needed. While Paul maintains most of his career was down to luck, he did have the advantage of an agent (not the one who found him - she retired without telling him) who knew how to direct his career and advise on the kinds of roles he should be going for. is is rarely to be found by actors entering the profession now. Ed Cooper Clarke (C2 1994-99) is one of these. While there was no Damascene epiphany prompting him to act professionally, there were many little moments. Great teachers and inspiring shows at Marlborough played a huge part, including the touring productions at the Bradleian and the quality of school plays. “Performing the opening lines of Martin Chuzzlewit in front of 900 people in the Memorial Hall is an experience I’ll never forget and was certainly good preparation for the West End and UK tours I’ve since done.”

Ed Cooper Clarke in Tennessee Williams’ Tiger Tail Photography © The Nuffield, by Mike Eddowes e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Ed studied Drama at Birmingham, thinking he wanted to direct. Initially he was far too scared to take the possibility of acting seriously and instead created a show for Edinburgh. He then worked for Channel 4 Drama and FilmFour, developing scripts, before he finally bit the bullet and secured a place at Drama Centre, aged 27. He has since built up an impressive CV, including the recent UK tour and West End production of e Madness of George III. Like Paul, Ed was inspired by his leading actor, David Haig, watching him put every ounce of energy and focus into a hugely demanding role, regardless of the location or size of audience, night aer night for 200 performances, always wanting to be better than the night before. Ed sees significant differences between acting now and in Paul’s early days. ere may be more jobs thanks to filming technology being cheaper, but they pay a lot less, there is more competition, and it’s harder to keep afloat if you’re not constantly in work. e demise of rep theatre has also taken away the clear career path; you can’t hone your skills when filming. “eatre lets you correct mistakes the following night and really understand your cra”. In Paul’s day auditions were oen one-on-on with the director, who would cast you on merit and your previous work. ese days it’s hard to get into the room unless your headshot is good and fits everyone’s ideal, with casting directors and producers having much more say. While it helps having been seen on stage by a casting director, it seems that fitting the role in terms of look and type is more relevant than experience. But perhaps the most damaging thing for actors now is the rise of the cult of celebrity, which means actors with a name work more. ose without are then stuck in a Catch 22 situation: they need to create a buzz, but struggle to get in the room in the first place. Paul is no longer acting, having taken the decision to stop when he hit retirement age and having been successful enough to be able to do so. Perhaps it was his happiness to appear in just a couple of scenes of any project rather than play a more significant role that was the key to his longevity. ere is also a lot to be said for the fact that because he wasn’t desperate to be cast in everything he went for, he was able to audition better on the day. Up and coming actors like Ed are more greatly challenged. It’s no longer a profession where you can rely on a good agent to get you the work you want, you really have to get out and be seen yourself. It’s also less likely to bring in a regular income, you have to subsidise with other jobs. You also have to be able to drop everything at any time to audition or take a role at the last minute, you face watching your friends earn more money than you and cope with losing roles into which you had put your heart and soul. However both agree: if you really want to become an actor then get out there and give it a go. It can be a great life, but it helps to have a back-up plan. Andrew Shepherd is the Artistic Director of ACS Random, and combines his work as a producer, writer, director and actor with his back-up plan as a fundraiser. A “sweet spot” in the Memorial Hall, where he landed as Puck in 1995, started it all off for him. 64

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Successfully Engineering Good Careers James Meredith (B2 1988-93) Marlborough has a rich history of producing fine engineering minds that have played and will continue to play a significant role in shaping the world we live in today.

“Alexander Moulton CBE (C2 1933-38), of 1960s folding bicycle fame, even won the Queen’s Award for Industry.”

he practical application of science and maths to solve problems and bring ideas to life, engineering in the UK is currently undergoing a renaissance as the government shis its focus towards industry that transforms raw materials into finished goods, creating jobs along

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the way. Engineering graduates are therefore highly sought aer; companies are competing directly with consultancies and banks for the best graduates (who can earn excellent salaries) and a career in engineering is international, challenging and exciting. MC has always been a wonderful place to develop and apply knowledge. e Technology Centre opened in 1985 with the aim of encouraging children to apply theoretical science in the real world; Design as a subject emphasised problem solving, relevant thinking skills and practical competences and this was enhanced by the introduction of computers that enable pupils to design and manufacture high quality products from concept through to finished item. Some fantastic and innovative projects have resulted. James Popper (C3 2008-10) developed the multi-award winning CookerSmart, an infrared kitchen flame detector that e Marlburian Club Magazine

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black from the carbon powder mixed into the rubber. It was a great learning experience that galvanised my desire for a career in engineering; I subsequently studied Mechanical Engineering at Bath, a course I would thoroughly recommend to anyone. I have always loved cars and was destined to join the motor industry. Immediately aer University I therefore joined the Special Vehicle Engineering Department of the Ford Motor Company. In a small team it was essential we could all do everything: I had wideranging responsibilities from design right through to the manufacture and testing of individual parts, to complete cars. We had suppliers and test facilities throughout Europe and America requiring regular visits to ensure things were progressing as they should; I regularly found myself crash testing cars for Volvo in Sweden, durability testing in Belgium or at manufacturing sites in Germany, Spain or Turkey.

“As for me, engineering is in my genes: my grandfather (FW Meredith) received many awards for his work on the automatic pilot...” overcomes the problems with conventional smoke detectors. Having raised thousands of pounds in venture capital James is now studying Engineering at Cambridge. Roland Glancy (C2 19952000) is the inventor of the Radfan, an innovative idea to help distribute heat evenly throughout the house, while Alex Groffman (PR 1988-93) has set up a design consultancy that specialises in advanced computer-aided design for the automotive industry. A few years earlier 66

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one of Marlborough’s most famous engineers, Alexander Moulton CBE (C2 1933-38), of iconic 1960s folding bicycle fame, even won the Queen’s Award for Industry in 1967 (see obituary on p50). He would have been particularly interested in Emily Brooke’s (TU 200204) innovative Blaze bike light, designed to reduce cycling-related accidents and due to be launched this autumn.

In a quest to expand my knowledge I later decided to study for an Engineering Doctorate. Based at the University of Warwick I developed and patented a new bone gra material that can repair human bone defects arising from trauma or disease. I was subsequently asked to apply my know-how of biocomposites to motorsport: the WorldFirst racing car is a Formula 3 racing car made from sustainable materials. We exchanged natural fibres including flax and hemp for carbon fibre, used polymers derived from old vegetables and fitted a diesel engine that ran on fuel derived from waste chocolate. It was a massive challenge, but hugely rewarding and I even got the opportunity to drive it up the hill at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. As a Lecturer in Engineering at Warwick I now run the Warwick University Electric Vehicle Grand Prix team, which has just returned from Indianapolis in the USA where we qualified in pole position but unfortunately crashed in the race.

As for me, engineering is in my genes: my grandfather (FW Meredith) received many awards for his work on the automatic pilot whilst at the Royal Aircra Establishment and I was certainly inspired by the practical design and manufacturing skills I learnt at Marlborough. Aer school I joined the ‘Year in Industry’ scheme, designing rubber car components in Freshford, near Bath. Every day I would return home

So as you can see a career in engineering is nothing if not varied. Further proof ? Mike Richards (B3 1956-60) took a job to run a factory in Jordan when still in his thirties. On arrival he found that there wasn’t a factory and the person meant to build it had just quit. His boss said “It’s ok, British engineers can do anything!” and with that Mike had to design and build the factory as well as fill it with the right equipment. He had little


knowledge, knew nobody and didn’t speak the language, but aer two years gra had a working factory. is experience made him a better and more practical engineer than he could ever have imagined and since returning he has sold his successful automotive component manufacturing business and retired to the USA. OM engineers also span multiple industries of which I can only mention a few. In the nuclear industry we have Tom Cheshire (BH 1982-87) and Charles Hume (TU 1967-71) on submarine nuclear propulsion and Mark Lee (C1 1975-79) as a nuclear power consultant. In environmental engineering we have Tim Loveridge (C3 1981-86), Director of BWB Consulting and Will Sheard (LI 1997-2002) designing wind turbines at Siemens. In oil and gas Philip Henstock (C3 1950-54) has been in charge of Piper Alpha in the North Sea and the sea island jetty for huge tankers in the Persian Gulf, Jeremy Christopherson (TU 1992-97) has just set up his own consultancy and Richard Bateman (B1 1954-58) has written a book, Adventures in the Oilpatch, recounting some of his fascinating exploits searching for oil in Punta Arenas. Richard has recently been enticed out of retirement to lecture to a new generation of oil and gas explorers at Texas Tech University.

year, has published several most readable books about his life with trains, including Steam in the Blood, Railways in the Blood, Beeching - Champion of the Railways and A Life on the Lines (see pp 10 and 11) all of which use photographs and words to convey some of the joy experienced by the people who worked with steam trains. We even have a flight test engineer, Tim Miller (B3 1959-63) who helps to bring new aircra technology into commercial use. He works with design engineers to tweak their ideas and extend the performance envelope of new aeroplanes. And engineering isn’t just for boys. As well as bike light entrepreneur Emily Brooke, Zoe Dayan (TU 1985-87) is deputy director at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, promoting women in engineering and science.

him to be a torchbearer for the Olympics. He describes the experience of running past 20,000 people in only 300 meters as overwhelming and incredible. He has since stepped up his STEM activities and is now involved in ‘keeping the flame alive’. Let us hope future Marlburians will keep the OM engineering flame burning equally brightly. If you could mentor Marlburians in engineering or are interested in meeting fellow OM engineers, please email james.meredith@warwick.ac.uk or join the LinkedIn group. You can also inspire the next generation by talking at the College’s annual Science and Engineering Careers Symposium run by Nick Allott: nma@marlboroughcollege.org

And finally we have Matt Humphrey (C1 1994-99) who as an ambassador for STEMNET (the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Network) has been highlighting to young children the rewards that engineering can bring and doing his bit to ensure that we will have a good supply of engineers in the future. Matt’s dedication to the cause even led to his company nominating

We feature on the railways too. Our most distinguished railwayman, Nigel Gresley (C1 1918-20), designed many steam locomotives including the Flying Scotsman, 90 years old this year. Richard Hardy (C3 1937-40), himself 90 this

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C r o s b y & l Aw r e n C e MArlborough

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Letters to the Editor Dear Madam... Madam

Madam

in writing about the extensive use of initials to identify beaks (nicko Franks, edition 113), i would like to reassure him that he does indeed have shared company. i wonder if today’s Marlburians continue the practice?

Memories of the white horse

Aer also being in Priory with AECC (AEC Cornwall), I went on to B2 where there was an exception to the rule. Here the Housemaster, being a northerner, was usually referred to by his full name but with the ‘H’ dropped to give ‘Jack Arrison Alliday’ (JHH), always however with an eye over one’s shoulder in case he came within hearing distance! I was also sad to read the obituary of ARDW (but at last to know that the ‘R’ was for Robert not Ronald!). Only such an inspirational teacher, with the help of Nevins and Commager’s textbook, could possibly have got me through my American History A level with only two terms of study. Not only did he die on my birthday but also exactly 50 years aer I le his exceptional tutelage at Marlborough. Jonathan Grant-Nicholas (B2 1958-62)

Tuesday 8 May 1945 was Ve (Victory in europe) day. e College was graciously awarded a half-holiday to celebrate this momentous event – it may even have been a whole holiday, the memory dims. Some Upper Fih formers from C3 decided to mark the occasion by cleaning the White Horse opposite the College. It had been turfed over during the war to stop German aircra using it as a marker! At first light, about 4.30am, before breakfast and Chapel, six or eight of us set off to climb Granham Hill with a motley collection of tools, thinking the job would be done in an hour or so. We didn’t realise how big the Horse was until we started work. Although the legs were only a foot or so wide, the body and head seemed huge and the task beyond us. All went well and the job was nearly done when a group of Prefects hove into view, asking what the hell we were doing out of College bounds. An altercation nearly ended in fisticuffs before we returned to a well-earned breakfast.

Hubert Wylie, C3 housemaster, if he ever knew and I suspect he did, took no action and overlooked any transgression of College rules. We felt we had done a memorable piece of work with the Horse more or less restored to its original chalky whiteness, even if not quite as momentous as the event we were really celebrating that day. Michael Hutton and others (C3 1942-46)

Madam Your excellent edition 113 has so much of interest that it took days to read. Marston’s letter about deaths made me dig in my files where I found the Michaelmas Term, 1946, Alphabetical List. e names take up 33 pages with 20-21 names per page suggesting that the figure 900 for those days is incorrect. My dates, SU 1942-46, included three weeks on my back in the San avoiding death while infection spread up from my shin (rugger injury). I think it was treated with sulphur, pre-penicillin. In the same file I found “Summerfield House Rules”, which covers 16 pages dealing with beating, fagging, hot and cold baths, swinging on the bar in the dormitory, and wartime food rationing, etc. I have lived in Canada since 1956 initially as a journalist as earlier in the UK. Rodney Touche (SU 1942-46)

Madam Robert Macmillan’s mention of TV filming in 1954 reminded me that twice during the late sixties BBC TV cameras were let loose on us, once for the series One Pair of Eyes, and once for a feature on Twenty-Four Hours (the predecessor of Newsnight). One of e Marlburian Club Magazine

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these visits included a momentous day in March 1968. e bell was rung in Hall and all boys were told to be in the Mem Hall at 4.30pm. No amount of speculation could have provided the reason: John Dancy (Master 1961-72) announced that girls were to be introduced to the school the following September. His closing words were: “ere is a very curious TV camera crew outside; please do not share what I have told you with them”. Whether anyone did or not, the rest is history.

I also remember the caption at the head of the review in the Daily Mail the morning following the broadcast ‘800 MOTHERS’ DARLINGS LEARNING TO SAY ACTUALLY’. is was read out to the school by the Master, Tommy Garnett, when he made his end of term address. It was greeted with the most tremendous roar of laughter! David Hinde (C2 1952-56)

Tom Stevenson (LI 1966-71)

Madam Madam i read with interest robert Macmillan’s reflections ‘sixty years on’ in edition 113. I remember well the making and broadcast of the TV documentary ‘Portrait of a Public School’ in 1954.

I was very interested to see the picture of Brasser in Edition 113 and to see both ‘Pop’ Lewis and Bruce Hylton Stewart (known to us as Hagger Stagger). Bruce taught me piano for much of my time at Marlborough and I also sang in the choir and in the performances of oratorios conducted by Bruce, the first being Messiah. During my piano lessons he

sometimes seemed to sleep, no doubt due to my masterful playing. Towards the end of my time at Marlborough I had an urge to play in a larger group, and I chose Brasser as it seemed easiest to get into. But what instrument to play? is was solved when it became clear to me that the lower instruments had easier parts and were less tricky to play, so I chose the tuba. I was ably instructed by Pop Lewis and eventually entered Brasser and also the CCF marching band. In one of the music competitions at the end of my time at MC I was asked by three trumpeters to play the tuba in a rendition of “ree Jolly Sailormen” arranged for three trumpets and a tuba, which I was glad to do. e judge wrote of our performance that the tuba tried to emulate a whole brass band. is showed that I did not have great skill in playing, but as I thought that I was supposed to represent an entire brass band, I was quite happy with this review. Christopher Harrison (C3 1951-55)


Review of 1940 Penny Reading - see letter from Neil Lockhart

Madam Bill Spray was a most wonderful teacher, not only of History, but of many aspects of life and education that typical macho, and sometimes, intellectual, Marlburians of the 1950s needed to learn. He had a profound effect on me, and I oen say that I gained my History degree on what I was taught by Bill and Hubert Wylie in the Lower and Upper 6th. Bill’s quality was illustrated for me when, aer his retirement, I met him at MC, for the first time in forty years. I spoke to him, to thank him for his teaching, and introduced myself saying “You won’t remember me, but my name is Hopkinson.” He looked straight at me and said, without any hesitation, “BA Hopkinson.” I was overwhelmed. Ben Hopkinson (C2 1949-54)

Madam I was very interested to see the 1940 Penny Reading Programme in 2012’s Magazine. I remember well “Ole in the Road”. If memory serves me right the cast of “Cinderella” contained 9 members of

B1. CG Gough won a DSC and PM Castle-Smith an MC, and 4 members were Killed in Action and one Killed on Active Service in World War II. I enclose a copy of the review from pps 26 and 27 of e Marlburian of February 1940. Neil Lockhart (BH/B1 1939-43)

Madam Christopher D A Martin-Jenkins (B3 1958-63) wanted to be nothing more than a test cricketer from his earliest days. Playing success at the very highest level was denied him but he became known throughout the world as a cricket commentator and writer. Were I to choose one Englishman as a ball-by-ball Test Match descriptor I would nominate Christopher without any hesitation. His voice was perfectly modulated and utterly clear. His understanding of his role as the eyes of the listener was remarkable - and an object lesson to many others! His knowledge of the game was astoundingly comprehensive but he imparted only as much as was necessary for an imagined hearer to keep up with play. No matter what the venue he sketched

word pictures of life beyond the ground with a seeming effortlessness. Personal Reflections: I first met Christopher at Cambridge in 1965 in the Portugal Place courts, where he was putting possible Rugby Fives partners through their paces. In 1967 he captained a most successful Fitzwilliam College side, showing a sharp appreciation of the abilities of friend and foe alike. In 1972 he captained an MCC side against Cranleigh School, where I was a candidate for playing membership. He held of his declaration until I had had a chance to make a major score. In the 1970s and 1980s I had the good fortune to play for the Marlborough Blues when he was captaining the side. He showed the same appreciation of his fellows that I had seen at Cambridge. He did his very best to ensure that every member of the team, even the weakest, enjoyed the day. Drinks in the Seamers’ garden were a special highlight for us all. At such gatherings he showed himself a brilliant raconteur and mimic. In the 1980s I was watching a Test Match from the roof of the Lord’s Pavilion, sitting right beside the BBC Commentary Box. Christopher e Marlburian Club Magazine

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emerged from the last flight of stairs with Archbishop Desmond Tutu some way behind him. “ank goodness you are here”, he (CMJ) puffed when he saw me. “e Archbishop has not been allowed to watch play from the Committee Room as planned because he is not wearing a jacket. As a major concession (!) I have been allowed to bring him up here because I am to interview him during the lunch break.” For the next hour and a half I had one of the most absorbing experiences of my life. I had the delight of being able to explain various unusual features of the ground such as the slope, while he, in his turn, expanded on his dreams for the future of Southern Africa. When Christopher was presenting “Down Your Way” on BBC Radio, it was no surprise to us that he chose Marlborough as one of his subjects. He movingly evoked both the general spirit of the place and the atmosphere of his time at school in the 1950s and 60s. Michael Preston (CR 1967-2001)

and comparing them with Preston’s. I have only completed ten years, alas, and will probably not be spared to complete twenty! What fascinated me was the fact that still, in the 1950s, those of us interested in natural history, based in the Mount House, were still involved in recording the earliest records for natural events mostly birds - and I have only just realised that this was the last fading memory of the structure that omas Preston had established in 1865. Jack H Halliday (CR 1946-74), a lovely, rather portly, biologist, was our mentor in the Natural History Society, and LG Peirson (CR 1919-54) was the ornithological guru whose records are still quoted in the recent avifauna Birds of Wiltshire, 2007. is is a small by-way of Marlborough history but I have been a member of the British Trust for Ornithology all my subsequent life, and contributed to its activities in the Bristol area as a direct result, and, as it is a by-way, I am probably one of the very few alive who still know anything about it. Richard Bland (B3 1950-54)

Madam May I draw your attention to Marlborough’s enormous importance in the science of Phenology, which, in my retirement, has become my abiding study? Rev omas Preston did a 20 year study of the phenology of natural events in the Marlborough district 1865-85. I think he was copying Gilbert White’s study at Selborne. He became the director of the Meteorological Office Phenology Division in 1875, a division that lasted until 1947. e absence of computers meant that they actually failed to spot the significance of their own work, which covered a period of very rapid climate change. A copy of Preston’s report was in the Bristol Naturalists’ Society’s library, and became my inspiration when the Woodland Trust took up the issue of phenological studies in the late 1990s in association with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, originally at Monkswood. is is now a key part of the study of the impact of climate change. What is interesting is that during Preston’s time everything was getting colder rather than warmer. I have recently written an article summarising my studies here in Clion 72

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Madam Benjamin ompson captures well the PNC/OPR dynamic enjoyed by double block history in the 1970s (Edition 113). However, the class of 1969-71, who had only two terms with OPR before A Levels, was also fortunate to be taught English Medieval History by Michael Williams (CR 1968-70, subsequently Rabbi Michael Williams of the Rue Copernic Synagogue, Paris), e American Civil War by Michael Preston (CR 1967-2001) and, for two terms before he le for Leighton Park, e Scientific Revolution and 16th Century History by Bill Spray (CR 1946-70) whose obituary is included in the same edition of the magazine. Each made a distinctive contribution to our historical education and Spray, our form-master for a term, also added to our wider intellectual development in a course examining the philosophy of punishment. Spray was a remarkable teacher, with great clarity of mind, whose insistence on essay outlines on torn half-sheets of paper, laid out paragraph by paragraph, bullet point by bullet point, was one of life’s great

practical lessons in developing an argument and expressing it. Antony Root (SU 1967-71)

Madam I was delighted to hear how many applicants there were this year for grants from the Marlburian Club Common Room Fund. However some of the applications appear to be for items which were more for the benefit of pupils rather than for the individuals making the request; while this shows great public spirit on behalf of their charges, it is not really the purpose for which this fund was established. After seven years as Club Secretary I was deeply impressed by the dedication and commitment to their pupils shown by members of Common Room and it seemed appropriate to establish a fund which would show the Club’s gratitude for this dedication by making grants which would directly benefit and enhance the personal or professional development of individual teachers - rather like the many gap year awards available to pupils. It is, in my view, important that this should be the criterion against which grants are assessed. e initial capital base was necessarily modest, but I hoped that other alumni might consider this to be a worthy aim and that the fund could be supplemented by further donations. If you might be prepared to publish this letter, I hope it might perhaps inspire others to make such donations. Robert Smith (B1 1943-48, Club Secretary 1989-96)

Madam I enjoyed the letters about School Rules in Edition 113. I have a dim recollection of being given a new edition of e Rules at the start of one Summer term and debating with my study companion whether, without getting caught, it might be possible to break every one of them in a single term. Some, like walking on the grass outside Chapel, were absurdly easy to break. By going to the cinema in Swindon we succeeded in breaking two at once.


distance at MC because he was in a different house and ahead of me in years, but we met on the hockey and rugger fields in House Match finals, in which in those days B2 seemed to prevail!

But others were much more difficult. I managed with some effort to have a hidden wireless in my study, but I’m afraid we failed on some others. One was going in an aeroplane without one’s parents’ permission - the first half of the rule was the difficult bit! I don’t remember if “a breach of common sense” was one of the rules then, but if it was, I suppose we could have ticked it off immediately we embarked on the project. Graham Elcombe (PR 1944-49)

Madam Reading Rob Peal’s account of the 2005 Barton Hill fire in Edition 113 reminded me of the occasion in July 1966 when the Polly Tea Rooms also had a serious fire. e Polly at that time was a two-storey building. Two children and their grandmother were rescued by fire crew from the upper floor which was entirely destroyed and never replaced. ree Marlborough firefighters (including George Johnson, see Edition 113) received the Queen’s Commendation for Bravery. e fire started to take a serious hold in the early part of that summer’s evening. College students had finished tea and were, mostly, working on the day’s prep. Word spread among the in-houses of some dramatic events taking place in the High Street. Indeed smoke from the fire could be seen waing towards St Peter’s Church and into the College near the Master’s Lodge and B House area. Gradually boys began to make their way out of the gates near the Master’s Lodge to walk (or in some cases run!) down to watch the Wiltshire fire-fighters tackle the blaze. ere must have been around seventy to a hundred pupils gathered on the north side of street watching the spectacle. All of them had illegally broken bounds and there were to be repercussions! e following morning, in the Assembly Hall, the Master (John Dancy, Master 1961-72) asked all prefects to take down names of those who had le the school premises without permission the previous evening. All boys listed were to meet in the Bradleian at 2pm that aernoon and await instructions. I, and many other culprits, quaked in our boots a little during the morning’s lessons, wondering

what form of punishment awaited us. When we sidled into the old building aer an anguished lunch, we were told to go and change in to our sports clothes and meet at the base of the Mound, outside the entrance to the (then new) Art School. At that point we had to run up the pathway to the top of the Mound and back three times. e slowest five boys were then to report to the Master in his study at the Lodge. I had fortunately been eliminated at that point but one of my fellow B2 housemates was not so lucky. e five remaining rule-breakers shuffled into John Dancy’s inner sanctum. ey were then told to run up and down the lawn, at the rear of the Master’s Lodge, ten times. e last boy to complete this exercise was to return alone to the Master’s Study. He happened to me my friend from B2 and later told me what he had to do next. “I want you, young man”, intoned the Master, “to return to our garden. You are to select and pick flowers to be placed in rooms around the Lodge and, in particular, for Mrs Dancy’s dressing table. When you have completed this task, you will have fulfilled your obligation over last night’s event.” I shall never forget the Polly fire and the ingenious ‘punishment’ allotted to those of us who went to witness the occasion. e Master clearly saw the educational value in the boys’ experience that warm July evening. His wise response was a generous, flexible and unique adaptation of the rule requiring boys to remain within the school perimeter aer ‘gates’. Cream tea, anyone? Simon Beards (B2 1964-68)

Madam May I add something to the obituary of JS Lloyd (C3 1937-42) [p53]? I knew John very well though somewhat at a

e winter of 1942 was so severe that no inter-school matches were played, so John, though Captain of Hockey, was very unfortunate. He had been lucky to be Captain, for RA Roseveare (B3 193641) was to have been Captain that year, but being a brilliant Mathematician was grabbed by Bletchley Park and le one term early [see obituary in Edition 106]. e frost was so penetrating and consistent that we played ice hockey on the Kennet & Avon Canal, and on one occasion I remember a scratch game with JS Maples (CR 1936-58) and DS Milford (CR 1928-65). John later played for Cambridge and was unlucky not to get a blue. John was a good neighbour of mine in Somerset and was my son’s Godfather. I saw him many times in the very good care home in Wiveliscombe where he spent his last few months, and the talk was inevitably of our shared memories of MC and how lucky we both were with our Housemasters, he with Hubert Wylie (HM C3 1935-54) and I with Alan Cornwall (HM B2 1930-36). Richard Moody (B2 1939-43)

Madam I still use my father’s OM tie. He was Charles Durst (C1 1902-07). Can any OMs beat this record for the oldest tie in circulation? David Durst (C1 1936-41)

Interested in becoming the next Editor of the Marlburian Club Magazine? jpendry@marlboroughcollege.org

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A Coronation Review RM Moody (B2 1939-42) kindly sent us this letter written by his step-father, AJ Capel (B2 1908-13) to AJC’s sister. As this is a Coronation Anniversary year, we though it apposite to reproduce it, even though it refers to a rather different Coronation, that of George V, in 1911.

B House, The College, Marlborough, 6th July 1911

My dear Katrine I am so sorry you could not come to the review at Windsor; I am sure you would have enjoyed yourself, and the weather was simply perfect. I will try to tell you all that we did, but it is very hard to remember. The day began with “revelly”, followed immediately by a general rush to the beds of the Civilians, which were promptly turned upside down, and the Civilians landed on the floor. This all happened at about 4 o’clock. We then had breakfast, and got to the station about 6 o’clock. There were only seven in a carriage, and so we had plenty of room to rot about, which we did. We each had to take in our haversack a mug, a fork and a knife, and after singing every tune, whether it was a comic song or a hymn, we had a drumming competition, using the mug as the drum, and the fork and knife as sticks, and the chief result was that my mug was broken, another chaps fork, and another’s knife. I have no doubt that we shall hear more of that later. We arrived at Windsor at eight o’clock, without further damage, to ourselves, or our property, and then we marched off to our assembly grounds, which were about two miles from the station. Windsor was still decorated very elaborately and looked very nice. We marched all down the long walk, which is about three miles long and perfectly straight with Windsor Castle one end, and a huge statue of George III, about three times life size or more, the other end. After we had had some biscuits and cocoa, we were allowed to fall out, until dinner at 12 o’clock. It was getting rather hot and so I and two others strolled up to see the statue. It was an awfully good one, of George III on a horse, and from it there was a splendid view for miles round, on every side. There were the remains of what had evidently been a coronation bonfire up there, and it must have been a very big one. We sat there for about an hour and then walked slowly back to the assembly ground. We had

dinner soon after getting back and they gave us a tremendous lot to eat, but it all soon vanished. It was rather like being in camp, without the tents, but with piled rifles instead. Some schools had come the day before, and had encamped there, and so there were some places to wash at, which was a mercy. Soon after dinner we had to fall in for the review. We were “sized”, tallest on the outsides. Luckily I was only six from the right end, which was a great advantage, as the right is nearest the King in the march past. We had about ½ a mile to march to the parade ground and then we had to wait for about ½ an hour. All round the grounds, at intervals of 50 yds, there were groups of Horse Guards who looked awfully nice. While we were waiting for the King several chaps fainted from other schools, but not one of us fainted, which says a lot for the air of M.C.. When the King came we presented arms and the band (about 300 of the Household Band) played God Save the King. With him were a lot of swells including Lord Roberts and a lot of Indians, who looked very smart. After them came the Queen’s carriage, with the Queen, Princess Christian, Princess Mary and the Prince of Wales. They looked tremendous “knibs”, especially Princess Mary. The King was wearing the dress of a Field Marshal and looked awfully nice. First of all he rode round the battalions, only just in front of them, as it would have taken too long to have gone between each company, and the Queen also drove round. I could see very well, as I was very near the front. Then the King took up his position at the saluting base, and the march past began. We marched past by companies, about 100 yds between each, and the whole thing took 55 minutes, as there were about 19,000 to march past, and each company is only 100 men. First of all the cavalry of the universities went past, then their artillery, then the infantry. We were the first 4 companies of the ninth battalion, and I was in the fourth company. It was simply ripping marching past to the band as of course it kept perfect step and you felt that it was impossible to get out of step. We were the best of the schools in the march past, and Haileybury was second best. Afterwards we were greatly complimented by General Munro, director of military training, and by the battalion commander. The officer who inspected the corps here on Thursday had written specially to the War Office to tell them to write to the King, saying that we were very good, and so he was looking out for us especially. We are the only corps who wear green hats, and so we are easily distinguishable. After the march past we went back and had tea, and then we had a long time to wait until the train. So some of us went into Windsor and had an awfully good time in spite of the river being out of bounds. We fed on ices and chocolate, and other nauseous mixtures, but we did not feel any the worse for it. Windsor was simply crowded, as heaps of corps were going back every few minutes, and boy scouts were arriving for their review the next day. We entrained at 9.30 and got back about 11.30. We had an awfully good time in the train, as we enjoyed as much possible considering the limited space. We got off a good deal of work the next day, as everyone was so sleepy. I think I should like a review every summer term, as it is not so hot as field day. Of course, it is quite a thing to have been to, as the King only takes the review once during his life, so it is not an every day affair by any means. Now I must stop as I have got no more to say. Much love Jack

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Marlborough Legends: Common Room Embroiderers Clare Russell (CR 1980-), Assistant College Archivist In 1956 the women of Marlborough’s Common Room started a task which led to 10 years of delicate, lengthy effort: they formed an embroidery group. Led by the Master’s wife, Penelope Garnett and Maire, wife of art master, Guy Barton (CR 1946-66 ), they began in a small way with some simple kneelers for a side chapel, and made use of the skills of local expert Sybil Matthews, author and prominent member of the Embroiderers’ Guild, following a model devised by a Miss Pesel of Winchester Cathedral. used on occasion. e work demanded a high standard of needlecra: Una West, widow of David (CR 1948-78), tells me that she would follow her chart, stitching early in the morning while still in bed, to make use of the morning sunlight, and that work had to be regularly shown to the more experienced leaders of the group, who monitored its quality.

Sybil Matthews

n fortnightly meetings in the Master’s Lodge and in their own homes, the wives and daughters of Common Room, along with some Dames, resident cooks, a few local ladies, mothers of OMs and one solitary male OM, followed the Celtic design-style mediaeval or Saxon type of cross patterns devised by Guy Barton, to produce the 96 stall seat cushions and kneelers, alms bags and carpets for the chancel steps still used in the Chapel today. In addition there are some designs based on College crests, College buildings and some all-over patterns of wild flowers with no two designs alike.

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Chapel kneeler

e stitches are mainly cross-stitch, rice stitch, long-legged cross-stitch and satin and tent (petit point) stitches, but Oriental, French and Gobelin were also

Many different stitches were combined to give a pleasing variety of texture and the dyes were natural, with many delicately differentiated shades, oen chosen in detail by each maker. It was intended that the red ground cushions would occupy the shaded south side of Chapel to give warmth, while the blue ground were for the brighter north side. In those days every stall seat was allocated to a beak, who had a list of the boys sitting opposite him so that he could guarantee good behaviour. On Sundays wives went into Chapel first, followed by boys, and then the beaks in procession, until Master (1961-72 ) John Dancy’s wife Angela asked wives to accompany their husbands into the Sunday service. To ensure ‘that “more than immediately local talent” could be canvassed, on Prize Day, 1958, a small exhibition was staged of the stall seats at their various stages of completion, to try to interest visitors’ (Embroidery, Spring 1961, the journal of the Embroiderers’ Guild). Funds to cover costs (eg 15s per stall seat) were raised in a variety of inventive ways. Winchester jute was used for the base, which gives an attractive irregularity and the threads were worked in different thicknesses and shadings with e Marlburian Club Magazine

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wool from Lee & Sons of Birkenhead, dyed with beautiful natural dyes. When the embroidery was finished, (some participants needed to be chivvied) the mattress stuffing had to be constructed using horsehair from old mattresses, which caused sore hands and blistered fingers. e finishing was “an awful bore” until the discovery of an alternative and modern foam rubber material. Finally there was a celebration tea party and photograph. Some examples were even exhibited in Australia and the fashion spread to local churches, though the St Peter’s kneelers, of which College ladies did half, were of coarser work and could be finished in only three months. Guy Barton in retirement oversaw similar work for Durham Cathedral. In this far-off world College wives of course did not have their own jobs outside the school. eir work was to bring up their children and support their husbands’ work; but childcare to allow time for stitching was not an issue as most had au pairs, and children over eight were sent away to school (as nowhere local was considered suitable). e community was

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held together by such creative and companionably shared occasions, though I am assured that chat was limited to embroidery matters rather than gossip. More than 70 women (and one man) worked with commitment for their own and for our enjoyment, taking on average about 2 years to complete a seat cushion, and to beautify and enhance the magnificent, but austere Chapel seating. Above: George Matthews with an example of his wife’s work on the hearth. Below: Chapel kneeler


The Derwent Reservoir and Dam outside Sheffield, used by the Dambusters for low-level flying practise

OM Dambusters Terry Rogers (CR 1964-96), College Archivist Everyone has heard of the Dambuster Raid of World War II. It received much immediate publicity and its iconic status in the national psyche was confirmed in 1955 by the classic film we all know. But in this, its 60th anniversary year, are you aware that of the 19 Lancasters involved in the attack on the Dams on 16 May 1943, two had OM pilots? David Maltby (B3 1934-36) and John “Hoppy” Hopgood (C1 1935-39) played very prominent parts in the action. n the Michaelmas term of 1935 both were in the same form and, interestingly, their Form Master that term was physics beak, AR Pepin (CR 1915-52), who is credited with having designed a “walky-talky” radio set for the College Corps that was subsequently used by the Army. Perhaps MC can claim that Pepin was its equivalent of Barnes Wallis?!* Maltby le Marlborough early, aiming for a career in mining engineering, while Hopgood stayed until July 1939, securing a place at Cambridge with the ultimate aim of becoming a solicitor.

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David Maltby (B3 1934-46) and Guy Gibson in Gibson’s office

Soon aer War broke out both volunteered for service as aircrew and, in due course, qualified as bomber pilots. By late March 1943, when they were posted to RAF Scampton to join the newly created 617 Squadron under Guy Gibson, both were seasoned “veterans” of numerous bombing missions. Aer seven weeks’ training flying Lancasters at tree-top height over reservoirs all was ready and, shortly before 10pm on 16 May, Gibson led off the first wave of nine, including “M for Mother” and “J for Johnny” piloted by Hopgood and Maltby respectively. Just over two hours later they arrived over their target having flown so low that Hopgood had at one point flown under an electricity cable. Gibson went in first, dropping his bomb on target but, seemingly, to little effect. Hopgood was next but the flak defences were now alert and “M for Mother” was on fire before its bomb was released but eventually it bounced over the Dam and exploded in the power station below. Knowing his plane was doomed, Hopgood struggled to gain enough height to give his crew a chance of escape, but only two got out before it blew up, witnessed by Maltby circling above. Two further Lancasters made their runs, the Dam seemingly still undamaged, before it was Maltby’s turn. As he approached he could see slight damage e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Fraser of the Canadian Air Force, was one of the two members of “M for Mother’s” crew who baled out successfully. Aer the War, knowing that he owed his life to the bravery of his pilot, he named his son John Hopgood Fraser and his daughter Shere, aer Hopgood’s home village in Surrey.

*Many OMs will remember Dr Brian Wallis (CR 1967- 97). Unsurprisingly, he was known universally as “Barnes” and several Marlburians actually believed it was he who had devised the famous bouncing bomb! Hopwood after passing out at Cranwell

to the Dam wall, but when his bomb hit dead on target a large section of the wall completely gave way. e operation had achieved its goal but at the cost of eight Lancasters and 54 crew. A visit by the King and Queen to Scampton to congratulate the survivors was followed by an investiture at Buckingham Palace in which Gibson was given his VC and 33

fellow Officers and NCOs other decorations: Maltby a DSO to add to his DFC. Maltby soon flew again but his luck finally ran out when he and his crew were lost in an operation over the North Sea on 15 September 1943. Sadly, he le a young widow and a 10-week-old son. A moving tribute was in due course made to “Hoppy”. His Bomb-aimer, Flt-Sgt

Eder Dam

Your Network – Your Way Stay connected to your Old Marlburian community… your way Update your profile and join affiliated clubs and groups through the Members’ Area of the Club website… www.marlburianclub.org/members Join the Marlborough College alumni LinkedIn group

New Distribution Policy Only one copy of the Magazine is now being sent to each household. Members sharing an address may request their own copy or receive alerts for the online version through www.marlburianclub.org/magsubscription or the Club Office

Going Mobile

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MC Foundation To ensure Marlborough retains its position as one of Britain’s leading independent, co-educational boarding schools it has to look to the future. As the Master, Jonathan Leigh, enters his second year with more certainty as to how that can be achieved, he has appointed a new Director of Development who will be instrumental in helping him and Council develop and articulate this long-term vision and raise the critical funds required. achael Henshilwood joins the College with an impressive CV in school fundraising. She spent four years at Eton (which has just hit its first new £50m endowment target and where her husband Alex resumes as Geography Master and Head Coach to the Boat Club) and has just returned from three years at Melbourne Grammar School in Australia, where she was instrumental in developing a highly acclaimed Indigenous Bursary Program and initiating the development of a new world-leading Science and Technology Centre.

R

“Too oen development offices or fundraising functions are seen as a necessary evil for schools such as ours, hidden away only to be spoken about in whispers.”

Rachael is all about the bigger picture. “Too oen development offices or fundraising functions are seen as a necessary evil for schools such as ours, hidden away only to be spoken about in whispers. Marlborough College has the most phenomenal progressive history and renowned excellence in boarding. Combine this with the recent development in Malaysia and we have a significant opportunity to embrace and shape future pedagogy, whilst developing real social understanding and philanthropic hearts. It’s about understanding how we can best educate the leaders of tomorrow. Already (only in week five) I am hearing stories of achievement and ambition that show what an impressive institution – and indeed students – we have here. I am already very proud of what I see around me, both past and present. “Communicating these stories in an appropriately engaging way to a variety of different audiences is challenging, but something we will be developing

from a sound base. Also, supporting e Marlburian Club and its fantastic associations so that our Alumni and current and past parent bodies feel engaged and embraced by the school, is critical. Institutions such as ours can and should remain relevant to Marlburians and their families throughout their lives, if in differing contexts. Only when a community feels truly valued, engaged and communicated with (as opposed to) will they be keen to support the College in any meaningful financial capacity. ere will be significant opportunities for families and individuals to make a significant impact into the lives and, therefore, long-term future of students. is is what my job is about and I love it!” As Rachael builds her understanding of Marlborough she would very much like to meet as many OMs as possible, to help her through this journey and answer some of the questions posed above. In coming months she also looks forward to helping the College shape its 25 year vision, both in terms of buildings but also with regard to need-blind bursaries, internationalism, social enterprise etc with, hopefully, the help of OMs. “I’ve joined the College at a truly transformational time and I am tremendously excited by what I have learnt to date and where this journey could take us.” Rachael would be delighted to meet anyone who feels they would like to share their MC experience or feel they could contribute towards this thinking for the future. Please call her on 01672 892237 or email rhenshilwood@ marlboroughcollege.org to arrange a meeting. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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e 1843 Society Life… is simply too short. Early ambitions for adventure fade over time into distant dreams, and hindsight is one of those inner voices that tell us what we secretly already knew all along. bizarre way to introduce the topic of legacy giving? Not so. Writing a Will and leaving funds to close family, friends and causes we hold dear, allows us to contribute even aer we’ve gone and help others achieve the dreams we didn’t. Far from being melancholic, this can be decidedly stimulating! But thinking ahead, beyond our own time, does require a certain nerve, plus ambition and hope for others, and confidence in values.

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1843 Society Luncheon 2013. Jane Rose with Magnus Jackson (LI L6) and Elijah Samuel (LI Sh)

Cricket Pavilion, overlooking the 1st XI. Mrs Jane Rose, widow of Henry (C1 1953-57), was a guest of honour along with Henry’s brother, John (C1 1947-53). ey were delighted with the restoration, which had been carried out thanks to Henry’s generous bequest. Speaking with them and the other wonderful guests, a common theme emerged through their questioning of the school today and memory of what it stood for in their youth: that Marlborough’s values remain as strong now as they were then. is inspires the confidence which, combined with a fundamental belief in the importance of education, has led the Roses and all the other 1843 Society members to remember those early ambitions dreamed of at Marlborough,

Until recently I wasn’t much of an OM...

modest success in work and play, but when I le rather turned my back on the place.

I was at school during the war, when a large proportion of the pre-war teachers were serving in the forces. I got off to a bad start, catching pleurisy in the bitter winter of 1940 and, not being very gregarious, found myself ill-equipped to deal with the rigours of a largely unmonitored boarding-school life. I came to terms with it all, achieving

It was only later I began to realise what the College had done for me. It had taught me independence and given me the desire to achieve something in life beyond the humdrum. Most of all it awakened what became my two major interests. Sitting at the feet of Hubert Wylie (CR 1927-59) gave me a life-long liking for history, om which I have also

It was the mutual confidence in our Marlburian values that struck me most at the Annual 1843 Luncheon* in May, held in the newly refurbished Henry Rose

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and want future Marlburians to have the chance to realise them in their place, by their leaving of a Legacy to the College, no matter how big or small. In recognition of this critical contribution, as the inaugural 1843 President I am working closely with MC’s new Director of Development, Rachael Henshilwood, on establishing a Committee of likeminded OMs and Past Parents who feel as committed as I to leave a legacy to the school. e growing list of members of this special Society will be invited to many more events both at the school and around the country, to enable us both to say thank you appropriately during your lifetime and keep you thoroughly up to date with developments both inside and outside the classroom. Life is too short, but let’s not wait for hindsight to tell us that. Marlborough makes a huge difference to the lives of so many and this is possible only thanks to the generous donors who believe in, support us and enable this to happen. To join or learn more about this growing Society, do please call me on 01672 892237.

Martin Evans (CR 1968-) President, e 1843 Society *A more detailed account and slideshow of May’s 1843 Lunch can be found at www.marlburianclub.org.

earned a living at various times, and in RAU Jennings’s (CR 1927-66) class I developed that passion for fiction which has kept me writing novels all my life. Aer my first wife died, I fell in love again. Jan has encouraged me to do what I had half-decided on before: to try to pay back a little of what Marlborough gave me. Guy Etherington-Wilson (PR 1940-44)


Looking ahead Mark Malloch Brown (C1 1967-71), Chairman of Council Marlborough has a habit of getting back into our lives. It is more than a school, or the years we spent at it. For many of us it has been a formative and continuing part of the ethos, values and acquired knowledge we live by. What it taught us inside and out of the classroom is with us for life. or those of us on the Council or staff there is a responsibility to conserve that very special Marlborough Way, but also the challenge to refresh its offering and renew its values in changing times.

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“e Academies and Free Schools, together with a new generation of private day schools, are introducing a new choice for parents: the old binary system of state and private is breaking down.”

Taking on the baton of Chairman of Council from the larger than life Sir Hayden Phillips is a moment to reflect on this. When I was at the school it was led by that great reforming Master, John Dancy (Master 1961-72). To many in the student body’s delight, he smashed precedent and introduced girls to the sixth form. I can only imagine what must have been the reactions in the clubs and bars where Old Marlburians met. Yet I saw a revolutionary who understood that this change must go with the grain of the school, not against it. So there was continuity as well as change. ose early girls added dazzle and some broken hearts but were as rooted in the Marlburian values of intellectual curiosity, liberal tolerance, respect for tradition, and the responsibility to try and make a difference as the boys they joined. e subsequent success of so many Marlborough women reflects this. ey extended Marlborough’s impact rather than diluting or confusing it, as some initially feared. Today the school may not face such obviously revolutionary choices but nevertheless it is at a series of equally important crossroads. First, with Marlborough Malaysia now up and running, we face the question of the extent to which these are just two sister schools with one ownership (different by the way to the arm’s length franchise arrangements that govern other schools’ overseas campuses); or to what extent we are looking at a combined offering which offers a vision of educational exchange

and shared values across two very different cultures. Back home Marlborough faces dramatic changes in the domestic educational market. e Academies and Free Schools, together with a new generation of private day schools, are introducing a new choice for parents: the old binary system of state and private is breaking down. At the same time our partnership with Swindon Academy reminds us how much inequality of opportunity still remains to be addressed in the British state school system. And thank you to every boy and girl and beak who is part of this important initiative [see article on pp 8991]. Marlborough, in its Wiltshire eyrie, can seem a long way away from the broader debate about our nation’s education. Finally le unaddressed, the currently inexorable rise in private school fees risks pricing out the families who have been the backbone of this school since 1843. It is surely time we focussed even more on both value for money and improvement in our stock of bursaries. Now these will primarily be issues for Jonathan Leigh and his team to lead on and for we, the Council, to support. For I have one other modesty-enhancing memory from the time of John Dancy: I remember the Master and wonderful and inspiring beaks like Martin Evans and the late Robert Avery and others who taught me, but cannot for the life of me remember who the members of Council were.

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A change at the top Sir Hayden Phillips CMG, retires as Chairman of Council e workload of a Chairman of Council is largely invisible but significant, testing and, at times, extremely heavy. Sir Hayden Phillips has offered distinguished and valuable service to Marlborough. His has been an active love for the place freely and generously given. ot a Marlburian himself and indeed the only non-Marlburian to chair Council, Hayden’s connection with the College was, in the first instance as a neighbour, living at Ramsbury, and subsequently as the father of Tom (PR 2001-06). He joined the Council in 1997 and served under Sir Jim Butler (LI 1942-47) and, subsequently, Paul Orchard Lisle (SU 1952-56) until becoming Chairman himself in 2005.

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“To watch Hayden chair a meeting was an education. He managed a talented and, at times, ank and articulate team with admirable sensitivity, ensuring that unanimity and consensus emerged even aer fierce debate.”

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To watch Hayden chair a meeting was an education. He managed a talented and, at times, frank and articulate team with admirable sensitivity, ensuring that unanimity and consensus emerged even aer fierce debate. Significant decisions were taken during his period in office: the change to the Admissions system, the Malaysian initiative and the formation of a new girls’ house are examples. In order to gain accreditation as an IB World School the Chairman had to undergo a rigorous examination: he had mastered his brief and passed with customary grace. In times of difficulty or challenge he was hugely supportive and unfailingly wise. He has held firmly to valuable traditions whilst grasping appropriate innovation.

Hayden’s affection for the College really shone through when he visited during a working day, observing lessons and departments and meeting pupils and members of staff. He particularly enjoyed his contact with those undertaking crucial but unglamorous tasks: one of his favourite places was the College Laundry. He possesses an instinct for the humane which is unerring and warm. His stock of Speech Day jokes may have been limited – some of them became old friends – but his work on the College’s behalf, and his personal support for those living and working within it has been unstinting and transformative: he knows and cherishes the vital, enduring strengths of the place and he has fostered a sense of institutional ambition and a willingness to embrace new horizons which will serve present and future Marlburians extremely well: the College is much in his debt.

Nicholas Sampson (Master 2004-12)


e Master’s Review Jonathan Leigh (Master 2012-) e late Nora Ephron famously wrote, “When your children are teenagers, it is important to have a dog, so that someone in the house is happy to see you.” t has been my fortune to return home to the pleasures and misfortunes of our great benighted land in the midst of seismic educational debate. 37 years of communication with teenagers has not yet blunted my enthusiasm for them, even though I have had great dogs to keep me semi-sane on either side of the Atlantic. Lucy, my latest, is a canine wonder. 21 years on and enjoying the privilege of my

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third headship, the contrasts and similarities invariably bring a wry smile when thought through, especially when considering moments spent in two great nations disunited by a common language. Returning, there were some acute immediate impressions. Aer 7 years of no league tables and no pit in the bottom of one’s stomach shortly before the A level results came out, it was strange

to inherit someone else’s results and finding myself defending their profile. Even stranger was the sense that, oen, 3 A grades were essential for placements in courses or even universities which, a decade ago, would never have been asking for such a score. Grade inflation is a sorry reflection of modern life and today’s teenagers look neither cleverer nor stupider than those of 20 years ago. Amusingly, many Heads still write glowingly of record-breaking years. en, if one had anticipated confirmation of this well-known fact, it was a genuine shock to find that “re-marking” is now a solid industry, a sad reflection of the current national failure to serve our pupils with a reliable (examination) service. Interestingly this is in contrast to the consistency of the IB, something which is attracting increasing numbers of good schools in North America at a time when, for some amorphous reasons, our own private schools are allowing it all to spin in reverse. On leaving these shores in 2004, the international-mindedness of such a system was of immense appeal, so it is counter-intuitive to find a new isolationism creeping in, or maybe not in a country which is doubtful about European Union. It is good to hear of increasing numbers of pupils wanting to go abroad for their degrees. inking beyond the confines of our own Russell Group is much needed. World ranking tables of universities testify to this. As we fight our local battles with the curriculum and the cocurriculum, so the preservation of balance in an atmosphere that is less of a pressure cooker is to be commended. However, that does not fly in the face of specialisation. One key aspect taught me strongly just how valuable the existence of high performance expectations can be. In a mere 18 months, Ridley College was able to revive its rowing programme. Back here the emphasis of excellence within Marlborough’s music department proves the same point, that, when expectations are highly placed, then students of all calibres will rise to meet them. e Marlburian Club Magazine

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“In my years away British attitudes have shied. It is now understood that there are virtues in annual giving campaigns. Also, despite the weight of fees, schools in aging premises need fund-raisers to draw attention to both immediate needs and long term philanthropy.”

en, there is the importance of core traditions. At Marlborough, the Chapel is a still centre to keep all grounded, no matter what their belief. When this particular community enterprise goes well, there is an inner-humanity in the standards and values which can be inspired. From such a core our increasingly internationalised world can flourish. Training an empathetic awareness of each other’s understanding is fundamental, as much of it lies in re-evaluation of language. Nearly a year on from our return, despite the forebodings of economic gloom that beset Europe, it is great to be home. Eight years abroad is a tonic. Despite the privilege of assuming Canadian citizenship, it was impossible to cast off a certain sense of being forever English. e comprehension that boarding is a total way of life is something with which

we wrestle. With soaring fees everywhere it can only be contemplated by an increasingly narrow band of the population. As such it becomes dangerously exclusive. e need for foundational funds to reach out and become more inclusive has never been so important. Schools with strong foundation development departments have much to learn from the North American models of annual giving. In my years away British attitudes have shied. It is now understood that there are virtues in annual giving campaigns. Also, despite the weight of fees, schools in aging premises need fund-raisers to draw attention to both immediate needs and long term philanthropy. e great Victorian models which sprang up so readily in the C19th will struggle, should they prove too slow to adapt to the times. Many schools and universities in North America have development funds which are vast investments – sometimes even reaching billions of dollars. e need to emulate such endowment has never been greater as has the need to reach out and share. Lastly, it is always sad to find that there is still a belief that if one shouts loud enough in English, then all those who speak some other language will “get it” in the end. Walking a mile in the next man’s moccasins is a far better way of acquiring understanding of their native point of view. Imagine my excitement on sitting with four different nations most mornings of the week at breakfast at Ridley. Conversation was seldom at a loss and not least on one occasion when discovering that the collective sum of languages spoken by four 15 year old boys came to eleven across the group surrounding me – suddenly my own, not even bi-linguism, felt just a little bit limited in comparison to the realisation that they were networking in multiple intelligences. Never has it been so obvious that linguistic comprehension is as important as it has ever been. Whether dealing with domestic inclusion or foreign outreach to our new school in Malaysia or beyond, we strive for deeper understanding. Fortunately, the fertile imagination of Marlburians is as great as ever. ey will make a massive difference. Imagine their infinite potential; it certainly makes it a privilege to have come home, older, hopefully wiser, and definitely different.

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College Admissions Procedures For Shell entry the College uses an assessment system that seeks to select children with academic, sporting and artistic appetites and abilities that suggest they will make the most of their time at Marlborough. e process relies mainly on interviews at the school and reports from prep schools heads. If you are interested in sending your child to the College, please contact the Admissions Secretary, Louise Smith, on 01672 892302 in the first instance, indicating that you are OM so that this can be taken into account at the time of assessment.

Scholarships and Exhibitions A wide variety of scholarships and exhibitions is available to all children (whether offspring of an OM or not) at 13+ and 16+ entry. Details of all such awards, including values, dates, qualifications and examination procedures, may be obtained from the Senior Admissions Tutor, Dr Niall Hamilton. The Scholarship Booklet may also be viewed on-line at www.marlboroughcollege.org The Marlburian Club Charitable Trust makes funds available for various purposes but most commonly assists OMs with a child at the College who experience unexpected hardship. It also gives grants to College leavers pursuing GAP Year projects involving an element of service to others. The Marlborough Children of Clergy Fund, in accordance with the intentions of the College’s Founders, assists ordained members of the Church of England (whether OMs or not) to send their children to the College. To apply to either The Marlburian Club Charitable Trust or The Children of Clergy Fund please contact Peter Bryan, Deputy Master and Director of Corporate Resources, on 01672 892 390 or pnb@marlboroughcollege.org

Can you offer a work placement or internship? e Careers Department is keen to support sixth formers and young OMs taking their first steps towards a career. If you think you or your organisation may be able to offer work experience or internships please contact Guy Nobes in the Careers Department who will be delighted to give you more information: egn@marlboroughcollege.org e Marlburian Club Magazine

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College News clutch of particularly eminent beaks, who will be well known to younger OMs, bade the College adieu in 2013. We wish them all much happiness in their new pastures and pursuits.

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Alan & Claire McKnight (CR 1981-2013)

lan’s car broke down on the way to his interview. Claire wryly observed that this would at least be remembered at the wash-up…

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Alan is kind, generous, loyal, entertaining, a tremendous raconteur and mimic and quite the sportsman: whatever the game, Alan is good at it. A superb teacher, he rapidly became Head of Biology, where he championed some great appointments: Sean Dempster and Neil Moore to name but two. An excellent judge of character, Alan never feared airing his point of view. He is also a great communicator, essential for a good HoD and HM. In meetings, he could spot contradictions and waffle immediately. Alan was a natural Housemaster; few have such a keen understanding of the workings of the teenage mind. e same attributes he exploited when running marathons also contributed to his success: comprehensive preparation, tenacity and an ability to carry on despite unbearable fatigue. A phenomenal memory also led to his 86

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remembering and recounting every misdemeanour and funny occasion of the Turner House year in his legendary Christmas Supper speeches. Parents loved the McKnight method. From the outset they became part of a larger family and during their time would be royally entertained on a rich diet of Claire’s cooking, the Bursar’s wine and Alan’s wit. Alan believed in training parents as much as, if not more than, their children; getting along with the mothers, in particular, was essential. “I kiss ‘em!” Alan would say…and did! But it was the children who were his greatest fans. His philosophy was simple: he treated each as his own while demonstrating singular perception and complete fairness. Quite capable of shredding a student, he seldom did. Humour greased Turner’s wheels and where others hammered, Alan chiselled, patiently craing. e thought that they might let him down was far more of a deterrent to his charges than any punishment. Each one felt special and his example le an indelible impression. Alan and Claire have given 32 years of service to Marlborough, 16 of them to Turner. Alan could not have survived them without Claire. Gentle, wise, inscrutable and serene, she was Alan’s rock while simultaneously sustaining her own career as an artist. Alan is philosophical about the departure of beaks from MC, including himself. “e waters quickly close over,” he says. Less quickly I would venture, in the case of the McKnights. Garry Doyle (CR 1999-)

Mark & Lisa McVeigh (CR 1991-2013) ark McVeigh, a qualified HGV Truck driver from Northern Ireland, arrived from Lancing with Lisa in 1991 to head the Chemistry Department. Resident Tutors in C3, the pair learnt from legendary housemaster Bob Sanderson (CR 1972-2007) both how to relish a boarding community and become experts in fine wine and

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food: a knowledge and expertise they subsequently shared freely, not least via regular wine tastings. From 1996 to 2012 it was through their work with the boys of C2 that they made their mark. To preside over a successful community of 60 teenage boys for so long demands an extraordinary tolerance of industrially-scaled unscheduled disturbances, outstanding patience, stamina, generosity and a deep understanding of the multifarious ways of adolescents. Mark has a rational scientific mind: C2 reflected it. He designed his study to accommodate large numbers for pep talks and group discussions, while individuals would be made to feel that he both knew of and cared about their achievements. From this immaculately-ordered administrative powerhouse housemastering looked effortless; C2 boys knew where they stood and appreciated the clear framework. Always ambitious for the house, particularly in sport, Mark also led from the front; the trophy cabinet heaved. Lisa complemented Mark’s crisp efficiency. e open kitchen door, tuck shop and loaded table regularly surrounded by cheerful teenagers provided the regular maintenance essential in a boarding house. Her ability to see the funny side and Middlesex Hospital nursing training were also invaluable. Apart from providing unending care and fun for Marlburians, parents and tutors too


were always welcome at Dene House, while it was also of course home to Jamie and Lucy. Mark’s international portfolio over the last year has helped him prepare for their next move: Marlborough Malaysia is very lucky to have Wiltshire’s best DNA heading its way. Mark will become deputy head pastoral and Lisa will run the sani. Like a Grand Cru Gevrey Chambertin, the king of Burgundies, the McVeighs have a nuanced complexity and demonstrate remarkable long bottle age / ability. ey are a ‘big’ wine and complement any fare, social or institutional. Niall Hamilton (CR 1985-)

Richard Markham (CR 1994-2013) ichard Markham: the man in the picture whenever the Duchess of Cambridge’s time at the College comes under newspaper scrutiny. Many have puzzled over the identity of the youth in the hockey team photo…

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Richard arrived in 1994 to teach both History and History of Art. He pioneered the teaching of Vietnam as a lower school topic and was fascinated by the Middle East and the Cold War. He also became a serious medievalist, enjoying a run of Oxbridge successes. Having made an interesting sideways move into cultural history while at Oxford, he mirrored it when he became Head of History of Art in 2002. Bright and energetic, a mere year in Richard was snapped up to become Summerfield’s RHT, occupying a tiny

flat on the first floor, entirely surrounded by pupils. He and Kate did well to keep their burgeoning romance alive with 60 boarders on sentry duty! Greatly in demand as a tutor, particularly with Sixth Form pupils, RTM’s ability to fillet a personal statement in seconds was impressive and duty nights were characterised by lively discussions. An Oxford hockey Blue, Richard continued his impressive playing career, becoming a fine role model. He played for Guildford in the English Premiership, winning the Hockey Association Cup in 1995 and “runningup” in the 1996 European Cup. He also amassed 41 international caps for Wales, scored 23 goals and took part in 1998’s Commonwealth Games. Master in Charge of Hockey from 1996 to 2005, while Catherine Middleton (EL 19962000) was a player, he was also a fiercely competitive coach. In 2005 Nick Sampson selected Richard to introduce the IB to Marlborough, recognising in him the drive and stamina required to get a new curriculum off the ground. Richard persuaded CR of the philosophical ideals behind the IB while engaging pupils too in an impressively balanced way, recognising that it would not suit everyone. He steered MC skilfully through the registration period, was responsible for launching the first cohort and constructed the foundations of a challenging and ambitious programme. Becoming Director of Studies in 2009, Richard rapidly established a reputation for hard work and deep commitment; many colleagues have valued his measured guidance and wise counsel. He leaves CR in good heart as he, Kate, Harry and Freya move to Bishop’s Stortford where Richard will become Principal of Hockerill Anglo-European College. ey take with them our warmest best wishes. Bill Nicholas (CR 1998-)

Janice McFarlane (CR 1985-2013) have sometimes been told that the ablest teachers get taken out of the classroom to go on to higher things. No beak has disproved this fatuous

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statement more emphatically than Janice McFarlane, who has dedicated herself single-mindedly to the cra of teaching throughout her long Marlborough career. She discovered her love of teaching while teaching undergraduates at York University during her DPhil in English & French 19th Century Literature, honed her skills further at a girls’ school in Surrey before coming to Marlborough in 1986, where she soon established herself as a beak of considerable talent, with a warm-hearted affection for her students (however rascally they might be) and a formidable intellect – which she carried with great modesty. ese facets have earned her the absolute respect of her students throughout the past twenty-seven years. Despite changes of exam boards and syllabuses, the launch of educational initiatives and developments of policy, shis in pedagogical theories and successions of Mastership, Doc Mac has kept true to her vocation as a classroom beak. True, she has had a couple of stints away from the College, one year writing for Index on Censorship and another teaching in the British School in Brussels, but otherwise she has never shown any interest in career progression or promotion; instead, she has focused on the privilege of sharing great literature with generations of fortunate Marlburians and exploring with them how words work. Her enduring fascination with words has informed her extracurricular commitments too (she will readily admit that she is no sportswoman). Instead, she worked on the resurgent Heretick magazine and on e Marlburian and Newssheet, started the Retro Book Club and organised the Chapel readers. Her tutoring in C3 has also been outstanding. No beak can have e Marlburian Club Magazine

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College News been more dedicated or meticulous in the preparation of lessons or in marking work, or more compassionate. As one OM put it, it is impossible for Doc Mac to give less than 100% commitment to her students. Her contribution to Marlborough has been quietly and emphatically courageous. We wish her well. Mike Ponsford (CR 1987-2013)

Britt Faulkner (CR 2011-13)

ritt came to Marlborough as a Graduate Assistant in PE and to help the Foundation with publicity projects; in two years she has made herself a hard act to follow. Film-maker extraordinaire, she has changed the face of the website with outstanding videos conceived and produced with great flair, humour, consummate professionalism and at incredible speed, all of which form a lasting legacy. Very sporty, Britt was the only female member of the CR team in the CR v College Football Match in 2013 and, as Head of Lacrosse, she also put OM Lacrosse on the map with the launch of the first OM team. In a very short time Britt has le an indelible mark; we thank her for all she has done and wish her every success as she returns to the USA.

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Andrew Brown (CR 1981-) 88

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Marlborough College’s results within the overall national academic picture he summer’s exam results once more demonstrate the present generation of Marlburians is performing very impressively in a wide range of disciplines and in an ever-increasing array of qualifications. Overall the percentages of A* and A*/A grades at A level (19% and 58% respectively) and those for A*, A*/A and A*- B grades at GCSE (49%, 79% and 95% respectively) were all the highest ever recorded at Marlborough. Along with a good set of IB results and encouraging AS results it has been a very positive year of high academic achievement.

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Although there is increasing interest in international university applications and it is clear that this trend will continue, a large majority of leavers still seek places at British universities, most oen those among the ‘Russell Group’. is year eight out of ten pupils achieved their first choice UCAS offer and nine out of ten were accepted by either their first or second choice. Many of the leavers are now off on a mixture of challenging, exciting, hardworking and exotic GAP years but a few will already be attending university lectures by the time OM Club Day comes round. It is sad for many outstanding pupils that widespread talk of grade inflation and the need for more rigorous exams can take some of the gloss off their remarkable achievements. Whilst debates rage nationally over whether our national curriculum is fit for purpose, it is important to remember that many pupils are doing all that one could ask of them. One can only imagine that the five Alevel & Pre-U candidates who secured the highest grades available to them (A*/D1) in at least 4 subjects and the 15 GCSE pupils who gained straight

A*s (either 10, 11 or twelve of them) would have prospered in any era and in any curriculum. Happily, their stellar performances are not the only cause for celebration; far from it, for more than a third of A-level & Pre-U candidates gained straight A grades or better whilst more than a third of their GCSE counterparts secured at least 7A*s. is year’s results have been achieved against a backdrop of long-overdue grade deflation nationally and at a time when the College continues to encourage pupils to reach ambitiously for academic enrichment. In the Hundred over half the papers are now sat at IGCSE, which is generally considered more rigorous than GCSE. e Sixth Form either take the demanding 6 subjects of the IB or pursue four subjects through to A level or Pre-U (again an exam intended to be more rigorous than the national A level). Furthermore many oen submit supplementary research essays for an Extended Project Qualification to boot. Against this backdrop, the setting of new records can no longer be an annual requirement as in the past. Many young Marlburians work remarkably hard and to tremendous effect. Well done to them all!


MC Swindon Link Marlborough has both forged and enjoyed connections with various educational establishments throughout its history, both here and abroad. arlborough Malaysia is of course the latest of these, but many OMs will also know of the strong bonds that are now becoming established between the College and the Swindon Academy. Not so many will know how these came about and what it actually means to both parties now. College Archivist Dr Terry Rogers and Partnership Co-ordinator Colin Smith explain.

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An Archival perspective Almost from its foundation the College has tried to make Marlburians aware of their privileged education and of the moral imperative to seek to understand and, wherever possible, try to do something to help those less fortunate than themselves. e first major expression of this was almost certainly the establishment in 1882 of the College’s Mission Church of St Mary’s in Tottenham. Marlburians and OMs gave money regularly and the first two priests in charge were OMs. In addition, older boys oen spent weeks of their holidays helping in the parish. e College still has links there and it was good to hear that aer the recent serious

rioting in Tottenham, St Mary’s had been able to do much to help re-establish normality. Any OM visiting St Mary’s for the first time also cannot fail to notice resemblances to the College Chapel! Aer WWI it was suggested by Cyril Norwood (Master 1917-25) that the College would find it easier to help on a regular basis in Swindon and from 1924 annual camps were held at the College in the summer holidays, to which 50 or more Swindon boys were invited. ey were accommodated in four different boarding houses and up to a dozen Marlburian sixth-formers gave up a week of their holidays to look aer them and run numerous activities. ese camps were so successful that during term-time senior boys travelled to Swindon every Saturday

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Right: Swindon–Marlborough Camp 1933

evening to run a Boys’ Club in a room close to the Station, kindly donated by the GWR. e Club even had its own magazine, named, of course, “e Swindon Marlburian”. ese activities were interrupted by WWII but continued until about 1960. Only a short while later, in 1965, at the instigation of John Dancy (Master 196172), 21 Sixth Formers from Swindon arrived to spend two years at Marlborough studying for A Levels. is was made possible by the cooperation of the Swindon Education Committee and the financial assistance of a charitable trust. ese boys were not hand-picked and, though a few did not flourish, the great majority did, the most successful going on to become a surgeon specializing in trauma injuries and being instrumental in organizing the treatment of those soldiers wounded in Afghanistan. It was not possible to continue what had become known as the “Swindon Experiment” because on-going funding was not available, but the initiative was certainly viewed as a success, not least for the extra breadth of experience these 21 boys brought to the College during their time here. For much of the 1980s the College engaged in a very successful series of exchanges of both pupils and beaks with the Wilfrid Martineau School, a comprehensive in a deprived area of Birmingham, sometimes making use of the College’s OA Centre in Snowdonia to take everyone out of their comfort zones. 90

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And so it seems, to this Archivist at least, that the College’s partnership with the Swindon Academy is just the latest initiative in a very worthy tradition spanning at least 130 years. Dr Terry Rogers (CR 1964-96)

e Swindon Academy Partnership now e idea for an Academy in Swindon arose in 2004, just aer the Labour Government started to promote the concept, which was targeted at failing schools, usually in areas of substantial deprivation. Sir Anthony Greener (PR 1954-58), who had been a Member of Council for some 10 years, was well aware of the outstanding education provided at the College. However, he was concerned at the narrow exposure of Marlburians to those in society who came from less fortunate circumstances, with whom they would need to work, and oen lead, in the future. ere was additionally the requirement for the College to be able to demonstrate its wider benefit to the community under the Charities Act. In discussion with Edward Gould (Master 1993-2004) who, aer leaving Marlborough, had became an advisor to the United Learning Trust (ULT), an organisation running a number of Academies in the most disadvantaged parts of the UK, Sir Anthony agreed to seek to part-sponsor an Academy within reasonable reach of Marlborough. He approached Ken Kier, the head of

Honda-Europe, to persuade them to become part-sponsors also (coincidentally Ken had had two daughters educated at the College). Honda have their main UK Manufacturing plant in Swindon, and the decision was taken, at the highest level in Japan, to support the Academy as a sign of the Company’s commitment to Swindon, and as a positive step to improve the education of young people who one day might want to work for them. In conjunction with Swindon Borough Council, the school selected to convert to the new Swindon Academy was Headlands Secondary School, located in a difficult part of north Swindon and with very poor academic results. From the outset it was agreed that the Academy would also incorporate two local Primary schools to seek to tackle literacy and numeracy issues at an earlier stage and thereby reduce the ‘remedial’ activities at the Secondary stage. Headlands converted to Academy status within the ULT group in September 2007. A completely new school was built on a thirty-one acre site nearby, incorporating a nursery, primary, secondary and sixth-form with excellent sports and other facilities; the move to the new location was completed in January 2010. e Academy currently has around 1350 students with capacity rising towards 2000. Since the formation of the Academy the links with Marlborough have grown steadily, with growing interaction between pupils from both schools and increasing numbers of joint activities. Nicholas Sampson (Master 2004-12)


and many members of Common Room have given freely of their time to build these links. e arrival in January 2012 of the new Principal, Ruth Robinson, and the subsequent far-reaching changes that she has effected, have led to a fundamental review of the links between the Swindon Academy and Marlborough. Re-defining the nature of the partnership has been central to our combined thoughts whilst continuing to ensure that there are mutual benefits to staff and pupils at both institutions. is has now been formalised in the ‘Marlborough College/Swindon Academy Student Partnership’, which aims to bring benefit to both parties through a detailed and

For the College and its students the Partnership is making an increasingly important contribution to widening the educational experience for Marlburians while increasing their awareness of other sections of society.”

ambitious programme of collaboration and individual face-to-face contact. e current on-the-ground links are too numerous to detail here but include various year group exchanges, academic collaboration between departments at both schools, reading projects at one of the Academy primary schools, participation in shared leadership training via the CCF and Outdoor Activities, revision/study days, a joint CreativeWriting course and one-to-one weekly mentoring of Academy pupils in various subjects. For the College and its students the Partnership is making an increasingly important contribution to widening the educational experience for Marlburians while increasing their awareness of other sections of society. For the students at the Academy there is a realisation that they too can aspire to very different life circumstances through education, application and hard work. What is so far uncontested is the considerable benefit to MC pupils and staff involved in the partnership. e deliberate use of the word ‘partnership’ both highlights the way in which the relationship with Swindon Academy has markedly changed since we were invited

to help a failing school while also reminding us of the two-way nature of the link. It is hoped that the Marlborough College community will continue to support this invaluable activity. For many members of our privileged community a journey of a few miles from Marlborough transports them to a challenging place which is more of ‘another country’ than many exotic destinations. Colin Smith (CR 1991-)

e College would warmly welcome the support of OMs who may wish to offer their expertise and experience to help develop the aspirations of pupils at the Academy, or join a group of Old Wellingtonians led by Nick Cowley. e Momentum Project, which Nick is pioneering for several Academies, offers sixth-formers a week’s experience in the workplace during the summer holidays of 2014. Other OMs may be able to open up their own area of work or experience so that a small group of sixth-formers might visit just for a day or an aernoon. Colin Fraser (CR 1984-2011) would be delighted to receive any ideas or offers of support on caf49@btinternet.com

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West meets East: Marlborough College Malaysia one year in Harry Wills (C1 2003-08) I came to Marlborough Malaysia with mixed feelings of both anticipation and trepidation; for teachers, pupils and parents alike to be in at the start of a brand new school is somewhat of a gamble. But without a doubt the original Marlborough College has a particular ethos that has been able to transcend England’s borders, especially when carried by numerous ex-MC UK teachers and pupils. herefore even though Marlborough College Malaysia was far from a finished product when I arrived on 14 August 2012, it didn’t faze me. e entire site had been a plantation field just over a year before; I therefore naively perhaps expected things to continue at that same rate of improvement. I still believe this, despite the XI cricket pitch proving to be a seemingly insurmountable task even now, another year later. However a school does not consist solely of buildings although they do help, especially when they contain air-conditioning to help combat a tropical climate - but in the students and teachers that work there and the community that results.

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ere is a stereotype that students of eastern origin are hard workers under much pressure from their parents to succeed. is is true in some cases, but I believe no more than in any other school in any other part of the world. People are perhaps too distracted by the ‘Malaysia’ part of MCM, failing to recognize that the school is just like any other: full of individuals - some sporty, some academic, some kind, some disobedient. Although some may see the school as exotic and adventurous, which it undeniably is, it is important to view it as an educative institute.

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What it is therefore important to emphasise is what Marlborough College can bring to Malaysia and its neighbours. e co-curricular experience immediately comes to mind. Too oen is education limited purely to academic prowess, and that is definitely the case in Malaysia. But, as my old politics teacher told me, Marlborough produces “the most well rounded pupils” he has ever taught; every pupil should be exposed to and have the chance to improve in as many aspects of life as Marlborough College can provide, whether it be the Swimming team or the CCF. It is important for every pupil to find a niche in which they can excel and which can provide them with the confidence to succeed in other areas of school life. is is what I foresee happening with Marlborough Malaysia and it has got off to a very good start with the diversity of sport already on offer and the Clubs that have already sprung up. One such is the Outreach Group, through which pupils and staff members are raising money for local charities, the latest effort being the ‘Marlborough Miles’ event. Pupils (including children from the reception class), beaks and even parents came together to run or walk (preferred in the intense heat!) to raise funds. Not only was money raised for the school down the


road from MCM but it helped create a school spirit that instantly reminded me of the Marlborough UK 20 mile walk. It encouraged pupils to recognize that there is a world outside their school and homes that should be considered and this seems entirely appropriate given that it was this thinking that was responsible for the setting up of Marlborough Malaysia in the first place. e social life and social interaction of a boarding house especially equips pupils with life-long skills. Boarding schools are intensely social places where pupils constantly spend time with their peer group. ere is however a difference in the social cohesion of the MCM boarding houses compared with those in Wiltshire. At the moment the boarding houses are not at full capacity (though this will not be the case in a few years time), the year groups are smaller and the ages spread from 11 to 16. e social interaction between the year groups is therefore much more fluid, they go on trips during the weekend as an entire house and spend a lot of time in each other’s company. When I was in the Marlborough UK Shell I would never have socialised with the top year in the way that the younger years are doing at MCM; I would say that there is therefore more of a family atmosphere within the Malaysian boarding houses, albeit of a very extended and diverse family. I was very fortunate to be part of the first exchange between Marlborough College Malaysia and Marlborough College Wiltshire in the spring of 2013; this provided an excellent opportunity to observe any differences between the two schools and the pupils themselves. Credit must go to the pupils of both institutions, all of whom represented the Marlborough ethos admirably and made the most of the opportunity they had been given. ere might have been some worry as to whether students from such different backgrounds would be able to socially interact without awkwardness, but these fears were quickly set-aside on the first day.

All were students with similar interests and senses of humour and any cultural differences paled in comparison to what was held in common. e first thing every UK pupil commented on upon arrival was the heat, while the Malaysians commented on the cold when they arrived in Wiltshire in an unseasonably cold March. It is a cliché to say the English always talk about the weather but in these circumstances it really was obvious. Marlborough threw us everything from bitingly cold gale force winds that threatened to blow us off the Downs to a flurry of snow, for some MCM pupils their first ever encounter with the white stuff. I was immediately transported back to my Duke of Edinburgh Award Bronze expedition, when we sheltered in a restaurant bathroom taking turns to warm ourselves under a hand dryer to gain respite from the cold. It seemed entirely appropriate that the MCM pupils were able to experience what it is to briskly walk down the corridors of a chilly boarding house corridor to get into an oen-lukewarm shower; in Malaysia a brisk walk oen results in profuse sweating.

Marlborough College Malaysia continues to be a fine extension of Marlborough College in Wiltshire and although on the surface the differences are numerous, it does not take very long to look beneath the surface and see that the pupils are already becoming the well-rounded people that the overall Marlborough ethos produces.

Speaking with the pupils before writing this article, there is a recurring comment that comes up in regard to the major differences between the schools and it is nothing to do with any cultural differences, but with the town of Marlborough. e ability for students to

Harry Wills has been acting as a Graduate Assistant at Marlborough College Malaysia since the school opened in August 2012 and will be at the school for the next two years completing his teachers training

walk into town from the boarding houses is perhaps one taken for granted by Marlborough UK students but certainly not by the MCM pupils. A walk outside the school perimeter at MCM would in all likelihood result in a chance encounter with a monkey, snake, scorpion or, if unlucky, all three. As a result the chance to make a trip to the fine dining experience of the Marlborough Charcoal Grill Kebab shop for lunch was one that was seized by MCM pupils with alarming relish.

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Book Review Second that Emotion by Jeremy D Holden (BH 1978-82) Reviewed by Andrew Grant (B3 1977-81) ealots, Disciples and Congregations at first glance you might think this is a religious tome, but it is nothing of the sort. ese are the core constituencies of any significant new movement or societal trend that Jeremy Holden has identified in his book, Second that Emotion. In the book he identifies a number of people, brands and organisations, both political and commercial, who have formed ‘social contracts’ that both define and legislate their behaviours and characteristics. ese range from Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan to Audi and Angry Birds. To each he has applied his lifetime of experience in marketing and consulting to identify what the original premise of the ‘social contract’ was between a range of people and companies with those that follow and endorse them. It is an exhaustive catalogue. Each were first discovered by the Zealots - societal explorers who found direct and strong empathy with the promise of the contract and became standard bearers for the cause amongst the Disciples. A Disciple takes longer to embrace the contract, but once

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Published by Prometheus Books, £22.95 ISBN-13: 978-1616146641

he has, he remains a true devotee for a long period, unless the terms of the contract are breached at which point he either forgives or turns away disappointed. It is the Disciples that turn a fad into a trend and spread it powerfully into the broad church of the population e Congregation (that’s you and me by the way). Holden also identifies a number of other trends and behaviours that drive the formation and development of these movements; the critical importance of the Chief Disciple (the CEO in Corporate land); our desire for certainty and our ability to overlook or discard the facts in the search for emotional certainty; the importance of symbols and signs to capture and transmit the core strengths of the movement and, most significantly, the impact that digital and social media has had on the ability for ideas, products and reputations to be rapidly and extensively transmitted to an enormous audience. He does however go to lengths to explain that this is both an opportunity and a threat and stresses the importance of “embracing the conversation”. However at its heart, despite the extensive analysis and myriad examples which Holden uses to illustrate each step as he sets out his thesis (he must have spent a lot of time at the movies as Toy Story, e Blair Witch Project, About a Boy, Star Wars, elma and Louise and many more are cited as supporting evidence) this is a book that identifies our society’s preference for emotion over analysis even when the facts tell a different story. It is the power of this emotion as it spreads from a few to the many in support of a product or a political idea on a digital wave that Holden has identified. So next time you offer a well held opinion over dinner, it might be worth having a second thought and asking: is that analysis or emotion talking?

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Also on the Shelves Teach Us of Love: a collection of poems by Henry Disney (Ronald Disney at MC, B1 1952-57) Published by Pneuma Springs Publishing, £10 ISBN-13: 978-1782281849

Wiltshire and the Great War: Training the Empire’s Soldiers by TS Crawford (SU 1959-63) Published by e Crowood Press, £16.99 ISBN-13: 978-1847973559 Soon aer the start of the Great War, work hastily began on a series of hutted camps in Wiltshire for more than 100,000 men; during the course of the war it became home to troops from Canada, Australia and New Zealand as well as Britain. With soldiers forming a third of the population the effect on the businesses, farms, and indeed the morals of the county was dramatic. Even aer the Armistice peace did not return, with mutinies and rioting in the camps because of frustration at delays in demobilization. Wiltshire and the Great War describes this turbulent, fascinating period in depth. It describes pre-war training, showing how inappropriate it was to future warfare, outlines the pioneering of military aviation in the county and describes the role of railways in moving tens of thousands of troops. ere are accounts of shirkers, spies, escaped prisoners of war, prostitutes, the ‘landship’ that clanked across the county and the wireless station that pinpointed the position of Zeppelins. Also described are advances in military technology, the camp-building scandals that led to an inquiry by a Royal Commission, press censorship, and the blighting of the Stonehenge landscape.

is collection of stirring verses gathers into a single volume previously unpublished poems primarily concerned with musings about the author’s Christian faith – a faith which is less concerned with abstract doctrine than with living out the Gospel in everyday living and in how one relates to the variety of people one encounters. Topics include family life, human nature, politics, an earnest faith and a variety of poignant situations.

e Last Cavalryman: the life of General Sir Richard McCreery by Richard Mead (SU 1960-65) Published by Pen & Sword Books, £25 ISBN-13: 978-1848844650 Dick McCreery was commissioned into the 12th Royal Lancers in 1915 and served on e Western Front, winning the MC and surviving wounds. In 1938 he joined the staff of 1st Division under Alexander before being given command of 2 Armoured Brigade. He won the DSO for his leadership during the retreat to Dunkirk May/June 1940. In North Africa McCreery was sacked by

Auchinleck, with whom he had major differences, but while waiting for a plane home was spotted by Alexander, who made him his Chief of Staff. Many credited him for the solution to the El Alamein victory; he was promoted to command X Corps at Salerno and commanded it during the advance to the Gothic Line. McCreery relieved Leese as Commander 8th Army in September 1944 and it was his brilliant plan that seized the Argenta Gap and drove the Germans back across the River Po into Austria. ere he would become British High Commissioner, C in C British Army of the Rhine and British Military Representative at the UN, retiring in 1949. Although not a public figure, McCreery was key figure in the development of armoured warfare, a brilliant tactician and among the most important British fighting generals of the Second World War. is book is an overdue acknowledgement of his contribution to victory.

Sidney Chambers and e Perils of the Night (e Grantchester Mysteries) by James Runcie (B2 1972-77) Published by Bloomsbury, £14.99 ISBN-13: 978-1408828106 1955. Canon Sidney Chambers, loveable priest and part-time detective, is back. Accompanied by his faithful Labrador, Dickens, and the increasingly exasperated Inspector Geordie Keating, Sidney is called to investigate the unexpected fall e Marlburian Club Magazine

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Also on the Shelves picturesque landscape of the Wye Valley, one of the most varied places in Britain to explore on foot.

How to Seize a Dragon’s Jewel (Hiccup) by Cressida Cowell (BH 1982-84) Published by Hodder Children’s Books, £6.99 ISBN-13: 978-1444908794

of a Cambridge don from the roof of King’s College Chapel, a case of arson at a glamour photographer’s studio and the poisoning of Zafar Ali, Grantchester’s finest spin bowler. Alongside his sleuthing, Sidney has other problems. Can he decide between his dear friend, the glamorous socialite Amanda Kendall and Hildegard Staunton, the beguiling German widow? To make up his mind Sidney takes a trip abroad, only to find himself trapped in a web of international espionage just as the Berlin Wall is going up. is is the second Grantchester Mystery; for a full review of the first, please see Edition 113.

tionary process did humans acquire theirs? Will he and Wallace meet again in another life? Wallace’s philosophy is simple: the past is the past, live for the present and let the future take care of itself. e story is largely factual and primarily about Wallace, with a clearly identifiable relationship between the Brigadier and the author.

Walking with Wallace by Michael R Koe (B1 1945-49) Published by AuthorHouseUK, £11.99 ISBN-13: 978-1467889131 Walking with Wallace is about a Staffordshire Bull Terrier and the debates he and the Brigadier have as they walk in South Northamptonshire. ey reflect the philosophical and scientific concerns of man and dog, such as their origins and those of the Universe. e Brigadier assumes he can interpret Wallace’s thoughts; Wallace is an intelligent dog and might disagree, but is too polite to say so. Since being widowed the Brigadier has lived on his own, though he has a large family. Over the last 13 years he has seen more of Wallace than any other living creature, though both are now ageing. In one of their more controversial debates, the Brigadier asks whether dogs too have souls? If not, when in the evolu96

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Wye Valley: 40 Hill and Riverside Walks by Ben Giles (CR 2010-) Published by Pocket Mountains Ltd, £6.99 ISBN-13: 978-1907025013 From the broad riverside meadows of the Herefordshire plain and the soaring limestone cliffs of the lower gorge near Chepstow to the industrial heritage of the Forest of Dean in the east and the farreaching views of the Trellech plateau in the west, Ben Giles’ 40 circular routes offer a refreshing introduction to the

e story continues in the tenth volume of Hiccup’s How to Train Your Dragon memoirs. At the end of volume nine things for Hiccup were getting very dark indeed. e Dragon Rebellion has begun. Snotlout is the new Chief of the Hooligan Tribe. Stoick has been banished and given the Slavemark. And Alvin the Treacherous has EIGHT of the King’s Lost ings, and has been proclaimed the new King of the Wilderwest ... But what can Hiccup do, now all alone and in exile, hunted by both humans and dragons? Can he find the Dragon Jewel, mankind’s last and only hope? And if he does, what will he do with it?

A practical guide to Costume Mounting by Lara Flecker (CO 1987-89) Published by Routledge, £60 ISBN: 978-0415657914 e effective preparation of garments for display is essential for exhibitions of contemporary and historical dress. Costumes not only need to be visually


a carefully collated selection of ephemera, artworks and photographs drawn from the National Railway Museum, York. Collectively these images and artefacts tell the stories of the great brotherhood of railwaymen. (See article on p10)

Owliviah… the owl that couldn’t fly by Martin Winbolt-Lewis (B2 1960-65) Published by Lightning Source, £6.99 ISBN-13: 978-1782220756 appealing but also fully supported and historically accurate. is is a comprehensive guide to mounting costumes from the eighteenth century to the present day and is an invaluable resource for historians and all working with costumes in museums, private collections or within the fashion industry.

A life on the Lines: A Railwayman’s Album by RHN Hardy (C3 1937-40) Published by Conway, £14.99 ISBN-13: 978-1844861736 is fascinating volume illuminates the world of Britain’s railways during the Age of Steam, seen through the eyes of legendary railwayman Richard Hardy. One of the last of the ‘old breed’, Richard is the author of innumerable transport articles and biographies of Dr Beeching and Bert Hooker as well as Conway’s ‘e Railwayman’s Pocket-Book’. During much of his early career, from 1944 to the

early 1960s, Richard took hundreds of pictures of life on the railways and the men he knew and worked with on a daily basis, using his trusty Brownie 620 box camera. ese unique and largely unpublished images form a fascinating and hugely evocative portrayal of the height of the steam era, during the age of the ‘Big Four’, and aer 1947 on the sprawling nationalised network known as British Railways. Many of the pictures capture the railways in wartime: a valuable social record of the nation at war. In addition there is a sequence of rare photographs of French engines, railways and railwaymen, which offer a superb contrast to the British rail network (it quickly becomes evident that whereas the British rail system ran on tea, the French system ran on wine). Great characters are the pictures’ unifying theme, and they include famous figures associated with the railways such as poet John Betjeman (B2 1920-25). is lavishly illustrated book sets Richard’s personal photographs and text alongside

“…no one noticed the three or four straggly leaf and twig disguised newcomers who eased into the crowd during the Award ceremony. But Owliviah did…” Owliviah, the youngest of the Tawnee owl family, is not all that she seems. While she finds many simple tasks difficult and flying impossible, her other gis soon become the means of saving her West Spinney community from disaster. is story is a reminder never to write anybody off !

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Also on the Shelves e Final Whistle

Griffin’s Book Times & Places

by Stephen Cooper Published by e History Press Ltd, £14.99 ISBN-13: 978-0752479354

by Paul M Griffin (C1 1950-54) Published by Paul Griffin, £32.50 inc P&P ISBN-13: 978-0955434921. Available om: Ludlow Bookbinders Ltd, Unit 5, Lower Barns Business Park, Ludford, Ludlow, SY8 4DS

Provocations for Development

Tel:01584 878110 Cheques payable to Ludlow Bookbinders Ltd.

by Robert Chambers (B2 1945-50) Published by Practical Action Publishing, £9.95 ISBN-13: 978-1853397332 Winner of the 2013 British Sports Book Awards’ Rugby Book of the Year, this is the story of 15 men killed in the Great War, two of them Marlburians who each merit a chapter of their own. All played rugby for one London club; none lived to hear the final whistle. Rugby brought them together; rugby led the rush to war. ey came from Britain and the Empire to fight in every theatre and service, among them a poet, playwright and parfumier. Some were decorated and died heroically; others fought and fell quietly. Together their stories paint a portrait in miniature of the entire War. e Final Whistle plays tribute to the pivotal role rugby played in the Great War by following the poignant stories of fieen men who played for Rosslyn Park. ey came from diverse backgrounds, with players from Australia, Ceylon, Wales and South Africa, but were united in their love of the game and their courage in the face of war. From the mystery of a missing memorial, Cooper’s meticulous research has uncovered the story of these men and captured their lives, from their vanished Edwardian youth and vigour, to the war they fought and how they died. 98

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Do we use obscure words to impress our colleagues - or fashionable ones to win research proposals? How do poor people define their poverty? How can we use aid budgets most effectively? Are many of our actions against poverty simple, direct...and wrong? Provocations for Development is an entertaining and unsettling collection of writings that questions concepts, conventions and practices in development. It is made up of short and accessible writings by Robert Chambers reflecting on the evolution of concepts like participation and of organisations like the World Bank. Besides provocations, there is mischief, verse and serious fun. e book is organised into four sections: Word Play irreverently examines vocabularies of development and how words are instruments of power; Poverty and Participation challenges concepts of poverty, presents empowering breakthroughs in the current explosion of participatory methodologies; Aid is critical of past and present procedures and practices in aid and points to feasible changes for doing better; For our Future touches on values, ethics, gender and participation, immersions, hypocrisy, and paradigms, and sees hope in children. e final provocation invites readers to find answers to the question ‘what would it take to eliminate poverty in the world?’

e influence of the Marlborough College Press in the early 1950s is clear throughout this book, not only in its immaculate presentation but in the story it tells covering well over fiy years. ere is the detail of how its author persuaded Laurence Housman to write a preface for the edition of AE Housman’s A Shropshire Lad he was printing at the Press, how he started in advertising in Chicago, became a foreign banknote trader and finally launched two niche perfume brands worldwide. ere are gems in a chapter on Marlborough, a near escape in Beirut, life in Oman during the two Persian Gulf wars, dealings with the KGB in Moscow and working with the Maktoums in Dubai. However Griffin fails to mention that the Film Society he started had its own telegraphic address: filmsocol Marlborough!


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ose were the days Patrick Compton (C1 1966-71) My memories of Marlborough cricket are golden ones, even though the record suggests the game was sometimes played in black and white. During my time in the XI (1968-71), the batting was stronger than the bowling and we had too many draws. But nostalgia happily casts its golden cloak over grey statistics as I recall what happened 45 years ago. at feeling is also burnished by physical distance. Shortly aer I le the College, in 1971, I made my home in South Africa, where I still live. For many years, Marlborough – and England itself – disappeared into the recesses of my memory. Bob Percival (C1 1962-67), Nick Frome (PR 1967-71), Philip Cayford (PR 196570) and Jon Hickling (CO 1964-68). e talk was naturally of the old days, with stories told, retold and finally reinvented!

The 1970 XI: Standing from L to R: HJ Hawksfield (LI 1966-70), H Murray (C1 1965-70), PJB Cayford (PR 1965-70), BStC Thomson (B3 1967-71), AGB Parker (B2 1966-70), PD Barker (CO 196670), CM Page (LI 1965-70); Seated from L to R: J Goodrich (B3 1966-70), RP Brown (C1 1966-71), RBM Johnston (Capt) (LI 1965-70), PK Brookes (B3 1966-70), PMD Compton (C1 1966-71) Played 9: Won 3, Lost 1, Drew 5

ecently, however, two events have served to ignite my recollections of the school and that happy plateau we called ‘e Eleven’. e first was my old friend Richard Brown’s (C1 1966-71) 60th birthday last year. Richard’s dad, Freddy, was a former England captain, while Denis, my father, played under him. Richard – a fast leggie who was a spectacular exponent of the highly unconventional “frog in a blender” action – and I played plenty of cricket together for Marlborough, and had kept in touch ever since, so when his invitation arrived in my Durban letter box last year, I rather grandly decided to attend.

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e birthday party extended most pleasantly through a glorious September aernoon and evening in London. Aer many years I was able to catch up with a number of my old peer group, including 100 e Marlburian Club Magazine

e other event was a sad one, on New Year’s Day, when Christopher MartinJenkins (B3 1958-63) succumbed to cancer. CMJ, due to become President of the Marlburian Club later this year, was one of the pre-eminent voices of English cricket for nearly 40 years and, in my view, epitomised the spirit of the game. He was, truly, a “verray parfait gentil knight”. From the time I was appointed cricket correspondent for my Durban newspaper, e Mercury, I used to see CMJ once every four years, when South Africa played England, and he always fondly recalled his time at Marlborough. inking back on my schooldays, I was extremely fortunate to be one of the last boys to have the opportunity to play at Lord’s in the annual match against Rugby. at privilege began in 1855, just 12 years aer the College was founded. Sadly, in 1972, the year aer I le, the MCC pulled the plug on the fixture because of their concern over the Lord’s square being overused. I played three times at HQ – all in one-day matches – but it was the first occasion, on 13 July 1968, that I remember most keenly. Naturally, I was nervous and a little overawed. I was only 15 and Lord’s was the cathedral of cricket. I’d also heard stories from my father of batsmen losing their way from the dressing-room to the pavilion steps and ending up in the broom closet! ank goodness I negotiated that one.


e next hurdle was walking through the Long Room while being peered at by a large group of intimidating men in bacon and egg ties.

vividly recall the smell of freshly cut grass (good) and the frantic yapping and pungent odour of the beagles’ kennel (less good) as I strolled up the hill.

Finally, the immaculate Johnston had the presence of mind to be married then, if not later, to a teetotaller, who drove us all home from Gatwick.”

Finally, to my great relief, I stepped onto the sacred turf, to a ragged cheer from the crowd congregated in the standing room area in front of the Lord’s Tavern bar. Marlborough was wobbling on 26/3 with both openers having been run out, and Rugby’s total of 137 looked some distance away.

e match against the OMs was another highlight, with players’ families and a sprinkling of dignitaries filling the pavilion stand and circling the plateau. Making runs in that two-day match was a special pleasure. Sadly, I never played for the Blues aer I le school, and so missed their only victory in the 1980 Cricketer Cup at Burton’s Court in Chelsea. It was skipper Johnston’s proudest memory: “e game ended in the dark because [opponents] Wellington had taken so long to bowl their overs, having put us in. As keeper, I asked the fielders to roll the ball along the ground because you couldn’t see it in the air! Our victory was the culmination of a wonderful season of real team spirit. It was remarkable that we won the Cup having scored only a single half-century in the entire competition.”

Marlborough’s cricketing ranks have been dotted with internationals – Allan Steel (PR 1871-77), Norman Druce (PR 188993) and Reginald Spooner (B3 1893-99) – as well as a good sprinkling of county players, but I like to think that the school’s cricketing heritage is owned by all of us who have played, for better or worse, on e Eleven.

I was batting with Robbie Johnston (LI 1965-70), the jewel in our batting crown, and we began to build a partnership. We had brought the hundred up, and our partnership to 91, when I drove a delivery back from Rugby’s le-arm pace bowler, Wetherill, who touched the ball onto the stumps with Robbie out of his ground. Immediately aerwards I was adjudged leg before to the same bowler and we subsequently plummeted to a 21-run defeat, losing our last seven wickets for nine runs. Robbie’s greatest moment took place the previous year when, aged just 14, he became the youngest Marlborough batsman to strike a century against Rugby. e two-day match, which took place at Rugby, was the centerpiece of the school’s quatercentenary celebrations. Marlborough captain Bob Percival remembers the occasion with a touch of irreverence: “e hero of the second day was the then angelic Robbie Johnston, aged about 9 ½, whose ton was watched by many crying women.” e game ended in an exciting draw, with Rugby needing 11 runs and Marlborough two wickets although that situation might have been improved, Bob said, “if the current Bishop of Hull [Richard Frith] hadn’t spilled a catch in the gully”.

at team deserves to be named: Robbie Johnston (capt, w/k), Nick Ross (PR 1961-66), Alec Cunningham (C3 1970-74), Chris Worlidge (B3 1973-78), Mike Griffith (current President of the MCC, C3 1957-62), David Walsh (C1 1960-65), Simon Lillyman (B3 1973-78), Richard Brown, Richard Savage (BH 1969-74), Ollie Gravell (C3 1972-77) and Nick Frome. Bob remembers the aermath: “When a slot came vacant to travel to Epernay to celebrate the win, I was rewarded with the nod. e day holds many memories. We drank all day but never got drunk – a feat I have never managed to emulate since.

Former members of the XI at Richard Brown’s 60th birthday party. From L to R: Peter Brooks (CO 196065), Bob Percival (C1 1962-67), Nick Frome (PR 1967-71), Jonathan Hickling (CO 1964-68), Philip Cayford (PR 1965-70), Patrick Compton, and the birthday boy (C1 1966-71)

“Robbie’s greatest moment took place the previous year when, aged just 14, he became the youngest Marlborough batsman to strike a century against Rugby.”

I have the fondest memories of the school’s cricket professional, David Essenhigh, who combined a glorious Gloucester burr with a lovely sense of humour, encyclopaedic cricketing knowledge and a devastating leg-break. Cricket master David Green (CR 1962-95) was a figure of authority who kept our feet firmly on the ground. e only time my feet le it was when I occasionally ghosted up a ladder into the attic of the tractor shed next to the pavilion where I used to calm my prebatting nerves with a cigarette, quickly followed by an XXX peppermint. Home matches meant missing half the morning’s lessons (always good) and I e Marlburian Club Magazine 101


Sports & Club Reports OM Cricket Club - e Blues 2013 Season he Blues had a season of mixed fortunes, winning 4, drawing 1 and losing 8 of the 13 games completed. e season began with two closely fought victories over St Edward’s and Sherborne, but results took a downturn aer that. ere were emphatic wins against the Wiltshire Queries and Radley, but comprehensive defeats suffered at the hands of the school, Westminster, the Flashmen, the Guards and Eton.

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A tough draw against defending champions Shrewsbury Saracens in the 1st Round of the Cricketer Cup proved fruitless. e holders won an important toss and inserted the home side on a damp and overcast morning. Despite skipper Ed Kilbee’s (C2 2001-06) 41, the Blues total of 153 was not competitive enough to challenge Shrewsbury, who achieved their victory target only 4 wickets down. ere was some solace in

the fact that Shrewsbury went on to reach the semi finals. e highlight of the season was the inaugural CMJ Trophy at Radley in memory of former BBC Broadcaster, Blues Vice President, Radley parent and Marlburian Club President elect Christopher Martin-Jenkins (B3 195863). e Blues secured an impressive win, but more importantly it was a memorable occasion with the game being played in a perfect spirit, as CMJ would have wanted it to be. CMJ’s son Robin (formerly of Sussex CCC) captained the Rangers side and his widow Judy was there to present the cup to winning Blues captain Al Edmonds (C1 1997-2002). Secretary Mike Bush (TU 1993-98) 07773 901 484 michaelbush1979@googlemail.com

Marlborough Blues AGM 2013 will be held at Lord’s Cricket Ground this autumn (date tbc) courtesy of Mike Griffith (C3 1957-62), President of e MCC and e Marlborough Blues CC.

Skipper Al Edmonds receives the CMJ Trophy from Judy Martin-Jenkins after victory over the Radley Rangers

2012 leaver Will von Behr en route to his maiden century for the Blues against the Wiltshire Queries

Centurion Jamie Bill after his splendid innings against Radley 102 e Marlburian Club Magazine

Blues cricket in full flow versus the Sherborne Pilgrims on the XI


Cricket results: V St Edward’s Martyrs 4 May – Won by 3 wickets St Edward’s 232 for 8 from 50 overs (Ed Nicholson (SU 1997-2002) 2/30, Alex Armstrong (C1 1996-2001) 2/36) Blues 233 for 7 (Hugo Adair (C2 1999-2004) 77, Mike Bush (TU 1993-98) 35) V Sherborne Pilgrims 19 May – Won by 4 wickets Sherborne Pilgrim 235 all out (Dom Brown (C1 2007-12) 3/36, Tom Morton (TU 200106) 2/21) Blues 239 for 6 (Tim Marcon (C2 1985-90) 53*, Andy Gough (C1 1989-94) 42) V Old Wykehamists 26 May – Lost by 3 wickets Blues 99 all out (Will Eversfield (C3 2007-12) 32) Winchester 100 for 7 (Mike Bush 3/7) V Hurlingham 8 June – Lost by 42 runs Hurlingham 291 for 5 dec (Tom MontaguPollock (C2 1996-2001) 2/28, Alex Armstrong 2/127) Blues 249 all out (Andy Bush (PR 19952000) 63, Tim Marcon 34, James Caldwell (CO 1995-2000) 31) Cricketer Cup 1st Round v Shrewsbury Saracens 16 June – Lost by 6 wickets Blues 153 all out (Ed Kilbee (C2 2001-06) 41) Shrewsbury 154 for 4 (Alex Armstrong 2/31) Prize Day V School 28 June – Lost by 8 wickets Blues 101 all out (Will von Behr (B1 2007-12) 32) School 105 for 2 V Flashmen 7 July – Lost by 145 runs Flashmen 282 for 8 from 50 overs ( Jamie Davies (PR 2000-05) 3/53, Guy Parker (SU 2001-06) 2/59) Blues 147 all out (Mike Bush 55) V Wiltshire Queries 8 July – Won by 96 runs Blues 283 for 6 dec (Will von Behr 112*) Wiltshire Queries 187 all out ( John Carroll (CR 2005-present) 4/28, Charlie Harrison (CR 2006-present) 3/29) V Old Westminster 14 July – Lost by 8 wickets Blues 135 all out (Ed Rothwell (TU 2005-10) 48) Westminster 138 for 2 V Hampshire Hogs 20 July – Match Drawn Blues 309 for 6 dec (Andy Bush 66, Will von Behr 65*, Dom Brown 51*, Charlie Hicks (C2 1980-85) 49) Hampshire Hogs 279 for 7 (Dom Brown 2/30, James Oakden (C2 1988-93) 2/38) V Radley Rangers 21 July – Won by 10 wickets Radley 156 all out (Mike Bush 3/38) Blues 158 for 0 ( Jamie Bill (C1 1998-2003) 100 retired) V Guards 3 August – Lost by 8 wickets Blues 168 all out (Andy Bush 44, Hugh Twort (TU 1995-2000) 37) Guards 169 for 2 V Eton Ramblers 17 August – Lost by 9 wickets Blues 161 all out (Pete Jarrold (B1 1992-97) 40) Eton 162 for 1

Club Day Meet 6 October 2012

Palmer Marlborough Beagles he season’s highlight was the 60th Anniversary Dinner held at the College on Club Day, 6 October 2012. Aer a Lawn Meet in Court, we headed for Old Eagle where hounds spent the aernoon in full cry around Four Mile Clump, Smeathe’s Ridge and Barbury Castle. In the evening, glasses were raised at a dinner attended by 50 people of whom 20 were OM beaglers, including founding members Nick Wykes (C1 1948-52), Peter Lyster (PR 1948-52), Richard Bateman (B2 1947-52) and Brigadier Tom Sneyd (C1 1948-52). Also present was Alastair Jackson (PR 1958-63), Master of the College beagles between 1961 and 1963 and recently President of the Masters of Harriers and Beagles Association, and Guest Speaker, Stephen Lambert (C3 1963-67), Master of the College pack

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OM Lacrosse ue to a bout of unending wintry weather and unfortunate timing the 2nd Annual OM v College 1st XII Lacrosse match was cancelled, twice, this year. However snow and scheduling have not hampered our enthusiasm and we look forward to celebrating next year’s alumni match with a participant and spectators’ barbeque in 2014. My successor as Head of Lacrosse, Jen

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in 1965 and currently Chairman of the Masters of Foxhounds Association. Aer this inspirational start, the season went from strength to strength. Master of Hounds, Max Rumney, encouraged students to get involved in whipping-in and, as usual, we were warmly welcomed by local landowners, many of whom provided wonderful teas. We were delighted to be able to repay some of this hospitality when we hosted a biennial Farmers’ Supper in e Marlburian in May. anks to kennel huntsman, David Gaylard, and his daughter Becky, the hounds are in great shape. We look forward to the 61st season of beagling at Marlborough. Sean Dempster (CR 1994-) 01672 892 240 hmc3@marlboroughcollege.org

Cohen (jac@marlboroughcollege.org), will be organising it. Meanwhile I would like to thank you for all the support you’ve given College lacrosse and its community during my two years at Marlborough. It’s been amazing to see our programme and network grow in my short time here. Britt Faulkner, Head of Lacrosse Secretary Teddie Naish (MO 2006-11) theodoranaish@hotmail.co.uk

e Marlburian Club Magazine 103


Sports & Club Reports OM Football Club points from a possible 42. A semi-final defeat to eventual winners Charterhouse in the ADC and a gut-wrenching loss on penalties to Lancing IIs in the semi-final of the Junior League Cup, meant the OMs finished the season with only one piece of silverware. Next season sees them step up to Division 2 - likely to prove even more competitive. ere is a lot of anticipation already about what can be achieved in 2013/14 following September’s pre-season tour to Lisbon.

The OM Football Team: Standing (l to r): Charles Laughton (TU 1994-99), Joe Hare (C3 1999-2004), Nick Horowitz (C3 2002-07), Joel Hughes (C3 1999-2004), Caryn Hibbert, owner of Thyme at Southrop Manor (Sponsor), Alex Azis (CO 2000-04), Jack Webb (C1 1991-96), Tom Forsythe (BH 1999-2004), Harry von Behr (B1 2001-06); kneeling (l to r): Harry Harvey (C3 1998-2003), Charlie Allen (CO 2001-05), Dan Black (C3 1999-2004), Will Harvey (PR 2006-11), Jack Fletcher (C2 2004-09), Alan Hamilton (C2 2003-04)

f the OMFC had been asked at the start of 2012/13 whether they’d settle for a championship winning season along with reaching two semi-finals in the available cup competitions, most would have bitten your hand off. Only Charlie Laughton, the evergreen (utility) father figure, would have demanded and expected more. For the rest of us it constituted a pretty good season.

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Our league form started off excellently with 5 wins on consecutive weekends, putting us in a commanding position with over a third of league matches played. A culture-filled pre-season tour to Amsterdam and plenty of off-season fitness ensured we hit the ground running. e squad’s nucleus had stayed together following the successful 2011/12 campaign, which allowed for continuity and some free-flowing football. is was shown in abundance with the OMs making the most of pitches yet to suffer the effects of a long, hard, bitterly cold and wet winter. e OMs had added a level of grit and determination to their football too. Senior OMs Laughton, Hughes, Hare, Gray (James CO 1994-99), Allen (when Arsenal weren’t playing at home) and 104 e Marlburian Club Magazine

Webb showed some fight to add to the flair of players further up the field, with Harvey Senior, Fletcher, Alcock (C2 1999-2004), Hamilton, Azis and Harvey Junior all making significant contributions. Special mention must also go to Harry von Behr for an outstanding season in between the posts, solving the wellpublicised ‘goalkeeping problem’. As Peter Ford (CR 1988-) always points out, “ere is a national shortage of goalkeepers.” e start of an impressive Arthur Dunn Cup (ADC) run, possibly the second oldest cup competition in the world, saw the OMs defeat Westminster Is in a 3-2 thriller at Marlborough. Only 1st teams are eligible to enter this competition making the result even more impressive with Westminster plying their trade two divisions above. An immaculate (athletics) pitch, great support for both teams and a fantastic spread organised by by Jane Pendry and the Marlburian Club made the victory even better! Despite a couple of league defeats and an injury crisis, the OMs finished the season as champions, winning a remarkable 36

Whilst a great squad effort, special mention must go to the stalwarts that played week-in, week-out and made the season so successful: newbies such as James Wilson (BH 2007-12), Tom de Boinville (C3 2002-07), Tom Forsythe and Nick Horowitz all made telling contributions. Despite being a veteran, Dan Black also seemed like a quality new signing aer spending the 2011/12 season on the sidelines! ere are also positive signs from those still at university who have registered an interest to get involved aer they graduate. e OMFC would also particularly like to thank Caryn Hibbert of yme at Southrop Manor, who generously sponsored the team strip pictured. Caryn, mother of Camilla Hibbert (NC 2007-12), is a great supporter of the OMFC and is oen to be seen on the touchlines cheering us on. So… onwards and upwards; the OMFC is going places. Can we achieve back-to-backto-back promotions?! e signs are good, with many players committing their future to the Club. But we continue to look for committed, enthusiastic players willing to join this remarkable journey. Please get in touch with either Dan Black (Daniel.Black@amlin.co.uk) or me if you are one. With over 30 games every season there are many opportunities to show off those footballing skills honed so successfully on Mabs, Watermeadows and the like! Secretary Joe Hare (C3 1999-2004) 07810 577 256 joe.hare@gva.co.uk


The Marlborough Restaurant A stunning contemporary menu using only the best produce with an emphasis on local products and suppliers. Bar Food Vibrant and varied with British Tapas. Bar and Drinks World class wines, local beers and fantastic cocktails. Rooms Six individually styled boutique rooms in the stunning 15th Century Building. The Marlborough 90 High Street, Marlborough, Wiltshire. SN8 1HF Tel: 01675 515 011 Web: www.themarlborough.co Twitter: www.twitter.com/marlboroughthe Facebook: www.facebook.com/marlboroughstyle

e Marlburian Club Magazine 105


Sports & Club Reports OM Girl’s Hockey

OM Golfing Society his year we have not won any trophies to put in our metaphorical cabinet, but the Society continues to thrive.

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We had a disappointment in the Halford Hewitt, losing to Eton in the first round, on the 18th green in the last match. Eton went on to win and no side did better against them than we did, so I think that almost gives us a podium finish! Numbers continue to grow, and thanks to the initiative started last year by Tim Martin-Jenkins (B3 1961-65) we are seeing a growing interest in golf both at the school and also amongst leavers, which is very encouraging. Our meetings continue to be delightful occasions when OMs can get together and enjoy each other’s company. Hugh Blenkin (B3 1954-58) led us admirably as Captain until May (our AGM) and we are lucky to have Robin Swann (B3 1962-66) taking over for the coming year; all our Captains contribute so much in their own individual ways to the health of the Society. On the subject of Captains we were delighted to hear that Malcolm Cornish (C2 1966-70) will be Captain of the Berkshire next year. Malcolm, who will be standing down as Treasurer of the

OMGS, has contributed (and continues to contribute) so much to the OMGS that we are vicariously very proud of this honour. Amongst our number we have a plethora of past and present Captains of Golf Clubs and I like to think that the school has something to do with that. Secretary Adrian O’Loughlin (B3 1965-69) 01483 302 748 adrian@gooserye.com

he inaugural OM Girls’ hockey match against the College First XI on 9 December 2012 ended with a 1-1 draw, which both teams agreed was fitting, as it was a hard fought but even match.

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e First XI was very well drilled, fast and skilful, but an early goal from the OMs put them in the lead. Some great saves from Anna Hextall kept the Marlburians out of the game, until an excellent individual goal from Olivia Hazlitt brought them level. It was bitterly cold but there was great play from all involved with no let-up on either side. is was particularly impressive as it had been many years since the OMs had played together, some not having played at all since leaving MC!

The OMGS & Common Room Golf Team took on the College on 14 March 2013 at Marlborough Golf Club. The occasion was kindly organised by Chris Dowling (B2 1966-71) and was great fun. Sadly the boys went down by five matches to one, but special mention must go to James Mathison (SU) who won his game and played in great style. Depicted: James Stewart (C2 1962-67), Robin Swann (B3 1962-66), Paul Farrant (C2 196971), Matthew Lewis (B1 1955-60), far end, Chris Dowling (B2 1966-71), Charles Pendergast (CO 1965-69), Stephen Morgan (LI 1953-57), James Hopper (C1 1957-62)

OM Team: Anna Hextall (MM 2002-07) (GK), Robyn Vere Nicoll (NC 2002-07), Matilda Kay (EL 2002-07), Becca Naylor (MM 2003-08), Claire Sykes (EL 200712), Alex Bromley-Martin (EL 2003-08), Fiona Readman (EL 2002-07), Mary Alexander (EL 2005-10), Rosie Morgan (EL 2007-12), Hattie Gibson (EL 200409), Leonie Lawrence (EL 2001-06), Tatiana Delaney (NC 2000-05). Contact Jane Pendry jpendry@marlboroughcollege.org

OM Real Tennis he OM Real Tennis Club is keen to enter as many pairs as possible for the Henry Leaf Cup in January 2014. ere are two competitions, Open and Handicap, and anyone interested in participating should contact Steven Bishop, specifying a preferred partner if you have one. Henry Leaf was an OM but our support for the competition in recent years has been light. Now that we have at least one pair which has tasted success in the Johns Cup at Lord’s, I am hoping that we can rectify that situation.

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Secretary Steven Bishop (PR 1969-73) smwb@thspartners.com 106 e Marlburian Club Magazine


OM Hockey he 2013 OMs v School XI Hockey Match was unfortunately cancelled twice and the game was never played. is was not due to a lack of effort or enthusiasm on either side, but the weather and the re-laying of the Astroturf pitch. is match has however been a great success in the 3 or 4 years that I have run the event and I look forward to the match in 2014. With Lacrosse also getting involved in OM matches we have the makings of a great day of sport for current and past Marlburians. Let us just hope that the snow can desist in 2014 so that we can enjoy an exciting game on the new pitch. If anybody would like to get involved, please feel free to contact me.

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OM Sailing Association 2012’s Arrow Trophy Regatta, an open sailing competition between independent school alumni, took place as always on the challenging waters of e Solent in Sunsail F40 yachts on 6/7 October 2012. e boats were collected from Port Solent, Portsmouth on the Friday and sailed or motored to Cowes.

looked aer the mainsail and spinnaker trim. Bob Milner (C1 1956-61), who stepped in at short notice to helm, was integral in securing the race victory. It was a frantic day of 5 competitive short races. e crew was delighted with its best finish in a number of years taking 3rd place in one of the races and this set a celebratory tone for the evening. We were lucky to be invited for ‘Captain’s Cocktails’ in the home of a local resident before attending the Regatta Dinner, aer which the crew quickly retired to the bar for the now annual Iguana Wrestling competition…

e Regatta itself then not only matched the fun of previous years but delivered two fantastic results. I coordinated the crew and operations from the pit, Edward Gregg (C2 1988-93) and James Meredith (B2 1988-93) ran e Foredeck (no spinnaker wraps all weekend!), while Lucy Campbell, Andrew Jackson and Neil Jeffries made a formidable grinding team on the headsail and spinnaker. Mark Wright (C3 1998-2003) was on the traveller and Jo Gillespie

Sunday saw a slow start due to lack of wind, but for the first time in recent history, the OM boat achieved a race victory, and by a significant margin. 2013’s Regatta will be taking place almost as this Magazine hits your doormat, but if you are interested in becoming involved in 2014, do please contact me. e Annual Sailing Club Dinner, held at the Royal ames Yacht Club on 21 February was also a huge success! Commodore Charlie Kendrick (C1 1998-2003) charlie.kendrick@rbc.com

Secretary Tom Morton (TU 2001-06) 07795 035 999 tommorts@hotmail.co.uk

OM Courtiers Squash difficult season for the Courtiers Squash Team with an early exit from the Londonderry Cup and the heavy snow forcing a cancellation of the Harold Radford Rose Bowl in January…

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However, e Rose Bowl Tournament, open to all OMs, pupils and beaks will next be held at the College in January 2014, date to be confirmed. anks as ever go to all who make themselves available to play in these fixtures. e youth policy of the Courtiers is though failing and younger blood is needed. So please get in touch if you would be interested in playing. Secretary Alex Wildman (C2 1984-89) 01367 870 144 / 07768 681 704 alex@brookshirecapital.co.uk e Marlburian Club Magazine 107


Sports & Club Reports OM Rugby Malones ollowing their victory in the annual match at Marlborough against a team made up of Common Room and some older pupils on 9 September 2012 (see Edition 113), the Malones travelled to Clion on 29 September for a highly anticipated match celebrating Clion’s sesquicentenary in high spirits, hoping to steal the limelight. ree matches and a special lunch with England Head Coach, Stuart Lancaster, were planned; the Malones’ match was the curtain raiser. Temporary stands had been erected in front of Clion’s main school buildings and pitchside, which were filled with supporters from both schools. Some of Marlborough’s finest players of recent years were in action; Clion would surely get a good run for its money.

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With the Malones unable to field a ‘legitimate’ front row, uncontested scrums featured, probably to the Malones’ advantage, judging by the size and force of the Clion pack. e Malones had some big guns of their own to counteract this, Will Scott (C3 2004-09) and Ben Scott-Barrett (C1 2006-11) oen punching holes in the Clion defensive line. e Malones’ backline would prove their main strength, Greg Heath (TU 2007-12)

and Jonathan Patterson (TU 2004-09) causing Clion constant worry. Following little practise, it proved hard for the Malones to play the fast freeflowing rugby that would favour their strengths; they also perhaps weren’t as fit as they might be! Clion also made the better start and frequently stretched the Malones’ defence, finally breaching the line to score the game’s first try. e Malones struggled to convert any try and went into the break down; a big second half response would be needed to reverse the deficit. For a while it looked good, with a more solid defensive display and some lovely flair out wide. Persistence also paid off as they snuck over the Clion line in the far corner. Still down, the Malones also had one great last chance under the posts to cross the line, but a knock on out wide in the umpteenth phase provide Clion with some respite and, despite closing the gap, the Malones had to accept a 13-8 defeat. e XV fared better with a victory, concluding a lovely day (see also p18), with many hoping the fixture might become an annual event. Secretary Tom Geddes (TU 2004-09) tomcgeddes@hotmail.co.uk / malonesrfc@hotmail.co.uk

OM Tennis pril 2014 will see an OM VI take on the current MC Men’s 1st VI on the astroturf courts at Milford. is is a fixture that has taken place previously (albeit not since 2010), but has always been a relatively low-key affair.

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e OMs consistently manage to get a strong team out (a lot of us are still playing tennis fairly seriously…) but in 2014 we’re trying to broaden our horizons by encouraging a wider range of generations to get involved. e format of the day is as yet undecided - it normally consists of 3 rounds of doubles against each opposing pair, but next year the goal is to get some singles play in as well. Man or woman, young or not so young, I’d very much encourage you to email me if you’re a former 1st VI player, fancy giving the current generation a good runaround, and would enjoy a full day’s tennis followed by a barbecue and beer! Secretary Greg Carterer (CO 2000-06) g jcaterer@gmail.com

The OM Malones at the Governor’s Cup 108 e Marlburian Club Magazine


OM Masonic Lodge he Old Marlburian Lodge is made up of ex-pupils and masters of Marlborough College. It is affiliated to e Marlburian Club and is also an active member of the Public Schools Lodges Council, a group of 32 Public School Lodges. is group has an annual festival, held in 2013 at Felsted. Members of any one lodge regularly visit other lodges within the group, promoting active social interchange between people from many public schools.

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ere are several members who are sons of members, and last year the Master of the Lodge initiated his son; this reaching across generations is one of the features of Masonry. Including the initiation just mentioned, we initiated three members this year.

Ed Jeens (BH 1998-2003)

OM Rifle Club 2012/13 ur news highlight must be the excellent performance of Ed Jeens (BH 1998-2003), the youngest of the three Jeens brothers, who took the NRA Silver Medal and Badge aer finishing second in the Queen’s Prize at Bisley in July 2013. In the tightest of finishes he was just pipped at the post by Australia’s James Corbett aer both had scored 297 ex 300 over distances from 300 to 1000 yards. However, Corbett’s higher count of tie-breaking central bullseyes in the smaller central ring gained him the Prize by 46 to 40. With brother Henry (BH 1995-2000) having won the Prize in 2004 and Richard (BH 1994-99) being current World Long Range Rifle champion, the Jeens are a formidable trio. e OMs also won the Veterans’ Challenge Shield for first teams.

One of the principal aims of Masonry is to raise money for charity. Our Lodge divides its charitable giving between causes linked to Marlborough College, Masonry in general, and other charities. We also provide a Bursary for OMs in their Gap Year and value the interesting reports from the recipients which can be found on our website (www.omlodge.org) together with other information on the Lodge and masonry in general.

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Otherwise it has been a fairly standard year for the OMRC with our traditional matches against the School on the open ranges (full bore) at Bisley in September and May and indoors at the College (small bore) in November and February. We have to admit that the College rules supreme at small bore, whilst the OMRC tends to win the full bore matches, but the 2012/13 season saw the College come out on top, all credit to its leadership team of Peter Finn (master-in-charge) and Martyn Watkins (coach). ere were victories for the school in the small bore matches by 14 and 2 points, and in the September full

Charles Brooks (PR 1969-74) coaching James Spender (C2 1987-92)

bore by 1 point. e Club had its revenge in May by 24 points in a high scoring match. Sam Day achieved possibly a unique feat - top scoring in each of these 4 matches for the College, whilst our top shots were Habib Rahman (B1 1971-75) (September) and Robin Baker (B2 1954-59) (May) - winner, as a result, of the Few Cigarette Case.

e Old Marlburian Lodge meets three times a year in London, with an additional yearly visit to the Lodge of Loyalty in Marlborough. It is in good health, with a broad age range, and is very happy to welcome new members. Please contact the Secretary to find out more, or look at our website which also has links to other sites with further information on freemasonry. Secretary Julian Soper (LI 1979-81) julian.r.soper@mac.com

Several OMs gained international honours in the period up to the National Championships (Bisley, July 2103). Dominic de Vere (BH 1987-92) was a member of the England team to South Africa in April and Charles Brooks was vice captain (and acting captain for part) of the highly successful GB team to the West Indies in April/May. Dominic wins his first GB cap on the team to Canada this August, and tours with Richard Jeens, who is Team Adjutant. e Marlburian Club Magazine 109


Club Secretary Martin Evans and Alumni Manager Jane Pendry at our Dinner that evening, where the former delivered one of his hilarious addresses to the 36 OMRC diners and their guests.

Team photo of the OMRC PS Veterans ‘A’ Team 2013 with the trophy. From left: Captain, Patrick Pelly (B3 1968-72), Sandy Gill (BH 1996-2000), Richard Jeens (BH 1994-99), Dominic de Vere (BH 199297), Bill Richards (C1 1977-79) and Robin Baker (B2 1952-59).

e 2013 Veterans’ Match at Bisley proved very successful for our first team, who won the Veterans’ Challenge Shield by a clear point from the Old Guildfordians. ree team members made maximum scores of 50 in a total of 248 ex 250. e ‘B’ team finished fourth and ‘C’ and ‘D’ teams third and eighth in their sections and we were fourth overall in the Aggregate: a very good performance all round. We were delighted to have

In the main Bisley Meeting that followed there were several individual successes. Charles Brooks captained the winning England team in the National Match against the three other home countries: Robin Baker, Richard Jeens, Bill Richards (C1 1977-79) and Dominic de Vere all reached the final of the St George’s Vase match; Ed Jeens finished 6th in the

Grand Aggregate, with Richard Jeens, Alex Gill (BH 1996-2000), Dominic de Vere, Bill Richards and Robin Baker all in the top 200 ex 828 entries. In the Queen’s Prize Ed (2nd) and Richard (12th) Jeens, Gill (59th), de Vere (73rd) and Martin Watkins (98th) - the College’s shooting coach - all reached the final stage. In addition members featured in many prize lists. Finally, Bill Richards took the controlling seat in all the three international matches for England and Great Britain as the main wind-coach, upon whose call the success or otherwise of a rifle team may depend. Richard and Ed Jeens represented Wales in both National and Mackinnon matches, accompanied by Ed’s wife Clare in the former. A satisfying conclusion to the main part of our shooting year. Charles Brooks (PR 1969-74) President, OMRC

James Plunkett (PR 1978-83), Jane Pendry, Martin Evans and Ayhan Dawood (B1 1975-80)

Secretary Habib Rahman (B1 1971-75) 01749 899 529 laverley@tiscali.co.uk

MARLBOROuGH COLLEGE

SuMMER SCHOOL For further information and to receive your copy of the latest Summer School brochure, please contact us at: Marlborough College Summer School, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1PA Telephone: 01672 892388 Fax: 01672 892476 Email: admin@mcsummerschool.org.uk

www.mcsummerschool.org.uk Marlborough College is a Registered Charity No. 309486 incorporated by Royal Charter to provide Education

110 e Marlburian Club Magazine


Short story Nobody notices me by Lottie Pyper (MM 2007-12)

e five-minute bell releases a sea of kilts flowing out of Millmead towards lessons. Why do I feel so small? It’s not just my height - five foot two isn’t bad for a Shell girl. e Sixth Formers in the long black skirts don’t feel small. Not even Hannah – she’s five foot. ey swing by confidently, conscious that everybody knows their names. ere is even slang about some of them. For excellent style: ‘Jess-worthy.’ For moving extremely fast: ‘Doing a Piers.’ At least Marlburians are not too cool to show respect. But they are much too cool for bags. I clutch my files to my chest, hunched over to avoid being de-booked. Not that I need to worry. Nobody notices me. uniform is not just about clothes. It is possible to distinguish exactly which year each student is in. e Shell: oversized, perfect costumes, no holes, no stains. A hunched walk, the downcast eyes: the body language gives it away. Remove have more confidence and their jumpers are starting to fray. Hundreds are easy to spot everybody is bursting out. With only a year le it’s not worth getting new clothes. e boys are tearing their jackets with newly built muscles: the girls constantly grab their sleeves in an attempt to make them full-length. It’s rags before riches. Once you get to Sixth Form, everybody looks much more attractive. ose elegant long black skirts. Tailored suits for the boys. I deliberately walk into a puddle to let Jess and Harry pass. ey are the school’s celebrity couple. I watch from behind. Ambitious and self-consciously attractive. When you get to Sixth Form, you become individuals. You have identity. You have presence. But nobody notices me.

Lottie Pyper is now in her second year reading English at Oxford. In April 2013 she won the U26 category of the 2013 Wills Writing Awards (see p46) Illustration by Lucy McVeigh (MM 2007-12) Lucy McVeigh is in her first year reading Drama at Manchester University. She has performed leading roles both at university and while at Marlborough and has just been appointed to direct the ‘eatre Uncut’ programme for Manchester next year

t is impossible to feel like anything other than invisible. A little schoolgirl. e blue and green checked kilt falls clumsily mid-calf, the plastic stripy shirt itches underneath the crest emblazoned navy v-neck. Most people wear non-reg plimsolls made of black canvas. It’s the only part of the uniform that Lower School get to choose, so naturally it is the place to show defiance and rebellion. Wearing regulation leather is just uncool. Makeup is the face we wear. I trace a faint line on my lower lashes; attractive without being obvious. No jewellery. Hair brushed and earnestly parted in the middle. Let my hair cover my face, swinging forward as a curtain; walk discretely, blend in. at’s the idea. So that nobody notices me.

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Keep my head down. Jess’s long black skirt swishes like she’s on the catwalk. With that attitude, she could never be anonymous. She is carrying too many books. One slips and falls. I’m right there so I stoop and pick it up. Keeping my head to the ground, I tap her on the shoulder and hold it out. ‘Oh, thank you!’ she gushes, spinning around. I nod curtly without liing my face, and wait for them to keep walking. Shell daren’t meet the Sixth Form’s gaze. She wouldn’t know the name of a random Lower School girl anyway. I look at her from under the curtain. Perhaps hierarchy is something we all have to go through. ose who suffer at the bottom want to lord it at the top. But maybe, on some level, we all enjoy it. Slipping into our prescribed positions. e Marlburian Club Magazine 111


Jessica and Harry started off in Shell too. Piers hadn’t beaten the school 100m record five years ago. ey all wore the unattractive Lower School uniform once. Were a part of the sea. You don’t remember your old self. Maybe you casually wonder how you survived. You get used to being high and dry. Nobody looks back. Nobody stops to think. Is it really the uniform that separates me from Jessica and Harry? Five years at Marlborough turns you into a certain sort of person. With an easy smile and a confident laugh. Yet with this curtain of hair falling over my face, nobody notices me. Court is a beautiful place. e colours are the same colours as my skirt: green grass and blue sky. Everybody thinks Norwood is ugly, but that’s just the outside. Inside it’s wonderful. I have a bigger problem with the Medawar building: it’s not symmetrical. e windows are lopsided, and inside the layout is like a maze. But nobody moans about that. Maybe it’s because it is dressed in cute brickwork. e lesson bell starts up. You can taste the change of atmosphere: everybody tenses and moves quicker. I immediately start running. at’s what Shell girls do. You don’t want to be late – you’ll be chitted. Teachers line the grass like traffic wardens. But the upper School don’t worry about things like that. Jessica has slowed to a walk, to make a joke with Mrs Russell: Harry goes on alone. I keep my gaze lowered as I pass. Mrs Russell doesn’t recognise me. Is it just this uniform? If I looked up and smiled at her like Jessica, she’d say hello back. She’s my teacher too –

English. Maybe it’s my body language - the hunched, introspective walk begging to be ignored. But I am late: she can’t ignore me. ‘Hurry on then!’ she stutters. I don’t look up. She glances at Jessica. ‘And get some proper shoes!’ Jessica treats her like a friend: Mrs Russell responds like an equal. I treat her like the enemy: she reluctantly accepts her role. I made this barrier: the curtain is my hair. As I pound into the Museum Block, I glance self-consciously round to see if anybody is observing my ridiculous run. As if. Mrs Russell is still chatting with Jessica. Nobody notices me. e classroom door is shut. I take a deep breath and open the door. Everybody turns. ‘Who is she?’ ‘Cocky Shell, interrupting our lessons.’ ‘Hey sweetheart, wrong class. unless you want to sit next to me.’ Piers grins, a wicked glint in his eye. Mr Blooms sees the uniform. He barely looks up to address me. ‘Sorry – I think you have the wrong lesson,’ His tone is apologetic. I pretend to be surprised. ‘Oh, well, I’m pretty sure I have history now,’ I stutter, still keeping my head down. ‘Friday period one – yes, MRB.’ ere is an impatient cough behind me. ‘Excuse me,’ says Jessica, sweeping past and gliding down next to Harry. ‘So sorry I am late, Sir – had to talk to Mrs Russell about prefect duties for next week.’ He nods. ‘Well, that’s everybody then. Apart from Rose. Anyone know where she is?’ e class all shrug. I stand there awkwardly. e seconds slip. I know where she is. But nobody notices me. ‘Well, we’d better get started.’ Mr Blooms looks at me pointedly, refusing to reiterate

e Marlburian Club Magazine is for OM news… want to know more about College news and sports results? Visit www.marlboroughcollege.org You can also take out a £10 annual subscription to the latest edition of the school magazine e Marlburian. Make your cheque payable to ‘Marlborough College’ and send to Mrs Jane Gow, Website & Publications Manager, Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wilts, SN8 1PA

112 e Marlburian Club Magazine

my dismissal. I throw my hair back. ere is a stunned silence. ‘Okay... Well, come sit down, Rose.’ Jessica looks at me and the colour rises in her cheeks, realising it was me who picked up her book. ‘Wow Rose, you are way too convincing as a Shell,’ says Piers, across the room. ey all laugh. I laugh as well. But now my smile is false. I thought it would be funny to pretend to be in Shell. But it was unsettling. It was not just that I dressed the part – I acted it too. Somehow it became more than a prank, like the social experiment of ‘the prisoners and the guards’. I only wore the uniform, clutched my books, kept my head down. All of a sudden, my friends were my superiors. e teachers didn’t recognise me. In that uniform, it was back to the start. Invisible. A little schoolgirl. And nobody notices me. Sometimes I can’t wait to leave Marlborough. All its rules and hierarchies. Now I realize how much I’ve changed. It’s funny. You don’t realise how far you’ve come until you try going back. During the lesson I’m my usual self - arguing with Mr Bloom, playing devil’s advocate. He decides to let us out early. Way before we’re allowed to go to lunch – the Lower School have to eat first. We try to get in anyway. It happens every week. We are always sent away. ‘Can’t you understand – the Lower School have to eat first. Come back in ten minutes.’ ‘How annoying. urgh,’ moans Jess flouncing off. I smile. ere are some advantages to being in Shell. I resume the hunched downcast walk. Go into the Dining Hall past the Master. Of course I’m not stopped. Nobody notices me.


Moderate Crossword W H S

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2012 Crossword We were delighted to receive several correct entries for 2012’s Moderately Challenging Crossword, set by the late Tony Hall (B2 1943-48). e winner was JBW (Jack) omas (C2 1942-47), who also named the Masters he had identified in Alberich’s Difficult Crossword while noting the absence of Ferrar (PR 1929-34), his greatgrandfather! He wins an OM tie.

or those who prefer a gentler challenge than Alberich’s overleaf, here is the last of Tony Hall’s generous legacy of crosswords le specifically for the Club Magazine.

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Closing date for entries for entry to 2013 competitions: 31 March 2014. Please send to Jane Pendry, Alumni Relations Manager, e Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire, SN8 1PA or email a scanned copy to jpendry@marlboroughcollege.org

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ACROSS 1 Somerset town to the Orient on the contrary! (5) 4 Yellow underwater home for Coleoptera, we hear (9) 9 Emphasise on the slope (9) 10 Improper conduct found in those behaving without restraint (5) 11 Two score (less one) strides for Canada’s 22’s novel (6,4,5) 12 Certainly (6) 14 Surplus waste dumped here (8) 17 Ally dips into water plant leaves (8) 19 Bust, although all right in the gun (6) 22 Out East, green orange lover is the top man in the country (8,7) 24 Register in Seven Rolls of Honour (5) 25 I can be around a thousand and five around nothing but can’t be shied (9) 26 I had rents in a muddle and my reputation was this (9) 27 Steer in the right direction to adjust (5)

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DOWN 1 Aunt Sally is such an honest test (4,5) 2 At the brook a piebald animal is seen (5) 3 Record fibre in a letter (7) 4 Younger members of a family (6) 5 A confused Neil I ban him every other year (8) 6 Awakened (7) 7 Looking healthy - in a bed of roses or carnations? (2,3,4) 8 No odds on getting this clue (5) 13 Meat in stag produces rescuer (9) 15 Ole! Listen for the most solitary (9) 16 His nomad wanders off - to tick off (8) 18 Italian producer of tyres - and calendars (7) 20 Check or the bath may overflow like this (3,4) 21 Vertigo made me act crazily (1,2,3) 22 Visitor who may be paying or welcomed free (5) 23 Clothes we rob escaping in a hurry (5) e Marlburian Club Magazine 113


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2012 Crossword We were delighted to receive several correct entries for 2012’s Difficult Crossword, set by Alberich (C1 1976-80). e winner was Robin Garran (B2 1952-57), who wins a pair of gold-plated OM cufflinks.

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ome OMs fancy their chances with a harder challenge; alongside the moderately hard crossword overleaf generously set by Tony Hall (B2 194348) before his untimely death in 2011. We therefore welcome back Alberich (C1 1976-80).

Half the clues contain a consecutive jumble of letters which need to be removed before the clue can be solved. ese jumbles may appear anywhere in the clue and aer removal the remainder may well not make sense. When unscrambled, these jumbles of letters form a set whose common element (6 letters) should be highlighted in the completed grid.

10 Lover met lush in club, mostly an uncomplaining sort (5) 11 Support given to the Crete revolution’s beginning to waver (6) 12 Female punter Renee keeps cut (8) 13 Helping her set up requires a speech, first off (6) 15 Plant that’s deep blue, 1000 for a penny (8) 18 Son overheard annoying conversation (8) 19 Freezing cold temperature - ice on car first thing (6) 21 Where people may confess the bad deed, not half sick? (8) 23 Show-off having lost sure won’t chat (6) 26 Me, I’m all done aer business regarding disheartened dog (5) 27 is creature’s natural at spinning (9) 28 ose who play it hope not to take the lead! (7,8)

ACROSS 1 Brutal police sergeant’s first in struggle for promotion (6,9) 9 Is wearing one transparent material or another (9)

DOWN 1 Playwright’s written about Acton to artist (7) 2 To take on a business, sir, more green stuff is needed (5)

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Closing date for entries for entry to 2013 competitions: 31 March 2014. Please send to Jane Pendry, Alumni Relations Manager, e Marlburian Club, Marlborough College, Wiltshire, SN8 1PA or email a scanned copy to jpendry@marlboroughcollege.org.

114 e Marlburian Club Magazine

3 Fireplace feature that’s unique having top removed without approval? (9) 4 Some older aeroplanes can be seen around the back (4) 5 City girl entertains film’s demure star (3,5) 6 To try this, you’ve a somewhat twisted ego, for starters (5) 7 Aer inserting first of suppositories, somehow go to toilet? I felt ill, dear doctor! (9) 8 Salmon, all born this year, ingesting impure coke and Ecstasy (7) 14 Reference book has gist mostly involving Biblical character (9) 16 Gym enrols new exercise staff (9) 17 As reigning champion is a Parisian, British scoffed (8) 18 Surprisingly twoccer used to be a charmer (7) 20 Officer needs right plant for bouquet (7) 22 Hot island next to independent Caribbean country (5) 24 To Ben, relative gives torment (5) 25 Old vessel’s goods beginning to be unloaded (4)


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Marlburian Club Magazine 2013  

Marlburian Club Magazine 2013  

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