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MARLB OROUGH COLLEGE, MARLB OROUGH, W I LT S H I R E S N 8 1 PA

T H E M A R L B U R I A N M AG A Z I N E M I C H A E L M A S , L E N T & S UM M E R 2 015 /16

2015/16 MICHAELMAS, L E N T & S UM M E R


Faure Requiem To commemorate the 20 OMs who tragically lost their lives alongside thousands of others on the opening day of the Battle of the Somme one hundred years ago, the College honoured them in two performances of Fauré’s stunning Requiem in Chapel. Each of the movements of the Requiem were interspersed with specially selected readings, some as expected were by Siegfried Sassoon (CO 1902–04) alongside other appropriately topical texts. The Chapel Choir were joined by Old Marlburians, Common Room and guests with Helena Mackie (MO) Head Chorister 2016/17, and guest baritone, Christopher Sheldrake (Wells Cathedral Vicars Choral) as the distinguished soloists. This was a beautifully poignant and suitably moving occasion, a fitting closure to the College year. PTD

James Young (B1 1906–08)

Dominick Brown (B2 1901–6)

Geoffrey Sanderson (C1 1903–06)

Percy Bent (B2 1907–12)

Llewellyn Sanger-Davies (C1 1907–12)

Wilfred Kohn (CO 1907–11)

Thomas MarriottDodington (PR 1909–13)

Montague Burge (B3 1888–92)

John Towers-Clark (B2 1910–12)

Frederick Wragg (C1 1894–1900)

Christie Hickman (LI 1901–06)

Charles Prowse (CO 1882–85)

Henry Field (LI 1908–11)

Anniversary Plans 2018 marks the 50th year of girls at Marlborough College and the 175th year since the College was established. Richard Lovett (C2 1883–87)

Hugh Mott (C2 1907–13)

Edward Chambers (C2 1909–13)

Jocelyn Buxton (PR 1910–14)

Cecil Coxe (C2 1911–15)

C ove r photo : C l a ud i a Vy v y a n (MO U6 ) a s R e no Swe ene y, i n C ole Por t e r ’s A ny t h i n g G o e s . P u bl i s he d by M a rl b orou g h C o l le g e , Wi lt s h i re S N 8 1PA E d itor : Ja ne G ow Wit h s p e c i a l t h a n k s f or t he photo g r a ph s of I a n L e on a rd a nd Pe t e D av ie s a nd to C h r i s Ta n ne r f or c ompi l i n g t he s p or t s re p or t s . D e s i g n by S u n Hou s e Cre a t i ve

Charles Edmundson (C3 1905–08)

Clifford Ellis (C3 1911–14)

We would be delighted if you are able to join us for some of the celebratory events which will take place throughout the academic year 2017/2018. Please save the dates. Celebratory School Walk 17 September 2017 Cycle to the Somme 13–15 October 2017 Rugby and Girls’ Hockey Festival 4 November 2017 Celebration Concert 3 December 2017 Commemoration Day Celebration 26 May 2018

Marlborough Marlborough to Amiens Marlborough Marlborough Marlborough


The Marlburian Magazine, Michaelmas, Lent & Summer 2015/16

Sports

Arts & Reviews

The Master’s Speech

2

The School Play

62

Rugby

102

Lent Illumination

5

The Penny Reading

64

Boys’ Hockey

109

The Shell Play

66

Girls’ Hockey

114

Exam Season Plays

68

Football

118

The Musical Year

70

Lacrosse

122

Michaelmas Orchestral

74

Girls’ Tennis

124

Orchestral and Ensembles

75

Boys’ Tennis

126

Southbank Sinfonia Concert 76

Netball

128

Wind Department Concert

77

Cricket

132

MCCS

78

Athletics

139

IB Visual Arts Review

80

Basketball

140

A level Photography

82

Cross-Country

140

Collisions Remove Project

83

Fencing

140

Fives

141

College Community Common Room News

8

Super Sunday

11

Skill-Up Week

12

Sorley Service

14

Swindon Academy 15 Modern Languages

16

CCF 18 House Shout

20

House News

22

Clubs & Societies

34

Trips & Expeditions

Upper Sixth Fine Art Personal Investigation Review

84

Upper Sixth Fine Art Examination

86

Rackets 142

88

Squash 143

Golf 141 Polo

141

Creative Writing Trip

44

Post-GCSE Trip to Rome

46

Post-GCSE Sailing

47

OA Expedition to Tanzania

48

GCSE Fine Art Examination

CCF Trip to San Diego

50

Wrapped Remove Project

90

Swimming

GCSE Project

91

Water Polo 144

Art Exhibitions

92

GCSE Storage

94

GCSE Electronic Projects

95

AS Product Design

96

A2 Product Design

98

Sixth Form Art Trip to Madrid

52

History of Art Study Trip to the Low Countries

54

Japan Rugby Tour

56

SwimTrek in Turkey

57

Devizes to Westminster

58

Shooting

CONTENTS

Introduction

THE MAR LBUR IAN

Contents

143 144

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THE MAR LBUR IAN

The Master’s Speech Extract from the Master’s Prize Day Speech, May 2016

THE MASTER’S SPEECH

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y breakfasts and lunches this year revealed an increasing trend of people uncertain that they want to go to university quite so immediately. This is not just because they would like a gap year after the stresses and strains of school but because they would rather wait until they are sure of time, place and course before committing to something which might not be the right thing. There is a logical argument that they do not want to spend an enormous amount of money concluding with sizeable debt and a lower second class degree in a subject which had not been the right choice, thereby making the whole process of job applications that much harder. Hence, there is much more interest in internship or even apprenticeship as well as the gap year, whilst it should also be emphasised that there is more talk of gap years which are involved in “real social enterprise”… hence, the contribution to society and social issues at an early age. This is most encouraging if one thinks it through, reflecting a maturity of attitude.

Beyond that, we know of six definite medical places right now and some 24 or so heading off to North America including five places at McGill in Montreal, three at NYU, a place at Stanford and a place at Yale.

Examining our university entrants, just about two-thirds of the year accepted UCAS offers. Once again, we will hope by the time A levels / IB and this yeargroups’ applications have concluded, to reach the five-year average of 18 going to Oxbridge.

Once again, it is easy to speak of a yeargroup who are multi-talented. Hamish Lorimer’s speech at the Cadet Dinner spoke volumes for an organisation which, under the watchful eye of RSM Bate, received an outstanding report from

Overall, we believe that, of the UK universities chosen, we will score around 85% in the Russell Group Universities and over 60% of you will go to universities which are ranked in the World’s top 100. Deflecting just a little, Marlborough College Malaysia has a similar global approach and profile as their first Upper Sixth Form have sat the International Baccalaureate. We hope to see strong results from them and our final 24 who have seen through the IB as a very cohesive group worked through it with dedication and style. Thank you to Mr Gist for the lead he has given it throughout what has been a short-lived experience and one from which there can be no doubt that all participants have gained.


the officer who conducted the Biennial Inspection. As we continue to honour the glorious memory of those who fell exactly 100 years ago, so the early army tradition of Marlborough’s history is alive and well. Secondly, the Choir Dinner paid tribute to a superb year which featured a brilliant service at Keble College, Oxford, another one at St Paul’s Cathedral, and a disc which they had cut at the beginning of the year, exemplary traditional services, participation in Elgar’s astonishing Dream of Gerontius, and a combined Evensong with OMs, one of our feeder prep schools, and most especially, a choir brought down from Kennington who sang their hearts out. The great thing about these combined enterprises, and indeed, events that cross the school such as the Orchestra or the jazz band is the sense of involving individuals collectively. This Upper Sixth has given a fine lead to all of that.

“Please take pleasure in each other’s success, make the most of the remaining days in this remarkable corner of Wiltshire and be ready for the explosion of the big wide world.” There was also considerable evidence of this in Drama where both the dynamic The Revenger’s Tragedy and absolutely sparkling production of Anything Goes revealed excellence of some individuals of the very highest level but also great concentration and ability to achieve real

Sophie Shakespeare

detailed concentration by all members of the cast – key features of Marlborough’s productions in the Ellis Theatre. Turning to sporting distinction, the senior teams have benefited greatly from our range of coaches which include Budge Pountney in rugby, John Jackson in hockey and now, Mark Alleyne in cricket. With the Director of Sport, Katy Hudson, offering a calm lead, so we have seen happy overall seasons in rugby where the fixture list is particularly strenuous, very promising girls’ and boys’ hockey, much enjoyable netball and now, excellent athletics under the leadership of Marcus Sharrad. There have been some fine early cricket results inclusive of splendid 20:20 performances by the XI and much promising boys’

Henry Martin (Credit: Patrick Khachfe)

THE MASTER’S SPEECH

THE MAR LBUR IAN

Will Beattie

and girls’ tennis. This is not to mention the many other minor sports which also flourish. One or two individual names should be emphasised as they move on, such as the contributions of Sophie Shakespeare who plays for England in hockey and also the captain, Olivia Hazlitt, whose hockey has been outstanding. Recently we heard that Head Boy, Henry Martin, has been selected for the England Sevens Academy, a good tribute to his five years of speed on the wing in rugby, a game where Will Beattie maintained huge enthusiasm as he led what was a small side physically. Captaincy is always hard when the going is tough but there were some really pleasing performances, especially a good Sevens victory for the second year running in the South West Tournament at Sexy’s School.

Schuy Neuhauser

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THE MAR LBUR IAN

THE MASTER’S SPEECH

Other individual honours go to Schuy Neuhauser, Captain of Shooting, who has represented GB. At this point, it is right to single out the considerable Housemasterships of Ben Miller (11 years in C1) and Neil Moore (17 years in C1 and Barton Hill). The 24/7 nature of today’s housemastering boarding job is considerable indeed. Many of the pressures are relentless and the constant need to stay alert is a comment on the demands of modern times. Measurement on the one hand may help people assess pretty accurately where things are but it brings considerable strains and the sheer weight of bureaucracy, not helped by vast numbers of emails and the technological explosion, is such that real diligence is needed all the time, along with patience

and a sense of humour. However, and this applies to the entire HM team, HoDs and Senior Management who pull the strings to make this work, there is a true sense of dedication and belief in all you young people. It remains a privilege to be the Master of a school where the values of producing communicative individuals have not been forgotten. This all comes down to the daily grind so successfully negotiated at a House level. Long may Marlborough’s Houses remain in the care of figures such as Miller and Moore because the all-round success of the school comes about through their firm, kind integrity and sense of duty.

“Wherever you go in the next year or two, please look back at these Marlborough days and the friendships made within them as being fundamental to your future.” Wherever you go in the next year or two, please look back at these Marlborough days and the friendships made within them as being fundamental to your future. What you learnt here, will in some way or another stay with you, so I hope the

vast majority of memories are happy ones. Once again, we see a splendid group of you who are ready for the wider world. Please take pleasure in each other’s success, make the most of the remaining days in this remarkable corner of Wiltshire and be ready for the explosion of the big wide world. At the Mayor-Making ceremony the other day, the outgoing Mayor, Margaret Rose, former Dame at Preshute, referenced the opening lines of the first of the four quartets by T. S. Eliot, “Time present and time past / are both perhaps present in time future / and time future contained in time past. If all time is eternally present, all time is unredeemable”. As an OM wrote this very week – “though I have always lived far away from the College, I am continually aware of how formative in my life my time there was”. May that be the experience for the 204 of you destined to leave, inclusive of the four splendid Heads of School whom it has been my delight to get to know well as you look both back and forwards in time that is eternally present.

@MarlboroughCol May 27 The Master’s Lodge played host to the Prefects’ Dinner last night...

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JL


THE MAR LBUR IAN

Lent Illumination Showcasing Talent To start the night off, the much loved MCTV team made their Illumination debut with an informative report on pupils’ plans for the forthcoming half of term as well as the preparations for the Illumination performance. They were also prepared to show their diversity and depth by covering reactions to the major current affairs issues of the day. he opening musical number came from the Hundred. Olly Cutts and Freddie Elmberg upped their game with a rogue three-song mash up, having added some girls to the group. The new recruits were impressive with a higher range, but struggled with the microphone height. Annie O’Grady took to the stage with a fabulous rendition of Sam Smith’s Omen. Her guitar playing was faultless and luckily it made a re-appearance later on in the show whilst Chloe Hubbard sung her heart out in an effortless performance. Littlefield showed off their best with a heartwarming acoustic version of Coldplay from Henry Harte and Tom Southgate which captivated the audience. Next up was a video from the Prefects with insight into their secret lives. This may have inspired some Lower Sixth to seek higher office in the Parlour and their dominance in the library. The question remains though, did they find it funny or was it too close to the bone?

Cotton consolidated their reputation as ‘rogue’ with Henriette Bos slapping the bass. She exploited every inch of the guitar in an outstanding acoustic performance. Her unique talent took the audience by storm. Striking the perfect balance between light-hearted humour and skilful coordination, Josh Fryer-Bloom stole the show with his recreation of the extraordinary dance from the film Napoleon Dynamite. His confidence was reflected in his performance: a risqué display for those lucky ones in the front rows.

LENT ILLUMINATION

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An original catchy number from James Eyles and his band brought the live show to a perfect ending – accompanied by a hatted Max Foulds, talented Luke Smith and the enthusiastic Ollie Ordish, who took control of the pedals and humbly displayed his guitar skills in a solo. Rachel Winfield (MO) & Lottie Brousse (MO)

@MarlboroughCol Dec 4 Last night’s Illumination in Memorial Hall – an entertaining evening!

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C O L L E G E C O M MU N I T Y

COMMON ROOM NEWS SUPER SUNDAY SKILL-UP WEEK SORLEY SERVICE SWINDON ACADEMY

8 11 12 14 15

MODERN LANGUAGES 16 CCF 18 HOUSE SHOUT 20 HOUSE NEWS 22 CLUBS & SOCIETIES 34

The new Fitness Centre opened at the start of the Lent Term 2016.


COMMUNITY

COMMON ROOM NEWS

Common Room News W

e welcomed a total of 21 new colleagues in September. Rebecca McAuley as Head of Psychology, Alex de Trafford as Head of Spanish, Qingwei Li as Head of Chinese, Christopher Moule as Head of History, Chris Wheatland as Head of Physics, James Burton as Head Librarian and Budge Pountney as Head of Rugby. Other new colleagues were Amy Adderley (Economics), Ben Allen (Physics), Orla Grimley (Maths), Joe Lane (Spanish), Hannah Meehan (Geography), Izzy Munro Kerr (Classics), Yukari (Momo) Momota (Japanese), Marcus Sharrad (PE) and Laura Zaninelli (Italian). A number of Graduate Assistants also joined Common Room: Emily Everdell (Lax), Archie Franks (Artist-in-Residence),

Grace Lawes (PE), Caitlin McGinn (Lax), Ben Mackey (PE).

Robin Cockett

We have celebrated the arrival of new members of the wider Common Room community, with additions to the Birkhill, Flatres, Willmett, Wheatland and Wingfield-Digby families. We also offer many congratulations to Katy Bennett and Tim Hudson, to Marcus Sharrad and Fi Davies and Richard Sandall and Maria von Weisenberg who were married during the course of the year.

(CR 1999–2016)

We were sorry to say goodbye to a number of friends and colleagues as the year progressed. Miss Jen Cohen goes on to be a postgraduate student at Edinburgh University. Mrs Bev Callender has retired. John Jackson goes on to be Head of Hockey at Prior Park. Dr Georgina Longley goes on to teach classics at King’s Canterbury. Andrew Pembleton goes on to be Assistant Director of Sport at Millfield. Duncan Curry goes on to be Head of OA at Bryanston. Peter and Sally Finn go to Marlborough College, Malaysia on an exchange year. Robin Cockett moves on to be Head of Sixth form at Hockerill AngloEuropean College. We have also said goodbye to a number of graduate assistants: Lindsay Bayliss, Joshua Entecott, Archie Franks, Grace Lawes, Ben Mackey, Adam Staines and Emily Everdell. We thank the leavers for all they have given to the College and to the life of Common Room over the years, and we send them every good wish for the future. NJLM

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obin joined the Modern Languages Department 17 years ago, leaving the City to move into teaching German and French. For all but one year, when he moved across to Sevenoaks before being almost immediately drawn back to succeed David Whiting as Head of Modern Languages, we have enjoyed his genial, sparkling and mischievous good humour in the department and in the wider Common Room. Robin is a phenomenal Germanist. He loves the language and speaks


Robin loves exchanges and foreign visits, relishing these as opportunities not only for individuals to perfect their language skills and to appreciate a foreign way of life, but also for schools to be openminded and work together for long-lasting educational benefit. In the classroom, Robin’s sets have appreciated his patient, well-structured teaching, his calm good humour, and his thorough and rigorous demands of precision and accuracy in the learning process. On the cricket field, the 4th XI has benefited hugely from his coaching and sense of fun, and this year he has introduced them to the world of village cricket, another example of Robin’s outreach instinct. Singing has long been a favoured hobby of his too: inspired by his love of choral singing, he has instigated some memorable collaborations between the Modern Languages and Music departments, including the annual Liederabend and the multi-lingual Advent Celebration.

COMMUNITY

Duncan Curry (CR 2010–2016)

D

uncan has worked in the Outdoor Activities department for seven years; for a short period with Rupert Rosedale (CR 1999–2009) and then Russ Tong (CR 2001–). He is an excellent practitioner of a whole range of OA activities with climbing being his particular interest. During his tenure Marlborough College has achieved some notable team results and some outstanding individual results at The Schools Indoor Climbing competition. He has been a hugely valued assistant to Russ on numerous challenging overseas expeditions including the Italian Dolomites, Indian Himalaya, the Cordillera Blanca in Peru and Iceland. He has also been a major influence in the increasing popularity of the Devizes to Westminster (DW) canoe

race each year in which during his final year, Marlborough College won the Junior Team Trophy, The Schools Trophy and the Junior Ladies Team Trophy.

COMMON ROOM NEWS

it beautifully. He has wide cultural knowledge and particularly loves German film and twentieth-century literature. Like many linguists he appreciates the humour inherent in language with its pitfalls and traps, and often he has stumbled with a chuckle across cartoons, online clips, articles and the like which show up the comic side to language use and misuse. As Head of Modern Languages for nine years, Robin led some bold initiatives, introducing Chinese and Italian as major languages, bringing French on to equal terms with the other five as an optional language in its own right, and embracing the inherent IB spirit of “languages for all” in a Marlborough context which survives in the wide range of Upper School nonspecialist language options. A particular highlight of the year for Robin is always the Modern Languages Drama Festival, where all the Lower Sixth sets perform in their own language. With the UK now looking to redefine itself on the world stage, the opportunities for Marlburians to leave as skilled speakers of any of eight languages are directly due to Robin’s visionary leadership of the department.

In every OA activity Duncan is involved in, he manages to be an excellent motivator of the young: he certainly has an excellent pastoral instinct. Many pupils over the years have benefited greatly from the interest Duncan has shown in them as individuals helping them develop and improve their outdoor passions. As well as providing a huge contribution to OA, Duncan has been a valued tutor on Wednesday evenings in Cotton and a great supporter of all Common Room events. He leaves us to become Head of the OA department at Bryanston next year and we wish him all the best. Neil Moore & Russ Tong

For the past two years Robin has had wider responsibilities as Director of Cultural and Global Awareness, while remaining Head of German. The experience he has gained in this wider role will serve him well as he now moves to Hockerill Anglo-European College, Bishops Stortford, as Assistant Head of Sixth Form. An internationally inspired school specialising in Modern Languages and Music, as Hockerill is, is surely tailor-made for Robin. We congratulate him and thank him for all he has done at Marlborough over the past 17 years and send him, Petra, Lily and Alfie the warmest of good wishes for the future. Andrew Brown

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COMMUNITY

Andy Pembleton (CR 2010–2016)

COMMON ROOM NEWS

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eflecting upon Andrew Pembleton’s tenure at Marlborough College, something of a contradictory figure emerges from the plethora of sport, overseas trips, teaching and pastoral duties to which he contributed. Upon his arrival in 2010, Marlborough immediately benefited from the gifts of a schoolmaster in many of the traditional senses of the word. A decent, principled, vocation focused man, full of integrity while wholly dedicated to his own family; Andy offers a terrific role model for his pupils and also many of his colleagues. In New Zealand they call it ‘mana’, and Andy has it in spades. At the same time, we all witnessed his progressive approach to life and sport in general. He is extremely well read, and always ahead of the curve with regard to the latest thinking in his profession, sports psychology or management ideas, yet Andy’s appetite for looking forward is never compromised by his affinity for tradition. As such, he was a great appointment, a neat ‘fit’ for Marlborough and its overall ethos, and began to make his mark on life and sport here in a wide array of spheres. As Head of Academic PE at Marlborough, Andy set an uncompromising but supportive tone in the classroom, and led by example out of it. Formerly a Master in Charge of Rugby himself, at Wanganui Collegiate in New Zealand, Andy contributed enormous amounts of coaching expertise and pastoral work in the Rugby Club here at the College. First with the Junior Colts, then the XL and finally the XV, Andy proved himself across a wide spectrum of abilities and ages. As a member of staff on the Australia Tour of 2013, we really saw him at his best (both socially and professionally!) and memories from this trip offer the most accurate recollections of him as an associate. As an

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adopted Kiwi himself, nobody took greater pleasure in beating the Aussies more! Also a former Housemaster at Wanganui, Andy’s experience was integral at Turner House as a tutor, working first with Alan McKnight and then with Gregor Macmillan. With overall control of Tennis at Marlborough, Andy took a succession of teams deep into National competitions and really drove this particular sport towards the upper echelons of the schools’ game in the UK. Also, as a highly regarded hockey coach, one never had to look too far from his results to figure out where the ‘Turner Cup’ would be heading in any particular Lent Term. It may not rank too high on anyone’s bucket list, but as a former warden of the infamous tug of war House competition myself, I really admired the blend of humour and rigour that Andy used to manage this particular duty. I’m sure that his memories of Marlborough are more significant than requesting pupils to “take the strain…” but they will certainly be part of the jigsaw! So, a true sporting polymath departs, leaving behind various chasms in the coaching, teaching, tutoring and management structures of the College. It is fair to say that the ‘waters close over’ fairly quickly at a school as big as this, but ASP leaves behind quite a large number of whirlpools as he departs for fresh challenges. Andy moves to Millfield as Assistant Director of Sport, and finds himself on a trajectory which we would all agree, was somewhat inevitable. I know that he will make a great success of the opportunity, having emerged from a highly competitive field to seize one of the plum jobs in English school sport. Andy is perfectly suited to this renowned sporting behemoth and we wish him, Tammy, Jacob and Reuben every success and happiness for the future. We look forward to saying ‘Kia ora bro’ again soon. CLH

Georgina Longley (CR 2011–2016)

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eorgina Longley arrived here five years ago from Oxford High School, with impressive academic credentials – a First in Classical Mods and Greats, an MA with Distinction and a DPhil. She honed her teaching skills here across the full range of classical subjects and students – from Michael Miller to Ivo Devereux – and impressed everyone with her indefatigable energy, her razor-sharp mind, the range and depth of her knowledge and her love of words. Though her puns were formally banned from Classics department meetings, she got her revenge by trouncing JFL at Scrabble on the Greek Trip. Do not attempt to challenge Georgina to Scrabble in any language! She has coordinated the Extended Essays for IB, mentored Upper School scholars, as well as mentoring Oxbridge candidates and supervising some EPQs. She has taken a major role in Debating and has helped take classics into local primary schools through her highly successful outreach programme. All of this activity has been fuelled by cups of intensely strong coffee brewed in the Languages Resources room. She has been a fantastic role model during these five years for those pupils who love to explore ideas on an exciting journey of intellectual discovery. In Elmhurst, Georgina was one of those tutors who went the extra mile always attending House events, arriving on duty with an excellent array of cakes, helping all comers with personal statements, happy to turn her hand to anything and willing to roll up her sleeves and get stuck into the least attractive chore that needed doing. She will be enormously missed by the House. Georgina heads off to pastures new to join Owen Moelwyn-Hughes, Kate Batty and others at King’s Canterbury. We wish her all the best with everything Kent has to offer. NGML


ith an abundance of early summer sunshine, hundreds of students took the liberty of walking across Court without Prefect badges. It was fantastic to have the whole school assembled together, nonchalantly putting the anxieties of a busy term ahead to bed for an afternoon. I could not resist the temptation to step inside the main marquee and witness the potential being showcased in the Battle of the Bands. With everything from Bill Withers to Cyndi Lauper, the free-spirited souls who braved the stage did not fail to produce. C3 started off the afternoon with an unforgettable rendition of Gorillaz Feel Good Inc. Dunhill (C3 L6) and Spillmann’s (C3 L6) onstage camaraderie resembled Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett to a T, while their vocals comprised rich tones and harmonies. Despite a minimalistic group, Barton Hill’s Whiter Shade of Pale produced a mystical eeriness with their raw interpretation which reduced the audience to a speechless silence of approval. I don’t think anyone could review Super Sunday without singling out Thomas

Southgate’s (LI U6) soulful and husky vocals. Despite the occasional referral to his phone for lyrics, Southgate definitely had one of the best voices in the contest and Helena Hussey (LI U6) complemented this with her bright and colourful tones. Elmhurst transported us to the Nevada Desert of the Burning (WO) Man Festival, whilst Summerfield took us to silky sands with cocktails in hands with their Piña Colada Song. Every House brought something unique to the stage. However, it was Preshute who took the trophy home, with their interpretation of Fleetwood Mac’s Go Your Own Way. Kit Rendle, our very own Stevie Nicks, brought charm and charisma to the stage accompanied by his mellifluous female vocalists. A well-deserved win! The annual event is also an opportunity to raise a substantial amount of money for various different charities such as The Brain Tumour Charity, and there was significant cooperation between pupils and teachers to make this happen.

SUPER SUNDAY

W

COMMUNITY

Super Sunday

fighting in Mexico, whilst the aroma of oriental stir-fry and a plethora of homemade baking were a few of the touches that contributed to a glorious afternoon which left everybody smiling.

Inflatable jousting secured an audience that resembled Hispanics watching bull-

Issy Carr (EL)

“The annual event is also an opportunity to raise a substantial amount of money for various different charities...”

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COMMUNITY

Skill-Up Week Teamwork and Transition

Skill-Up Week is the name given to the penultimate week of the Summer Term for the Hundred. It marks the end of the GCSE examinations and the transition into the Sixth Form. The opportunities in 2016 were a cultural trip to Rome, preparation for the RYA Day Skipper Award on the South Coast, a creative writing trip to Pembrokeshire, the CCF Summer Camp, the OA trip to Snowdonia, work experience and the Collegebased Incrementum Course which aimed to develop communication and leadership skills through a variety of challenges.

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SKILL-UP WEEK

he Incrementum Course welcomed 18 pupils and two staff from Marlborough College Malaysia, making a total of 45 pupils, with little knowledge of what was to come! However, the swift split into various groups of 3s and 4s (all of which were named after a different country) added an immediate sense of competition to the week.

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Introvert or extravert? On the first day, we had a morning of personality tests to find out the answer to this question. The outcome of these assessments were then clearly demonstrated in the series of competitive challenges the next day which included one-legged squatting on a slack line, securing the whole team to the top of a 30-foot tree and safely reaching the other side of the river on a barrel and rope raft.

As each country collected more points, the tasks became harder and more challenging, necessitating the need for good communication skills as plans were devised. The importance of listening, as well as speaking, became apparent. On Wednesday, we headed to Brimslade Farm to continue the challenges. No sooner had we arrived than our shoes and socks were soaked through from walking in the wet fields. However, the high team spirit of each country continued as we competed in stretcher races, throwing competitions and filling a pipe with water which, little did we know, contained multiple holes! Back in the Ellis Theatre, our analysis work was put to good use as we watched a series of job interviews and took notes on how to perform or not to perform at an

interview! This was particularly useful for those of us hoping to do work experience in the near future. There was also a seminar on the university application process led by Mr Hardee from MCM. We also had the opportunity for a walk up the Mound to see the far-reaching view over the school and the town, which was thoroughly enjoyed by both UK and Malaysian pupils.


COMMUNITY The final day consisted of a UN mock referendum and was also the final chance to win points! This was a brilliant experience especially for the UK students as we hadn’t taken on anything like it before. However, everyone rose to the challenge and took part in either of two amendments, the

Zika virus or nuclear weaponry, whilst representing their country. The points were then added up placing New Zealand as the winner closely followed by Japan.

“... we competed in stretcher races, throwing competitions and filling a pipe with water which, little did we know, contained multiple holes!”

SKILL-UP WEEK

On Thursday, an external company came in to work with us to help improve the younger generation’s skills in communication. We took part in a set of team challenges, some of which involved no speaking. We were also mind-boggled by a bunch of questions that needed focused listening skills and a switched-on mind. The day was topped off by an hour of Scottish reeling run by Mr McSkimming and Mr Finlay, which was great fun for all of us.

Huge thanks must go to Mr Hodgson and Mr Finlay for making the week run so smoothly and for creating such an enjoyable, fulfilling course. I would certainly recommend it as we all gained so much from this experience. Georgia Dunlop (MO)

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COMMUNITY

CHARLES HAMILTON SORLEY SERVICE

Charles Hamilton Sorley Service The Marlborough College Archives and Music Department produced a moving service of words and music to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of the poet Charles Hamilton Sorley (C1 1908–15) at the Battle of Loos in 1915 while in acting command of his Company of the 7th Suffolk Regiment.

H

e was the son of the Professor of Moral Philosophy at Cambridge and won an Open Scholarship to Marlborough College in 1908 at the age of thirteen. He was a Prefect who gained an Open Classical Scholarship at University College Oxford, but, like so many young men of that time, he never took up the opportunity. He chose to spend some months in Schwerin and Jena in Germany to study the language, history and culture he so admired. At the outbreak of war he was on a walking tour in the Moselle Valley, but succeeded, with difficulty, in returning to England, and in August 1914 was gazetted Second Lieutenant in the 7th Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment, becoming Lieutenant in November and Captain in August 1915. On 30th May he was sent to France and was killed by a sniper at Hulluch in

north-western France in the Battle of Loos on 13th October, 1915, aged 20. His poems, many of which had appeared in The Marlburian, were published after his death in January 1916, under the title Marlborough and other Poems, the fourth and definitive edition appearing in 1919. Letters from Germany and the Army was privately printed in 1916 and published with many additions and biographical notices in 1919, in response to the wide interest aroused in his writings and personality. He had given every promise of a powerful and original genius. We had the honour of hosting members of Sorley’s family for this commemorative service. They kindly agreed to lend the College Archives his medals, his letters and letters from the poet Robert Graves to Professor Sorley after the poet’s death. CCR

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COMMUNITY

Challenging Preconceptions Swindon Academy Partnership

T

he “Reading Buddies” activity is an excellent example of a responsibility and mentoring experience. Many of the academy pupils are not given academic support at home, so the work of our pupils can have a powerful effect. Another collaborative, and equally rewarding activity, is the annual Year 10 (Remove) non-residential exchange where both schools shadow the others’ lessons. It provides an opportunity to gain some insight into the lives of young people from a very different background. Swindon Academy joined our pupils for the Lower Sixth Leadership Day. Through working collaboratively on various leadership challenges they added a different perspective and enhanced the experience for our own pupils.

GCSE Maths mentoring was a great success. Swindon pupils worked oneto-one with their Marlburian peers, in preparation for their summer exam. Also during the Summer Term, Marlborough pupils helped with the giant inflatable ‘It’s a Knock-Out’ competition. This reward trip for Swindon Academy primary school pupils, very much depended on the enthusiasm of our pupil helpers.

SWINDON ACADEMY PARTNERSHIP

This year our pupils have undertaken a range of activities with Swindon Academy, our stateschool partner of almost 10 years. Amongst other things the Partnership provides opportunities for pupils to establish friendships, to help those less fortunate than themselves and experience leadership and mentoring opportunities. Yet again, pupils from both schools learn together, form friendships, and challenge preconceptions through joint Partnership activities hosted by Marlborough College. CSS Director of Partnerships

Selected pupils from Swindon Academy and Pewsey Vale School are prepared annually for wilderness experiences in Canada with Outward Bound Canada. The funding for these trips is provided by The Stuart Horne Charity. The pupils take part in a challenging preparation week as they join the College post-GCSE Outdoor Activities trip to North Wales.

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COMMUNITY

MODERN LANGUAGES

Modern Languages A quieter year for the Modern Languages Department as sadly our annual Lower and Upper School Exchanges to France had to be cancelled due to the security situation. However, other languages have enjoyed excellent exchange and study trips abroad. The Liederabend was once again a magnificent evening of European song and, now in its ninth year, another very successful collaboration between the Modern Languages and Music Departments.

Hundred Study Visit to Cuenca The traditional city of Cuenca sits off the main tourist trail despite its status as a UNESCO World Heritage Centre. The old town rises up a sharp spur – to either side the slopes descend into deep gorges of the Júcar and Huécar rivers – whilst the new town spreads across the valley below. Our group of eleven students from the Hundred could therefore experience contemporary Spanish life in a small, modern city, but also peer into a more traditional Spain of centuries-old monasteries, castles and narrow alleys of sandstone houses.

After dark, as we arrived in Cuenca, the Marlburians were greeted by their host families, parents accompanied by children eager to meet their foreign guests. In pairs, our students were whisked away to their new homes and dinner, stumbling over their opening phrases and awkward descriptions of their journey. A week later, as they bid farewell to their host families, these initial nerves had given way to warm embraces, easy conversations and cries of ¡Hasta luego!

back at home with their host families. The group would then meet in the midafternoon for an activity: a treasure hunt around the old town, a visit to Cuenca’s excellent science museum, kayaking in the shady river, a basketball match against a local youth team, cooking tortilla española under the guidance of a local chef. Before heading home for dinner, everyone would gather in the centre of town to socialise, stroll along the main street and enjoy a light snack – exactly as the locals do.

Every day followed a similar pattern: classes in the morning, either in the language school or around the town to practise listening and reading authentic Spanish. This was followed by a late lunch

We spent our last day in Spain, visiting Real Madrid’s spectacular stadium – the much-venerated Santiago Bernabéu – as well as the Palacio Real and the Plaza Mayor; eating mouth-watering tapas in the nearby Mercado San Miguel; and wandering through the streets of the capital to marvel at perhaps Spain’s most iconic artwork, Picasso’s Guernica, in the Museo Reina Sofía. The energy and enthusiasm of the group never faltered, even in the face of impressive local basketball skills or cold river water. Each experienced something of typical life in a typical city, but left with unique insights and memories, not to mention new-found confidence in their spoken Spanish and a much better grasp of the language for their exams a few months later, and life beyond.

@MarlboroughCol Jan 26 U6 pupils enjoy time on campus (and sunshine!) at Spanish exchange school Colegio Manuel Peleteiro earlier today

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AHDT


COMMUNITY

Upper Sixth Santiago Exchange “Pulpo”, “Mejillones” and “Percebes”… these are just some of the new words now familiar to a group of intrepid Upper Sixth pupils who swapped Marlborough for north-west Spain as part of an exciting exchange. The Pre-U Spanish pupils spent a week improving their language skills by staying with families in the stunning region of Galicia and attending class at Colegio Manuel Peleteiro, a high-achieving school in the historic city of Santiago de Compostela.

During the week pupils attended classes at the 1,400 pupil school to experience what day-to-day life is like for their Spanish exchange partners. They also enjoyed cultural visits to local sites of interest including Santiago’s cathedral, end point to the famous pilgrimage trail the “Camino de Santiago”, “La Torre de Hercules”, the oldest lighthouse in the world in nearby La Coruňa, and the natural baths of Ourense. Not only that, they attended Latin dance lessons, sampled delicacy “chocolate con churros” and had a go at playing the “Pandereta”, a tambourine which features strongly in traditional folk music. And with Galicia self-proclaimed home to the finest seafood in the world,

pupils did not hold back from sampling local delicacies. These included “pulpo” (octopus), “mejillones” (mussels) and “percebes” (a type of barnacle which is harvested at great risk along the region’s coast). Not only has their confidence in speaking the language gone through the roof, but they have learned lots about the Spanish way of life and made connections with people which they will remember forever. JTWL

Russian Trip to St Petersburg and Moscow The biennial Russian trip to St Petersburg and Moscow was both fascinating and enlightening for the 21 pupils, from Remove to Upper Sixth. It opened our eyes to a Russia away from Western press and propaganda. We slept in a student hostel and on four mornings attended Russian lessons in a local St Petersburg College. The highlight of these lessons was undoubtedly when the language of the English classroom came alive in Russia. After the lessons we ate a delicious lunch in the college: soup course to start, salad and then meat followed by a freshly baked dessert.

The afternoons included a variety of tours to museums and palaces in St Petersburg, most notably the Zimny Dvorets, or Winter Palace. This is where Catherine The Great housed her newly purchased art collections from the West. A huge selection of paintings was on display here including Leonardo Da Vincis and some spectacular Rembrandts. After five days in St Petersburg the group took the rather antiquated night train to Moscow. This was an exhilarating experience as no one had ever been in a room so small with so many beds in.

MODERN LANGUAGES

Whilst there, the group experienced total immersion in the Galician culture, speaking Spanish all day and participating in a host of cultural activities.

In Moscow, the group became tourists and spent the day at first gorging on pancakes, and later in the famous Kremlin and Red Square where we even went iceskating. Seeing the abandoned mausoleum of Lenin, for so long the spiritual HQ of Russia with its link to Communism, gave the group a profound insight into how far Russia has developed. A great day topped off with a nice meal in “Buddha Bar”. Despite miles of walking every day, the slight repetition of the cuisine and a bad night’s sleep on the train, everyone got on superbly and the atmosphere within the group was amazing fun to be a part of. The trip was a complete success and many thanks to Mr Nelson-Piercy for organising it and Mrs Aylward for accompanying and working so hard. Joash Nelson-Piercy (CO)

Liederabend Twenty of some of the finest continental songs were performed by singers from the Shell to the Upper Sixth, showing a fine range of colour and style from the declamatory to the tender, the epic to the restrained, the German Baroque to post-war French popular song. In all of the singers there was a wonderful sense of engagement and communication, and a rich variety of timbres.

The evening was enhanced by the original translations by Upper School linguists and programme notes on the poetry and songs. The setting of the Adderley was perfect for the evening, and the sense of sharing in the rich cultural history of Europe was enchanting. Bravo to all, and particular thanks are due to Clare Toomer, whose expert accompaniment was such a part of the evening’s success. AJB

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COMMUNITY

The Combined Cadet Force An Action-Packed Year

A

THE COMBINED CADET FORCE

nother action-packed year began with 14 weeks of compulsory CCF for the Remove. Their first task was to get to grips with the Stretcher Race after a bit of Drill. They were then deployed on Exercise Bulldozer. The weather was kind and all cadets had the opportunity to practise their camouflage and concealment, fire and manoeuvre, first aid and navigation skills. The Lower Sixth Advanced Infantry Skills (AIS) cadets led the Remove well for the day and even provided a Blank Firing Section Attack Demonstration. The Hundred Basic Infantry Skills cadets (BIS) were joined by 14 members of Nova Hreod Academy, a secondary school from Swindon, as part of the Cadet Expansion Programme (CEP). After boots sizing and kit issue, followed by plenty of skill at arms training on the cadet GP Rifle and fieldcraft lessons around Granham Hill they were deployed on Exercise SelfReliance. This 36-hour overnight exercise on Salisbury Plain Training Area (SPTA) was supported by 1st Battalion the Rifles who provided kit, equipment and activities for the cadets to do. The BIS Cadets also had chance to talk with the Riflemen about life in an operational Infantry Battalion in the 21st century.

Upper Sixth cadets started term with a few lessons from the SSI on how to conduct and instruct lessons at CCF which they put into practice on Exercise Self-Reliance to great effect. On Remembrance Sunday the Upper Sixth cadets looked immaculate in No 1 Dress (Blues) for Chapel, carrying out their duties respectfully and poignantly. Particular praise goes to Cadet RSM Hamish Lorimer for his leadership and organisation. The Lower Sixth took part in the Town Remembrance Parade in Marlborough marching with HM forces, members of uniform emergency services, Scouts, Cubs and Guides. They showed great discipline and were a credit to the College. In January 2016 the Lower Sixth (AIS) visited First Battalion the Rifles at Chepstow for an Inter-Section Competition Day of physical and mental tests to overcome with chance to speak to serving Officers in the Officers’ Mess over lunch. We thank Major Will Peltor OM (TU 1991–96) for his help in making the day such a success. The Contingent welcomed Brigadier CT McClean MBE as the Inspecting Officer for the Biennial Inspection at Marlborough College. The Brigadier was

welcomed by a Guard of Honour from the Upper Sixth, the Master and the Contingent Commander WO1 Bate. He was shown the Remove training exercise in the swimming pool and the challenge course on the Water Meadow by Cadet RSM Hamish Lorimer. He also evaluated the AIS and BIS paintballing exercise and cadets working with Wiltshire Fire and Rescue on a simulated casualty evacuation exercise or simulated road traffic collision. The Brigadier addressed the entire Contingent prior to departing. At the Contingent Annual Dinner we congratulated the Upper Sixth cadets on their service to CCF over the past four years. The Contingent were honoured to have WO1 Army Sergeant Major Glen Haughton as the guest speaker and also to have many serving OMs in attendance at the dinner again this year. In June the AIS departed for Sennybridge Training Area (SENTA) in Brecon, Wales on Exercise Celtic Warrior. The weather was awful and tested cadets and staff alike. The cadets worked extremely hard conducting two recce patrols, an ambush patrol and an advance to contact. Thanks again to 1st Battalion the Rifles for their support in providing an enemy force for the duration of the exercise. The Hundred (BIS) CCF Summer Camp at Beckingham with 7 Infantry Brigade was both challenging and rewarding giving the cadets experience of sailing, mountain-biking, climbing, abseiling, raft building and canoeing. They also had chance to conduct live firing with the cadet GP rifle, shotgun and air rifle, tackle the Obstacle Course and to build upon their field skill with numerous small exercises and field craft lessons. I am extremely happy to report again for the fifth year in succession that the BIS won Best School Contingent at Summer Camp 2016. The Contingent welcomes back to its ranks Major Neil Moore taking over from the SSI WO1 (RSM) Bate SJ as Contingent Commander. Sean Bate, School Staff Instructor, Marlborough College CCF

@MCol_CCF June 22 @MCol_CCF Lower Sixth have just returned from Exercise Celtic Warrior in Sennybridge

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COMMUNITY 16-25 October

EX Pond Jump Cadet

San Diego, USA

8 cadets

08 November

Remembrance Sunday CCF

Marlborough

75 Cadets

15-16 November

EX Self-Reliance

SPTA

65 Cadets

02 December

Remove Field EX Bulldozer

SPTA

122 Cadets

26 January

Rifles Competition Day

Chepstow

32 Cadets

02 March

Biennial Inspection

Marlborough

249 Cadets

08 March

EX Morning Hedge

SPTA

30 Cadets

09 March

EX Bulldozer

SPTA

125 Cadets

13 May

CCF Dinner Night

Marlborough

16 Cadets

23-25 June

EX Celtic Warrior

SENTA

25 Cadets

27 June - 02 July

CCF Summer Camp

Beckingham

35 Cadets

THE COMBINED CADET FORCE

Major Events 2015/16

CCF Summer Camp

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COMMUNITY

House Shout House Harmony & Song Competition

HOUSE SHOUT

Girl’s House Winner – Elmhurst

T

he much-anticipated House Harmony once again took place to a packed and enthusiastic Memorial Hall and, as usual, was an absorbing and entertaining spectacle. Harmony is tough – groups consist of a maximum of 10 singers singing unaccompanied and often intricate songs that tests both technical and musical criteria to the full. Composure under pressure is also a key aspect, but all performers this year should be congratulated on committed and commendable contributions rightfully acknowledged by this year’s excellent judge, Mr Alex Tester (Director of Music, St Edward’s School, Oxford). Special mention was made of Ivy House, C3 and Morris with Elmhurst as eventual winners for an outstanding performance of Rihanna’s Disturbia put together by Willow Cunningham and led on stage by Bella Patrick (EL).

Girl’s House Harmony Winner – Elmhurst

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The annual House Song Competition has a reputation for passion, participation, energy, enthusiasm and, on occasion, a whisker of controversy. Mercifully this year, the latter was


COMMUNITY Boy’s House Winner – C1

HOUSE SHOUT

Mixed House Winner – Littlefield

anonymous and each House offered worthy contributions sprinkled with some real highlights along the way. The atmosphere in the hall was excellent. A good healthy competitive spirit mixed with genuine appreciation for other performers and with the excellent adjudicator, Mr Alex Tester, once again in the hot seat following his sound judgement of the Harmony competition the evening was unquestionably a resounding success. The door was left wide open for the overall winner after Mr Tester gave the three separate House awards: the winner of the Girls’ House went to Elmhurst for Sia’s Chandelier, the Boys’ House to C1 for an awe-inspiring rendition of James Blunt’s Bonfire Hearts and the Mixed House to Littlefield for Robbie Williams’ Candy. In the end, Elmhurst ran out as the overall winner of the 2015 House Song Competition. Congratulations to all competitors and the audience for creating something so special. PTD

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HOUSE NEWS

COMMUNITY

House News

Neil Moore

B1

They say all great things come to an end and so it is that the time has come for Neil Moore to step down as a Housemaster. Neil has been a Housemaster for 15 years, four in C1 (2001– 2005) and eleven in Barton Hill (2005–2016). Throughout that time he has been supported by his wife Lyndel, herself a tutor in House throughout that time, and of course their dog Islay whose paper- and cushion-eating antics and constant demand for attention helped put many a pupil at ease.

The quantification and analysis of progress and success is, it seems, an ever-increasing priority in all aspects of society. In a boarding house this could be measured by PIRs, grades, trophies won, or commendations and distinctions gained. Nevertheless, it is, perhaps, the unquantifiable successes that might mean most in our community. For example, the successful induction of new pupils from different parts of the world and very different backgrounds that enables them to thrive and make the most of their opportunities. Yet how do we know if it is successful if we cannot measure it? Perhaps through pupil/beak conversations, seeing pupil interactions and observing a developing culture of wanting to give and wanting to serve; perhaps it is in the galvanising power of Upper Sixth pupils encouraging Shell boys in House rugby; perhaps it is seeing the Upper Sixth music scholar patiently teaching a four harmony to a group of boys who have never performed on stage before – and seeing their sense of achievement afterwards; perhaps it is walking into a boarding house and seeing pupils across the yeargroups chatting and enjoying each other’s company, feeling a part of a community, something bigger than themselves.

His tenure in charge was epitomised by the low key way in which he stepped down, refusing to have any big send-off and insisting that everything should always be about the pupils and never himself. That was Neil’s style and every pupil knew just how much he cared and wanted the best for them. He was selfless in his service to them and to the House, unstinting in his commitment to, and support of, the boys, managing to get the best out of them or help them find inner strength and depths that even they did not know they had. Neil managed the seemingly impossible task of managing to remain consistently calm, whether it was day one or the last day of term after an all-night stint in A&E, he always managed to maintain the same positive, composed attitude, letting the boys know everything was alright with a “very good” or an “ah there you are”. There is much more I could say, but that too wouldn’t be his style. Suffice to say that Neil and Lyndel’s tutors will miss them, the pupils will miss them, and while it is true that the wheel of time keeps turning and check-ins keep happening, they have left an indelible, positive mark on all the boys who have passed through their care. They will be sorely missed and we wish all the family the very best for the future: dog walks and early nights galore. JPS

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B1 has been fortunate this year to be led by an Upper Sixth as diverse and talented as any in the College, with an extraordinary

range of backgrounds, abilities and interests. Between them, Heads of House Joshua Wake and Nicholas Avery led the House with skill and care, displaying an intuitive grasp of their responsibilities. This was certainly a successful year for trophies with victories in House athletics, water polo, swimming, fives, shooting, personal accolades for academia, music, rowing and drama, to name a few. Yet it was the events in which we competed that did not yield a trophy that were perhaps the most satisfying. Reaching the final of House drama with a student-written play, a spoof of The Famous Five, was a triumph for director Milo Rowse and his cast of (mostly) Lower School boys. Toby Wyles’s rendition of The Last Post and Reveille on Armistice Day was beautifully delivered and a fitting climax to five years of excellence and service to the College. Alexander James’s weekly bettering of his 800 metre time in the Summer Term was fascinating to behold. The Sixth Form’s determination in reaching the House rugby final once again, despite having no representation in the 1st XV, was an extraordinary achievement. James Davey’s participation in the gruelling Devizes to Westminster race, having had to change partners very late, was a notable personal triumph. The Upper Sixth’s display of teamwork in cooking a wonderful three-course meal from scratch for their delighted guests


JPC

Barton Hill A great year for every aspect of life in Barton Hill under the leadership of Harry McKelvey as Head of House, Archie Wheeler as Head of Sport and Ben Wilson as College Prefect. A new year has seen a new Dame with the much-loved Miss Gibbs moving to C3 and Mill Mead, leaving behind many happy memories of spectacular cakes and a jolly House outlook, and Miss McAllister who has made a brilliant start to House life. Barton Hill has seen an impressive year on the sports front with many pupils representing 1st teams around the school with Ben Wilson, Edward Andrews, Toby Baines and Alex Green playing in the XV. Hockey saw Freddie Vint, Toby Baines and Ben Wilson all representing the 1st XI. Oliver Hart and Jake Hankinson broke the record for the fastest college team to complete the Devizes to Westminster Canoe race which is said to be one of the hardest physical and mental challenges the school offers. After a total of 15 years of fine governance under Mr Moore we were all sad to say goodbye to our much-respected and valued Housemaster. The cheerful calls of “bundles”, “swabbing” and “very good” still seem to echo the corridors but we welcome Mr Ellis to his new position as Housemaster with open arms. Time has also come for us to say goodbye to Dr Swift who will also be sorely missed as he moves on to his new appointment as Housemaster of

COMMUNITY

Congratulations to the Upper Sixth for their outstanding results and achievements in reaching universities of choice. Sam Burdett, Kaj Larsson, Schuyler Neuhauser and Jake Glasmacher fulfilled the potential that they had always shown through strong academic careers. Jonathan Lurot, Paul Louis De Nassau and Nick Avery worked with dedication to prove to themselves just what they could achieve. Toby Wyles and Joshua Wake produced superb results that aptly reflected the nature of their commitment to their studies. In early September, as the Upper Sixth leavers prepared to begin their new lives at university or on gap years, I received a call from a recent B1 leaver, Joshua Folkes, who has had to face a life-changing event this year. Struck by a vehicle in January, Joshua spent many weeks in a coma and faced significant concerns about his future. The warmth of his tone of voice in that telephone call, a changed voice but still recognisably his, spoke of a different challenge as he regains his strength and confidence, and prepares to re-apply to university. I am not sure how Joshua’s achievements might be measured, but he is certainly winning.

C1. We look forward to Mr Willmet taking on his new position as RHT. The public exam results were very pleasing across the board with outstanding A level performances from Freddie Vint with 3A*s. Theo Syder, George Naismith and Frederick Macpherson also gained commendable results with almost all of the Upper Sixth achieving their first choice at university. GCSEs were equally impressive with Sam Fairer-Smith obtaining 9A*s. A huge amount of gratitude goes out to the incredible team of domestic staff and House tutors who run the House so smoothly and efficiently. With many respected Beaks moving on from the House we wish you all the best in your new appointments and welcome everything that the new academic year brings. James Orr

C1 The focal point of the school, C1, yet again had a superb year under the leadership of Hamish Lorimer, as Head of House, together with Charlie Souster and Jolly Reid as School Prefects. Rather than approaching the long and unpredictable Michaelmas Term with dread, the boys in C1 marched through the winter months with determination and fire in their bellies. This is reflected by the multitude of individual successes, which must be commended. Dom Coulson impressed on the sports pitches as well as winning the rackets National Championship, Finn Kverndal sniped his way to the title of ‘Best Marksman’ against the fierce competition of Ben Borrowdale. The House also stormed to victory in the Colts cross-country, the Lowers rugby and the Shell swimming, Ben Place amply proving his worth in an aquatic environment. Academic achievements boded well for the rest of the year with the boys yet again picking up the much sought-after trophy for Commendations. The House would certainly agree that the highlight of the term was the astonishing victory in the boys’ House Shout. An awe-inspiring rendition of James Blunt’s Bonfire Hearts gained C1 the win over worthy competitor Barton Hill; much to the delight of our very own Timmy Oliver, his celebrations will never be forgotten. The Lent Term landed us with another commendation trophy, more sporting success and an equally positive House attitude. In the Uppers hockey 6s, we were the dark horses of the competition. After a brave fight and against all odds we reached the final and came up against Summerfield, a squad packed with talent and first team players. Tom Moody spearheaded the attack with a ‘fiery’ approach and we battled to victory taking home the trophy much to the delight of Alexander Adams and Gus Turner, substitutes by name, spectators by nature. The coveted Wilkinson Sword, for best fencer, went to Theo Featherstone who entertained

Ben Miller Since 1843 C1 has had over 40 Housemasters, yet only two have exceeded Ben Miller’s watch. He shared this long tenure with his wife, Katie, and their three children, Olivia, Florence, and William – and with Nellie, the black Labrador. Ben leaves C1 this summer after devoting eleven years to its young charges, and leaves it thriving. On his appointment in 2005 the lucky few knew him already as an outstanding Geography beak and games coach; to many he was an unknown quantity. An intensely private man, raising a family in Marlborough’s most public boarding house was a great sacrifice, one he performed with unstinting commitment and energy. From the outset he had a strong sense of duty, not just to the boys, but to the House itself. One early change was to fill in the honour boards in the lobby with the names of Heads of House, Prefects and HMs since the College’s foundation. These provide recognition, inspiration and much reminiscence when alumni return. Another step was to give each room a name. Reflecting his values, these did not just commemorate famous OMs and Housemasters, but also long-serving members of the C1 community: families, tutors and domestic staff.

HOUSE NEWS

was a true highlight! From a personal point of view, seeing boys challenge themselves to work that bit harder, to recognise that success can only truly be sustained through graft and commitment, is the most satisfying aspect of life in House.

Ben instilled his values in the House by his deeds, not mere words. Standards mattered, and in their HM the boys had the best example to follow. Ben showed the dignity and humility, openness and rigour, honesty and compassion that he asked of them. He always made time for them, willingly giving up his evenings to celebrate, commiserate and counsel. To teenagers going through change and stress he was consistency personified. This regularity extended to his attire: blazer, chinos and wellloved penny loafers, the last item aiding the monitoring of the corridors, especially at the end of term! Ben’s farewell was entirely true to character. He insisted that no fuss be made, no speeches and certainly no tears, for he had done his duty and the end of term should be about the boys. All wish him and his family much joy in their new home, one with its own garden and without Court’s cacophony on Saturday nights. Ben Miller will long be remembered as one of the greats. RAS

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COMMUNITY

HOUSE NEWS

the House with his foil work on a regular basis! Isaac Hocking enjoyed the Lent Term at the forefront of school hockey, playing many matches for the XI. The musical trend continued with Jon Lam being awarded with his Diploma in Piano and Ijah Ofon his grade 6, most impressive. Before touching upon the exam results of Summer ’16, it is important to recognise the other successes in the sun… and snow on one occasion! Cricket was a joy to watch with such skilled bat-and-ball men on display for the House. Billy Mead, also player of the season, led the team to victory in House cricket, stellar performances also came from Jim Crossland and Archie Clarke. In addition to the Grand Lucas Cup the House Maths challenge also made its way onto the honours list for C1 this year. A level results were excellent with Charlie, Jolly, Timmy, Tom and Thor not dropping below the A grade in any subject. A special mention has to go to Theo who achieved 3 A*s and an A! The Hundred had similar success with 38 A* grades between them with Lorimer the star of the show with 10 A*s. 2016 was to be the final year for Mr Miller, Mr Sandall and Mrs McFarlane in C1. Mrs McFarlane worked brilliantly for her tutees and I know they recognized all she did for them. Mr Sandall was always a pleasure to have in House, his eccentric ways, tireless aid and customary door-knocking will live long in the memory. As a House we are all extremely indebted to Mr Miller. He was a superb Housemaster who went out of his way to make sure every boy in C1 made the best of their time and he always acted in our best interests. His time in C1 may have come to an end but the lessons and skills we have learnt from him will last indefinitely. We cannot thank Mr Miller enough for all that he did. The exit of some means the entry of others. The House is thrilled to have Dr Swift and Mr Lane joining us next year and hope to do everything we can to help them to settle in as quickly as possible and become part of the House in no time at all. Henry Hudson

C2 We welcomed Mr Hugo Tilney to C2 as our new Resident House Tutor in September; Head of Lower School Scholars, English teacher and keen cricket and rugby coach, Hugo has already made a huge contribution to the House. We all thank Katie, Charlie (4) and Max (2) in particular for their tremendous enthusiasm for C2. Bed time for young children is challenging enough, but 25 teenagers playing cricket beneath the bedroom window has added a new dimension! Mrs Teresa Sugden joined us as C2 Dame fresh from the very different (in some respects!) world of Wiltshire Police. Untidy Brew Rooms used to draw the odd telling off; these days the boys wake to photographs of the dirty

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dishes posted on the main notice board with dire warnings about the consequences if such behaviour continues. Mrs Sugden has already added a great deal to life in C2 and we are, as always, indebted to her House Team and Mark our Houseman for all that they do for us. As ever, one of the highlights of the year was the House Harmony and House Shout in the last week of the first half of the Michaelmas Term. Led with tremendous enthusiasm and skill by Sam Eatough and Monty Rhodes, C2 gave a good account in both competitions and while we weren’t rewarded with a trophy, the Upper Sixth definitely raised the bar and set a standard for the House to maintain next year and beyond. We enjoyed a fabulous House Christmas Supper with Morris House at a beautifully decorated and prepared Marlburian to conclude the Michaelmas Term. Sam Moore (Head of House) gave a very funny and clever summary of the year, with some hitherto private behaviour being gently revealed – to the embarrassment of certain members of the Upper Sixth. The boys of the Lower School finished 3rd in the inaugural Lowers Football League, played over two terms. The Shell Rugby 7s team just missed out on a semi-final based on a points difference despite an absolutely heroic win against Cotton. The Colts stormed into the semis only to suffer an injury crisis days before the match and eventually succumb to an inspired Barton Hill team. Ned Corfield led by example and the Shell won the House 6s Hockey Tournament on a horribly wet afternoon in February. Summerfield and Turner were defeated in penalty shootouts in the semis and final, with particular mention going to Ed Abbott in goal who only conceded one goal in 6 matches. Jude Fry dominated throughout the Lowers 11-a-side Hockey Tournament and led the side to a famous victory over C1 in a closely fought final. The 4–0 semi-final victory over Summerfield was particularly impressive with almost every member of the Shell and Remove in C2 being used at some stage. The Uppers were unable to repeat the heroics of last year and lost out to a very impressive Summerfield side at the semi-final stage.

C2 remained the Chess House par excellence with Tom Hunt making serene progress through to the final of the Lowers Tournament for the second year in succession and Josh Fryer Bloom retaining his Uppers title of the previous year. Josh managed 3 full years of competitive school chess without a single defeat – an absolutely phenomenal achievement. Fraser Hutchinson played a massive role in the Lent Term production of Cole Porter’s Anything Goes. He brought the house down in his role as Moonface Martin, the second rate gangster moonlighting as a priest. The C2 Cheltenham Festival Sweepstake was another highlight of the Lent Term, and, having been in receipt of a couple of hot tips, Mr Playfair managed to sneak victory by a short head on the final day. Plans are afoot for a House trip to the November meeting next year. Tom Hunt, Sam Nelson-Piercy, Milo Sweet and Jude Fry all started for the under-16 Boys’ hockey team in their attempt to become National Champions in late April. The first Marlborough Hockey team to ever compete at the National Tournament, under the tutelage of C2 Tutor Mr Heywood, the boys missed out on the final on goals scored and finished 4th after penalty shuttles in the Bronze Medal match. Played at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park the boys gave their all and are determined to return as U18s in two years’ time. The Summer Term began in earnest with a fabulous entry into the Battle of the Bands. Sam Eatough again led from the front but was supported superbly by Will Catton, Rory Quick, Fraser Hutchinson, Piers Kicks and Ned Seagrim. Second place was comfortably the best C2 has achieved in this endeavour and huge congratulations must go to the boys for their innovative and wholehearted display. Uppers House tennis and Uppers House squash were once again won by C2, with huge congratulations to Josh Fryer Bloom (Head of Sport) for leading from the front in both teams. The following boys won Prizes this year: Form – Ed Abbott (Shell) Dutton (German) – Virat Talwar (Hundred) Percussion – Sam Eatough (Upper Sixth)


As term drew to a close the Shell just missed out on the hockey/tennis double in a superb final against Summerfield played in the fading light on the Milford Astro. The Colts boys stormed to victory in the House athletics in the last week of term but we missed out on overall victory with B1 deservedly walking off with the Trophy. On a wet Wednesday in the final week of the year Oscar Powell (Remove) dragged his Housemaster around Marlborough golf course in the final of the Pick Putter Golf competition – winning with an ugly 7 on the Par 5 1st in sudden death. Massive congratulations to Oscar for carrying his partner through the Tournament! GRP

C3 After a barren year, C3 bounced back with victories in Uppers hockey, Uppers football and the Senior Rifle Shooting Competition, won by Oskar Money-Kyrle and Kit Connell. Wiltshire U18 champion, Jamie Amor, added to the silverware in the trophy cabinet by winning the Individual Golf Cup. On an individual basis, the highlights of the year were Oxford places for Marcus Miller and John Cattermull who achieved 4 A*s at A level. Jonny Venn gained a Distinction in his ATCL Diploma in oboe. This is equivalent to the standard achieved at the end of the first year in a Conservatoire. Felix Scrivens was awarded an Upper School Academic Scholarship. Morgan Pollard (9A*s) and Gabriel Jordan (8A*s) were the top performers in GCSEs. At the start of the Michaelmas Term, Shell boy Charlie Madden competed in the U14 World Biathlon Championships in Georgia, finishing 18th out of 43 competitors. In the summer holidays, Charlie represented Great Britain in the U17 European Triathlete Championships in which he came 9th, qualifying for the World Triathlete Championships in Florida in October.

Led by Jonny Venn, the House Harmony team did extremely well to be the only boys’ House to finish in the top four of the competition. Their rendition of the Beach Boys song I Get Around raised the roof and was by far the most popular act of the evening. Many thanks to Merlin Lindsay and Olly Connell who made a fine job of directing our House Shout entry, Love It When You Call by The Feeling. The boys rose to the occasion and gave it their best shot on the night but they left their best performance in the Link Room during their final rehearsal (or in the chanting of “C3, till I die” on the way to the Memorial Hall!). Ben Barnes was one of four U15 players to be selected by The Hurlingham Polo Association to attend training camps in South Africa in a bid to reinforce the development of the mosttalented juniors in England. In the Lent Term, Worcester Bawden was our sole member of the Xl. In the Southern Regional Fencing Championships, Henry Clark finished third in the epee and qualified for the National Finals. Over a period of four days, mostly between 0630 and 0730, Tom Corfield swam 10 kilometres and raised about £1,000 for Great Ormond Street Charity. George Nicholson achieved a Distinction in Grade 8 Trumpet. In the Summer Term, Ed Cornish, James Ellis and Jack Thistlethwayte represented Marlborough in the National U16 Hockey Championships at the Olympic Park. All the boys played extremely well and the team finished 4th. In cricket, Will Davies and Jack Thistlethwayte played for the Xl. Mason Hunt was a member of the Colts 100m relay team which equalled the College record of 45.7s. Jamie Amor carded an amazing score of -2 over 36 holes at his home club in Marlborough to finish 2nd in the Wiltshire Senior Championships. He also

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Theatre Studies & EPQ – Ned Seagrim (L6th)

In rugby, Henry Kirkman and Phil Springford played for the XV. John Cattermull, Cosimo Amati and Will Davies represented the Granham Casuals 1st Xl. In full-bore shooting, Oskar Money-Kyrle achieved the highest score in the match against Wellington, Bradfield, OMs, Old Wellingtonians and Old Alleynians.

Margot Hewer Margot’s involvement with the College started 33 years ago when she accommodated students studying for Oxbridge exams. At the same time she was employed by Summer School, an organisation which she has gone on to play an enormous role in. In 1989, Margot became Dame of the brand new C3/MM building, the flagship of coeducational boarding at Marlborough. She was heavily involved with the later stages of the building work and has been part of the fixtures and fittings ever since. Not content with Daming for two Houses, in 1991 Margot became a tutor, and briefly an RHT, in Elmhurst. Margot’s next venture was managing the newly opened Marlburian. As well as weekday afternoons, she was involved in running the hugely popular Saturday night bars. In 2003, MM was extended to accommodate more girls and Margot took up residence in the RHT flat where she remained for six years.

HOUSE NEWS

Marlburian Club Sporting Award – Tom Hunt (Hundred)

Working with Margot has been an absolute pleasure. If allowed only one word to describe her, it would be “charming”, because that encapsulates the warmth of her spirit, her generosity and her tremendous sense of humour. At work Margot is boundlessly enthusiastic, clinically efficient and disconcertingly meticulous. She has enriched our lives and those of the countless boys and girls who have passed through her care. Her charity work is legendary and, her initiatives such as Dawn till Dusk Football, the Regal Beagle café, cake sales and end-of-term breakfasts have raised thousands of pounds for Cancer Research and Tom’s Ward in the Oxford Radcliffe Hospital. Having been involved in the building of C3/ MM, it was most appropriate that Margot should have had so much influence on the recent refurbishments. Completed over consecutive summers, this was an enormous project which caused many sleepless nights. However, everything fell into place eventually and it must have given Margot enormous pride to walk into the building every morning and see the fruits of her imagination and dedication. We are enormously grateful for all that she has done for us and we wish her a very happy retirement. SMDD

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Cotton Yet again, Cotton had another exceptional year with triumph across a wide variety of school activities. Much of this is down to the superb atmosphere generated by the Heads of Houses, Amy Smart, Rupert Shingleton, Charlie Mates and Hermione Llewelyn-Bowen. Hugo Smith and Henriette Bos also served as prefects.

won the Wiltshire Foursomes and represented Wiltshire in South West Week – seven days of inter-county matches against Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire.

HOUSE NEWS

On Prize Day, awards were made to: Jamie Amor (Marlburian Club Sporting Award), John Cattermull (Science), Will Grant (Geography), Gabriel Jordan (Russian), Charlie Madden (German), Marcus Miller (History), George Nicholson (Music), Charles PearsonChisman and Morgan Pollard (Progress), James Ruddell (Maths), Phillip Springford (Harvard), Jonathan Venn (Music). On Sports Day, the following boys won their events: Phillip Springford, Jonny Venn, Miles Brandi and Henry Dunhill (L6 4x100m relay), Henry Dunhill (L6 100m hurdles), Marcus Redpath (Remove 200m), Tom Corfield (Shell Discus). During the year we welcomed the arrival of the youngest member of the House, Milo Arthur Birkill, who weighed in at 8lbs. After 27 years, during which time she helped with the design of the original C3/ MM building and then played a huge role in its refurbishment, our much-loved Dame, Margot Hewer, decided to retire. Thankfully she isn’t leaving the College completely as she will continue to play a major role in Summer School. At half-term in the summer, the Dame of BH, Ms Eula Gibbs, took over the reins from Margot, her delicious cakes making an immediate impact with the boys! Also leaving us are Nic Allott and Joe Lane who have been excellent Sixth Form and Remove tutors respectively. I would like to thank this year’s Heads of House, Ed Carter, John Cattermull and Henry Kirkman, for doing such a fine job of helping me to manage C3. All three of these boys were excellent ambassadors for C3, as was College Prefect, Marcus Miller. Finally, I would like to pay tribute to new Houseman, Marcus Lutner, the entire domestic team and all the tutors for their patience, good humour and care of the building and the boys which bring it to life. SMDD

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GSCE results were particularly pleasing this year with Jamie Hartley gaining 12 A* grades and Luke Smith gaining 11 A* grades. Congratulations to the Upper Sixth students who achieved outstanding A level results with 5 students obtaining A/A*, or Pre-U equivalent, in every subject. Some of the universities that Cotton pupils are going to in 2016 are: Balliol College, Oxford, Imperial College London, University of Bristol, Durham University and Exeter University. Inter-House sport has been an important part of life in Cotton, House spirit is always there even when the medal is not. There were victories for the Hundred who won the House swimming competition and individual successes in the boys’ and girls’ squash competition. Also congratulations to the Upper School boys who narrowly lost in the final of the House water polo competition. There were other sporting successes; Stasi Knight was selected to represent the Welsh Women’s Indoor Hockey Team at the 2016 Eurohockey Indoor Hockey Championships in France, and this marked her senior international debut. Charlie Mates and Hugo Smith consistently represented the College’s rugby 1st XV team and Amy Smart who enjoyed a strong season with the lacrosse 1st team. In addition Nico Martin Giron and Stasi Knight both represented the College in the first XI for hockey. Cotton pupils were also successful in minor College sports with Zharif Shahryn fencing at both county and national level in the Foil and Epée class. He gained two College fencing trophies during the year, an amazing attainment for a Remove boy. Cotton was the largest House group in the Devizes to Westminster competition. George Hankinson, Archie MacColl, Joseph Sykes and Rohan Bigham all completed the demanding challenge of this four-day kayak race. Cotton prides itself on the silverware that it has obtained on the fireplace in the Common Room. Firstly, the Shell set the standard high when they were awarded the winners of the Shell debating, with a special mention to Sam Holden who gained the prize for best speaker. Cotton pupils were busy at the prize day awards also, with a total of 15 prizes awarded. Most notably to Zac Place who was awarded 3 prizes for Maths, Modern Languages and Biology. The prizes were not always for excellent academia but were wide ranging from the Goodall CCF prize, to the Upper School Music prize and the Marlburian Club Sporting Award.

Cotton is not only recognized for its sporting and academic prowess, but also for its cultural aspect too. This year, many Cotton students have performed in a number of musical events specifically our music scholars, Ciara ParkerNortheast, Luke Smith, Nico Fletcher and Bel Guillaume. Also particular congratulations to Bel for achieving a distinction in her Grade 8 singing exam. Music is not only for the grades, Cotton proudly held a House concert in order to raise money for the small national brain injury charity, The Silver Lining. Awards for outstanding performance also go to Zac Place who has been appointed a Scholar and to George Cayley who was awarded a Music Exhibition. In addition, this year a few pupils have represented the House in the various school plays and musicals throughout the year. In particular, Sam Holden and Sam Bucks who performed in the Shell play, Haroun and the Sea of Stories. The annual school play, The Revenger’s Tragedy, saw a strong Cotton performance from Benjamin Powell and Hermione Llewelyn-Bowen who took on major roles in the show. The predominant highlight for the House is the infamous Cotton bar, although this year the event had to be swiftly moved inside the Marlburian due to heavy summer rain. Despite the change of venue, the event was still personalised by the House with decorations from the Upper Sixth with plenty of entertainment all night. A huge thanks to Mr and Mrs Conlen as well as Mrs Jamieson for helping organise the last-minute materials and making the bar just as much fun despite the lack of foam. This year has been incredibly busy with success in all fields of the school, it could not be fulfilled without the help and continuous support from Mr and Mrs Conlen. Also a huge thanks and appreciation goes to our Dame Mrs Jamieson and our RHT Mr and Mrs Bates who keep the House in top condition. We look forward to another successful year in Cotton. Stasi Knight & James Neville @MCol_OA June 16 Another great Shell OA expedition for @MCol_Cotton! A few big storms to entertain us.


The Michaelmas Term started with flying colours, as we enjoyed success in the Shell steeplechase. Holly Smith, Rosie Pembroke, Melissa Bowyer-Knight, Nina Stewart and Bella Bullen all came in the top ten, a remarkable achievement. To continue with this sporting triumph, we were the winners of Lowers Hockey, captained by brilliant India Shakespeare. The Upper’s Hockey missed out marginally, by being placed runners up in the House competition, but this by no means meant they did not throw everything into every match. Onto more adventurous sports, Ellie Wills and Maddy Kirkwood were selected as part of the squad for the Devizes to Westminster Kayak Challenge 2016. Conditions were very extreme over the weekend this race took place and unfortunately the race had to be abandoned on the final day due to strong winds. However, the girls were not downhearted and they should be extremely proud of their achievements both throughout the training and during the event. I think everyone would agree that one of the most memorable moments of the Michaelmas Term is the House Shout and Harmony Competition. Arabella Patrick compiled a particularly stunning rendition of Sia’s Chandelier, where the girls commandeered the audience into silence with their rich tones and mellifluous harmonies. The girls won the House Harmony Competition and continued this success by becoming the overall winners of the House Song competition. A particular mention should go to Willow Cunningham for leading the House Shout, Rihanna’s Disturbia. A well-deserved celebration was held at Barton Hill afterwards. To end the Michaelmas Term, the annual Christmas supper and House entertainment was a particularly enjoyable way to begin the Christmas holidays in high spirits. The Lent Term began with the glorious news that Bella Imi had been appointed as Senior Prefect, a magnificent achievement. Bella later

It was a term also governed by sporting successes, as the Lowers won the House Netball Competition, captained by Phoebe Westgate. Lily Pilkington took control of the Shell water polo team and Cosi Bugel and Stella Smith continued this streak of success by winning the Uppers Fives Competition. Our resident squash captains, Ellie Wills and Katerina Mathison lead our House team to victory in the House competition. Sophie Shakespeare was selected for the U18 England Hockey Squad and in the summer captained the team to a third place finish in the European Tournament held in Cork, Ireland. We will have to keep an eye out for her in future years and hope to see her emulate the success of the GB squad in Rio 2016! Whilst many associate the Summer Term as one overruled by exams, despite this, the Elmhurst girls still managed to shine across the board. Jemima Small, Rachel Bester, Zinnia Satchell and Mashie Agnew won the House clay pigeon shooting competition. Millie McKelvey, retained her title as U16 National Girls Racket Champion. Whilst winning Upper’s House tennis, Shell football and also runners-up in Shell House tennis and House athletics, it was another particularly good term for sporting success. At half-term, we celebrated with a

COMMUNITY

It has been another busy yet undoubtedly exceptional year in Elmhurst. The multitude of successes is testament to the hard work and rigour each Elmhurst girl throws into their every day.

received the news that she had been offered a place at Keble College, Oxford, to read French and ab initio Italian. Other Oxbridge successes included Tilda Coleman (leaver 2015) to read English at St John’s College, Sophie Shakespeare to Christ Church for Mathematics and Oonagh Coleman to Trinity Hall, Cambridge for History of Art. All three of the Upper Sixth went on to exceed their offers, gaining these places after their exceptional A level results. The best of luck to them for the coming years and leaves us with a wonderful example to the rest of the House. Other academic success included, Lucy Hudson, Ellie Wills and Florence Tuckey who brought home the trophy for the House debating competition; Georgia Gibson was commended by E - The Environmental Magazine in the poetry writing category for the Eliot Prize Writing Competition and Lizzie Hankinson who won a short story competition run by The Racing Post.

Sheila Mills Sheila started work at Marlborough College 15 years ago, prior to working as a Dame, she had graduated with an English degree before working for a publishing company in London. She then met husband Simon and moved to Marlborough to start family life. Sheila started work in C2 with Mark McVeigh for seven years before moving to Elmhurst to work with Jean McFarlane and then Harriet Cox for eight years. The role of a Dame is hugely diverse and Sheila took on any task with the utmost professionalism and most importantly enthusiasm. Sheila provided excellent additional pastoral support to all the pupils in her care but she also showed a huge amount of loyalty to all the House staff.

HOUSE NEWS

Elmhurst

In Elmhurst she took huge pride in the fabric of the house and worked tirelessly to ensure that rooms were tidy and that it looked as good as it could. Her cakes were legendry, whether it was lemon drizzle for the post sports afternoon pick me up or the deliciously chocolately sponge to celebrate dozens of birthdays. Food is a key part of boarding school life and along with hot chocolate at break time, pizzas, sausages and curry nights, Sheila managed to organise it all. Christmas is a special time in any boarding House and the work that goes on behind the scenes is key. Sheila always went the extra mile with candles, crackers and holly to turn the Common Room into a festive spectacle. Sheila’s arrival for work in ‘Sheila’s wheels’, a powder blue fiat 500 became a key talking point amongst the girls. The parents and girls were so grateful for all that she did and gave Sheila a splendid send off at our annual Parents’ day and I hope that she will remember this fondly as she enjoys retirement. Sheila will be kept busy in her beautiful garden in Clatford, caring for her chickens and her own children, whom are now all working. Sheila left us with a special gift, a new Elmhurst sign for the boarding house and whenever we look at it, I know it brings a smile to all our faces. HAMC

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final whole House barbecue, where we bid farewell to our Dame Mrs Mills. Having been with us for eight years, she always went out of her away to assist the girls and will of course be remembered for her faultless baking. There were many individual successes during Prize Day and as a House we should be proud of the return of The Bell Trophy, which is awarded for overall academic success in the Upper School.

HOUSE NEWS

As the Upper Sixth and Hundred disappeared one by one for their well-deserved summer breaks, it was down to the Lower Sixth, Remove and Shell to pull a performance together for the House Drama. While the rendition of The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe might not have made it to the National Theatre, there was a brilliant coalescing of effort from all. Dressed in lavish furs, Florence Tuckey, Lily Pilkington, Sophie Kirkwood and Bella Bullen should be commended for their wonderful depictions of the four children, illustrated in C S Lewis’s magical children’s book. Mimi Grant also did not fail to amuse and scare us, as The White Witch. It seems infinitely important to take this moment to thank Mrs Cox, Miss Brown and Miss Dellalau, to whom we are indebted too. They give up everything to ensure all the girls in Elmhurst make the most of what is on offer, and these commendable achievements listed, are a way of the girls reciprocating their eternal gratitude to these admirable figures. Georgia Gibson and Corisande Lyster-Binns were awarded the prestigious role of school prefects and Head of House will comprise a coalition between Zinnia Satchell and Lucy Hudson. If the coming year is as much of a success as this one has been, 2016–2017 bodes particularly well for Elmhurst. Issy Carr

Ivy This last year felt like the year that Ivy “came of age” and put itself well and truly on the map. Each and every girl said that winning the Girls’ House Song Competition (or House Shout) with a fabulous rendition of Valerie was the pivotal moment. It really was an exciting day and a very proud moment for us all. The girls were extremely well led by Lizzie Daniels and thanks also go to Bella Bryan for writing an intricate House Harmony which earned the girls a special mention by the judge. Whilst this may have been the highlight, there were many other spectacular successes and the year got off to a flying start on the sports pitch with Claudie Grainger and Lotte Quinn coming first and second in the Shell steeplechase. Indeed the whole yeargroup did well with seven of them in the top 20 fastest runners. Fast runners were not limited to the Shell and Bea Speelmans (U6) came second in the Uppers cross-country. In sports in general, Ivy were strong contenders in all competitions and the girls were ably led and inspired by our two Heads of Sport, Bea Speelmans and Natasha White who both won their College

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Colours for netball and lacrosse respectively. Indeed, we were immensely proud that Bea was our first captain of a sport – netball. Ivy was well represented in the counties, with Lotte Quinn helping the U14 As to victory and Lara Thompson and Emily Boom also helping the U16 As to become county champions. The Ivy girls seem determined to dispel the image of being the House in the town and for the third year running have won the High Gun trophy for clay pigeon shooting thanks to Hannah Cameron who shot the highest number of clays and the team as a whole came second out of the five girls’ Houses. Shooting is obviously a forte and Claudie Grainger also boosted our trophy cabinet by winning the House shooting competition. Congratulations also go to Nell Hargrove and Amelia Heard, who rode in the county championships. Nell’s team came 3rd in the 1m class and Amelia’s came 2nd in the 90cm ShowJumping. Amy Vogel, Beth Ransome, Lydia Hunt and Claudie Grainger played in the inter-house Fives and came 2nd! All of the Ivy yeargroups should be proud of their performances on the netball court with the Shell winning 2nd place and the Remove, Hundred and Uppers gaining 3rd in the inter-house netball. We seem to grow stronger in athletics also, with many wonderful team performances and outstanding individual successes including Millie Middleton who again beat her own school record in 75m hurdles. Special mention also goes to Anoushka Freeman who was hugely successful in the Devizes to Westminster canoe race. On Easter weekend, she and her partner completed 108 miles in just under 18 hours and were placed second in the junior ladies, first in the ladies junior school team and second in the schools team. Ella Bennett was once again chosen to represent GB in 420 World Championships in San Remo in Italy. Some 25 nations were represented in a 12race series over 6 days. Ella finished 19th out of 84 boats in the Ladies Championships with a bullet (win) in the last race in over 20-knot winds. We are immensely proud of her! Last but definitely not least Ivy regained the trophy for the inter-house tug of war. Back to music which has always played a very special part in the life of Ivy House and this

year was no exception. Lizzie Daniel’s solo with the Southbank Sinfonia in Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D major earned her a standing ovation. Bella Bryan was also exquisite on the cello and received a special mention. It was thrilling to see so many girls playing in the orchestral concert and I thank them too for helping to raise money for the Devizes Opportunity Centre at our own Ivy House Charity concert. The concert was just one of many amazing fundraising opportunities and at the annual Marlborough Festival the whole House helped to prepare and run the Ivy sweet stall. Particular thanks go to Freya Andreae and Aphra Mactaggart who made and sold jewellery and the two stalls together raised over £250 for Chain of Hope. Bella Swadling also raised a huge sum doing the Moon Walk and went on to complete her DofE Gold along with Char Corfield and Eve Mahony. Thankfully, there were not too many dramas in Ivy House but Drama is certainly very popular and it was delightful to see Lara Prideaux, Poppy Redfern, Lily Martin-Jenkins and Nell Hargrove (all Remove) appearing in a play written by American pupils in a TheatreLink project. Talia Neat and Henrietta MacKenzie made their debut appearance in the Shell Play and Chloe Hubbard and Salome Northridge were fantastic in the College musical Anything Goes. Finally, a fantastic year ended on an extremely high note thanks to the girls winning the House Drama competition with their hilarious performance of the Not-So-Grimm Tales. With 19 girls in the cast, it truly was a House event and I thank all the girls for the way they rehearsed with such good humour, ably encouraged and directed by Aphra MacTaggart. We thank Mrs NP, the tutors, the “ladies” and Ian for the important part they play in making Ivy a happy and comfortable home. We were sad to say goodbye to Dr Cairns who had been such a great support to the U6 while Mrs Green was on maternity leave. We wish Mrs Adderley all the best for her role as RHT. Finally, we say a fond farewell to Xa – we shall miss you! 2015/16 was truly a remarkable and happy year for Ivy House. It was also a strong year academically with many prizes being won.


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Maddy Avery, Xa Longden, Salome Northridge and Freya Andreae all gained straight As and A*s at GCSE and almost all the Upper Sixth gained their place at their first choice of university. Huge congratulations go to Izzy Skelley, Lizzie Daniels and Bella Bryan all of whom gained straight As and A*s at A level or PreU. We all thank Natasha White for being such a wonderful Head of House and wish all of the Upper Sixth the best of luck for their future studies. The Master’s Dance was a wonderful way to say goodbye and celebrate a fantastic year. ALK

Littlefield

There have been four Heads of House this year. For the first half of the year Lucy Goodman and Stuart Newton-Tyers led by fine example and then Will Heard and Helena Hussey took over the reins for the second half of the year. The Upper Sixth yeargroup are already greatly missed. They started their time here by winning the swimming in the Shell and followed this through to a magnificent victory in the tug of war in their last term. Thanks to the captain of clay pigeon shooting, Jamie Quinn, we also won the House clay pigeon shooting. The highlight of the Michaelmas Term was winning the House Shout with a performance of Robbie Williams’s Candy suitably impressing the judge. Charlie Henman deserves special mention for organising this so well. The Revenger’s Tragedy was the main drama production in the Michaelmas Term and Littlefield was well represented with Isadora Corfield, Owen Hargrove, Charlie Henman, Ollie Phelps and Ollie Cutts. Will Heard’s role in charge of Illumination has inspired many from Littlefield to perform. Henry Harte and Thomas Southgate performed a brilliant duet whilst James Eyles unleashed a new rock star as he performed with the Lower School rock band. Having gained his Grade 8 on the trumpet, James Downie was well qualified to be head of music; he organised a brilliant House concert which was a highlight of the Lent Term.

in spite of horrendous weather, Hector Hewett, Harry MacColl and Kate Southern all made it to Teddington (where the race was stopped this year). The girls paired with Cotton to cause an upset by winning the Uppers hockey 6s, a great credit to Miranda Manning for captaining them. I am delighted that not only did Tom Cayford get amazing A level results, but he was also awarded his pilot’s licence this year – an amazing achievement. After 10 years in Littlefield we say farewell to Mr Ellis and wish him well as he becomes Housemaster of Barton Hill. My thanks to the wonderful Mrs Marr and her team who look after us all so well and without whom the House would quite simply not function. We wish the Upper Sixth well as they leave for pastures new and as we reflect on another excellent year. JJLT

and Seniors cross-country events, the House continued with wins in Lowers House tennis, Shell House tennis, House ERGO competition, Lowers swimming, Uppers swimming, Remove water polo, Uppers water polo, Shell netball, Shell hockey 6s and Second places in the House tug of war, Uppers House tennis, Shell rounders and Remove netball. Such success provided the House with the tally we needed to retain the 1993 Sporting Excellence Trophy for the most successful sporting House in 2015/16. We continued our good form at the track at the end of the Summer Term, taking victory in the House athletics. Mill Mead took victory in all three participating yeargroups; winning all six House relay finals! Particular mention must go to Scarlett Thompson, Ana Downing and Harriet Eyles who broke the school records on that day for triple jump, 200m and javelin respectively.

Mill Mead has continued to involve itself in all aspects of College life with great enthusiasm and commitment leading to a busy and successful year.

On the musical front, Mill Mead put in a strong performance in the Battle of the Bands at the Marlborough Fest and for the House Play, our enthusiastic cast took on a rewritten version of Cinderella created and directed by Libby Adam. The cast did a wonderful job; we failed to clench the title but provided a very entertaining performance for the audience.

Having started Michaelmas Term with heartbreak in the Shell steeplechase, Mill Mead were determined to fight for continued sporting successes this year. Taking both the Colts

On the academic side, Mill Mead took second place in the general knowledge competition of House Challenge in a closely fought final on last year’s Prize Day, with this year’s final team

Mill Mead

HOUSE NEWS

The summer brought excellent news for the departing Upper Sixth and they left in fine fettle. Special mention must go to Jenia Borisenko who gained 42 points in her IB and secured her place at Stanford to read International Health. Tom Cayford was the pick of the bunch from those taking A levels; he scored A*A*A*A and leaves to read Astrophysics at Durham. Further straight A*/A grades were also gained by Lucy Goodman, Owen Hargrove & Thomas Southgate. James Eyles impressed with his GCSE results of 13 A*s, Ollie Cutts and Peter Corti also gained straight A*/A grades.

Individual sporting success has come with many representing 1st teams. Owen Hargrove was vice-captain for the hockey XI. Elijah Samuel impressed again for the XI scoring two half-centuries. The Devizes to Westminster provided its usual challenge for many crews and

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consisting of Hannah Biddle, Sophia HamiltonRussell, Evie McVeigh and Helena Barton. We were proud to see Emily Symington take on the role of President of Woman and Gender Society and has led the opening discussions with insight and has already raised the profile of gender studies across our community. Mill Mead and C3 arranged a lovely leaving BBQ for our Dame Margot Hewer, who retires after being associated with both Houses for 27 years (please see C3 House report for her tribute). Both Houses are so sad to see her leave, but very grateful for all she has done for us and we will all miss her immensely. Alice Springett led the House Choir who performed an evening grace at her formal retirement dinner, leaving very few dry eyes in the audience. We have been sad this year to also say farewell to Mrs Rachel Jackson and to Miss von Weissenberg from our tutor team. We have been excited to welcome our new Dame, Ms Gibbs, who has already settled into life here in Mill Mead. We must say a big thank you to our two Dames this year and to all of the domestic staff who continue to do an amazing job quietly behind the scenes. With such a busy year behind us, who knows what next year will bring!

HOUSE NEWS

Imogen Matanle

Morris This year saw another extremely busy but highly successful time in Morris. It began with the news that Rosie Shaw had gained 45 points, full marks in the IB exams which allowed her to go on and gain a place at Yale. Further academic success was achieved by Veronica Nott, Georgia Ashworth and Anna O’Donald who all gained places to read Medicine at highly competitive universities. In the Lent Term Violet Mackintosh and Arabella Harris were made Academic Scholars as a result of their hard work and achievement and on Prize Day, no less than 26 Morris girls went up to receive an award. Right from the start, the Upper Sixth showed their leadership potential. Veronica Nott was appointed Senior Prefect, Livy Hazlitt was

made hockey captain, Hattie Cockerill was Head of Choir and Charlotte Russell and Keya Punja were in charge of Illumination. Unsurprisingly, the yeargroup were excellent captains in House and Hattie Cockerill, Georgia Ashworth and Georgia Vyvyan led the House to exceptional performances in the House Shout and Harmony competitions. On the sports front we were winners of the Lowers hockey, Lowers fives and the Shell swimming competition. Lara Bracher broke the course record in the Lowers cross-country competition and helped us to a very close second place. This year, Morris had three Lower Sixth girls taking part in the Devizes to Westminster canoe race. This race takes place over four days and requires an enormous amount of dedicated training, sometimes in appalling conditions and often in the very early morning! Ollie Newbon, Issy Perry and Milly Karsten all completed the race in fine style, although the tail end of Storm Katie saw the race shortened as the conditions became too dangerous. Morris continued to excel in all things musical. Helena Mackie was selected for the National Youth Orchestra for the third year in a row and received a distinction in her diploma on the oboe. Georgia Ashworth and Hattie Cockerill were both soloists in the final orchestral concert of the year, bringing to a close their distinguished time as Music Scholars at the College. Over the summer we

received the news that Tertia Paterson scored and extraordinarily high 139, Distinction in her Grade 8 singing and Tate Oliphant and similarly impressive Distinction in her Grade 7 singing. Many thanks to Helena Mackie who organised the Parents’ Day concert which saw some outstanding performances from the girls. The first weekend of the Summer Term saw the ‘Battle of the Bands’ and Tertia Paterson led Morris to a very creditable fourth out the 15 Houses that took part. The Morris girls were, as ever, a considerable presence on stage as well this year with Georgia Vyvyan playing the lead role in both The Revengers’ Tragedy and Anything Goes and Violet Mackintosh masterminding the shows as Stage Manager. Honor Koe and Xanthe Nathan wrote and produced a hilarious pantomime, Marlboroughella, at the end of the Michaelmas Term and put on a similarly strong performance of an episode of Friends, to qualify for the final of the House Drama competition. In terms of staff, we welcomed and very sadly said goodbye to Mrs Kiggell as our resident House tutor. She was outstanding in her support of the House over the year and we wish her the very best in her new role as the first Housemistress of Dancy House. We also said goodbye to Miss Darby who moved to Mill Mead after 15 years of tutoring in Morris. We are enormously grateful for all the support she gave the House over the years. So, another successful year and my grateful thanks go to Mrs Presley, Mr Hodgson, Miss Allen, Mrs Kiggell and the whole House team, who work so hard in support of the girls. JAH

New Court

@MarlboroughCol May 28 A view of the Shell inter-house tug of war in Court between @MCol_Morris and @MCol_Elm

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There was much to celebrate this year in the little oasis of calm that is New Court House. We got off to a fine start with a fiendishly devised pictorial treasure hunt that had the whole House involved, with all-age teams in friendly competition. Scampering high and low across the campus, the fun and laughter was followed by the traditional barbecue with music and dancing – one of the hallmarks of the House.


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Bell trophy; recognition that we have achieved the strongest academic performance in the Lower School. This is a fantastic accolade, and a welcome reward for the consistent hard work by everyone – and the brilliance of many – over the year. MJP

Preshute

There was sporting success with the girls giving their all and enjoying every minute. We put in a great performance in the House hockey and athletics competitions, couldn’t quite hang on to our trophy in the tug of war, and managed to play magnificently to achieve second place, against tough competition, in the House netball competition. But there is no doubt that we are second to none when it comes to social occasions. The New

Court Christmas supper, as always, was a huge success, with the common room transformed into a glitzy Hollywood set and the whole House dressing up in fittingly glamorous attire. In the spring, the legendary New Court May Day breakfast was again a wonderful event, with everyone sitting outside in the sunshine to enjoy a fantastic communal breakfast to mark the start of summer, whilst listening to the choir singing madrigals from the top of the Brad Arches. There was also another wonderful New Court festival with our traditional cake fest afterwards and new this year was the family tennis and croquet tournament, which proved to be a great success and one that will become a tradition in the years to come. As always there were plenty of barbecues in the garden, impromptu dancing in the common room and a celebration when our New Court duck returned to nest in the garden, producing a healthy brood of 12 ducklings. With hearts in our mouths we ushered the whole family, once they were waddling, down to the river and had the joy of watching them launch themselves into water for the first time. On Super Sunday, in the Battle of the Bands, the musicians from New Court were on blistering form, delivering a fantastic rendition of Waterfalls which gave them third place overall and best Girls’ House. Finally, as the year drew to a close came the news that New Court had been awarded the

Kit Edgecumb-Rendle led the House from the front setting a sound example to his fellow Preshutians. With his door open to anyone, and a cup of tea in his hand, he has guided the House through thick and thin. With his strong influence and musical ability, he was instrumental in Preshute claiming glory as the Battle of the Bands winner. However, despite a valiant effort, the same could not be said for either House Shout or House Harmony. Sadly, with the start of a new school year, the House said goodbye to some old friends. After 16 years of Friday nights Mr Eales hangs up his bow, says goodbye and will be greatly missed by all Preshutians – we hope he enjoys a happy and peaceful retirement! Mr Jackson departed us with high hopes of becoming the second Preshute tutor with an Olympic gold medal; however, tough competition got the better of him and his Irish Hockey Team. After two years we said goodbye to Mr Cockett who leaves for Hertfordshire. After 12 years with the House Mr Finn goes on exchange to Marlborough College Malaysia. We wish him and his family the all the best with the intense humidity that next year will bring them! We say a solemn farewell to Mr Staines, the House will not be the same without his cheerful, caring personality and St Mary’s Calne will be all the better for having him. We also say goodbye to Mr and Mrs Adams, although we will be seeing less of them as they step down from being RHTs (7 years) we will still see them on a Friday night.

HOUSE NEWS

Of course, too much has happened over the year to fit into this brief report, but mention must be made of the variety of Sunday trips: the Shell on the ropes course at South Cerney, clay pigeon shooting, the creativity afternoon working with a ceramicist, the fantastic day Christmas shopping in Bath, dry slope skiing (where Mrs Shearn found out on her return to NC that she had broken her wrist!), water sports with the Shell and Remove, scuba diving and of course, the Lower Sixth heading off to the Wiltshire countryside for a Captains overnight camp. The excitement of sleeping in a tepee reminded the girls of their OA week in the Shell and overall we had an amazing time and great fun. The girls became experts at wood collecting and did such a good job with the camp fire that it stayed alight overnight, ensuring the bacon rolls took no time at all in the morning. The Lower Sixth also undertook a sponsored walk to raise funds to help in the fight against Crohn’s and Colitis UK – a very worthy cause.

In the last year, Preshute has not fallen short of the standard that it has set in previous years. The House has excelled in many diverse ways. Mr and Mrs Marvin have kept the House steadfast and carried us through the many highs that we have had in the past year, and lifted us through the harder times.

After six years as Resident House Tutor, Mr Baldrey has decided to take a break from the action as he moves out from Preshute. He remains an evening tutor, although we will unfortunately be seeing much less of him. Mr Baldrey makes way for Preshute’s first Dameto-RHT conversion. Amanda Hutchings and her fiancé now inhabit the cosy flat and share the role of RHT with Marlborough’s tallest man and only Olympic gold medallist – Mr Dennis. Preshute also welcomes two members of the strength and conditioning team, Mr Wall and Mr Davies. Mr Bartlett, fresh ‘outta’ Cambridge replaces Mr Staines as the new postgraduate assistant. Despite a very athletically capable year, Preshute lifted the silver more than the gold.

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and Angus Rowan-Hamilton, who both lived up to the high expectations of the Christmas speeches, seeing the year off to a fun start. Our first large event in House was the Summerfield bar, which, thanks to Mr Harrison and compliance with health and safety regulations, was once again held in the House. With a range of themes and an amazing atmosphere it was an unforgettable night. Summerfield’s Upper School invitational dinner was incredibly organised by Calum Evans and topped off with our chef ’s (Pi) Michelin star-deserving food.

We were unlucky to miss out on the finals for Boys’ Uppers hockey although our hockey star, Ben Evans of the 1st XI guided us as close to the finals as possible. Preshute succeeded with the Girls’ Uppers hockey who were victorious against Summerfield. Sport amongst the girls was well represented, with Matilde Speelmans a core member of the girls 1st VII netball team. Nicky Savage loved to leave the opposition mesmerised in her wake in the pool as a valiant member of the Ladies’ Swim Team. House rugby 7s was a highlight for Preshute we were able to showcase our three 1st XV players, Henry Martin, Toby Charles and Jay Cooke. Despite the incredible talent, Preshute were narrowly defeated by Summerfield. Fraser Gordon captained the 1st XI through a strong season and will look back at his name engraved in the pavilion with pride. The Lower School amplified Preshute’s versatility on both land and in the water, as they won House water polo without losing a match. The suave Hugo Mitford-Slade captained the College Water Polo Team, but unfortunately they did not bring home gold for House Uppers. This winning streak continued as Toby Charles brought home more silverware to Mr Marvin’s study for being the best shot in the College. He put more weight into the trophy cabinet in the form of the DT trophy. Alex Martin guided, with a steady hand, our general knowledge team to victory. Alex went on to be the Master’s choice of best public speaker in House debating, which we also won. Finishing on a high, he intends on getting high again – but this time at St Peter’s College, Oxford to study Physics. This academic prowess was resonant within the whole year, particularly with Freddie Crane-Robinson, who was clearly studying hard when not on the basketball court – achieving A*A*A and hoping to go on to great things with his outstanding results. Preshute has bred some of its own international students with Pietro Bonfiglio starting at Georgetown, Washington D.C. He was not alone on the flight to the USA as Leo Polezhaev earned his place at Tufts, Boston. Sarah Ireland, with hopes of becoming a lawyer will study law at Manchester. Friendly Ned Sells dabbled in clay pigeon shooting and frequently contributed in Piccalilli. Preshute’s

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other prefect Tilly Streatfield crosses the Irish sea to Trinity College Dublin. The lobby miss the heart-warming personality of Tia Shannon. Louis Smith, ringing bells in prep, after Chapel and whenever he felt the urge, was our resident campanologist. He humbly played for teams far below his own ability captained the 3rd XI hockey. Louis’s charisma and horrendous chanting carried through the House and will be sorely missed. Preshutian talent ranged from the Chapel to the theatre; the performance of The Revenger’s Tragedy was well attended by those in Preshute as they supported Rollo Sutcliffe and Rebecca Addison. Rollo carried on his efforts through the Lent Term, taking on a larger role in the Lent Musical Anything Goes with Lottie Anning as a tap dancer. Overall, Preshute had another cracking year. Here’s hoping that the next will be just as good. Andrew Railton & Lottie Anning

Summerfield Summerfield has had yet another successful year, thanks to every member of the House involving themselves in all aspects of College life. The House was led through out the year by our amazing heads of House Lolly Cooper

Olly Line led our House Shout rendition of Everyday I Love You Less and Less by Kaiser Chiefs with great enthusiasm which was contagious on the night. Unfortunately, the three-note melody was not quite winning material but was definitely a performance to remember. In the House Harmony competition Rosie Woodhouse led exceptionally to tackle the complicated harmonies of It’s Time by Imagine Dragons. Thanks to Joe Lloyd, the musical talents of Summerfield made us proud during the Battle of the Bands competitions with our version of The Piña Colada Song by Rupert Holmes, narrowly missing out on a prize. Special mention should also be given to Casper Barker, Joe Lloyd and Annie O’Grady who made Summerfield proud during their Illumination debuts. As expected from Summerfield, the last year has been packed with sporting events and successes. Will Beattie led from the front as captain of the 1st XV rugby team. The younger years followed suit with Chris Freeman and Will Cook taking on the roles of captain in their respective 1st rugby teams, as well as Ben Spink making us proud as captain of Yearlings cricket. The Shell had a cracking year with wins in the inter-house steeplechase, tug of war, tennis and Lowers cricket (in tandem with the Remove). Congratulations to the Shell and Remove for winning the Lowers hockey 6s and an individual well done to Luca Conte who was placed runner-up in the Lowers 5s competition. The Sixth Form excelled this year winning the inter-house rugby and coming runners-


Not only have our Shell and Remove excelled on the pitches. Our Lower School managed to win the Lower School Commendations Prize. The exam term brought some incredible results from both the Sixth Form and the Hundred. Huge congratulations go to Max Foulds for achieving 9 A* at GCSE and both Seb Callender and Adam Dalrymple for achieving 8A*s. The same goes to the Upper Sixth who did extremely well. Special mentions go to Eliza Norris for achieving 2A*s and a D1 – gaining her a place into Oxford, Will Beattie for accumulating 3As and an A* and George Maxwell for gaining an A*, D1 and D3. Congratulations to all! Annie O’Grady

Turner We feel proud and fortunate in Turner to have enjoyed a year where both academic achievement and the value-added aspects of full boarding were on display throughout. Perhaps more importantly, support, kindness, and collaboration were consistently to the fore, with hierarchy distinctly absent. Visitors, when shown around the newly refurbished House by any number of willing guides, postulated myriad bywords such as calmness, avidity and fervour. Yet it was togetherness and the sense of family that regularly came out on top. Such well-being may in part be due to the transformation of the fabric that took place over the summer break. Boys have particularly enjoyed breakfast in the new dining room

A fine example of the achievement and diversity at the heart of the House is Freddie Moorhead (Hu) who, whilst keeping up representative climbing, rugby and Chapel Choir, achieved A* after A* at GCSE and still managed to find the time to train for the challenge of Kilimanjaro. Just a few weeks before Freddie’s successful ascent to the summit he, alongside Jack Kirkwood, raised just shy of a £1,000 by completing a half-marathon for Swindon Brighter Futures. Jack, who also matched Freddie for A*s, then went on to work in a school for the blind in China with another member of the Hundred, Milo Martin. With a plethora of talent across various fields, the House was able to put up a very decent show in the various inter-house competitions. Our first item of silverware was awarded in the opening sports competition of the year: captain of basketball Richard Chen demonstrated verve and panache that should rightly attract NBA scouts. The new Shell took on all-comers with high levels of confidence and team spirit. Will Ackerley secured the individual steeplechase with an outstanding run. This was followed up with the Shell rugby side winning through the group stages of the competition in some style. At the heart of Shell success was teamwork and lack of ego, and, in a wonderful advert for this spirit, a midfield break in a nail-biting match led the team to a nerve-jangling win in the final. The natural intermingling of yeargroups showed through in the junior football competition – a competition that seemed to be as eagerly awaited in House as the Premiership itself. It was played out over the duration of the Michaelmas and Lent Terms; the fluidity of the tika-taka one-touch, pass and move football led to the team being crowned champions with a match to spare. It was great to see Turner boys Thomas Mayes, David West and Max Read at the heart of the Open XV rugby squad. Fitness levels were at a peak when the House, with captain of crosscountry Conrad Cronin-Webb at the helm, won the steeplechase by the most impressive of margins. The Lent Term saw the top sporting teams riddled with Turner representatives. Charlie Wass captained the Open XI with distinction, playing alongside Alexis Pendleton. Olly Dundas continued to impress for the XI hockey team, as did Max Read. In the Summer Term, the combined Shell and Remove cricketers unfortunately ended up as bridesmaid rather than bride, losing a closefought final, as did the senior team. On the last day of term, the juniors dusted themselves down to win the tennis final on a golden point. Theo Cadier and Zack Chambers, with racket in hand, proved themselves to be standout junior

players; Theo won the individual squash prize whilst Zack represented the College at rackets at The Queen’s Club with distinction. Special mention should also go to Jack Kirkwood who, with a series of excellent performances, barnstormed his way into the Open tennis team.

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– usually continental, with the odd bacon sandwich thrown in for good measure. It is creditworthy and reflective of the respect for others that the magnificent new facilities in bedsits and surrounds have remained unblemished through a year of academic accomplishments and corporate and individual achievements.

Max Read and David West were stalwarts in the Open cricket XI. Representing the College at one sport is hard enough and, for Max Read to do so in all the major sports, (rugby, hockey and cricket) was an outstanding achievement. Arguably his impact was most keenly felt in the manner of his calm, mature batting, consistently displayed throughout the Summer Term. He revealed timing in his cover drives and in scoring runs at crucial times. Having played beautifully against the MCC where, heartbreakingly, he fell just short of a century, it was to his great credit that he produced a nerveless display to score his maiden century against St Edward’s, Oxford. Despite wickets tumbling around him, he led the XI to a onewicket, last-over win against a combative opposition. Ned Tarlton also represented the Open XI, though his standout performance was a magnificent century in difficult conditions for the Second XI. He showed his mettle and followed his knock up with a five-wicket haul. Ned also enjoyed a good measure of success, once again, whilst representing the clay pigeon shooting team with his partner Conor Evans.

HOUSE NEWS

up in the Uppers hockey, hockey 6s, football and squash. The girls had a good sporting year with a win in the hockey 6s and reaching the semi-final in the inter-house water polo tournament. Two Summerfield Lower Sixth, Jordan Coles and George Cortazzi, showed great determination and grit by completing the extremely challenging Devizes to Westminster race. A special mention goes to Nick Rusinov who was awarded the Individual Athlete of the Year award and competed at national level in the javelin. Well done to everyone for a successful year of sport.

Following another Turner tradition, that of producing top international sportsmen, we were delighted that Max Fillingham, a member of the England Senior karate squad, added another European karate title (the Venice Cup) to his collection. A fantastic achievement, as was Harry Pantin’s second place at the Bisley National Shooting competition. The House continued its tradition of turning out brilliant actors, musicians, public speakers artists, designers and photographers. As per usual, for the non-musicians in the House, levels of decibels and adrenalin were riding high for the House Shout competition, and the performance revealed no diminution of spirit. A wonderful reception was recorded. Likewise for the boys who performed a special Guns N’ Roses number so admirably in the House Harmony, led by Henry Anthony and Harry Owen. Harry leaves the College with 4 A* at A level and Grade 8 trumpet, one of several fine musicians in the House. Such individual success in such a variety of disciplines is in part attributable to the community as a whole, led by our wonderful Dame, Jo Aylward and her team. Special mention should also go to our excellent RHTs, Mr Hodgkinson and Mr Duplock and to Mrs Duplock, not least in her Artemis role. Finally it is most exciting that we go into the new College year looking ahead to the final phase of refurbishment that will doubtless enhance and encourage still further the levels of academic intensity and aretaic endeavour. Milo Osborne-Young Head of House ( Joint)

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CLUBS & SOCIETIES

Clubs & Societies Beagles Charity Think Tank Chinese Society Clay Pigeon Fly Fishing

Geography Society Griffith History History and the Arts History of Art Les Amis de Maupassant Literary Society Modern Languages Natural History & Biology Poetry Politics Racing Science 20th Century Drama 34

Beagles Such was the popularity of beagling this season that two minibuses were required to transport the 25 students who followed hounds every Tuesday afternoon. Much of the credit for the surge in support is due to our charismatic kennel huntsman, Danny Allen, but I would also like to highlight the inspirational leadership of Captain of Beagling, Will Heard (LI) as well as the enthusiasm and energy of the main whips, Laura Southern (IH) and Miles Brandi (C3). The 64th season ended with a Lawn Meet in Court that was attended by a large number of supporters including Brigadier Tom Sneyd (C1 1948–52) who was a pupil in the College when the pack was established in 1952. In the afternoon, hounds followed trails laid around Temple Farm and then we were treated to a delicious tea by Countess Goess-Saurau. On Saturday 12th March, 50 people enjoyed a marvellous Annual Dinner in Adderley and the Common Room Dining Room. It was our pleasure to welcome back Nick Wykes (C1 1948–52) who was one of the co-founders of the pack, as well as fellow OMs, Richard Bateman (B2 1947–52) and Brigadier Sneyd. During the summer, the hunt achieved considerable success at various shows. Having never won at Peterborough, we were delighted when Winston came first in the un-entered dog class (adding to his wins at Ardingly and Builth Wells) and Taper/Tablet won the couple class. As always, I would like to thank all the landowners over whose land we are allowed

to hunt. Without them the sport could not continue and more often than not we are invited in to their homes for lovely teas at the end of the day. Next season sees several changes in the management of the Palmer Marlborough Beagles: Richard Carter takes over as Chairman, succeeding Julian Chadwick who becomes a Master. After several seasons as Secretary, during which she has provided countless delicious boot teas, Pamela Blanchard hands over to Judy Grange. SMDD

Charity Think Tank The year 2015/16 was another huge success for the Charity Think Tank. The charitable calendar was packed to the brim with bake sales, sponsored swims, Robbie’s Roses and charity concerts. It is impossible to mention each and every charity endeavour, but here are a few. The success of the Macmillan coffee morning continued and raised over £700 in October 2015. A huge thank you to the bakers and all those who supported this event by buying delicious cakes and cookies. A very special thank you to the Norwood Hall team for making this event possible! Mr Simon Quinn ran another fabulous NSPCC number day raising over £950 this year. House teams gathered in yeargroups to complete maths puzzles and brain teasers. November saw weird and wonderful moustaches being grown by members of the Common Room. Another great effort


instigated by Mr David Armitage raising over £530 for Movember. Incredibly generous donations at the carol services raised over £7,300 for EDCLUB, Shonda Project, Afghan Connection and Kennet Community Transport. In the Summer Term, two thirds of the College took part in an exciting game of Assassins. A special thank you to the Charity Think Tank, especially Hugo Smith for taking charge and organising this huge event! Over £1,000 was raised in aid of UNICEF. The Summer Term hosted its second Battle of the Bands – another huge success with a very special thank you to Marius Baldrey, Will Finlay and Nick Gordon for making this possible. Charity stalls on the day included Dunkin’ Donuts, a plait parlour, a jewellery stall, inflatable gladiators, several BBQs and many more. HMS

Chinese Society

Just in time to add a sparkle to Christmas, pupils from the Upper School learning Pre-U Mandarin Chinese embarked on an afternoon to a Chinese Festival of Light. The festival took place within the grounds of Longleat House and featured over 23,000 individual lanterns as well as a Porcelain Pagoda made from 80,000 China teacups, bowls and plates. We were welcomed to the festival by traditional Chinese guards and soon saw the stunning resurrection of the Terracotta Warriors in the form of beautifully crafted lanterns. Pupils exercised as much Chinese speaking as possible, impressing some of the artisans present by engaging them in full conversation. In the New Year, a number of Sixth Form Chinese pupils visited the China-Britain Business Council (CBBC). With 25 offices in the UK and China, CBBC are leaders in their field, providing advise to British businesses on how to expand their work to China. Whilst at CBBC, pupils heard from several speakers across different departments, who together, painted a detailed picture of their involvement with companies operating in China, as well as their personal experiences with China. This

Our second speaker of the year was Dr Kevin Lin, who is the lead interpreter for the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, having acted as interpreter for Her Majesty the Queen and four successive Prime Ministers. Dr Lin gave an inspirational lecture, to around 80 Marlborough linguists, that touched on his own extensive experience as an interpreter and explored how we can make the most of our language skills. One of the most pertinent things Dr Lin spoke about was how increasingly valuable it is – and will become – to have Chinese language as a skill in a world where businesses and geopolitics are increasingly affected by the process of globalisation. In what was an eye-opening evening, Dr Lin spoke about how one can use language to open doors and help make the world a better place. It was a memorable experience for us all. Qingwei Li

Clay Pigeon Shooting The Marlborough A team (Ned Tarlton, Jamie Quinn, Conor Evans, Henry Gouriet, Piers Tabor) retained the Marlborough Challenge Shield at Barbury Shooting School for the 6th year in a row, beating 9 teams from Millfield, Wellington, Harrow and Kings Taunton. Ned Tarlton won the High Gun Trophy and Conor Evans was 3rd.

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Maths Challenge

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proved to be an enlightening visit, one during which pupils discussed topics ranging from the characteristics of Chinese economics to the idiosyncrasies of its politics.

On a very wet November afternoon on the Somerset Levels, we came 3rd out of 19 teams, beaten by two sides from Millfield on their home patch In March, at the Fido Vivian May Trophy hosted by Harrow, the boys shot very well (averaging about 80%) to finish 3rd out of 27 teams competing at the Churchill Shooting Ground. Once again, we were only beaten by two teams from Millfield. Jamie Quinn scored

As has become tradition for the Chinese Society, we began the year by celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival with an evening of poetry recitals, tea ceremonies and moon cake. In October 2015, we were privileged to welcome British Academy Fellow, Professor Henrietta Harrison from Pembroke College, Oxford to deliver a talk titled, Interpreting China to Britain: The story of a Chinese boy in 18th Century Europe. This was the story of a Chinese Emperor who became the first to have his portrait painted by Westerners in a style that was still alien in China. A very engaging speaker, Professor Harrison posed questions to her audience and encouraged an open dialogue, whilst describing her adventures through different countries in an attempt to track down this remarkable story. One aspect that many pupils found partially interesting was discovering just how many Jesuit Missionaries there were in China during the 18th Century.

Photograph courtesy of: www.longleat.co.uk

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CLUBS & SOCIETIES

Leon McCarron

Shelley Rudman

42/50 and was one clay behind the overall winner.

open the fishery to students from St Francis School who came on a couple of occasions.

Jamie Quinn was top gun in the House Competition, leading Littlefield to their 4th victory since this event started 11 years ago. Elmhurst won the girls’ competition in which Hannah Cameron was the best shot.

SMDD

Ned Tarlton (captain), Jamie Quinn and Conor Evans have represented Marlborough since being in the Shell and they have been instrumental in our successes. They were great ambassadors for us and a real credit to Huw Stephens and his team of coaches at Barbury Shooting School. All three richly deserved their 1st team colours. SMDD

Fly Fishing Having ceased stocking the river in 2015, it is encouraging to see so many juvenile brown trout as well as a very healthy population of grayling. As usual, the lakes were badly affected by algae in May, the larger one turning an alarming turquoise colour on occasions. However, a damp and cool June enabled conditions to improve and good sport was enjoyed by the 26 staff and pupil members of the club. The most successful angler was young Adam Kiggell who seemed to be able to land fish under all conditions. Thanks to the hard work of the Monday and Wednesday Outreach teams led by Action for the River Kennet volunteers, Don Harris and Rodney Owen-Jones, sections of the river have been narrowed, flow rates have improved, silt is being scoured out and the underlying gravel is gradually being revealed. Attempts have been made to establish Ranunculus (water crowfoot) but we are fighting a losing battle against the voracious Mute Swans and Canada Geese. I am indebted to Paul Maslin for his coaching of the four boys who signed up for fly fishing courses this summer. It has been a pleasure to

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Geography Society At the time of writing the Shell and Remove have just been inspired by Tim Oakley’s 700-mile dog sled journey in the footsteps of Amundsen who travelled from Herchel island to Eagle in 1905 to announce to the world his discovery of the NW passage. Earlier in the year Alex Hibbert spoke about his record-breaking unsupported ski journey across Greenland and back; he also introduced his Dark Ice project to ski in darkness to the North Pole. Leon McCarron, adventurer and film maker, gave two inspiring lectures to 500 pupils on recent Iranian and Chinese journeys. He spoke about his 2014 5-week Iranian journey along the Karun River, from the snowy Zagros mountains down to the coast and included clips from his latest award-winning film; the intrigue included multiple secret police arrests but overwhelming hospitality from the local people. Previously, the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation updated us on their conservation work with snow leopards in Mongolia and elephants in Zambia and Barney Rosedale inspired us with his images of Bhutan and Nepal in a comparative presentation on tourism and development in these very different countries. David Edwards’s lecture extravaganza day included a session on reclaiming Montserrat after the volcanic eruption period, Lower Sixth lecture Our Energy Future, a GCSE talk My Exploding World and a Shell presentation Antarctic Dreams. He will return again this year. Our rather wet September Hundred local field work day was challenging weather for

our River Kennet kick test biotic studies, channel form, flow measurements and flood management techniques. Marlburians are pleasantly surprised by the amount of life in our river. Deciduous woodland and microclimate studies were also part of the brief. The Lower Sixth completed a two day trip to the south coast and a detailed transect of the Studland sand dunes was complemented by a broader study of coastal processes and issues along Christchurch Bay. The Upper Sixth completed an issues evaluation of a proposed park and ride site in Bath and followed this up with an assessment of tourist sites and tourist attitudes; questionnaires are a fascinating challenge in this cosmopolitan destination. The Upper Sixth Cherhill Hill microclimate day provided excellent data collection and fitness training, too, as was the Remove Swindon day; the trail across Swindon town centre and transition zone dispels classic stereotypes to reveal a dynamic and fast-evolving town. KJDR

Griffith Society We were delighted to welcome Shelley Rudman to give the 2015 Dunford Lecture for Sports Scholars and other sporting enthusiasts. Shelley was a World Class skeleton bobsleigh athlete, who shot to prominence when she won an elusive medal for Great Britain at the 2006 Winter Olympic Games. Her career was remarkably long for this demanding sport – she also became World Champion in 2013. Shelley held the audience mesmerised (and a little scared!) with a video showing bobsleigh athletes travelling at up to 130mph when competing. She also described the intense physical and mental preparation that it takes to perform at this level. Other mental challenges were explained, including overcoming injury and fear to get back on the track.

@MCol_Geography June 13 Wet weather greeted the @MCol_ Geography Department Lower Sixth field day – micro studies at Cherhill Hill


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History at Marlborough at present spans numerous British and European themes from the 11th to the 20th centuries, and the teachers all play to strengths and teach periods and themes about which they are passionate. But one emphasis over the year has been upon the desirability of our historians getting to grips with a great variety of periods. To this end, the History And The Arts Society has been set up, with numerous meetings and trips. CAFM

History and the Arts Society (HATA)

Perhaps what made Shelley’s talk most relevant was her ability to explain how she managed all aspects of her life despite a very hectic (and at times chaotic) schedule. A local girl from Pewsey, she described in detail as a school pupil how she loved athletics, but eventually transitioned over to skeleton having reached a plateau in the sport. She talked about combining her studies with training, and more recently how she balanced her sport alongside her family life (she is married with two young children). Shelley had taken time to understand how the scholars in the room in particular were often juggling all of their commitments, and she gave some very good advice about coping with numerous demands. Finally, we heard about Shelley’s current roles and future plans; another striking aspect of her career, is her determination to ‘give back’ and she continues to volunteer to help aspiring young sportspeople and Olympians. After some excellent questions from the audience, we left feeling inspired that it is really possible to chase dreams. Personal sacrifice along the way is perhaps inevitable, but with good planning, a positive outlook and the determination to ‘bounce-back’ after any setbacks, reaching even the most challenging of goals is realistic.

Jonathan Parish, a senior NATO figure, explained the institution to our IGCSE classes. Another highlight was the visit of Janine Webber, a Holocaust survivor: she addressed the whole of the Shell with her appalling story, and was extraordinarily approachable and positive with them in talks and at dinner after her talk. Meanwhile, a different kind of learning occurred in the pouring rain in Winchester, where our Lower Sixth medievalists explored the great medieval institutions of that amazing city. By way of contrast, the Upper Sixth medievalists paid a quick (sunny) visit to Temple Rockley, to trace the Templar Preceptory there. There was, in fact, no sign of it, but they reconstructed it in their minds’ eye. Every week, Mr Ford ran expert seminars for a very strong Upper Sixth group, two of whom have gone on to Oxford. They presented on books they had read. Some fruits of research were also evident in the ‘Medley of Marlborough Historians’, in which twelve Sixth Formers gave compact presentations about their historical interests. We were pleased to welcome the town History Society to this, and indeed to most of our events.

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History Society

The History and the Arts Society (HATA) is a lively new society devoted to the practical appreciation and enjoyment of the arts and of the cultural environment more generally in the context of History. Normally, very wide periods are dealt with through general themes. Throughout last year there were weekly HATA meetings for Upper and Lower school. There were a great variety of seminars – from contrasting attitudes to colonialism (Norman Sicily and British India), to iconoclasm, to monasticism, to ‘late styles’ from great creators. One highlight was Thor Kverndal’s outstanding investigation of ‘the idea of North’. The HATA is also committed to frequent trips, and – again – these were very numerous. We visited the Welsh frontier to see the mighty castles of the Marcher lords around the Wye Valley, and enjoyed a warm May day at the idyllic ‘imagined worlds’ of Stourhead and Old Wardour Castle. Nearer to home were Littlecote House, Avebury, Savernake Forest, Lacock Abbey and various parish churches. Pupils were encouraged to link the learning gained from all these places, so that the enormous jigsaw of history could start to make sense in their perception of the environment around them. Meanwhile, major HATA plans for 2016–17 include a trip to Siena and a concert evening in the Bath Mozartfest. CAFM

KMH

History Society The department had an extremely lively year with many splendid visiting speakers – Dr Marc Morris roundly condemned King John, Professor Bill Philpott revised the usual view of the Battle of the Somme, and Professor Robert Tombs entertained us with the differences between the French and the English. Professor Tombs also visited some classes, and gave freely of his considerable and humane expertise in matters pertaining to modern History.

@MCol_Academic Oct 6 Pupils on today’s History Department Medievalist Trip at Winchester’s Great Hall, underneath the round table...

History and the Arts Society

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The History of Art Society Marlborough’s art historians enjoyed another rich programme of talks from visiting speakers throughout the academic year. These covered a great range of material, both close to the curriculum and from wider-flung areas of this already far-reaching subject. Everyone enjoyed the talks hugely, and they were culturally enriching and of considerable educational benefit.

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Our first guest was Dr Sarah Monks of the University of East Anglia who addressed the students on the important subject of Turner and British Romanticism. As Dr Monks expertly showed, defining ‘Romanticism’ is an elusive matter when it comes to Turner’s career, and he moved through a series of developmental stages in his output that require more nuanced identification and categorization than the broad suggestions of that convenient catch-all label. In November we were glad to welcome back Charlie Hall, Chairman of John Hall Venice, the long-established art history travel specialists, and a regular speaker at the College. His theme on this visit was The Venetian Renaissance and he spoke about the transitions in style and handling between Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto and Veronese, and emphasised the qualities of their work that arose from their Venetian environment. This was an important talk for some of our Upper Sixth students in particular who had spent the Michaelmas Term engaging with the art of Venice in the sixteenth century. Of direct concern to all was our first visitor of the New Year, Dr Jacqueline Cockburn, former Head of History of Art at Westminster School, former Chief Examiner for Pre-U Art History, and co-author of the Pre-U syllabus. Who better, then, to speak to the students on the subject of Still Life? Still Life is a particular passion of Dr Cockburn’s; it is also the area of study that the students concentrate upon for

their Thematic Topics paper. Unsurprisingly, there was a full house, and students sat spellbound as Dr Cockburn discussed the particular cultural traditions and economic circumstances prevailing in the Iberian Peninsula that gave rise to Spanish still life of the Golden Age. It was an intensely argued and beautifully illustrated talk, and of very great value to all who heard it. Our second visitor in Lent Term was Dr Catriona Murray from the Department of Art History at the University of Edinburgh. Dr Murray had made the long journey from Scotland specially to be with us, and to give a paper about The Use of Art as Visual Propaganda in the Early Modern Period. A rapt audience heard her discuss the historical use of visual ‘spin-doctoring’ from the very inception of the royal careers of both the Tudor and Stuart dynasties, and how Holbein introduced Renaissance sophistication into the British traditions of portraiture. She then went on to show the elaboration and refinement of royal propaganda under the Stuarts, particularly in the hands of Anthony Van Dyck. Dr Murray kindly brought artefacts from the seventeenth century to show the students, and our art historians were able to handle a mezzotint and medals celebrating Stuart dynastic achievements. There was a lively discussion at the end of the paper, and Dr Murray kindly answered questions about university life at Edinburgh and gave advice on the History of Art course there. On the first full evening of the Summer Term, the College’s art historians gathered to listen to Professor Geoff Quilley from the University of Sussex, an expert on British Art of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and former Curator of Paintings at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. His subject was Art and Empire with a particular emphasis upon representative images from the eighteenth century. Professor Quilley argued that it is increasingly difficult to view art in Britain from this period without seeing traces of the colonial project – be it through teapots in domestic

interiors by the likes of Hogarth, suggestive of the Ceylon links, or with black servants in high society portraits, sad legacies of the slave trade. Everyone present learned a lot, not least how to look again at apparently conventional English paintings, and see through them vistas of the world under British influence. Consideration of art from beyond the confines of Europe was also urged by our final speaker of the year, Robert Chapman from the National Gallery, London, in a joint meeting with the Politics Society. Mr Chapman’s title was Political Canvassing, and he spoke about the political context that lies behind so many images. Refreshingly, he chose his examples of such phenomena from widespread sources, which included left-wing propagandistic images from mid-twentieth-century Mexico, and the emergence of a national style in early twentieth-century Australia. It was an exciting body of material, and opened up the horizons of the subject to our pupils – a core aim for the History of Art department on a daily basis, and pleasingly reinforced throughout a year of stimulating and challenging talks on Wednesday evenings. FSM

Les Amis de Maupassant The nature of Les Amis de Maupassant is very much discussion based, with a casual tone and inclusive atmosphere. Once we were seated in a circle a short presentation is given by one of the student leaders of the society, giving background information on the writer. Examples of literature we have explored include Guillaume Apollinaire’s Calligrammes, Molière’s play Le Médecin volant, and Anna Gavalda’s short story Happy Meal. Everyone contributes to reading aloud sections of the passage or poem, after which an analytical conversation takes place, guided by Mr Brown. The College’s Upper School French society has had a successful year, with the wide variety of literature – and French snacks – offered attracting numerous pupils, and we only hope it keeps on growing. Emma Menarin, Imogen Redpath & Bella Imi

Natural History and Biology Society The first speaker of the year for the Natural History & Biology Society was Chris Sperring MBE who works for the Hawk and Owl Trust. A well-known naturalist and presenter of wildlife programmes such as the BBC Natural World series, Mr Sperring gave a very interesting talk on The Status and Conservation of British Raptors. His talk focused on the eagles, hawks and falcons found in Britain. These range in size from the enormous white-tailed sea eagle to

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COMMUNITY the diminutive merlin. He described how to identify the main species and we were given lots of information on habitats, feeding strategies, population size and conservation status. Particularly interesting were Mr Sperring’s suggestions that white-tailed sea eagles are actually lowland birds that should have been reintroduced to East Anglia or the Somerset Levels rather than the Scottish Highlands. He was also keen to point out that, contrary to popular opinion, sparrowhawks have very little impact on the populations of garden birds. Professor of Science Communication at the University of Gloucestershire, Adam Hart and wildlife photographer, Mr Ayub Amin were our next guests. The talk, entitled How insects say a lot without making a sound initially focused on leafcutter ants, describing how they feed on a unique type of fungus which is grown on the leaves which the ants bring into the colony. Ants have been farming fungus for far longer than humans have been practising agriculture! During the lecture, Mr Amin used macrophotography to show live images of the ants which enabled us to marvel at their anatomy, particularly their impressive jaws. Professor Hart described the various means by which insects communicate using chemicals called pheromones. Everyone was supplied with little vials of chemicals which we opened at intervals to appreciate the huge variety of scents produced and used by ants, bees and other members of the insect world. This really informative, fascinating and interactive talk ended with pupils being able to handle a chameleon and a tropical frog from Mr Amin’s tropical house in his London home. SMDD

Poetry Society The year’s poetic activities began on October 2nd with a visit from an old friend, Les Murray, a giant of the literary world – in every respect. The Australian laureate has always enjoyed

Harriet Baldwin visiting the College, and we were fortunate to be able to fit in a reading once again on rare and busy tour of these shores. We were particularly lucky, in fact, as the day after a convivial dinner with a group of enthusiasts at the Master’s Lodge, and a reading to a packed audience in Adderley, we heard that Les had been obliged to cut short his tour and return to Australia. Those who attended the reading were impressed by Murray’s idiosyncratic style, his mastery of the written word and his infectious good humour. There was also sadness at the realisation that this may well be his final visit to Marlborough.

from her volume Divinations, a beautiful book that had been produced by another ex-beak, Simon Brett the wood engraver. Simon talked about the process of making high quality books and about engraving, complementing Janice’s thought-provoking and enlightening reading. In the Lent Term there was also a brilliant ‘Own Work’ evening, in which members of the Poetry Society and other creative writers shared their recent writing: it was good to see such a range of excellent work, not only from sixth formers but also from a couple of members of the Remove. Bravo, one and all!

Two days later a large audience from both the town and the College gathered in the Memorial Hall to hear a reading by another iconic figure, Gillian Clarke, who is well known for her broadcasts on Radio 4 and her work as a playwright, as well as her many volumes of verse produced over a long career – her first collection was published 45 years ago. Like Murray, Clarke has been a regular visitor to the College, and she again proved a fascinating reader (we particular enjoyed the work from her most recent collection, Ice) as well as a convivial guest over supper back at the New Court Flat, where dozens were packed in to share the conversation.

The year was rounded off in fine style with a superb reading by Hannah Lowe in June. Lowe had achieved some renown after the publication of her first book, Chick, which focused on the character of her father, a Chinese-Jamaican immigrant who had been a shadowy figure in her life, eking out a living as a late-night gambler – amongst other things. Lowe was like her poems: candid, funny, playful and accessible. It was an added pleasure to find that her new book, Chan, was to be launched at this reading. Once again, an enthusiastic crowd gathered after the reading in New Court flat to share supper and conversation with Hannah.

In the audience for that reading was Isabel Palmer, our poet-in-residence for the following week, leading up to the Remove Poetry Festival on the Saturday evening. By contrast with the two previous guests, Palmer is a poet on the threshold of her career: she was generous in sharing the poems inspired by her role as the mother of a soldier serving in Afghanistan, and the process by which these poems were being assembled into a collection, Atmospherics, to be published as part of Bloodaxe’s Home Front volume in November of this year. Palmer’s workshops enabled those from all yeargroups to experience the pleasure of poetic composition, and her final readings to Upper School and Remove audiences were enlightening and inspiring. In the Lent Term, former beak Janice McFarlane returned to the College to read

CLUBS & SOCIETIES

Mr Ayub Amin and Professor Adam Hart

MJP

Politics Society The Politics Society began the year with the return of Eamonn Gearon, a leading world expert in Middle Eastern affairs who last visited the College in 2011 to speak on the Arab Spring. This time he continued the narrative by explaining why the aforementioned revolution had failed and what conditions had led to the rise of Islamic State. A thoroughly stimulating “extended conversation” in the society’s established question-and-answer format led to a really insightful evening which certainly clarified for many pupils what is a highly complex and relevant area of their global politics course.

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Conygree, taking the spoils in what proved to be his only race of the season.

Our next guest was Harriet Baldwin MP (LI 1975–77) for West Worcestershire and the first ever Old Marlburian female Member of Parliament whose hugely successful career disabuses the myth that girls educated at Marlborough only make it to the very top if they marry wisely! (See wives of the PM, the Chancellor, the Speaker, Governor of the Bank of England and the future King of England).

In the Lent Term, the Master and Mrs Leigh kindly organised a wonderful talk given by Ian Balding (SU 1952–56) after which we were treated to a delicious supper in the Lodge. Mr Balding recounted various of his escapades at Marlborough and told us about riding a winner at Wincanton in the Millfield colours. The highlight of the talk was the very emotional footage of Mill Reef winning the Derby, Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, Eclipse and King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes.

Her fascinating recollection of her career thus far – halcyon days at Marlborough, languages at Oxbridge, (Russian), followed by JP Morgan, then elected as an MP in 2010 and most recently promoted to junior minister to the Treasury (2015) provided inspiration to the well-attended presentation.

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The question and answer session provoked thoughts on an array of challenging issues from Mrs Baldwin’s solution to the West Lothian question and further reforms to Parliament to questions on the role of the whips. The evening concluded with our guest reminiscing about her days as a pupil at the College, one highlight being a talk by Benazir Bhutto. Many of the young pupils attending this talk would have undoubtedly found it equally stimulating and who knows maybe one day Marlborough will be boasting their first ever PM! In the latter part of the academic year, it was a huge pleasure for both the Politics and History of Art Societies to host Paul Chapman, nationally renowned Art Historian and permanent curator of the Longford Castle art collection. Paul was invited to share his expertise on Art in Politics and to explain the relationship between these two disciplines with reference to a wide range of artists. Using an engaging slide show he skilfully highlighted, linked and decoded the subtle themes and ideas incorporated in selected artists across three centuries. Referring to paintings by David, Delacroix, Diego Rivera and the late-19thcentury Australian painter, Tom Roberts, as well as the better known work of Banksy, he provided the pupils with a unique opportunity to make intelligent and thoughtful connections between both their Politics and Art A level courses. The last event hosted by the Politics Society was a visiting lecture on Life inside North Korea by photojournalist and former TV documentary maker Jeremy Hunter. Armed with numerous high quality slides depicting different aspects of the strange world inside the hermit state, Jeremy held the audience enraptured by his personal narrative of his own experiences there. Pupils were both bemused and repelled by the weirdness of what they were being shown and told. This is a fundamentally dysfunctional and dystopian country where people in their thousands are employed to make statues of the former Leaders Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il, where everyone is issued with a dust pan and brush to keep their own portrait of the Eternal Leader Kim Il-sung dust free, and where it is a crime to sit on a newspaper with the leader’s picture on it!! Jeremy explained that foreign visitors were taken on highly selective guided

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In the Summer Term a dawn visit was made to the Ralph Beckett’s (C2 1985–89) yard near Andover. Hopefully, we will be able to organise for Mr Beckett to visit Marlborough next year and talk about his highly successful training career.

Ian Balding

SMDD

tours which hid the reality of people eating grass to survive and where there are few cars or any access to information from the outside world. Many pupils stayed on after the talk to find out more which is testament to the appeal of Mr Hunter’s presentation. MAG

Racing Society The Racing Society was launched in the Michaelmas Term when we received a unique invitation from the Jockey Club to bring a group of students to Sandown Races one Sunday in November. After a sumptuous lunch, we were taken in groups to places in the racecourse which are usually inaccessible to the general public. In the Stewards’ Room we were shown how, after each race, the performance of every horse and jockey is scrutinised to ensure fair play. The racing itself was top class; we were fortunate to see the 2015 Gold Cup winner,

Twentieth Century Drama Society The 20th Century Drama Society is a gathering of Lower Sixth students who meet once each term to have supper and read a whole play together in an evening. In the Summer Term we read Brian Clark’s Whose Life is it Anyway? Ten keen members of the Lower Sixth attended and their enthusiasm brought the plethora of interesting characters to life, complete with some superb accents. The dark humour highlighting the moral principles of the play was not missed and the play sparked much fascinating discussion amongst the students regarding the philosophical ‘right to die’ debate. By exploring drama beyond the syllabus in a social and informal setting, students are able to whet their appetite for further reading and feed their love of literature. CEG


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Science Society The first speaker of the 2015/16 Science lecture series was Dr Sadie Jones from the University of Southampton who spoke about her work in astrophysics. We saw pictures of the large radio detecting arrays she used to observe the supermassive black hole at the centre of Galaxy NGC 4051 which prove that there are jets protruding from black holes. The talk was quite topical, with an update on Professor Hawking’s bold statements about the conservation of information in black holes and the future of jet observations.

Professor Donald Kurtz of the Astrophysics Department at University of Central Lancashire, Vice-President of the Royal Astronomical Society, delivered the 11th Blackett Science lecture on Planets and Pulsations at the end of November. The concept of Astroseismology was clearly explained with the basic physics of waves, and with inspiring animations and ‘sounds’ of the stars, the audience was effortlessly brought to the frontiers of stellar research. Our friend and colleague Tim Harrison from the University of Bristol School of Chemistry, delivered this year’s Christmas Chemistry Lecture entitled Gases in the Air to an audience of our own Shell, together with visitors from St Francis, Cheam and Pinewood Prep Schools and pupils from our near neighbours The Commonweal School and Swindon Academy. Pitching the chemical theory expertly to the assembled Year 6 – Year 9 (Shell) pupils,

Professor Donald Kurtz

Professor Robert Winston Tim highlighted the chemical properties and reactivity of the gases in our atmosphere, illustrating the talk with all of the explosive energy expected of a chemistry lecture, to the great delight of the audience. To start the Lent Term, Mr Luke Bartlett, Head of Science at Uppingham School, talked about the Chemistry of Wine. The production of wine is heavily scientific and its origins are unclear so Mr Bartlett posed the question – ‘did we discover it or did we invent it?’ We were able to sample different variants of wine, and it was interesting to physically interact with, via taste, the compounds shown on the screen, many of which were complex and unexpected. One of the main points of his talk was that each chemical has its own specific taste, which is why wine producers sometimes add specific, desirable, ones after fermentation. Dr Janneke Blokland visited us again in February to talk to the Hundred and Sixth Form about Particle Physics in a Nutshell. The talk gave an in-depth look at the Standard Model of particle physics. Dr Blokland explained that although the Standard Model

is widely accepted and taught in schools, there was always the possibility for a change of opinion in the field of particle physics. She explained the issues in quantum physics, and the ramifications they could have, in a concise and understandable way. Professor Robert Winston delivered the inaugural Medawar Lecture, marking the 101st year since Nobel Laureate, Peter Medawar’s (B2 1928–32) birth. Winston was a fitting choice, given the biological foundations both of his own and Medawar’s work. Winston referred to Medawar several times during the evening, calling him ‘one of the greats’. The title for the Professor’s lecture was Modifying Humans: where does genetics stop? The talk was well attended and Prof Winston’s amazing gift with public speaking meant it was accessible to all, scientist and non-scientist alike. This talk was without a doubt a highlight of the year for pupils, and especially scientists, at Marlborough.

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Our next speaker Dr Janneke Blokland, talked about Particles in the Spotlight. She shared her knowledge of the fundamentals of the universe, starting with the traditional Standard Model before bringing the non-scientific audience up to speed on quarks, leptons and bosons. The fact that she is a vicar as well as a theoretical physicist made her talk particularly fascinating when hearing about the Higgs boson, the elusive mediator particle of the Higgs field that the media (by accident) call the “God particle”.

George Cortazzi (SU)

Dr Janneke Blokland

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TRIPS & EXPEDITIONS


CREATIVE WRITING TRIP POST-GCSE TRIP TO ROME POST-GCSE SAILING OA EXPEDITION TO TANZANIA CCF TRIP TO SAN DIEGO

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SIXTH FORM ART TRIP TO MADRID HISTORY OF ART STUDY TRIP TO THE LOW COUNTRIES JAPAN RUGBY TOUR SWIMTREK IN TURKEY DEVIZES TO WESTMINSTER

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Freedom to Explore Creative Writing in Pembrokeshire

CREATIVE WRITING TRIP

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fter the rigours and strictures of GCSE examinations, it was liberating to leave the College for a week of creative exploration on the coast and (as it turned out) in the sunshine. By lunchtime on the first day the College already seemed a distant memory, and the afternoon was spent on Caerfai beach, with its distinctive damson-coloured rock, where we swam, played beach games, explored rock pools and caves, and acclimatised to the slower pace of life before heading back to our accommodation, a bunkhouse in the middle of St David’s, the smallest city in the country. The pattern for the week was set on that first afternoon and evening: time spent outdoors alternated with writing tasks, with everyone reading and sharing their work in progress; the tasks soon became as much about self-exploration as literary exercises, and the writing led to rich conversation. Tuesday, the second day, was busy and varied. A morning spent writing in the cathedral, just a short stroll from ‘home,’ was followed by the adventure of coasteering, when we flung ourselves into

braving the massive tidal rush over The Bitches reef, and discovering, as we left the relative shelter of Ramsey Sound, that the sea was in an angry mood on the far side of the island. We saw guillemots, razorbills, petrels and puffins on the cliffs and little rocky outcrops; seals surfaced to gaze at us with wide, curious eyes and on the homeward leg, thousands of shearwaters skimmed the waves as they effortlessly returned to their burrows at dusk. Back in the Court House we entertained guests: Lou Luddington, who is a marine biologist, kayaker and writer, and her husband Tom, an outdoorsman, thinker, musician and magician, whose prestidigitation had us all dumbfounded.

a swollen sea to make our way around the coast by swimming, scrambling, climbing and falling, eventually reaching a high rock-jump that had the adrenalin pumping. A quick change, and we were off on a boat trip around Ramsey Island,

The following days were a mixture of the artistic and the adventurous. We had a writing workshop in the studio of the artist Deb Withey, who generously gave us freedom to roam through her amazing house overlooking the cathedral, and filled with vibrant colour and intriguing paintings. There was trip to another beach, Porth Melgan, where we experienced solitary unconfinement – wandering alone

“... we experienced solitary unconfinement – wandering alone over the headland to have a place to sit, think and write.”

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS over the headland to have a place to sit, think and write. This was another liberating experience. We had a late afternoon and evening on one of the most beautiful beaches in the country, Traeth Llyfn, which we had to ourselves: swimming, writing, exploring; an impromptu game of football and a barbecue supper as the sun went down.

celebrate Wales’s success, and to bask in the unexpected heatwave sunshine. It was a glorious week away for all involved: Freya, Jess, Eliza and Emmeline, Imo, Anna, Stella and Lucy, Gruff, Ollie and Larry, and the two UWC students, Elias and Jackie. They could not have been better company. MJP & VRB

CREATIVE WRITING TRIP

Another adventurous expedition launched our final full day, as we set off in kayaks to explore St Non’s Bay, with its stacks and arches, caves and rocky outcrops. It was another scorching morning, and nobody minded the inevitable sabotaging of stability and capsizing. The final evening was marked with dinner at The Sloop at Porthgain, after the obligatory writing around the harbour under the towering ruins of the old brick and slate works. Between all these activities there was time to mooch around St David’s, to visit the market, to enjoy the seaside pleasures of fish and chips and real ice-creams, to lament the England football team’s dismal performance in the Euros and to

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Impressionable Minds Post-GCSE Trip to Rome Eighteen pupils from the Hundred travelled to Rome for a new venture, a post-GCSE cultural visit.

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POST-GCSE TRIP TO ROME

he week encompassed four days in the capital, and two in attractive provincial cities, Arezzo in Tuscany and Ferrara in Emilia Romagna. The pupils were excellent company and it was inspiring to see how willing they were to acquire new knowledge after the rigours of their examination season. We embarked on a busy programme of cultural visits, including on our first day a walk across the Quirinal Hill to S. Maria della Vittoria in order to see Bernini’s sculpture, The Ecstasy of St Teresa. The students were impressed by the technical feat of the work, and by the sumptuous setting of the Baroque interior. From there we walked down to Palazzo Barberini, designed by Maderno, Bernini and Borromini. We considered the stylistic differences of the three men, and the function of the building as a suburban palace. We ended our visit with a plenary underneath the enormous illusionistic ceiling by Cortona where we discussed how the painter had allegorised personal and papal power. In the afternoon and in increasing heat, we switched focus to Classical Rome, and Mr Giles addressed the students on the subject of the Colosseum, the Capitoline Hill and the Forum, before our appointment at the Capitoline Museum.

On the next day we visited a new museum in Rome, the Villa Valentini. This is an archaeological site adjacent to Trajan’s Column that has yielded amazing discoveries. Set in a series of darkened rooms with glass floors, the museum uses clever multi-media and technological methods to unfold the story of the site, culminating in truly enormous granite pillars, sole evidence of the gargantuan Temple of Divine Trajan. After lunch near the Spanish Steps, we moved across the Pincian Hill to the Borghese gardens and the famous Villa. There we saw the great collection of Caravaggios, Raphaels, et al., but spent special time devoted to Bernini’s four free-standing works, above all Apollo and Daphne. On Thursday morning we headed by train to Arezzo in Tuscany. We visited the house of Giorgio Vasari and considered his role as writer and artist. From there we moved on to the Basilica of St Francis and studied Piero della Francesca’s fresco cycle on the theme of the True Cross. We boarded a late afternoon train for Ferrara, and had a lovely evening in the shadow of Castello Estense. In the morning we paid visits to the Palazzo Schifanoia and the Castello Estense. At the former we talked about the astrological themes of the ‘Chamber of the Months’, and the peculiar style of Borso d’Este’s court, with

its Triumphs of the Gods, its zodiacal houses, and such strange manifestations of fifteenth-century Ferrarese life as the Palio of the Prostitutes. At the Castello the students enjoyed the chance of explore a vast, good old-fashioned castle, albeit one with surprisingly gracious rooms cheek-byjowl with primitive dungeons and smokeblackened kitchens. A late afternoon train took us back to Rome for our last night. Our final cultural destination was Palazzo Colonna, a real tour de force of Baroque splendour. Some of the students were able to demonstrate a grasp of what they had learned over the week, by interpreting allegories, identifying artists by style, and showing awareness of the symbolic function of rooms within palace complexes. It was satisfying to note such assimilation of ideas and the pupils were delighted and excited by their exposure to so many impressive and interesting things. I must record my gratitude to Mrs Woodford and Mr Giles for providing very considerable help and professional expertise.

“The pupils were excellent company and it was inspiring to see how willing they were to acquire new knowledge after the rigours of their examination season.”

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FSM


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

We are Sailing… Post-GCSE Sailing RYA Day Skipper Award

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oining the yachts in Lymington on a glorious sunny evening, the crews unpacked their belongings and found some rather unusual places to store the food including the depths of the bilges. After deciding on cabins and checking out the marina facilities we all headed into the town for our first crew meal which was a rather delicious curry. An early start the next morning began with a safety briefing covering the gas system, VHF radio, engine starting, winches and most importantly lifejackets.

This set the pattern for the week as the pupils each took their turn to skipper the yacht and make the important decisions about when to tack, gybe and reef. Learning the different sail positions depending on wind angles caused a few hilarious moments with the yacht completing several 360o manoeuvres and some rather spectacular gybes. The importance of these skills would be tested during the races later in the week but there was also a pride in the ability to sail out of situations rather than simply start the engine.

As soon as we left the mooring the pupils got immediately involved with helming and raising the sails as well as having to negotiate a rather large incoming ferry.

For lunches we anchored in stunning locations where the crews would often dive into the rather chilly waters before climbing back on board for a hot cup of

POST-GCSE SAILING

“Learning the different sail positions depending on wind angles caused a few hilarious moments with the yacht completing several 360o manoeuvres and some rather spectacular gybes.” soup and a sandwich. Evening meals were always ashore in well-chosen restaurants where we ate, drank and recounted the adventures of the day. By the end of the week everyone was awarded the RYA Competent Crew Certificate and several pupils were very close to RYA Day Skipper. KGAS

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

‘Slowly, slowly’ OA Expedition to Tanzania

‘Pole, pole’ we soon learnt is Swahili for ‘slowly, slowly’, it was all to be about timing. This was soon to become our mantra for the joint Marlborough College and Dauntsey’s school expedition to Tanzania. Our aim was firstly to summit Mt Meru at 4,566m in preparation and acclimatisation for our main objective, Kilimanjaro.

OA EXPEDITION TO TANZANIA

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ilimanjaro does not need much by way of introduction. Rising 5,895 metres, it is the world’s highest single standing mountain. It is also one of the highest mountains on the continent of Africa, one of the much-coveted ‘Seven Summits’. First summited by Hans Meyer in October 1889, the slopes of Kilimanjaro have been graced by some celebrated English mountaineers including HW Tilman and Eric Shipton back in 1930. Our initial challenge had nothing to do with the mountains but rather the uncertainties of the modern world and the endless boundaries of terrorism. A week prior to our departure via Istanbul, the international airport became a target for terrorists. Thankfully by our departure date the airport was operating normally. In the early hours of the 6th July we arrived, rather unconventionally by police escort, at the comfortable Weru Weru River Lodge to spend a relaxing first night against a backdrop of Kilimanjaro and roaming camels! After a necessary period of rest and final preparation we departed for Ngongongare Gate for registration and entry into the National Park.

At Momela Gate, the start of our trek and ascent of Mt. Meru at 4,566m, we met our crew of 26 porters, cooks and guides plus our armed park ranger. Whilst we set off on the gentler route affording more time for acclimatisation our porters made a direct approach to our first overnight camp at the Miriakamba Huts.

“Our summit day started at 03:30 as we made our way by the light of our head torches towards the first of the recognised landmarks” From the Miriakamba Huts it was another 1,000m ascent to Saddle Hut from which a summit attempt can be made. Our summit day started at 03:30 as we made our way by the light of our head torches towards the first of the recognised landmarks, Rhino Point at 3,800m. By 09:30 we had reached the summit, completing our ascent well within the guidebook time frame of between six to eight hours. The descent was the easy part but for some the effects of altitude were taking a toll. Rest and recuperation back at Weru Weru River Lodge were restricted

to an overnight stay so as not to lose the benefit of acclimatisation. Our chosen route up Kilimanjaro was the six-day Umbwe route which is described as ‘hard’ due to the initial ascent profile. The first ascent of 1,000m was an estimated six-hour trek and the team of 46 crew were anxious about arriving at our campsite after dark. We trekked at a tediously slow pace through ‘primary jungle’ along good tracks, thankfully arriving at Cave Camp (approx 2,800m) after five hours. Another 1,000m ascent the following day concluded at Barranco Camp where we saw for the first time just how popular Kilimanjaro had become. Here several


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

“Before too long we were looking for the early signs of sunrise as we trudged, one foot in front of the other, the path lit by the beams from our head torches and those in front of us.”

routes converged and there were many camps below the impressive Barranco Wall. The following morning, a little after sunrise, many groups had already started scrambling up the Barranco Wall, or ‘Breakfast Wall’ as it is sometimes referred to. It was all about timing. It initially looked an intimidating ascent up this rock wall but it was the only challenge in an otherwise steady trek at altitude. We made good progress over undulating terrain towards our next campsite, Karanga Camp at 3,995m. Karanga Camp to Barafu Camp was an easy three-and-a-half hour trek the following day, which was just as well, because it is from Barafu Camp at 4,673m,

For the rest of the day we rested and had a late meal before departing at 00:30. We expected it to be cold but never before had I worn a goose down jacket over another four layers of mountaineering clothing for a climb. At such a necessarily slow pace our momentum created little in the way of warmth. Before too long we were looking for the early signs of sunrise as we trudged, one foot in front of the other, the path lit by the beams from our head torches and those in front of us. As the early dawn rays lit up our surroundings magnificent views of a cloud inversion below us and the summit of Kilimanjaro above was a spectacular sight. After a welcome short break at Stella Point (5,756m) and a hot drink we made steady progress for a further 45 minutes to Uhuru Peak, the summit of Kilimanjaro at 5,895m and the highest point in Africa, where we all stood by 07:20. After numerous photos and hugs of celebration we retraced our steps back to Barafu Camp and past several groups still making painfully slow progress towards the summit. We continued our

descent and after a further rest at Barafu Camp made our way down the Mweka route to Millennium Camp for the night. The remainder of our descent was largely uneventful apart from a text message from The Master, our ‘Base’ contact informing us there had been a failed coup in Turkey and that Istanbul airport, our transiting airport, was closed. So it was all about timing! The only solution was to enjoy a two-day overnight Safari. We visited the Tarangire National Park and the Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area and concentrated on seeing as many of the ‘big five’ as possible whilst letting others worry about our travel arrangements.

OA EXPEDITION TO TANZANIA

also known as High Camp or Base Camp, that 1,222m summit attempts are made.

During a magnificent two days it became routine to see large numbers of lions, elephants, giraffe, and even a rhino at a distance plus countless other species of wild animals roaming in their natural habitat. Travelling back through Istanbul our flight home was, thankfully, routine. RT

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Exercise Pond Jump CCF TRIP TO SAN DIEGO

CCF Trip to San Diego

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ight cadets and three members of staff set off to San Diego on Exercise POND JUMP CADET 2.

Day 1 After carrying out a recce to and from key places we would be visiting during the trip we headed to the beach at La Jolla, which is a tourist hot spot and place of outstanding natural beauty, so it only seemed right to take a dip in the Pacific.

Day 2

Day 4

Day 6

We were hosted by the US Marine Corps at Camp Pendleton and after a briefing on the concept of the Marine Expeditionary Force we headed to the USMC 6th Amphibious Battalion who took us around the vehicle park and introduced the cadets to the Indoor Close Combat Trainer after lunch.

We left San Diego to visit the US Navy SEALs at the US Navy SEAL Training Centre at Coronado Island. After briefings and an extensive tour of all the facilities we headed to the indoor Combat Trainer. Here the cadets and staff were put through their paces with a variety of weapons including a Colt M4 Carbine that tested our weapon handling skills, judgement and reflexes in equal measure.

Our final day we visited a Nuclear Submarine at Point Loma Sub Base and then took a tour aboard the USS Midway aircraft carrier museum. The cadets who were in uniform also had their pictures taken with many Japanese tourist who wouldn’t take no for an answer at the Midway quayside!

Day 3 Started with breakfast at Denny’s Diner followed by a short drive to Miramar, home of the USMC Aviation (those of a certain age will recognise it from the film Top Gun “Fighter Town”). There we got to try out two simulators, one provided the chance to be a Sea Stallion Door Gunner and the other was to fly the VH20 USMC Transport Aircraft. The visit ended with a trip around the Flight Pan seeing both fixed wing and rotary assets available to the Marines followed by lunch in the DEFAC with USMC Pilots.

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After a thorough mental, physical and psychological work out we headed out to the beach followed by a little retail therapy and supper with two ex US Navy SEAL Captains at the best Mexican Restaurant in San Diego.

Day 5 After a late breakfast we headed off on a 25-mile bicycle ride along the board walk which hand railed the Pacific Coast taking in the sights, sounds and surf – all that is best about California.

“After a thorough mental, physical and psychological work out we headed out to the beach followed by a little retail therapy”

Day 7 After grabbing a few bargains at the Mall as the exchange rate was very favourable we boarded our flight back to Heathrow. A fantastic week was had by all. Roll on POND JUMP Cadet 3 2017! SJB


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CCF TRIP TO SAN DIEGO

TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Majestic Madrid Sixth Form Art Trip

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SIXTH FORM ART TRIP TO MADRID

fter a quick, early morning flight, we wasted no time stepping out of our hotel to the Atocha Train Station. We were greeted by towering ferns and plants, unexpectedly, inside the building. Spanish architects Alberto de Palacio Elissagne and Gustav Eiffel re-designed the station after a fire in 1892. Whilst maintaining the history of this monument, they skilfully incorporated modern, angular design with the prominent and organic installation of botanical gardens. Here we studied the nature of the locals and aura of Madrid, sketching and photographing its architectural beauty. During the afternoon, we walked to the world famous Museo del Prado. This inspirational museum holds one of the largest art collections in the world, featuring works by Bosch, Caravaggio, El Greco, Goya and Velásquez. We visited an exceptional Ingres exhibition, an important forerunner of the late 19th and early 20th century artistic revolutions. Ingres’ fascinating works were presented chronologically, with particular attention being paid to his complex relationship with portraiture. That evening, we ventured into the Old Town and ate a delicious,

traditional meal of paella and fish at the Restaurant La Catedral, whilst comparing and enthusing over our sketches of the day. We took a short trip to the Caixa Forum the next morning, to an abandoned electrical station, re-designed into a contemporary art gallery by Swiss architects Herzog and de Meuron. Its striking architecture, fuses cast-iron and steel with futuristic design. The main exhibition featured over one hundred works by the innovative Spanish artist Joan Miró. His Surrealist paintings, sculptures and ceramics, focused on how important specific objects and Miro’s culture were to his compelling art. He defined his artistic process in the late 1920s as the “assassination of painting”.

Walking through the bustling streets of Madrid, we passed through old stamp shops, the Plaza Major and on to the vibrant food market, Mercado de San Miguel, which features the best of every local delicacy. The different flavours of Spain’s capital city portrayed itself in traditional tapas, paella, fresh seafood and much more.

@MCol_Art Feb 17 Pupils drawing today within the magnificent Palacio Real courtyard in #Madrid

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS We later explored the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, which houses Picasso’s extensive monochromatic masterpiece, Guernica. An incredible work of art, and an icon of the Spanish Civil War. As well as Picasso, the Reina Sofia displayed art from Constant, installations by Alexander Calder, and further works by Miró and Dalí. That evening, we walked through central Madrid, taking in the atmosphere of the night.

On a return visit to the Museo del Prado in the afternoon, Mr Parnham gave two passionate and informative talks to our group, in front of key paintings by El Greco and Velásquez, and in particular, Las Meninas. Our Artist-in-Residence, Archie Franks, further expressed his great enthusiasm for Goya’s 14 Black Paintings. We all felt inspired by their knowledge and overwhelmed by the amount of exceptional art. During our long walk through Madrid at night, back to the hotel, we were all

moved by the lights of the Plaza De La Cibeles. The mesmerising beauty of the Royal Palace of Madrid welcomed us on our last day. The intricate detail of the glistening white stone was emphasised by the clear blue sky. We viewed 50 of the 2,000 luxuriously decorated rooms in awe. The architecture of the Palacio Real and Cathedral de La Almudena provided inspiration for photographs and dynamic sketches. Our remaining hours were spent exploring our favourite elements of Madrid; sketching, souvenir shopping and embracing the culture of such a beautiful city. Thank you to Mr Parnham, who led the trip, Mr Wilkins, Mrs Sandall and Archie Franks. It was a stimulating and truly inspiring four-day adventure, spent with wonderful people, learning about exceptional art and surrounding ourselves with remarkable culture.

SIXTH FORM ART TRIP TO MADRID

In the beaming morning sunshine, we took a short walk to the ThyssenBornemisza Museum. Marvelling at the vast variation of paintings by Goya, Van Gogh, Matisse, Freud and Picasso, we spent a few hours sketching and photographing its vast collection of works. After lunch, we visited the Chocolateria San Gines, where we were presented with towering plates of churros and cups of hot melted chocolate.

Aphra Mactaggart (IH)

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Windmills from a Golden Age History of Art Study Trip to the Low Countries

HISTORY OF ART STUDY TRIP TO THE LOW COUNTRIES

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ver the last week of the Easter holidays, 16 art historians from the Lower Sixth travelled with three staff (FSM, ATW, and AG) to the Netherlands and Belgium for the History of Art Study Trip. In the space of six full days, the students visited 10 towns and cities, and 15 museums, galleries, and churches. In addition, they enjoyed a reception at the studio of the most important still life painter in Holland, and a final group meal in Antwerp. The horrific events at Zaventem Airport, Brussels on the 22nd March occurred a few days after the College broke up for the Easter break. Since we had planned to return to the UK via Brussels airport, we needed to make last-minute adjustments to our plans, returning instead by ferry from the Hook of Holland. The students dealt with this circumstance with admirable forbearance. On the first evening of the trip, having settled into our main base at The Hague,

the students enjoyed a blowy walk on the wide sands of Scheveningen. On the next morning we travelled to Amsterdam for a long visit to the Rijksmuseum, and a late afternoon booking at the Van Gogh Museum. There was much to take in, not least the extraordinary Night Watch by Rembrandt, and examples from every stage of Van Gogh’s development. There was more Rembrandt to admire during the next day, which was wholly spent at The Hague. This included a memorable visit to the refurbished Mauritshuis with its great treasures, and then, by way of contrast, to the Escher in Het Paleis exhibit centring on the wonderful illusionism and mathematical games of M.C. Escher. That afternoon was rounded out with a look at Museum Bredius, the eighteenth-century mansion that is home to a collection of masterpieces from the Dutch Golden Age. We then took the coach to nearby Leiden for supper

– including mustard soup! – and students were put in mind of the opportunities of studying degree courses overseas. Now at the midpoint of the trip, we drove up to Haarlem to see the Frans Hals Museum. This is perhaps the best place in the world to see Dutch still life painting, and Still Life is the Thematic Topic we study for the Pre-U. It was gratifying to see the students’ naturally absorbed response to the fastidiously painted breakfast and banquet scenes. Unfortunately, rainy weather settled in after lunch, which coincided with our visit to an historic windmill on the river in Haarlem. Most of our time was spent inside the workings of the mill, but when we walked out on to the platform at the top, our panoramic views of the city were marred by torrents and blustery winds. The heavy rain continued on to Hilversum, and dampened our enjoyment of the Modernist town hall of 1931 by Willem Dudok. From there, we

“In the space of six full days, the students visited ten towns and cities, and fifteen museums, galleries, and churches.”


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS After three days largely spent in galleries, we changed pace by visiting two handsome small cities, Delft and Gouda, on our way down to our second base for the trip, Antwerp. In Delft, students visited the Nieuwe Kerk and studied the Baroque architecture of William the Silent’s tomb, as well as the remarkable reconfiguration of a Gothic building to fit the confessional needs of Calvinism. We then travelled to Gouda, passing the cheese shops on our way to the St Janskerk, with its UNESCO-listed stained-glass from the

sixteenth century. From there we arrived at Antwerp, where we were accommodated in the diamond quarter. Wet weather swept across the city, and our evening walk to the Renaissance town hall was a soggy affair. Fortunately, the next morning was bright and fair. We stopped by Otto Vaenius’s studio and Victor Horta’s Art Nouveau café on our way to Rubens’ House. From there we moved on to the Cathedral of Our Lady and stood before Rubens’ immensely moving altarpieces, The Raising of the Cross, and The Descent from the Cross. These were the most powerful pictures of the week for several of our students. One lovely aspect of our visit to the Cathedral was the opportunity it gave us to track down an altarpiece painted in 1897 by a certain J. Anthony, great-great grandfather to Hugo MacKichan, one of our party. Hugo had never seen this work before, but had heard plenty about it in family lore. After that, we moved on to the

Plantin-Moretus Museum, a wonderfully preserved workshop and HQ for the most important printers of Northern Europe in the seventeenth century. We then completed the afternoon, and the academic programme for the trip, at the Rockoxhuis, patrician home of Rubens’s friend and patron, Nicolaas Rockox. The day finished with the whole group gathering in a pizzeria in the company of Dr Wim van Dongen of the Vriej University of Amsterdam. After that, the party prepared for that trip to the Hook of Holland, broken up by a visit to Kinderdijk, the lowest point below sea-level in the Low Countries, and a site with no less than 19 eighteenth-century windmills. Their slow-turning sails perhaps in our fancy waved us off to the British coast.

HISTORY OF ART STUDY TRIP TO THE LOW COUNTRIES

arrived at a reception at the studio of Tjalf Sparnaay, celebrated still life artist, who gave generously of his time in talking to the students about the problems of still life and his own practice. Tjalf was immensely impressed by the eagerness of our students, saying that as the vernacular Dutch phrase has it, they had ‘asked his ears off his head’. He was delighted by their knowledge and interest.

FSM

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

JAPAN RUGBY TOUR

Widening Horizons Japan Rugby Tour 2016

The 2016 Japan tour not only represented a new country for Marlborough to tour, but also signified an age-old culture in which to immerse ourselves. With eight games to play within a 10-day touring period, both teams had a demanding schedule with little time to prepare for the physical battles ahead.

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aving never played a Japanese team or seen a native school team play rugby – our very first glimpses were on our only training day up in the mountains of Sugadaira. It gave us an insight of how dedicated and well-drilled they were and how long they would remain on the training pitch.

“... an incredible experience on and off the pitch and something we will never forget.”

The squad were treated to an incredible reception the night before the opening game, hosted by Kawaguchi High School with gifts exchanged, a first rendition of the tour song Wonderwall and a speech from the Mayor. The next day, the first of games took place at Sania Park in Sugadaira – the national training centre for Japanese rugby. Impressive surroundings and a stunning backdrop set the scene as the Colts kicked off the fixture list with a 38–5 win against a side that started the game with nine U18 players. The XV followed on and again eventually won 33–17, having come up against a very physically combative side who were clearly up for the challenge. Both teams from that point on understood the challenges that lay ahead of them. They had come against players that although smaller in stature would hit harder than a bullet train. Having spent three days up in the cooling mountain air, the teams started to travel towards the heat of Kyoto and Tokyo. What Marlborough encountered here was altogether new and very challenging. The average game day heat was 35 degrees and the humidity mostly held at around 80% – couple this with playing on artificial 3G surfaces represented a very different type of match preparation.

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We encountered playing two wholly different teams per half in one match, 13-a-side in another and a sweltering late afternoon at the YCAC club in Yokohama. Both teams remained unbeaten which was incredible given the huge itinerary we set out to achieve. This tour will remain firmly in the minds of all those who toured; an incredible experience on and off the pitch and something we will never forget. ACP

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Colts

P:4; W:4; D:0; L:0 Points for: 102 Points against: 50

P:4; W:4; D:0; L:0 Points for: 149 Points against: 29


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

Swimming the Turquoise Coast

SWIMTREK IN TURKEY

SwimTrek in Turkey

Eleven Marlburian open water pioneers of course, who went on a long distance sea SwimTrek in Turkey over half-term. This was Marlborough’s first SwimTrek, and the first pupil group SwimTrek had taken.

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his remarkable group of swimmers proved to be all that we would expect of Marlburians – adventurous, courteous, positive, curious and indefatigably energetic. They swam between five and six kilometres each day and showed such tenacity and resilience in the water. They were rewarded though, as every swim was memorable in its own way. What would not be memorable about swimming with turtles, diving into caves, swimming over an ancient city that sunk in an earthquake, reading the inscription on a WWII gravestone on the sea-bed, swimming through the ominously named Shark Bay, spotting tombs carved into cliffs or swimming to an amphitheatre? Perhaps the most memorable swim, and the most thought-provoking in terms of the geopolitical situation in the area, was the 3km crossing swim from the Greek Island of Kastellorizo back to Turkey. The Marlburians powered through very choppy waters with such determination. Little wonder that they all fell asleep on the boat after lunch. (In case there is any doubt, the Beaks on the trip didn’t spend their days on a boat sunbathing, casually following the swimmers through binoculars whilst shouting occasional encouragement across the waves. Oh no. This was Beaks and

pupils swimming side by side. It may be a bold suggestion but I suspect the Beaks might even have earned themselves a degree of credibility as swimmers.) The pupils proved to be veritable ‘foodies’, tucking into every Turkish mezze with relish – five-a-day quotas were gleefully exceeded with sun-ripened, flavoursome fruits and vegetables carefully prepared for us by the boat captain’s wife. Despite the endurance and stamina that the swims needed, the laughter and smiles during this trip were incessant. There wasn’t a calamity, or crisis or telling-off dispensed all week. The swimmers on this trip were such excellent company, each of them a uniquely charming and humorous conversationalist that made the week in Turkey with them an absolute joy. MS

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TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS

DEVIZES TO WESTMINSTER

Paddling up a Storm Devizes to Westminster

The Devizes to Westminster marathon kayaking race took place over the Easter weekend with 10 crews from Marlborough entering, 19 students and one member of Common Room.

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he 125-mile course is designed to be completed over 4 days with juniors camping for three nights at Newbury, Marlow and then Teddington, where they are expected to prepare their own meals, pitch their own tents and are responsible for leaving the campsite as they found it. The whole experience is tough physically, even tougher mentally, but a wonderful opportunity to challenge ourselves and discover what we are capable of. In preparation for the race we began training in late September three times a week and this continued all the way through to March. Occasionally we had to break the ice on the canal before putting

the boats into it. Most of us were beginners, barely able to paddle a mile and had to work up to kayaking 38 miles (between 5 and 7 hours continuous paddling) for each day of the race itself. The crews undertook 3 training races of between 11 and 35 miles as part of the Waterside series during the Lent Term. These taught us the skills of long-distance kayaking, capsize recovery, “portaging” the boats by carrying them around locks and weirs (77 required in the race) and being fed by hand by our support crews so as not to ingest canal water. We also spent a weekend in March prior to the race completing an overnight camp and paddle in order to make us all aware of

the challenges we would face on the actual race. Although it was one of the coldest nights of the year it ensured that we were all well-prepared for the race.

“With the sun shining, it was amazing to see so much support from the Marlborough community as many teachers and our parent support crews cheered us. The first day began bright and early at Devizes Wharf on Good Friday with 34 miles ahead. With the sun shining, it was amazing to see so much support from the Marlborough community as many teachers and our parent support crews cheered us. Thankfully every crew made it past the evil swan at Ladies Bridge – an achievement in itself. We all arrived very tired at Newbury, eager for a hot shower and some soup. The atmosphere in camp that night was one of exhaustion, but of quiet confidence for the next three days. Having completed the route to Newbury multiple times in practice Day 2 was more of a challenge as we faced stretches of the canal we hadn’t encountered before. Bitter cold and raging winds made the 36 miles very tough.

@MCol_OA May 25 DW squad team photo took place today, luckily they were a bit more organised for the official shot! @DWCanoeRace

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On Day 3 we kayaked from Marlow to Teddington, an area of the River Thames which included famous landmarks such as Windsor Castle and Hampton Court.


TR IPS & EX PEDITIONS All the crews finally arrived at Teddington, unaware that we would not be allowed to paddle the final day of the race. The weather was getting progressively worse, and life in camp very cold, wet and windy. At around 7pm that evening all the competitors were called together and we were told that the final day of the race would not be taking place due to the terrible weather caused by Storm Katie which was creating very dangerous conditions on the tidal section of the Thames. We were all extremely disappointed that we were not able to make it to Westminster having made it 108 miles with only 17 left. The fundamental aim of the team was to have everyone finish, which we managed.

DEVIZES TO WESTMINSTER

Huge standing waves were accompanied with hail, thunder and lightning which made the 38 miles even more gruelling.

However, as a team we won three events: the junior ladies, the schools and the best coach, which was an amazing achievement, and the most successful Marlborough has ever been in the race. We are hugely grateful to Mr Curry, Mr Tong, Mr Dixon, Mr Dennis and Tim Hudson for all their help and time without which we would not even have made it to 108 miles. To have taken a team of originally very mixed ability and prepared us for such a challenging event takes expertise and dedication to the cause. Many parents also contributed magnificently with the provision of food to prepare for our camping meals, and by meeting us every 3 or 4 miles along the route to resupply us with food and water which we are all extremely thankful for. Issy Perry and Olli Newbon

@MCol_OA Mar 28 Congratulations to all those that completed the 2016 @DWCanoeRace. Tough conditions tested everyone involved.

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A RT S & R E VI EW S

THE SCHOOL PLAY 62 THE PENNY READING 64 THE SHELL PLAY 66 EXAM SEASON PLAYS 68 THE MUSICAL YEAR 70 MICHAELMAS ORCHESTRAL 74 ORCHESTRAL & ENSEMBLES 75 SOUTHBANK SINFONIA CONCERT 76 WIND DEPARTMENT CONCERT 77 MCCS 78 IB VISUAL ARTS REVIEW 80 A LEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY 82 COLLISIONS REMOVE PROJECT 83 UPPER SIXTH FINE ART PERSONAL INVESTIGATION REVIEW 84 UPPER SIXTH FINE ART EXAMINATION 86 GCSE FINE ART EXAMINATION 88 WRAPPED REMOVE PROJECT 90 GCSE PROJECT 91 ART EXHIBITIONS 92 GCSE STORAGE 94 GCSE ELECTRONIC PROJECTS 95 AS PRODUCT DESIGN 96 A2 PRODUCT DESIGN 98


Ben Longcroft (CO)


ARTS & R EV IEWS

The School Play The Revenger’s Tragedy

David Kenworthy’s adaptation of The Revenger’s Tragedy was expertly framed as a clinical investigation of social behaviour and political ideology presented through the individual stories of the principal characters. The concept enabled a group of skilled young actors to tell this Jacobean story within a contemporary context.

THE SCHOOL PLAY

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he sensitive issue of mental health was given a highly realistic visual representation thanks to Paul Cox’s detailed hospital set design complete with medical equipment, fire exit signs and even the wall-mounted bacterial hand-wash. This, in addition to Josh Entecott’s clinical strip-lighting and the hospital scrubs and uniforms replicated by Dale Armitage, ensured that there was no mistaking where we were. Middleton’s characters became a group of patients reliving the violent and disturbing events that had led to their incarceration by means of supervised therapy. The actors were therefore required to live the story and reflect upon it simultaneously, and their ability to move effortlessly between the Jacobean language style and a more familiar post-dramatic one was most impressive throughout the performance. This cast worked seamlessly as an ensemble with some outstanding individual contributions.

@MarlboroughCol Nov 12 ‘The Revenger’s Tragedy’ – opened last night with great success

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ARTS & R EV IEWS characteristics and objectives. Not to be out-done in dastardly deeds was the other sibling partnership of Owen Hargrove and Isadora Corfield playing Ambitioso and Supervacuo who were happy to plot the execution of their brother with an array of well-played manipulative tactics. Uncorrupted characters were few and far between, but Ben Powell gave a sincere interpretation of the cuckolded courtier Antonio and Issy Foster gave us a beautiful and sensitive Castiza who tried in vain to resist the attempts of her impoverished mother, tactfully played by Hermione Llewelyn-Bowen, to sell her honour.

With such a rich narrative we were most grateful to the case workers, Charlie Henman and Charlotte Russell, who clarified events at every opportunity back in the frame of the hospital ward supported by a committed ensemble of medical staff and patients. This was an outstanding evening’s entertainment which succeeded in showing the political instabilities of Jacobean England to bear more than a passing similarity to our own.

THE SCHOOL PLAY

The scheming siblings at the centre of the drama were ruthlessly played by Georgia Vyvyan and William Atterton who crafted an utterly convincing balance in the relationship of the fiery sister and the cooler, more calculating brother. No match for the plotting of these two was the wonderfully dysfunctional ruling family, headed with authority by Max Foulds and Imogen Redpath as the Duke and Duchess. Their sons, played by Ned Seagrim, Virat Talwar and Oliver Cutts comfortably embraced the immoral standards set by their parents and the actors explored an impressive contrast of

JD

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

The Penny Reading

THE PENNY READING

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Anything Goes

ane Darby’s sparkling production of Anything Goes was as delightful as the famous Cole Porter song suggests. The treats were more delicious than DeLovely, packing a real contemporary punch into this 1930s farce set on the cruise liner Americana. From the moment the audience entered the Ellis Theatre we were treated to a sumptuous dockside vista, complete with sailors that seemed to have walked straight off an early twentiethcentury cigarette card. The interactive element of this innovative production was set up: we were guests on a themed cruise, the entertainment – Anything Goes – but a disaster (in the form of ‘man-flu’) required the all-female crew to recruit men from

the audience. The planted male cast were quick to volunteer – much to the relief of several boys in the Remove. This quickly ascended into a very polished and sharply slapstick production that buzzed and fizzed from one classic musical number to the next. Perhaps the greatest complement to this production was the seamless nature of the musical transitions, the actors effortlessly switched from dialogue to music putting character and intention before the school-actor stereotype of ‘showing-off ’ in front of their peers. ‘Say it in speech and some will listen; those nearest to you perhaps – and maybe they’ll disagree – BUT – say it in song and the mob will hush – will seldom disagree

and all are charmed enough to do your bidding’ (Sondheim). This was, from beginning to end, an ensemble piece and each member of the cast and backstage team contributed to making this such a glittering success. However, there are a few outstanding performances that should make special mention here. Georgia Vyvyan as the nightclub entertainer Reno Sweeney swept the stage with a subtlety and psychological continuity not usually associated with Cole Porter. Miss Vyvyan took advantage of every nuance and presented us with both the marble-carved entertainer (Blow Gabriel Blow!) and the beating heart of a woman on the edge of finding herself alone in life; her final thought in I Get a Kick Out of You seeming far more tragic than the song title first suggests. Jim Crossland as Billy Crocker was perfect casting. Jim bounded around the performance space with all the energy that puppy love could muster. This was high comedy at its best, from the shameless Sailor suit disguise to the revelation of Plum Blossom’s fate in the last scene. Mr Crossland’s ability to make us care about his love for Libby Adam’s Hope Harcourt was truly masterful; beyond all the play and slapstick was the classic boy meets girl storyline that requires genuine investment – and invest we did. Miss Adam’s Hope Harcourt was similarly detailed as she dealt with (perhaps) the most complex part of the story, struggling with her feelings for Billy in the light of her upcoming wedding to Evelyn. Little Dream Goodbye

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ARTS & R EV IEWS Fraser Hutchinson’s Moonface Martin was a fast-paced missile of comic action as he catapulted himself from one mistaken identity to another. The exhausting antics of Friendship were truly a musical theatre masterclass. He was ably assisted by Olivia Grant’s Erma whose sultry presence was magnetic, hilarious and perfectly pitched. In Buddie Beware she captivated the ensemble, the audience and anyone who happened to be passing by the theatre during the performance. The real comic heart of this piece, however, belonged to the older generation with Rollo Sutcliffe’s Elisha Whitney falling for Lucy Hudson’s sublime Evangeline. Miss Hudson’s performance was perfectly timed to capture every ounce of comic potential from this supporting role. Her Let’s Do It was a personal highlight, marrying together incredible vocal control with a joyous and comic performance. All of these central characters were held together by a very committed ensemble that provided so many highlights throughout the show. The tap-dancing Angels and Sailors were incredibly impressive and a testament to Jo Scanlan’s fantastic

choreography. The proceedings were held together slickly by Imogen Redpath’s Captain and Issy Carr’s Purser despite the efforts of Cressida Lawrence and Maeve Mahony as the Chinese converts attempting at every turn to open an illegal casino. There was a glorious pageant of characters from the ensemble filling the space with a real sense of variety and conjuring the glamour of a transatlantic cruise. The onstage band were sassy, intricate and bubbling with life under the superb direction of Alex Arkwright. The audience were treated to one glorioussounding number after another with this wonderful, textured and closely knit

THE PENNY READING

brought all these strands together and was beautifully and simply staged to emphasise Porter’s most poignant and moving song in the show. William Atterton as Lord Evelyn Oakleigh was a wonderful satire of English aristocracy complete with an imperialist interest in American jargon. His rendition of Gypsy in Me was a comic highlight juxtaposing the ‘stiff-upper-lip’ outward character with the passionate inner beast.

ensemble of musicians. Backstage was expertly managed by Violet Mackintosh who showed remarkable maturity in controlling a very complicated and detailed production. As ever the set design by Paul Cox was sumptuous, turning the Ellis theatre into the top deck of the Americana in fantastic detail. Dale Armitage and her team produced a glittering array of 1930s costumes that shone beautifully under Josh Entecott’s bold lighting design. This was total entertainment at its best and my hearty congratulations to all involved! DK

@MarlboroughCol Mar 9 Preparations are underway for the opening performance of tonight’s Penny Reading: Anything Goes

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The Shell Play Haroun and the Sea of Stories

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wonderfully sinister Snooty Buttoo. Sam Holden’s wide-eyed Haroun met Ijah Ofon’s charismatic Water Genies and were joined in battle by a wonderful ensemble of fish, a Floating Gardener and even a walrus. Haroun’s guide on this journey was the enigmatic Hoopoe played bombastically by Meriel Nolan.

he Shell brought to life the mysterious tale of Haroun in the Ellis Theatre in the Lent Term in a physical and imaginative style. Shadow puppets of weird and wonderful creatures circled the minimalist black box space which offset the bright and vivid costumes in this pageant of fantastical characters. The play itself, a meditation on freedom of speech set amidst corrupt elections, sends us on a journey of discovery through the lands Gup and Chupp, where the source of stories is in danger by the evil Kattam-shud. The quest to save the sea of stories becomes a quest to save the imaginative freedom of everyone, most notably the inhabitants of Haroun’s morose home city, a city ‘so ruinously sad it had forgotten its name’. The Shell, working as a tightly knit ensemble, brought this complex story to life in a grand style creating lots of vivid stage imagery and a series of bright and colourful characters. It would be wrong to make special mention of any individual

Paul Cox’s stark set design and Josh Entecott’s colourful lighting perfectly juxtaposed the highly physical and bold performance style. Dale Armitage and her team created vast numbers of imaginative costumes from the bright and lavishly feathered Hoopoe to the Pages that seemed to have walked straight out of Alice in Wonderland.

performances as this was such a team effort from start to finish. We were treated to many comedic turns from Sam Buck’s vain General Kitab through to Tate Oliphant’s

Congratulations to all involved in this innovative production that displayed a lot of promising talent for the future of Marlborough Drama. DK


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THE SHELL PLAY

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Exam Season Plays This year the exam season brought together a diverse range of classical and contemporary works as well as several original pieces devised by the students. Challenging issues were explored and the Bradleian once again became a centre to debate the nature of performance and the role that drama can play in provoking argument.

GCSE Productions

EXAM SEASON PLAYS

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he GCSE season was inspired by the work ‘consequence(s)’ and the groups chose to make pieces that combined different styles of text and characters related to this theme. The Flood explored the consequences of the current refugee crisis contrasted against the experience of flood victims in the north of England last winter. This was a highly charged and physical piece of theatre that sought to explore objectively both sides of the immigration argument.

The Age of Kali sought to capture and rationalise a chaotic series of world events tied into the Hindu end of days prophecy. Framed as a history lecture the actors explored historical figures that have stood up for their beliefs even though these beliefs are controversial or subversive in their own context. Milk and Honey was a devastating exploration of human destruction set amongst the ruins of a nuclear holocaust. This was a powerful piece of ensemble work reconstructing fragments of a culture through the fractured memories and objects of its survivors. Other People explored the issue of transgender children and the struggle we all have to understand who we are. This piece balanced the tragic tale of a violent battle with self-identity with the optimistic and hopeful elements of transformation and renewal.


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AS level Productions

The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Brecht belongs to a different era of political theatre, one driven by a scientific desire

to change society through a clinical application of devices used in performance to provoke debate. Brecht’s text is carefully constructed to allow the audience to objectively consider the actions of the characters without ever empathising with them – a challenge that this group of actors faced head on. Re-locating the story to the contemporary world, we were faced with the story of a child refugee seeking safety from the extremist government that had taken over his home. The ensemble were ever-present, singing, playing instruments and exposing the fiction of the tale. They were, however, consistently reminding us of the real atrocities that such children face in their daily lives and this contrast created a powerful and engaging piece of theatre.

EXAM SEASON PLAYS

The AS season contrasted two pieces of political theatre written 50 years apart but similar in their desire to interrogate and expose human nature. Fewer Emergencies by Martin Crimp is a brutal and violent trio of short plays written in the postdramatic style. The tightly knit ensemble constructed characters of staggering cruelty to play out the scenarios in Crimp’s assault on normality. This was beautifully played using a series of symbolic objects that forced the spectator to make connections between the contrasting scenarios. Framed within a community centre the audience drank sweetened orange cordial which only served to heighten the horror of the topics under discussion.

DK

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THE MUSICAL YEAR

The Musical Year A Review by Philip Dukes

Pupils’ Autumn Recital In a varied and thoroughly entertaining programme of ambitious music-making the Autumn Pupils’ Recital began the feast of musical performances scheduled for the year ahead. Helena Mackie is a firmly established member of the National Youth Orchestra these days and she opened proceedings with an accomplished and moving rendition of Strauss’s magnificent Oboe Concerto (2nd movement), setting the

tone (quite literally) for what followed. Not a weak link amongst them: a brave and increasingly robust performance from cellist Luke Smith, a fine, controlled and passionate dose of Kreisler from violinist Ciara Parker-Northeast, some wonderfully projected flute playing from Finn Kverndal, an extraordinarily confident and well-prepared display on marimba from Florence Tuckey, a dreamy romance from flautist James Eyles, swashbuckling and exciting rhythm from the Percussion Quartet, exquisite control, detail and pure class from flautist Sarah Mattinson

(as always), a moving and stirring Pie Jesu (Andrew Lloyd Webber) from vocalists Tertia Paterson and Lucy Hudson and to round this remarkable evening off, an astonishing and quite brilliantly delivered performance of Camille Saint-Saëns’s beguiling and persuasive Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso from the outstanding Lizzie Daniels on violin. PTD

Calne Festival Music Scholars Recital The annual Calne Music Festival is always a wonderful opportunity for our most talented musicians to perform.

Florence Tuckey (EL)

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Hattie Cockerill and Johnny Venn treated us to the subtle sounds of the oboe, while George Nicholson indulged us with the haunting, muted sounds of Ravel’s Habanera on the trumpet. James Eyles performed an unusual and quirky piece by Lennox Berkeley, originally for recorder. Some beautiful piano playing was displayed by Finn Kverndal and Jon Lam, whilst Ciara Parker-Northeast (violin) and Sarah Mattinson (flute) lifted the spirits with virtuosic fireworks. To end, Tertia Paterson and Lucy Hudson sang, angelically, the Pie Jesu by Andrew Lloyd Webber to a hugely appreciative audience. CT


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THE MUSICAL YEAR

Bella Bryan (IH) & Eleanor Tuckey (EL)

Hattie Cockerill (MO)

Royal Over-Seas League Gala Performance

Advent Carol Service

A packed Princess Alexandra Hall at the Royal Over-Seas League witnessed some outstanding contributions from Upper and Lower School music scholars together with non-scholars reflecting the considerable depth of talent and interest across all yeargroups. The Brass Quintet opened proceedings with a polished account of Ewald’s 3rd Quintet, followed by persuasive and sensitive performances from the Lower School String Quintet, the Mozart Oboe Quartet and the Schubert Trout Quintet. The Telemann Quartet (a mixed woodwind and string ensemble) also performed with freshness and zest alongside energetic and purposeful piano playing from both Thor and Finn Kverndal. With an excellent contribution of a Tarantelle from Hattie Cockerill and Sarah Mattinson and a tempting and effective contribution from the Jazz Quartet the evening was rounded off in style by Thor Kverndal, Scherzo in Bb by Chopin and Lizzie Daniels in a sparkling rendition of Saint-Saëns’s Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso. Clare Toomer once again was the brilliant accompanist throughout. PTD

There can be no doubt that this year’s Advent Carol Service was perhaps one of the most special in living memory. A packed and beautifully decorated Chapel is unquestionably the perfect setting to celebrate the new Christian year and the Choir’s contribution to this exquisite occasion was colossal. The choice of music selected by Choirmaster Alex Hodgkinson was predominantly English (Vaughan Williams, Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Andrew Carter and our very own Adam Staines) and a pleasing blend of classic and the more adventurous perfectly complemented by the readings – the highlight, perhaps, being Christmas by Sir John Betjeman. From the outset the Choir’s introit, The Truth from Above was positive, well-paced in tempo and totally secure in pitch offering the perfect start and allowing the Choir to move effortlessly and seamlessly through the service under the expert guidance and fastidious direction of Hodgkinson. There were some delightful highlights – Simon Whalley’s descant in O come, O come, Emmanuel was a treat, as was the Junior Singers in Lady, My Lord Will Come with Adam Staines as both conductor and composer. The latter was particularly

atmospheric and perfectly crafted. Perhaps the most arresting musical moment come as the Choir sang A Maiden Most Gentle, leaving the congregation spellbound with its beauty of line and phrase. PTD

Carol Services The traditional festival of carols was anything but traditional or routine. Point of fact, it was a superb blend of the established with music by the late Sir David Willcocks, the evergreen John Rutter and a splash of the unusual in Sir Richard Rodney Bennett and Eric Whitacre. There were one or two further nice additional touches with organ music played by pupils Annabel Hannan, James Eyles and Luke Smith before the service and a beautiful vocal quintet in an arresting performance of Luis de Victoria’s Ave Maria. Soloists Anna Laakkonen, Alice Springett, Juliette Hughan and Willow Cunningham deserve special praise for brave and expressive performances of Once in Royal David’s City and the hymns were gilded with a splash of brass to provide welcome and extra colour. Choirmaster Alex Hodgkinson once again cultivated a most precise and sophisticated performance from the Choir – phrasing and diction were particularly impressive

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Jonathan Venn (C3) Advent Carols

and dynamic colours persuasively delivered, none more so than in the line In a stable, ’tis no fable receiving a beautiful dynamic echo to conclude this famous carol. All in all, another fine bespoke weekend of high quality music-making for which all those involved should feel rightly proud.

missed by some, is Holman Hunt’s 1853 masterpiece, The Light of the World, which adorns a side chapel offering yet another inspirational twist to the building. Keble College is special, very special, and the choir clearly sensed that moment. PTD

PTD

THE MUSICAL YEAR

Pupils’ Spring Recital A shorter recital rounded off the first quarter of this even shorter term to excellent effect. Jonathan Venn’s (oboe) sophisticated opener was a dream start (what a sound…), Shell Scholar Florence Tuckey (trombone) delivered a performance of notable composure and control, Bella Patrick (vocal) gave a moving rendition of Cole Porter’s So in Love, the Brass Quintet produced some fine form in a well-balanced, varied and colourful performance, Sarah Mattinson (flute) was her usual outstanding self (Sonata tonight), and after Eleanor Tuckey (violin) delivered a warm, expressive dose of Brahms the evening came to a close with the Gibson Jazz Quartet’s smoky, and where necessary, lively and articulated finale. PTD

Evensong at Keble There is much lively debate concerning the architectural design of Keble College, Oxford but what is beyond conjecture is the chapel: Butterfield’s 1876 splendid design provides an opulent environment and acoustic in which the Chapel Choir, who sang music by Howells and Noble, certainly flourished. The tone was rich and lyrical and once again, Choirmaster Hodgkinson was fastidious in details of diction and timing, ensuring a polished and consummately musical performance. A further highlight of the chapel, perhaps

The Dream of Gerontius There is much pomp and circumstance made of Elgar’s more popular works, but as good as they are, it’s works like The Dream of Gerontius that put him in the Premier League of the greatest composers of all time. Marlborough College Choral Society worked themselves to the bone to grapple with the complexity which presents itself in Elgar’s score. Full marks then to choirmaster and conductor, Alex Hodgkinson, who led with true distinction to bring together a magnificent performance. The choir sounded in good heart, bolstered by the excellent Chapel Choir of the College and the fine professional orchestra assembled by Alex Arkwright and Adrian Eales (for whom the latter should be given a special mention as this was his final performance as leader of the orchestra after over 35 years of dedicated service as Head of Strings at the College). Gerontius needs good soloists too, and in this performance they were excellent, brilliantly led by the dashing James Oxley (tenor), the expressive Susanna Spicer (SU 1979-81) (mezzo) and the suave Robert Rice (baritone) alongside. David Bednall provided excellent support as a répétiteur during rehearsals and then lent his superb skills as an organist for the performance, with Marlborough College’s Beckerath organ adding that truly Elgarian ‘grandiose’ feel to proceedings. PTD @MCol_Music Apr 25 Chapel Choir all excited on the way to @ StPaulsLondon to sing Eucharist at 5pm

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Vocal Masterclass Choral music has enjoyed a long and distinguished tradition at Marlborough College. Indeed, interest in this area remains at unprecedented levels, the choirs are full to capacity and recent musicals, choral presentations and recitals indicate the future is equally bright. Penny Jenkins’s vocal masterclass offered an alternative approach to the weekly diet of tuition adding an extra dimension of opportunity. The participating pupils clearly relished the chance to develop their varied and impressive skills. Jenkins is a world-renowned coach and her teaching is both a mixture of the conventional and a splash of the unorthodox. The results are immediate and impressive – that ability by a great coach to pinpoint the faults and offer solutions and techniques for the performers to take away and apply to their daily work. And there was humour too, which is an essential ingredient of teaching (and performing in general actually) promoting a relaxed atmosphere and an inclusive one too as Jenkins embraced her audience in the process of her teaching. PTD

Sung Eucharist at St Paul’s Cathedral St Paul’s Cathedral is quite simply aweinspiring. Opened in 1708 and designed by Sir Christopher Wren, Christian worship has been offered there for 1400 years and the building remains an iconic landmark within the City of London and beyond. In spite of being an intimidating place to perform the Choir clearly warmed to the task, peaking in the Sanctus of Schubert’s Mass in G. There was also a sensitive and well-crafted anthem in the form of Give us the Wings of Faith by Ernest Bullock. Jonathan Venn and Lucy Hudson completed notable solos alongside the


ARTS & R EV IEWS Bella Imi (EL)

Annabel Hannan (NC)

PTD

May Day Madrigals It doesn’t come much better than this: a glorious spring morning (at last), a fine selection of May ditties from the excellent Chamber Choir and an appreciative and large crowd, all gathered in Court to celebrate May Day weekend. Once again, Choirmaster Alex Hodgkinson coaxed a hearty and lusty display from the vocalists which concluded with a delightful spot of barbershop singing. One couldn’t help but to be swept up by the atmosphere. Altogether, a thoroughly delightful moment in time. PTD

Jazz Evening What a delightful Jazz Evening we were all treated to – the smoky black that the ensembles were all dressed in oozed jazzy finesse and cool and what we saw was as brilliant as what we went on to hear. The pupils’ enjoyment of playing and participating radiated out of them and was just infectious. George Cayley never stopped smiling behind his drum kit, Bella Imi positively smouldered with her solos with the Jazz Quartet, Sarah Mattinson – whom we often see so graciously poised flute in hand – was equally poised at the piano, Salome Northridge charmed us once again and Luke Smith was, well, just frankly on stage all the time looking cool with his bass guitar. It speaks volumes about his commitment to rehearsal that he should have been included in every ensemble on the night.

There is something joyous about an ensemble of dizzyingly different heights – what’s not to love about Ben Spink holding his own near Tobias Wyles at twice Ben’s height? Rare and special are the occasions when we get to see students of different age groups working so happily together at such a high standard and with such a varied repertoire too. Equally joyous is the opportunity to see girls making just as much noise with their trombones, saxophones and trumpets as the boys – Florence Tuckey’s lung capacity was quite clearly comparable to Nico Fletcher’s, Nicky Savage’s trumpeting wasn’t about to be overshadowed by George Nicholson’s nor did Georgia Gibson’s alto saxophone make any less noise than Nicholas Rusinov’s, who looked decidedly funky with his baritone saxophone. Thor Kverndal’s toes tapped rhythmically as he played his saxophone and didn’t we all find ourselves doing the very same? Maria von Weissenberg

End-of-Year Showcase Concert The annual End-of-Year Showcase Concert in the Ellis Theatre is an invaluable opportunity to witness music

making in both the Shell and Remove yeargroups, and this year we were treated to a remarkable display of variety, and at times, virtuosity from both scholars and non-scholars alike. There was much to admire both in a solo and ensemble capacity, reflecting the diversity and depth from all corners of the Music Department. There was a first in a performance from a Marlborough College Malaysia pupil, Dayini Kamarul Baharin (piano) whose two Novelettes by Poulenc were a real highlight of the show. A number of Music Scholars were also on display: Darcey Goble (piano), Florence Tuckey (trombone), Annabel Hannan (piano), Jason Kellinger (trumpet), Alice Wood (oboe) and Jon Lam (piano), all worthy of special mention and with spirited displays from Concert Band, Junior Percussion Ensemble, Showcase Big Band and some rock and pop items preceding the finale from Junior Strings and Junior Singers, the absolutely huge audience was given a real treat.

THE MUSICAL YEAR

usual musical mastery, attention to detail and charisma of Choirmaster, Alex Hodgkinson. This is a valuable London performance for the Choir in front of a large congregation and on this showing, a presentation for which Marlborough College should be truly proud.

What’s particularly exciting is that these young musicians are the future of music at Marlborough and in their hands the future seems very bright. PTD

@MCol_Music May 10 The BCC (Beaks’ Church Crawlers) celebrated the arrival of May with madrigals at Bibury, Quenington and Fairford

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A Rousing Conclusion! Michaelmas Orchestral Concerts

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irst, a student-led concert entertained us with a sequence of good variety: an unexpected but deft piano improvisation, a short, well-prepared flute piece, a Brahms intermezzo, Stormy Weather calmly given, and finished with a very enjoyable performance of the first movement of the Bach Oboe and Violin concerto. Watching student accompanists grow in confidence was a huge pleasure, and the lively spirit of cooperation and endeavour in the room was as enjoyable as the music itself. In the Ellis Theatre on Sunday evening the string orchestra opened the concert with a Haydn movement and the Corelli Christmas concerto. The soloists (Lizzie Daniels, Bel Guillaume, Bella Bryan) have the experience now to be chamber players together, drawing in the others through their communication.

Leaping a continent and two centuries brought the Oklahoma overture, and the newly arrived woodwind and brass players almost seemed to be rocking on a chair and strumming a guitar as they played, though there was one of those too. Another cowboy in the gallery segued into a characterful rendition of Oh what a beautiful morning. What a lovely voice is growing there in Jonathan Venn. Seeing him walk out of the oboe section in normal concert dress later to reprise his solo showed just how versatile some of the College musicians are. A young timpanist at full throttle was a delight; he later reappeared with a trombone. Another able soloist, Rhys Barnes, performed the Suite for Viola and Small Orchestra by Vaughan Williams. Jolly Broadway gave way to a lyrical vision of the English countryside with the change of tone immediate and evocative.

The concert finished with the first movement of Dvorák’s New World Symphony. The brass section always enjoys a good bit of Dvorák and this was no exception, with the whole orchestra benefiting from the obvious accomplishment of its exceedingly able leader, and dedicated conductor, to bring a rousing conclusion. Finally twenty-four hours later in the Chapel a small group of singers gave us Compline. Obviously familiar with the demands of plainsong and Renaissance motets, they brought a lovely sense of intimacy, peace and stilling of the self ’s loud voice in preparation for what is to come. Whether the end of the day, or the Christmas dash, was irrelevant. Julia Daniels (B3 1978-80)


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The Final Countdown Orchestral and Ensembles Concert

This is always the most moving concert of the year as we say goodbye to the leavers who have put in years of hard work and dedication. porting their traditional red rose and standing for their individual ovation, they sum up what it is to be a Marlburian! The evening began with the Master cutting the ribbon on a new conductor’s rostrum, which had been beautifully crafted by Hattie Cockerill as part of her Design Technology A level. Brasser opened the concert with the mysterious and haunting fantasy suite Ghosts by Stephen McNeff. Each movement opened with Lucy Hudson reciting extracts of poetry and prose. Her timing and delivery was absolutely exquisite. The band came to life with the sound of eerie, ghostly chains and demonstrated superb rhythmic and dynamic clarity. The party atmosphere was then ignited by the tradition of playing The Final Countdown. Musically, this could not be called ‘high art’ but the audience were left in no doubt that the students were enjoying themselves. The Chamber orchestra followed with Janáček’s Andante from his Suite for Orchestra. Rich and indulgent, this work is extremely early in his output and could well be mistaken as Dvořák. Hattie Cockerill returned to the front of the stage to perform as the oboe soloist in Gabriel’s Oboe by Morricone. She caught the atmosphere wonderfully with her mesmerising interpretation of this wellknown theme tune from The Mission. The

last two pieces by the Chamber Orchestra were pure delights! I have never seen so many smiles on stage as they positively danced their way through Eleanor Rigby and Plink, Plank, Plunk, by Leroy Anderson. The latter (by popular demand) is played completely pizzicato and requires real commitment to project the sound to the back of the hall. This they managed ‘in spades’! This was Adrian Eales’s final appearance as the conductor of Chamber Orchestra and the smiles radiating from the students were a great reminder of how much he is loved and respected. He will be sorely missed.

the greats of the piano repertoire. The slow movement from Grieg’s Piano Concerto is rhapsodic in feel and Thor commits fully to the Romantic vein. He draws his audience in with his flamboyant gestures, teasing us through every musical nuance.

By way of contrast, the Symphony Orchestra opened with the rousing Dam Busters March. Displaying rich colours and real physical engagement, this could have passed as a professional performance. The mood was broken when Georgia Ashworth came on to the stage to perform the more reflective and gentler Romance by Beethoven. This work is deceptively difficult but Georgia produced an acutely sensitive rendition. Most remarkable was her incredibly mature approach to her playing. At all times the music came first – exquisite tuning, broad and beautiful lines and an astonishing understanding of the long arch of sound required.

CT

The final work was Walton’s Crown Imperial. A perfect end to a glorious concert, this work displays a wonderfully healthy patriotism. As it drew to a close, I could see the tears welling up in the eyes of the leavers. Let us all hope that they continue with their music-making through university and for many years to come.

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“This was Adrian Eales’s final appearance as the conductor of Chamber Orchestra and the smiles radiating from the students were a great reminder of how much he is loved and respected. He will be sorely missed.”

Continuing the more introspective mood, Thor Kverndal treated us to one of

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‘Where Words End Music Begins’ (Heinrich Heine) Southbank Sinfonia Concert

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he annual visit of the Southbank Sinfonia is hugely anticipated by all the students involved. For two days the side-by-side arrangement requires real commitment and concentration by all of the players.

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education and the performers will never forget the experience of playing alongside the Southbank Sinfonia. Together they produced a beautifully warm sound so appropriate for Elgar.

Saturday night simply buzzed with excitement. I have rarely seen the Memorial Hall so full. Opening the concert was Brasser, conducted by Alex Arkwright. Here we enjoyed both English pastoral charm and the vigour of spirited dance-like folksongs in Vaughan Williams’s Suite. Clarity and synchronisation are never easy with wind instruments because of the onset of notes but here the players were united in their efforts and the end result sparkled.

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto is one of the greatest challenges for any young violinist. Lizzie Daniels, the soloist certainly rose to that challenge. She owned the stage in a 20-minute movement which demonstrated maturity, technical brilliance and stamina. The most remarkable aspect of her performance was the grace and undemonstrative manner in which she revealed her compelling vision of the work to the rapt audience. Her exceptional abilities allowed her to be the true servant of the music.

The Chamber orchestra was beautifully led by Adrian Eales who appeared to be relishing one of the genre’s mostloved works. The Serenade for Strings is an essential part of every string player’s

To bring the concert to a close, we were treated to a passionate rendition of Smetana’s Vltava from Ma Vlast. Philip Dukes conducted the Symphony Orchestra in a highly disciplined and richly coloured

Lizzie Daniels (IH)

performance where the only splashing to be heard was from the watery motifs, which represent the journey of the river. Audience and performers alike left in a buoyant mood and we all look forward to next year’s creative collaboration. CT


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That’s Life Wind Department Concert

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n enthusiastic Memorial Hall audience was entertained by an energetic and eclectic mix of material, the common theme being the evident enjoyment of both players and conductors. Big Band set the tone with three highquality pieces, including a rendition of That’s Life as a suitable tribute to Frank Sinatra, who was born on 12th December 1915 which was sung with great charisma by Jordan Coles. The Aladdin Medley from the Saxophone Ensemble provided a seasonal change of mood. The Brass Quintet produced a very polished and well-balanced performance of an Ewald movement. The Jazz Ensemble featured many small solos in the uplifting You’re So Delightful and the title defying Sack Of Woe. The most rapturous response from the audience was reserved for the Percussion Ensemble, inspired by Sacha Johnson. The relentless rhythms were both inclusive and irresistible. Brasser concluded the concert with a set of three varied works, starting with the popular and climactic Creed by Himes. The atmospheric Sleep by Whitacre was an interesting experiment, being more familiar as a vocal piece. The dramatic Slipstream by Sparke provided a fitting finale to the musical term. JAG

Jordan Coles (SU)

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MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE CONCERT SERIES

Marlborough College Concert Series

Emma Johnson

Emma Johnson Crowned BBC Young Musician of the Year in 1984, Emma Johnson’s career blossomed into recitalist, soloist, director and chamber musician. Her latest trio par excellence, entitled Jazz Goes to Town, with fellow musicians John Lenehan (piano) and Paul Clarvis (drum kit) was quite brilliant.

Dame Felicity Lott

Dame Felicity Lott There can be few more revered or accomplished musicians alive today than the magnificent soprano Dame Felicity Lott: a world class singer indeed. A perfect start to the 2015/16 season and clearly appreciated by the regular Memorial Hall MCCS audience. Dame Felicity chose a truly varied programme, embracing a fabulous array of styles and colour – all beautifully crafted, shaped and delivered – particularly, perhaps, the Poulenc and Wolf in the first half. Graham Johnson was the outstanding accompanist as he expertly guided, supported and articulated each song to perfection. Having heard the ‘new’ Steinway in a number of solo concerts of late, it was particularly gratifying to hear it in a more delicate role – demonstrating its versatility and sublime range of tonal nuance.

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S E A S O N

The performance explored the roots and development of jazz with particular emphasis on the crucible of New Orleans – an ideal environment for African and European musical traditions to come together and react and evolve into a new music, namely jazz.

Perhaps the overriding impression that we were left with, however, was the totally effortless (and near faultless) delivery of the whole recital whatever the language or mood.

The result was an eclectic mixture of style, character and colour in which interest and energy never wanes. Each musical morsel was crafted with consummate skill with rhythmic control expertly delivered. The rapport between the virtuosic Lenehan and outstanding Clarvis in support of Johnson was nothing short of masterly. Johnson’s informative chat between each item created an informal and relaxed mood and mixed with the wit and humour injected into proceedings by Clarvis in particular (he grins through virtually the whole delightful process) the effect was truly special – ebullient, reflective, historical and unquestionably uplifting.

PTD

PTD

Charles Owen and Katya Apekisheva Charles Owen and Katya Apekisheva are two pianists who over their careers have become critically acclaimed, as both soloists and ensemble players. With a plethora of international experience as pianists, their virtuosic skill and dexterity was apparent in their choice of repertoire. Opening the concert, they played Sonata for Four Hands by a young Poulenc. The composition itself bears little resemblance to the harmonic and melodic style that is so easily recognisable as Poulenc, but Charles and Katya characterised each movement with beautifully varying colour, Charles Owen and Katya Apekisheva

photo credit: John Batten


The ballet Petrushka by Stravinsky was performed with an abundance of vibrant intensity and incredible care. The unusual spacing of chords in the piano and imitative moving lines made the instrument speak as though it was an entire orchestra. Ravel was influenced hugely from a young age by Spanish music, and the Rhapsodie Espagnole (not least by the name) is another example of such an inspiration. A mysterious four-note motif descends in the piano, forming the basis of the musical material for the first movement. The next two movements were both derived from Spanish dances; the Malagueña and Habanera were brought to life by the two pianists with expert dexterity and nuance. The final movement depicted a Spanish Fair, building excitingly through to a fortissimo climax. The final piece was the Suite from The Nutcracker by Tchaikovsky. The suite (representing only eight movements from the original ballet) sounded equally at home on the piano for four hands, as it does with a full orchestra. Both Charles and Katya conveyed a sense of exuberance and spirit, making the piano dance with a sense of Christmas festivities to come. In each movement, the delicate touch that the pianists produced brought this famous piece of music to life. AOJS

Tasmin Little Tasmin Little is a violinist of international repute and class. No surprise, then, that her recital with the outstanding pianist Martin Roscoe was an absolute delight. The rapport between Little and Roscoe was faultless and beautifully balanced – Roscoe’s tender and sophisticated touch perfectly complementing Little’s ravishing, vibratoladen sound.

ARTS & R EV IEWS

after which the rumbling timpani proclaim the instability that underlines much of this piece. The opening was full of controlled agitation, giving way to transitional phrases led by the trombones in a measured and understated mellow timbre. Simon Over controlled the colours expertly in the second theme in which the tonality changes constantly from major to minor. After the development section, the recapitulation begins with the placement of the strong opening two chords once more, leading to a long coda, and closing with a sense of sombre sobriety.

Tasmin Little

photo credit: Benjamin Ealovega

If you are a Fauré lover then this was a gift from God – his sumptuous (but tricky) A major Sonata was exquisitely delivered, with all the necessary subtlety of French colour and panache required to bring this work to life. Or perhaps your passion is Beethoven? There can surely be no greater sonata than The Kreutzer and this was a performance to be reckoned with: brimming with vitality, energy, flair, charisma, sublime lyricism and crisp articulation. All this preceded by a delicate rendition of Schubert’s D major Sonatina which set the tone (quite literally) for the magic that followed. MCCS prides itself on inviting ‘world class’ musicians to perform within our community and this was just about as good an example as you get. Wonderful stuff indeed. PTD

Southbank Sinfonia It is always a pleasure to hear the sound of a young orchestra, full of youthful musicianship and integrity, passion and pride of place. Southbank Sinfonia, conducted by Simon Over produced a wonderfully balanced programme complemented by sensitive playing, expression, and a great sense of musical perspective. The first two chords of the Brahms Tragic Overture are instantly recognisable,

Bruch’s Concerto for Clarinet and Viola contained rich, lyrical musical lines which were drawn out by the orchestra, delicately accompanying the two soloists. Bruch favoured these two instruments, especially in partnership (he wrote a further series of eight pieces for viola, clarinet, and piano), and what better partnership to play these instruments than Sacha Rattle and our own Philip Dukes. The soloists’ interaction with each other, the orchestra, conductor, and the music brought a beautiful sense of poignant placement and sincerity. Each movement left one with an overwhelming sense of gratification and equanimity.

MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE CONCERT SERIES

and developed rhythmic passages with great energy.

The concert was concluded by a robust and refreshing performance of Dvorák’s Symphony No. 6 in D major. The first movement was a statement in itself, with the full resources of the orchestra combining to produce a fantastic sound. The violins dominated the second movement, with a wonderful melody, which is then fragmented and sung by different instruments. The third movement was furious in character, but never uncontrolled. The woodwind had a great prominence in this movement, with articulated timpani entries bringing another dimension to the sound. The final movement concluded in a lively fugato, with each entry eminently rising through the texture, finishing with a bold chorale. AOJS

Southbank Sinfonia

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International Perspectives IB Visual Arts Review

Willo Corfield (MM)

This year, a highly engaging, multi-disciplinary exhibition of studio-based resolutions was adeptly curated by our Upper Sixth IB Visual Art students within the Mount House gallery. Visitors to the show, were able to view a dexterous range of two- and three-dimensional resolutions.

IB VISUAL ARTS REVIEW

O

ur six students also impressed with their depth of research involving both Western and Non-Western Art practices. Further connections were made between the student’s own subject matter and social, political and international issues. Independent themes ranged from ‘Colonialism’, ‘The Human Condition: Living Under Authoritarian Regimes’, ‘Family Migration and the Syrian Refugee Crisis’, to ‘De-constructivist Architecture’ and ‘The Perception of Identity Through Beauty in Different Cultures’. JHP

Alexandru Hosu (LI)

Willo Corfield (MM)

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Masha Yatsenko (IH)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Gabriella Gormley (MM)

Alexandru Hosu (LI)

IB VISUAL ARTS REVIEW

Magen Shvidler (LI)

Magen Shvidler (LI)

Keya Punja (MO)

Keya Punja (MO)

Masha Yatsenko (IH)

Gabriella Gormley (MM)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Focus On: Experimental Lens-based Media A level Photography

V

isitors to the Art School have been able to view the ambitious work created and displayed by our A level Photography students. Their inventive approaches have been attained through skilful manipulation of digital imagery and experimentation with traditional photography practices. This collection of images showcases the development achieved by our students within the A level Personal Investigation and Controlled Test units.

A LEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

JHP

William Tod (TU)

Suzanne Lewis (NC)

William Tod (TU)

Charlie Wass (TU)

Charlie Wass (TU)

William Tod (TU)

Suzanne Lewis (NC)

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Charlie Wass (TU)

William Tod (TU)

Suzanne Lewis (NC)


ARTS & R EV IEWS

Collisions Remove Project

T

he ability to juxtapose, take apart, refashion and transform unconventional materials into artworks formed the starting point for the Remove ‘Collisions’ project last year. Students initially built collaborative sculptures using Styrofoam toy planes. Once constructed, the clustered shapes and colours served as visual stimulus for a variety of photography, collage, and drawing tasks. Students then researched the Italian Futurist movement alongside British modernist printmakers. The project concluded with a series of colour linocut prints. Adnaan Goodwin (CO)

COLLISIONS REMOVE PROJECT

IAW

Poppy Redfern (IH)

Collaborative Sculpture

Harriet Place (NC)

Lily Martin-Jenkins (IH)

Poppy Miles (EL)

Henrietta Longden (MO)

Jamie Stuart-Smith (CO)

Seb Clément De L’Epine (B1)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

In the Studio Upper Sixth Fine Art Personal Investigation Review

UPPER SIXTH FINE ART PERSONAL INVESTIGATION REVIEW

I

t is always rewarding to witness the maturing of invention and originality being undertaken within the Art Studios throughout the year. Our Upper Sixth Fine Art students’ achievements can be attributed to the time given to supporting their Personal Investigation-based avenues of visual enquiry, vocabulary and media specialisms, accompanied by the refinement of their core drawing skills. This collection of images brings together insightful projects including figurative paintings loosely based on fairy tales, ceramic vessels – inspired by farmyard objects, painting and sculpture – inspired by historical cigarette advertising, and family portraits crafted on old chopping boards. JHP

Theo Syder (BH)

Juliette Hughan (MM)

Juliette Hughan (MM)

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Isadora Corfield (LI)

Rupert Edgedale (SU)


ARTS & R EV IEWS

UPPER SIXTH FINE ART PERSONAL INVESTIGATION REVIEW

Theo Syder (BH)

Beatrice Speelmans (IH)

Jemima Jones (NC)

Oliver Connell (C3)

Willow Cunningham (EL)

Willow Cunningham (EL)

Rupert Edgedale (SU)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Adventure and Expression Upper Sixth Fine Art Examination

W

ithin the Fine Art spectrum, the majority of our students create final resolutions within painting, sculpture, ceramics and printmaking. Through regular one-to-one tutorials, our artists are encouraged to work to their strengths, whilst continuing to refine their specialist practice through adventure and experimentation. Selected works shown here include a challenging ceramic vessel, still frame images from a sensitively crafted animated film resolution, carefully considered acrylic painting resolutions exploring the relationship of human figures inspired by Picasso’s ‘Blue Period’ and expressive and semi-abstract still life forms painted on canvas.

UPPER SIXTH FINE ART EXAMINATION

JHP

Juliette Hughan (MM)

Rupert Edgedale (SU)

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Willow Cunningham (EL)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Theo Syder (BH)

Juliette Hughan (MM)

Rupert Edgedale (SU)

Willow Cunningham (EL)

Beatrice Speelmans (IH)

Theo Syder (BH)

Rupert Edgedale (SU)

UPPER SIXTH FINE ART EXAMINATION

Willow Cunningham (EL)

Theo Syder (BH)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Creative Counterpoints GCSE Fine Art Examination

T

he imaginative work exhibited here communicates a concise introduction to the breadth of artistic techniques and creativity accomplished by our GCSE Fine artists each academic year.

Within our Controlled Test component, students undertake in-depth planning and experimentation prior to the creation of their 10-hour resolution. In preparation for this important challenge, our students are taught a range of two- and three-dimensional art techniques alongside approaches for making connections between the work of other artists and their own subject matter. This year students’ work explored diverse themes such as recycling, book art, narrative stories and the portrayal of movement and light through abstract images.

GCSE FINE ART EXAMINATION

JHP

Finn Gordon (TU)

Lydia Dickens (NC)

Lydia Dickens (NC)

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Emily Symington (MM)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Lara Thompson (IH)

Isabella Lee (NC)

Phoebe Lyster-Binns (EL)

Tom Elvin (BH)

Barty Cooke (PR)

Violet Threlfall (MM)

GCSE FINE ART EXAMINATION

Florie Rhodes (IH)

Celeste Spink (MO)

Georgia Beattie (IH)

Xa Longden (IH)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Wrapped Remove Project

T

aking initial inspiration from works by Christo students in the Remove wrapped soft toys adding luggage labels and string, as if ready to post. They produced large scale charcoal drawings to explore form before learning various processes in ceramics. After making small packages to experiment with the technique of embossing pattern and text into the surface of their clay, they went on to carefully construct teddy bear forms which they then textured and wrapped with thin clay bandages. Amelia Heard (IH)

WRAPPED REMOVE PROJECT

RLTB

Will Macpherson (BH)

Aylin Koc (NC)

Petra Bigham (MO)

Millie Middleton (IH)

Maya Jeveons (EL)

Arthur Colquhoun (PR)

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Lizzie Hankinson (EL)


GCSE Project

ARTS & R EV IEWS

Narrative Project Gabriel Debs (PR)

S

tudents explored a theme of their choice and created a broad range of visual recordings. After systematically developing their technique by referring to the work of selected artists, students planned their compositionally ambitious final outcomes. These artworks showcase a small selection of the many absorbing and diverse works students produced in response to their chosen theme. Students worked in acrylic paint and used printmaking techniques to resolve the final outcomes shown here.

GCSE PROJECT

JJD

Eliza Cameron (MM)

Mason Hunt (C3)

Mason Hunt (C3)

Isabella Lee (NC)

Miranda Dibden (NC)

Isabella Lee (NC)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Broadening Horizons 2015/16 Exhibition Programme

Archie Franks

This was my first year as Co-ordinator of Visual Arts for the College, and looking back at the programme for the Mount House it is surprising to see how much has happened. The gallery has hosted twelve shows, there have also been three different displays in Common Room and two exhibitions within Heywood.

ART EXHIBITIONS

Archie Franks Fresh from his residency at the British School at Rome, the new Artistin-Residence Archie Franks brought a sophisticated display of only five oil paintings and nine watercolours for our opening Mount House show. I think some people were bewildered to see so few works, but it was a clever move by Archie, to make us look deeply at his painting and not be overwhelmed by a tsunami of imagery that one can barely take in. It was a collection of serious painting with a comic and endearing calm that won over the art students. Archie combined his time at Marlborough with a fellowship at the Jerwood Visual Arts Foundation, which has supported some of the UK’s most successful artists.

Fragile Rachel Bruce curated a show of past and present students’ ceramics, which showed a breadth and variety of skill that illustrated why ceramics is such a popular and wellused resource area.

In the Marlborough Night Garden Tyga Helme (MM 2003-08)

Drawing In Five OMs (Tyga Helme, Emilie Pugh, Rose Arbuthnot, Freya Wood and Zanny Mellor) provided us with an excellent exhibition of drawing. It was great to see how some of the old Art School faces have developed their work. There was inspiring variety of subject matter and techniques within the range of work displayed.

Archie Franks

Ami Jackson (MM)

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Ceramics Exhibition

Photographer Gavin James and Jonathon Genton took us on to the astral plane with images of deep space. The film illustrating how Gavin made these incredible pictures from a Marlborough back garden was fascinating. Classes from all yeargroups came to the show and joined in the interactive displays. The Friends of Swindon Museum and Art Gallery visited and were amazed by the show and the hospitality at the College which included a tour of the telescope by Charles Barclay.


ARTS & R EV IEWS Ami Jackson (MM)

Xanthe Nathan (MO)

Ami Jackson (MM)

Scholars

and furrowed brows of the people filling in the forms. Ami, inspired by her father, who cleans his local beach, took the collected detritus and suspended it in jelly, rendering these polluting, mundane plastic objects disturbingly beautiful.

Common Room

IB Visual Arts Celebrating the final year of the IB, our six students showed work of high quality which was thoughtful and provoking, showing the best of this diverse course.

EPQ Xanthe Nathan and Ami Jackson asked to use the gallery for their EPQ (Extended Project Qualification). Xanthe researched and put together a questionnaire concerning our taste in art, entitled Old or New? This proved not to be such a simple answer, judging by all the head scratching

Adan Strange but somehow beautiful is the title of an essay which inspired an exhibition of the same name. Mike Yates generously loaned his Adan wooden figures, split weave textiles and metal objects for an exhibition in April. Mike, a journalist and folk music archivist, has visited Ghana and made a study and collection of these curious objects that are so much more than artworks. The exhibits were complemented by a video showing vodun practices and a library of relevant books. There were many visitors from within the school and it was exciting to see how many people from the town came back to see the show again and again.

Prize Day There was great weather for Prize Day and plenty of visitors to the Mount House, in honour of some commendable work by our GCSE students. Hopefully some of our exhibitions have influenced and informed the students in a positive and enriching way.

Photograph by Tom Cayford (LI)

At the opening of the Michaelmas Term, photographer Fran Smith showed her unusual and other worldly pictures, a touch of sci-fi, all made with plasticine, water and excellent camera work. During Lent Term, Vincent Stokes loaned his beautiful and thoughtful pictures, carefully composed yet packed with detail. In honour of his twenty years as Fees Ledger Clerk Joe Wiffen before leaving the College in August, was asked to put together a selection of his LP covers. Joe has one of the biggest collections in the county and his tastes in music are liberal. He decided to show albums that were not that recognisable, leaving us to concentrate more on the artwork. It caused lots of discussion and made me think we could have another twenty odd exhibitions of everyone else’s choices.

ART EXHIBITIONS

Throughout the year art scholars work with the Artist-in-Residence to develop their work in parallel with classroom study. The exhibition was full of surprises and a variety of styles from all yeargroups, that can sometimes show some of our most talented artists expressing themselves in ways none of us could predict.

Heywood For the beginning of the school year John Duplock displayed his colourful paintings developed from his time in Africa. This was followed by the student Photography Competition. This year, an arresting collection of works were displayed. Tom Cayford, Maddy Avery and Ben Longcroft were awarded large scale prints in recognition of their brilliant efforts in winning the competition. RKW

Adan

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Storage GCSE: Product Design Dominic Coulson (C1)

S

torage was the overarching theme for the GCSE coursework this year and whist pupils had the same starting point the diverse range of finished products showed how each pupil tackled their personal design journey. The aim is to produce well-designed and constructed products which meet the requirements of the client. The variety of outcome demonstrates the high degree of independent learning that took place. PRA

GCSE STORAGE

Henry Newman (SU)

Milo Kicks (C2)

Honor Northridge (NC)

Harry Bell (BH)

Benedict Nott (C3) Sebastian Callender (SU) Francis Meehan (C3)

Henry Pantin (TU)

Lara Bracher (MO)

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Sophie Wheeler (EL)


GCSE: Electronic Products

ARTS & R EV IEWS

Supporting Local Charities Matthew Hook (C1)

T

he theme for this year’s projects for Electronic Products was centred on supporting local charities. The pupils visited charity shops in Marlborough to research opportunities for products which would enhance the facilities and increase the visibility of the charities on the High Street. In discussion with the shop managers they came up with a number of design ideas. A common theme was collecting boxes and several projects used electronics to attract attention, encourage repeated donation and count coins. Several displays provided information and attracted attention by incorporating animated lighting and signage. Two electronically controlled dog bowls were made, one responding to the presence of a dog, the other providing indication when the water ran out. An intercom system helped to solve communication problems in a shop with two floors. Many of the products used the charities’ logos or colour scheme to provide clear branding. The final products were very well received when reviewed by the shops.

GCSE ELECTRONIC PROJECTS

NMA

Lachlan Graham (B1)

Charlie Phillips (PR)

Alexander Roe (BH)

George Bowron (TU)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Manufacturing Design AS Coursework

T

he Lower Sixth manufacturing project is designed to improve the manufacturing proficiency of all the students while offering them some flexibility in the overall aesthetic. A range of demanding techniques were mastered as each student constructed their version of a desk lamp. The precision and attention to detail exhibited by the pupils was highly impressive and resulted in some clearly wonderful projects.

AS PRODUCT DESIGN

DJM

Holly Brookes-Smith (NC)

Jay Cooke (PR)

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William James (LI)

Anoushka Freeman (IH)

Jemima Small (EL)


ARTS & R EV IEWS Henry Harte (LI)

William James (LI)

Jay Cooke (PR)

Jemima Small (EL)

Kieran Catton (TU)

Holly Brookes-Smith (NC)

Kieran Catton (TU)

AS PRODUCT DESIGN

Alice Springett (MM)

Anoushka Freeman (IH)

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ARTS & R EV IEWS

Merlin Lindsay

Commercial Design A2 Coursework

W

orking in collaboration with the HM of C3 Merlin designed this bench to be used outside. Made of solid oak, its clean lines give a minimalist impression and a comfortable platform on which to sit. The structure is held together using brass rods and detailed with padauk plugs.

Toby Charles

T A2 PRODUCT DESIGN

oby’s interests in Medical products led to him constructing a prototype physiotherapy aid for patients recovering from ACL damage.

H

ugo chose a commercial client for his project and developed a storage and display unit for a shop in London. The client was deeply involved in the form and aesthetic of this and Hugo showed a truly commercially driven approach to design.

Freddie Brooks-Smith

Georgina Millar

D

esigned to be placed in the Common Room of Mill Mead, this modular seat construction was influenced by the House colours. The Mill Mead tudor rose was used as a detail for the drinks holders.

Harriet Cockerill

H

arriet blended her interest for design and music in the construction of a highly impressive conductor’s rostrum for the music department and visiting conductors to use in the Memorial Hall.

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Hugo Mitford Slade

F

reddie’s highly technical project of a portable, lightweight windpowered generator for use in mountaineering expeditions is a showcase example for the inclusion and accessibility of scientific enquiry into design. This project was awarded maximum marks by the examiners.

Toby Eldredge

T

oby’s brief was to design a storage device to be used in the dining hall for pupils’ books and laptops. The latex rubber bands expand to as the books are inserted holding them firmly in place. This was an ingenious feature involving a degree of interaction by the user.

Orlando Lindsay

O

rlando designed this information board, to be used in the car park of Marlborough College, in order help visitors find their way to the sports pitches. The tubes hold A4 handouts which can be tailored to suit the specific requirements of the day.


ARTS & R EV IEWS Georgina Millar (MM)

A2 PRODUCT DESIGN

Toby Charles (PR)

Orlando Lindsay (C3)

Toby Eldredge (TU)

Hattie Cockerill (MO)

Hugo Mitford Slade (PR)

Freddie Brookes-Smith (C1)

Merlin Lindsay (C3)

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S P O RT S

RUGBY 102 BOYS’ HOCKEY 109 GIRLS’ HOCKEY 114 FOOTBALL 118 LACROSSE 122 GIRLS’ TENNIS 124 BOYS’ TENNIS 126 NETBALL 128 CRICKET 132 ATHLETICS 139 BASKETBALL 140

CROSS-COUNTRY 140 FENCING 140 FIVES 141 GOLF 141 POLO 141 RACKETS 142 SHOOTING 143 SQUASH 143 SWIMMING 144 WATER POLO 144


SPORTS

Rugby XV

RUGBY

P:10; W:2; D:0; L:7 Bryanston

L

8:24

Bishop Wordsworth’s

W

16:15

Sherborne

L

24:27

Sherborne

Abandoned

Clifton

L

7:34

Radley

L

19:26

Cheltenham

W

24:13

St Edward’s

L

3:25

Canford

L

5:13

Wellington

L

0:44

SQUAD: W Beattie (C), H Lorimer, J Reid, T Charles, T Mayes, E Andrews, H Hentenaar, C Mates, R Edgdale, J Cooke, D West, S Bradby, T Baines, B Wilson, H Kirkman, H Martin, P Kicks, P Spring ford, M Read, H Smith The 2015 season was always going to be a journey into the unknown. We had little time to draw new lines of relationships and come together to form a team in a very competitive round of fixtures.

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Pre-season was intense and the squads worked incredibly hard to work off an easy summer. With a new coaching set-up in place it was difficult to get a complete view of how the players would work and play together, but initial views showed a good work ethic that could be developed further in order to enhance our ability to play an all-round game. The XV – although not having the most impressive win/loss ratio – performed very well with every game being competitive. We had times in every game where the performance levels dipped and that resulted in teams taking an advantage. There have traditionally been many great fight backs for the XV, notably the 22-point deficit given to Sherborne only to lose by three points at the final whistle. This was some of the finest rugby seen from the team and the fight back against Abingdon was a glimpse of what we have been working towards all season. The rugby played looked ferocious and striking and epitomises where we want to take rugby at Marlborough. A lasting memory for the XV and XL this year was facing the Haka delivered by the Feilding

@MCol_Rugby Mar 11 The U18s were winners of the @SexeysSchool Sevens Cup yesterday, edging a great final v @SportBeechen

High School from New Zealand. It was phenomenal and the rugby they played was a true reflection of how rugby in NZ is played. Both teams took a huge amount out of their games respectively and found a new admiration for fast rugby. Will Beattie led the XV admirably and has been a consistent force, leading from the front as a captain should. Edward Andrews was rightly named Player of the Season for consistently high standards of play at tighthead. David West was named Young Player of the Season for his complete game and great work rate both on and off the pitch. However, the most popular award, ‘Most Improved’ went to Rupert Edgedale who had a stellar season, arriving from the 4th XV last year to being a XV ever-present during 2015. If there was ever a person to demonstrate a work ethic and passion for the shirt, then Rupert epitomises those virtues. ACP


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RUGBY

SPORTS


SPORTS

contained 15 L6 players without whom the season would not have nearly been as successful nor as enjoyable. This also bodes well for the future, and next season is definitely one to be excited about! JPS/TCML

Rugby Open 4th XV P:10; W:3; D:1; L:6

Rugby XL P:12; W:2; D:1; L:9

RUGBY

The win:loss ratio for the XL does not reflect what a highly spirited unit the squad has become. A special mention to Alfie Farndale who captained the side with gusto and, alongside ever-present seniors such as Nicky Bird, Jake Glasmacher, Conor Evans and Josh Wake, helped galvanise the squad. Senior players Hamish Lorimer, Jack Bunn and Ben Wilson who all added a touch of class at various points, as well as Olly Dundas and Alex Green who both played out of position when injuries struck. In spite of results the atmosphere all season has been excellent with notable success stories feeding players into the XV: Toby Baines making the move up, the rise of Sam Bradby from scrum to fly-half epitomised by his performance in the win at St Edward’s; Tom Mayes’s consistent throw at hooker spearheading him into the XV front row and Philip Springford’s ability to jink and dummy his way all the way to the XV back three. There will be moments the squad will look back on fondly and with great pride, most notably the opportunity to play on Hamersley and face the ominous prospect of responding to Feilding High School’s ‘call to battle’: The Haka. Wins were hard to come by despite the best physical efforts and the St Edward’s victory saw 30 unanswered points in the second half in what was the most impressive display of the season. I am sure that Mr Miller’s inspiring

calls to battle will long reverberate in the ears of the players in the squad as well as around the walls in the Maltese Cross. In my first year as a beak at the College it has been a pleasure to witness the progress demonstrated by the squad, playing an attractive and expansive offloading game. Best of luck to the leavers on their future rugby careers. MJS

Rugby Open 3rd XV P:8; W:4; D:0; L:4 The 2015 rugby season was yet again a great one for the 3rd XV. While we fulfilled our usual role of providing a large number of players up to the higher teams, we maintained a core of dedicated players that resulted in one of the most enjoyable seasons I have had the pleasure of coaching, not only playing some outstanding rugby but also having a good laugh in training (as long as I wasn’t having one of my rants). Our heart was the U6 players, led expertly by Fred Vint, a captain of superlative quality, and supported by Nick Avery, who has not missed a match in two years for the 3s, Henry Anthony’s route one rugby, Tom Hodgskin whose try from the back of a line-out he will recall for many years, the salmon-like Charlie Souster, the defensive lion Louis Smith, the tackling giant Harry Owen, the howitzer boot of Angus Rowan Hamilton, and the powerhouse running of Jonathan Lurot who can still outpace and sidestep me on crutches. What is particularly exciting is that the squad

This was not a big side. The team’s full-back, Imran Yusli, who is of comparable size to a family box of Shreddies, was not significantly smaller than many of his colleagues. Across the team, young men who would have swept chimneys professionally in an earlier age were tasked with taking on men of ample proportion. Bryanston were sizeable. Wellington were big. Sherborne were simply massive. And yet, the boys never allowed such disadvantage to hold them back. They competed at the breakdown and tackled manfully. Yusli, for example, tackled a behemoth in the Clifton centres so often it became comical – 16 stone seemingly unable to cope with five-and-a-half. The highlights of the year were a superb draw (17–17) against Clifton – with Jake Benney and Josh Short excelling – and the thorough demolition of Abingdon. This was a true team performance that may even have brought a slight tear to the eye of NJLM. The team were charismatically led by Henry Hudson and the large number of his charges returning in the U6 next year will make this a squad with great potential then too. RDW

Rugby Open 5th XV P:5; W:0; D:0, L:5 It was pleasing to see many of last year’s Lower Sixth players returning for more gentlemanly pursuits with the 5th XV. As ever, many earned promotion and were playing for the 3rds or 4ths by the end of the season. Our best performance was the first against Sherborne when our seasoned Upper Sixth players got stuck into a closely fought game. Unfortunately, we came out on the wrong side of the contest. An interesting but onesided fixture led to a large defeat at Clifton. Disappointingly this set the tone for the rest of the season as we struggled against Radley and Magdalen College School. We rallied for the final game of the season against Wellington, but a poor start to the second half was our undoing. However, the team did not like to judge itself by simple statistics: it was the character and dogged determination that set them apart from previous, more successful teams. At times there was some fantastic skill shown in the rucking as well as some great speed of foot. Hopefully they will remember the camaraderie of the training and fixtures in future years and reflect fondly. SJD

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Rugby Colts 1st XV P:11; W:8; D:1; L:2 Bryanston

W

50:5

Bishop Wordsworth’s

W

32:23

Dean Close

W

55:7

Sherborne

D

33:33

Clifton

W

34:17

Radley

W

43:0

Cheltenham

W

10:0

St Edward’s

L

5:7

Canford

L

7:28

Abingdon

W

29:22

Wellington

W

38:17

SQUAD: C Thomas, A Lorimer, T Elvin, M Hart, J Kirkwood, B Parrott, F Gordon, S Nelson-Piercy, M Hunt, A Clark, J Ellis, T Hunt, M Olivier, H Bunn, D Coulson, R Brooks, B Hall, J Thistlethwayte I suppose you could say that this was a good season. I mean, the scorecard seems to suggest so, and the manner of play was always attractive and vibrant. We had the usual, and requisite, highs and lows: we gave out the biggest hits; we scored some scintillating tries; we lost twice when we should never have done so; we had a few tantrums; we developed a free-flowing and fluid game that could be mesmeric; we destroyed a Wellington side that had had very close games against all the big teams; oh, and we had a Coulson!

Up front, the front five were the biggest improvers in the squad. Lorimer was cut from a familiar tree and the props, Tom Elvin and Charlie Thomas, developed enormously over the season. Thomas became that essential animal, that dog for the fight with a lust for confrontation and Elvin was a big puppy dog learning the Marvin way, which is not heavy on compromise, and he took weeks, literally eleven, before he got really angry for the first time against Abingdon. A great moment, a red letter day. Mr Harrison thought so too, and gave him a yellow card. Myles Hart was simply massive in the row, and hit things very hard, very often. Jack Kirkwood offered intelligence and honest vigour throughout and Benji Parrott sealed a superb season with a 60-metre try against a shellshocked Wellington. The back row was a real strength of the squad: Sam Nelson-Piercy’s intelligent athleticism, Finn Gordon’s happy knack of being an irritant in all the darkest places and Arthur Clark’s power in the loose, running exquisite lines off 10 and 12. The captain, Mason Hunt, was a calm and elegant presence in all areas, working with effortless efficiency. In the back line egos competed with Harry Bunn’s thighs, Dom Coulson’s shoulders and Jack Thistlethwayte’s tantrums for the title of “Biggest Show in Town”. In Hunt and Ellis, we had the two best 9s on the circuit. Max Olivier grew from being an efficient distributor to a powerful and guileful leader of the back line. In the centres, what we lacked in Scrabble prowess,

The back three were the ace in the pack. So often a source of controlled aggression and excellent team work in defence, their positional understanding and technical accuracy was exemplary. Hall is just so honest, tough and faultless in his approach, while Brooks is a mesmeric footballer with superb athletic control. At full-back, Thistlethwayte has more talent and more tantrums than Love Island, and, when on his game, is a rock in defence and a rapier in attack. A good season then? Yeah, you could say that… SCC

Rugby Colts 2nd XV P:11; W:8; D:1; L:2 A successful season saw the side remain unbeaten until the final three matches. There were comprehensive victories over Bryanston, Bishop Wordsworth’s (both 46–0), Dean Close (51–0), Clifton (61–5) and St Edward’s (34–15) and closer wins were achieved against Sherborne (14–5), Radley (10–7) and Cheltenham (14–0). Injury cruelly robbed us of the services of player of the season Ruben Flatischler for the last three games when the team suffered two narrow defeats by a conversion (Canford 17–19 & Wellington 12– 14) and showed a spirited comeback to draw against Abingdon (17–17).

RUGBY

Prior Park Plate Winners

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we more than made up for in power and subtlety of feet and hands. Then there was that moment when the mighty Clifton centre, a strapping 13-plus stones of Bristol beef, hit the Coulson with everything he had in a bone-crunching, front-on tackle; we all make mistakes, and the Coulson converted his own try from under the posts. As I said, we had a Coulson…

Aside from scrum-half Flatischler, a number of players deserve special mention. There were gutsy performances from forwards Virat Talwar, Matt Hook, Henry Newman, Gabriel Jordan, James Eyles, Max Foulds, Frank Meehan, Charlie Keenan and George Marshall. The back line of Jamie Hodgskin, Freddie Hall, Sam Cederwell, Freddie Boase, Seb Schramm, Tom Sykes, Hugo Middleton and Orlando Meyrick also made telling contributions at crucial stages. A memorable season superbly led by Freddie Elmberg and Sam Fairer-Smith. MPLB/TAB

Rugby Colts 3rd XV P:8; W:3; D:1; L:4 A great season, despite some frustrating narrow losses. Highlights were wins at Cheltenham and Teddies, when the boys learned about rugby being a 15-man game, and the whole being greater than the sum of the parts. They learned to trust each other as the season progressed, and developed a style which suited the player we had available. Ruck play was outstanding. Special mention to captain fantastic Alex Reeve, but this was a season where team excelled over individuals. GJM

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talent and strength in depth. We recorded wins in the first five games but Radley was always going to be a tough opposition. Their relentless pressure created gaps openings and showed us the importance of communication on the field. Centres Oliver Plaistowe and Jack Waters gave us a platform on which to build. Whatever the opposition threw at us, our defence was resolute and patient for the next three matches. When a turnover was created, the ball was quickly moved to our pace men, who ended up under the sticks more often than not. In our penultimate match, we squandered chances against Abingdon, who scored against the run of play to win. Wellington was always going to be a tough final fixture and despite the loss, we left the pitch with our heads held high.

Rugby Junior Colts 1st XV

RUGBY

P:14; W:11; D:0; L:3 Bryanston

W

51:0

Bishop Wordsworth’s

W

24:7

Dean Close

L

7:36

Sherborne

W

29:17

Clifton

W

31:17

Sheldon School

W

55:7

Priory Community

W

17:0

Radley

W

26:10

Cheltenham

W

22:0

St Edward’s

W

22:14

Canford

W

27:8

Abingdon

W

29:12

Colstons

L

12:19

Wellington

L

0:39

SQUAD: Z Shahryn, A Griffin, H Wake, O Wilson, R Piper, M Staples, J Barnes, N Ruddell, L Cloves, T Hargrove, S Spark, C Cooke, W Cook (Captain), F Taylor, A Fisher, O Fillingham, L de Hennin de Boussu Walcourt, H Foster, H Heneage, N Rusinov, J Fry, H Brooks The season started with a win against Bryanston, with top try scorer Nick Rusinov scoring a fine hat-trick. The boys were swiftly brought back down to earth, however, with a hard-fought win against Bishop Wordsworth’s. Captain Will Cook led from the front in a bruising encounter, with some fantastic defensive work and multiple turnovers; two aspects of his well-rounded game that led to him being named coach’s player of the season. Following defeat by Dean Close, the boys enjoyed a purple patch which continued to late November. The highlight of this period were the three wins in nine days, which started against a physical Priory Community School. Our original, expansive game plan had to be abandoned, and the forwards duly stepped up, with Archie Griffin, Zharif Shahryn and Harry Wake particularly impressive. The match will also be remembered for Toby Hargrove’s colossal early hit.

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Two days later, the boys overcame a 10-point deficit to win at Radley. Our final try showed the class of our backs, with Finn Taylor’s dazzling footwork allowing Harry Foster to break and feed centre partner Harry Heneage to score. A controlled performance followed in a 22–0 win against Cheltenham. Alfie Fisher stayed cool in his debut at 10 and James Barnes demonstrated how far he had come with some disruptive breakdown work. The boys then showed similar patience and control to beat Canford. Players’ Player of the Season Charlie Cooke was at his destructive best, and Jude Fry showed his power with several strong carries. The boys should be hugely proud of their achievements. They have shown grit and character and it has been a pleasure to coach them. We hope that they continue to push themselves and each other to develop and reach their full potential. HEBJ/CLH

Rugby Junior Colts 2nd XV P:11; W:8; D:0; L:3 As the boys gathered on Sloping Broadleaze for the first training session, we had the making of a good team with the right combination of

My thanks go to all the boys who represented the JC2s throughout the season. A big thank you should go to all the parents for their fantastic support throughout and a special mention should go to George Edgedale who grew in confidence as captain, and led the side with distinction. JH/JPC

Rugby Junior Colts 3rd XV P:7; W:4; D:0; L:3 A team of talented and free-running players who look set for great things. 17 different players scored tries and the team amassed 261 points at an average of seven tries per game. Narrow defeats against Radley, Abingdon and Wellington were fiercely contested and the team never stood down from a challenge. Captain and Player of the Season Will Millar scored six tries while Players’ Player Archie Stocker swapped his number nine shirt for the fly-half position as injuries to Marcus Redpath and Ben Barnes took their toll. Most Improved Player Sam Phelps was dynamic in the loose while prop Harry Broad often showed the pace of a winger. Theo Forrester’s size boosted the pack while Adnaan Goodwin proved solid in defence alongside Oscar Stratton and Arthur Colquhoun. Will Macpherson won Utility Player of the Season followed closely by Freddie Coen. Special mention must go to


HLRT

Rugby Junior Colts 4th XV P:5; W:3; D:0; L:2 This was a most respectable season, with a strong group of boys working together throughout the season and enjoying their rugby right until the end of term. There were glorious victories against Sherborne, St Edward’s and Cheltenham but Radley and Abingdon proved too strong and as a squad we needed to learn to tackle more consistently. Individual tackling, however, was at times exceptional, with Harry Powell putting his body on the line repeatedly and thoroughly deserving the Players’ Player at the end of season awards ceremony as well as Best Tackler. Mahdi Hussain’s elusive running won him Player of the Season, and Piers Horlock made off with the Breakaway Award for his ability to show the opposition a clean pair of heels. Bassano Compostella played in almost every position and was awarded the Utility Player Award, while newcomer Joe O’Connor was Most Improved Player. PNMF

Rugby Yearlings 1st XV P:11; W:1; D:0; L:10 Bryanston

L

26:36

Bishop Wordsworth’s

L

12:16

Dean Close

L

10:36

Sherborne

L

0:50

Clifton

L

7:48

Radley

L

5:31

Cheltenham

L

0:19

St Edward’s

W

12:5

Canford

L

5:10

Abingdon

L

0:12

Wellington

L

5:17

SQUAD: C Freeman, A Palengat, B Espinosa De Los Monteros, J Warner, F Booth, E Abbott, H Di Monaco, A Hardwick, E Corfield, M Brousse, K Ofon, F Henderson, S Cutts, H Hart, W Ackerley, O Beattie, B Place, B Spink, A Sevenyuk, H Norman, H Grant A was a tough yet hugely enjoyable season for this spirited group of players. Although results were hard to come by, and we came up against some strong opposition that were bigger and more physical in stature, the effort and commitment of the players was never in

@MCol_Rugby June 10 Great day with Stuart Lancaster yesterday. Morning focus: leadership and the afternoon with @MCol_ Rugby #development

Despite heavy opening defeats the atmosphere in training was outstanding. The players approached sessions with a hunger and desire to improve, and meaningful hit-outs with the Yearlings 2nd XV meant that we primarily worked as a large squad with new players being given opportunities in Y1 on a regular basis. As skills and fitness levels began to materialise, so too did confidence and overall performances. On a wet and muddy Thursday afternoon in late November the side received it’s just rewards in the shape of a win, and though the scoreline doesn’t reflect our dominance (12–5) – St Edward’s were well beaten. Better team performances were still to come, particularly away against a strong Abingdon side, and although no more wins were registered, it was terrific that we were undoubtedly playing our best rugby at the tail end of term. So, just the one win to show for. From an external perspective that might be seen as a disappointing season. However, we know differently, and provided that the boys stick together and continue to develop at the same rate that they have since starting at Marlborough the results will come. A big thank you should go to all the parents for their fantastic support throughout, and a special mention should go to Christian Freeman who led the side with distinction.

RUGBY

Head Boy Owen Hargrove who helped coach this squad with tireless energy and expertise. It is testament to him that very few opposition coaches spotted him as being a pupil rather than a fellow beak!

SPORTS

question. Great strides were made by every member in the squad which will stand them in good stead for years to come.

GDML/RAS

Rugby Yearlings 2nd XV P:11; W:7; D:0; L:4 It was clear from the first training session that the Yearlings 2 were going to be strong this season. With very little to separate the top 30 players in the yeargroup, expectations were high in the early stages and all of the boys worked hard, both in training and on the field, to make the mitre proud. Indeed, by the run-in to exeat we were three wins to the good, having secured 155 points for and conceded just 15; easy victories over Bryanston, Bishops and Dean Close. Clifton and Sherborne, however, proved stiffer competition and by half term the win:loss ratio was more balanced. The second half of term followed a similar pattern, although the standard of play was much higher and the intensity of collision more ferocious. Hatrick, Garnica, Wimbush and Lyster-Binns were tenacious in contact and around the fringes, and they provided a solid platform for the rest team to work from. The half-back pairing of Brousse and Corfield also developed with the season and they became more adept at bringing a rapid backline into the game. Hudson, Meyrick and Harvie-Watt all looked dangerous in space and with ball in hand, but it was Luthi who was the most emphatic. Bursting holes in defences by going through, around and in one case, at Canford, over, Luthi scored 13 tries in all and was the Rugby Clubs top try scorer for the season. This

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Kirkman, Lawrence, Benny and Amati all shone and in the second half as Marlborough were tenacious at the rucks creating quick ball to the well-organised back line. The star player was wing Billy White who scored a hattrick. Overall it was a fantastic season. I would like to say thanks to all the parents who turned out to support and a huge thank you also goes to the boys for a great season. I’ll enjoy watching their progress as they move up through the school. GB

Rugby Yearlings 6th XV P:2; W:1; D:0; L:1 helped secure further wins against Cheltenham, Teddys, Canford and arch-rivals Radley. In summary, it was a great season, and a winning one, and I really appreciated the time and effort that the boys put in; I look forward to following their progress as they move through the school. Particular thanks must go to Robbie Milne who, as captain, was exemplary throughout. DRA/JJLT

Rugby Yearlings 3rd XV

RUGBY

P:9; W:9; D:0; L:0 This was a strong team that worked hard all season in training and ended it undefeated. They developed a very attractive style of ‘quick hands’ rugby often admired by opposition parents. By passing the ball out of contact to speedy runners, they ran in a lot of goodlooking tries against weaker teams, comfortably beating Bryanston (36–0), Dean Close (53–0), Sherborne (55–0), Cheltenham (49–0) and Canford (59–0). The four closest matches were more a test of the team’s mettle. Still, these boys beat competitive sides from Bishop Wordsworth’s (22–0), Radley (24–12), Abingdon (25–0) and Wellington (17–0). These were exciting, hardfought matches in the true sense of that word – contests of equals. The boys played bravely in defence. The opposition did not score at all in eight of the nine matches. They were imaginative, even thrilling in attack. Strict orders not to kick away possession resulted in a season of ‘ball-in hand’ blitzkrieg that earned them a well-deserved Turner Cup. MBB

Rugby Yearlings 4th XV P:6; W:4; D:1; L:1 The side was once again able to draw on a pool of very talented players. The quality of play both from forwards and backs was very high in all matches and even in games against traditionally tough opponents, Wellington and Radley, there were periods when the team demonstrated high levels of skill. At halfback, Archie Probert and Freddie Hall were brilliant, and in the forwards, a formidable presence with Jonny Gondzic and Joe Piggott to the fore, meant that weaker opposition were defeated ruthlessly. Top try scorer of the season was Gus Nathan, with four, followed by Zu MacDermott, with three. The team was well captained through season by Archie Probert, both an inspirational leader and crafty fly-half. All players showed great courage and determination, never giving up in some of the harder fixtures, and there is no doubt that many will progress to better teams as they move through their Marlborough years.

Just two matches for the ‘mighty’ Yearlings 6ths this year: our first against Sherborne was very early in the term and played with uncontested scrums, and just 13-a-side, and was a 41–10 victory; the other was Marlborough’s finest 12 plus Radley’s trio of reserves against the other 15 Radley boys who (unsurprisingly given the preceding information) comfortably ran out 0–54 winners! Great fun and a chance for every boy to represent the College so, “Well done”. GBS

COS

Rugby Yearlings 5th XV P:4; W:2; D:1; L:1 Right from the off, the general feeling was that we had a strong group of boys. Once the team settled, training was focused with the importance of good communication emphasised. One particular match to note was against St Edward’s. The team showed grit and determination to keep the ball from the line during a huge first half defensive effort.

Budge Pountney Appointed as the new Master in Charge of Rugby in the summer of 2015, Pountney has a wealth of experience at all levels of the game. The 41-year old enjoyed a long playing career with Northampton Saints from 1993 to 2003, that included winning the Heineken Cup in 2000 at Twickenham. He then spent time as Northampton’s Director of Rugby.

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He won 31 caps for Scotland, later captaining the side, and after retiring from the professional game managed his own business before serving as Head of Rugby and Elite Performance at Totton College as well as business interests. He joined the College in September 2015 from his role as Player Development Manager with the Rugby Players’ Association.


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BOYS’ HOCKEY

and they left everything on the pitch. Chances were made but sadly too many errors meant that we struggled to finish with a win. Martin was well supported all season by vice captains Owen Hargrove who was resolute in defence, and Will Beattie who matured into a fine centre midfield. Typically for Henry he put his body on the line in sliding to score past the ’keeper and in doing so suffered a nasty head injury. Special mention must go to the enthusiasm which this group showed all season. As we wish John Jackson well as he moves on to pastures new via the Rio Olympics, the boys have benefited greatly from his enthusiasm. He has brought a fresh outlook on hockey at Marlborough which will I am sure inspire many for years to come. As Jacko would say – Clear Eyes, Full Heart, Can’t Lose. JJLT

P:9; W:2; D:2; L:5 Bromsgrove

D

0:0

Radley

L

2:3

Dauntsey’s

L

3:0

Canford

L

4:7

Eton

L

0:1

St Edward’s

W

3:2

Abingdon

W

9:0

Cheltenham

Cancelled

Wellington

D

1:1

Bradfield

L

1:3

SQUAD: H Martin (captain), O Hargrove (vice-captain), W Beattie (vice-captain), A Rowan Hamilton, F Vint, B Wilson, J Bunn, H Smith, B Evans, W Bawden, T Baines, H Horlock, A Demilecamps, W Catton, O Dundas, N Martin Giron The season started with a trip to the Regional Indoor Competition in late November. Considering this was the first taste of indoor hockey for most of the team, to beat Dean Close and Prior Park was a fabulous achievement. In fact, had the team managed to draw with Millfield, in a game they only lost 1–0 then they would have made the final. Henry Martin signalled his commitment to hockey

and highlighted just how dangerous his pace could be. The first game of the season was against Bromsgrove, a side with considerable hockey pedigree. Nico Martin Giron showed wonderful skills which helped him hold the midfield. How the Bromsgrove ’keeper saved Will Beattie’s fizzing reverse–stick shot we do not know! In the second game of the season Henry Martin’s speed sneaked a goal against Radley to take us 2–0 up. Freddie Vint was imperious in goal and looked as if he would hold out the relentless Radley attacks but to lose 3–2 in the closing minutes was frustrating. Although further losses followed against Dauntsey’s, Canford and Eton the boys were learning from these and the midfield work rate of Wilson and Beattie was phenomenal. Against Eton, Angus Rowan-Hamilton matured and started to show what a potent force he could be. In the same match Isaac Hocking played up from the Colts and required man-marking such was his impact. The first win came against Teddies (3–2) and the following week everything clicked. A very respectable Abingdon side were beaten 9–0 with Hugo Horlock showing mercurial talent and Jack Bunn’s laconic style deceived many a defence! The draw against Wellington marked a disappointing regression to poor habits, but the last game for the departing Upper Sixth was against Bradfield –

Boys’ Hockey Open 2nd XI P:8; W:5; D:2; L:1 This was an outstanding and hugely enjoyable season; one which will live long in the memory. With character and flair in abundance this side was a match for anyone, and the league record of five wins and two draws (finishing joint top with Radley) is as good as a Marlborough senior side has managed since the introduction of the ISHL. The ability to put the ball in the net was pivotal to the team’s success with the strike trio of Read, Kirkman and Wheeler all potent weapons. The work rate of the midfield meant that we were always going to create chances; Moody cemented his place early on to join C1 comrade Hudson (arguably player of the season) and the competitive Brandi. Seagrim’s pace and willingness to run through walls down the right was a big asset, as was the versatility of BrookesSmith and Downie – both solid and dependable. No side is complete without a stalwart defence, and the back four of Reid, Hentenaar, Carter and Bradby provided a terrific platform. With Catton outstanding between the sticks, clean sheets were odds-on.

BOYS’ HOCKEY

Boys’ Hockey Open 1st XI

Highlights include coming from 2–0 down to draw with Radley, a last-minute winner to defeat Pangbourne’s 1st XI 3–2, and putting Wellington to the sword with a comprehensive 3–0 victory. Every member of the squad contributed to our success, and collectively they can be proud of what they managed to achieve. Top in the league and recipients of the Turner Cup is no mean feat for a senior 2nd XI, and the superb record can be attributed, not least, to their spirit and togetherness. Jolly Reid galvanised the troops with distinction as captain, and the end-of-season team curry was richly deserved! GDML

Boys’ Hockey Open 3rd XI P:7; W:5; D:1; L:1 This year’s 3rd XI were the best boys’ side I have ever coached. The coaching talents of Mr Mackey and Miss Blackwood, who can actually play hockey, were greatly appreciated. Captain

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BOYS’ HOCKEY

Louis Smith was outstanding. He led from the front in practices, recruited talent from the DW paddlers and found our signature “Hatton heist” stripy shirts. Our only defeat was against Radley, and they only scored in the first half. By the second game against Winchester 1st XI the magic had begun to kick in, and we scraped a win. The team went from strength to strength and Canford, Eton, Teddies and especially Wellington felt our wrath. In our final match we had a poor start against a Bradfield and went two goals down. A great team performance got us a draw and we could have won it. Will James was outstanding in goal and David West’s rugby and cricket skills were put to good use and his determined play greatly appreciated. Fraser Hutchinson gave defensive stability and William Cadbury was one of our best players but missed many games due to injury. Paul Lavender-Jones was mercurial on the ball and Smith played in every position with exemplary work rate. Finn Doyne was adept and skilful up front and was not unduly hampered by his exuberant hairstyle. I would like to thank the entire team for the effort and commitment. JW

Boys’ Hockey Open 4th XI P:8; W:5; D:2; L:1 The Gents’ Grass XI clad in hunting tweeds remains one of the finest sporting sights on offer at Marlborough. We had too few matches on hallowed natural turf, but fixtures on grass with Radley were highlights: a 5–0 away win and a return home draw 1–1. Despite the disadvantage of playing most games on inferior artificial surfaces this year, the team lost only one match: at Eton 3–2; and Rory Peppiatt’s excellent last-minute shot to equalise was only saved by the post. Wins against Dauntsey’s 3rds 2–1, Abingdon 4–2, Bradfield 4–1 and St Edward’s 3rds 10–0 were all good performances. The least exciting game was a draw 0–0 with Lord Wandsworth. This team was once again a close rival for the Turner Cup, but ended as one of three runners-up to a very strong Colts 1st XI.

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I am grateful to all players, but especially those who have given two seasons to this team with considerable success and wonderful generosity of spirit. Buttressed at the back by the defence of men like George Naismith and Kit Connell, our midfield’s hard workers were again Alfie Farndale, Conor Evans and Rupert Edgedale. The attack was best when pushed forward by Nicky Bird, who was the College’s top goalscorer this season. George Naismith has been an excellent captain (and player of the season last year). This year’s player of the season is a new blood: James Orr. MBB

Boys’ Hockey Colts 1st XI P:19; W:14; D:1; L:4 Radley

L

1:3

Dauntsey’s

W

9:0

Canford

W

1:0

Eton

W

7:2

Millfield Regional Preliminaries

W

4:0

Cheltenham College Regional Preliminaries

W

2:0

Bristol Grammar School Regional Preliminaries

W

4:0

Abingdon

W

3:2

Exeter School Regional Finals Group Match

W

4:0

Millfield Regional Finals Group Match

D

1:1

Elizabeth College Regional Finals Group Match

L

1:2

South Dartmoor Semi-Final

W

2:1

Canford Regional Final

W

0:0 (3:0) Penalty Strokes

Bradfield College

W

3:2

Reed’s National Finals Group Match

W

2:1

KES, Birmingham National Finals Group Match

L

1:2

Thirsk National Finals Group Match

W

3:1

Cranleigh National Finals 3rd/4th Play-off

L

1:1 (3:5) Penalty Strokes)

SQUAD: D Coulson (Capt.), I Hocking (Vice-Capt.), M Brooks (Vice-Capt.), E Cornish, J Ellis, R Flatischler, T Hunt, S Nelson-Piercy, M Olivier, A Rigg, L Smith, M Sweet & J Thistlethwayte It was a season of ‘firsts’ for the Colts 1st XI, beginning with Marlborough entering the U16 Regional Indoor finals for the first time. The performance was below par, but it was an eye-opener for the boys as to the quality of opposition they should expect in the outdoor competition. The first match in Lent came and went, undone by a well-drilled Radley side, who played as a team and with this 3–1 loss virtually meant that the ISHL title would be relinquished for the first time. However, convincing wins over Dauntsey’s and Eton and Canford were the perfect results to head into the Regional Preliminaries. The message was a simple one; play the opposition and not the name. With

@MCol_Hockey Apr 20 The @MCol_Hockey U16s before the start of today’s @EnglandHockey Finals


April saw the arrival of the cricket season for most but these boys came back to a week of hockey to set them up for the National Finals at the Olympic Park. Tournament hockey is all about starting strongly and the boys did exactly this, pulling through 2–1 against Reed’s. Unfortunately, a lack of focus resulted in a 2–1 loss to KES Birmingham later that day. The next day saw Marlborough play Thirsk, knowing that the chance of topping the group and reaching the National Final was achievable but would require some performance. On pitch one, Marlborough were executing their corners well, resulting in a 3–1 win, whilst on the pitch two, Reed’s were doing us a favour by beating Thirsk 3–0. As it stood, Marlborough would be in the National Final but a goal at the death by KES meant that we missed out on goal difference and would now play Cranleigh in the 3rd/4th play-off. A little deflated from the earlier drama, Marlborough started sluggishly, going a goal down early on but got the equaliser and taking the game to penalty strokes. Unfortunately, it was not to be our day; however, to finish fourth in the country was a significant achievement. Over the past two years, this group of boys have produced some fantastic hockey becoming

SPORTS

The second half of term began with a 3–2 win at Abingdon before the long trip to Millfield gave the opportunity for the boys to realise what was needed to be done and they started off in clinical fashion, beating Exeter School 4–0 which set the team up to finish top of the group. The semi-final saw us pitted against South Dartmoor who had given us a lesson in the Indoor version of the game back in December. From 1–0 down, the boys kept their composure and booked a place in the final against Canford. Physicality and fitness shone through as Marlborough controlled the game and managed to win on penalty strokes, and in doing do became West Regional Champions for the first time in the history of Marlborough hockey.

history makers in the process and Turner Cup winners. They should now realise that winning does simply not occur at your own will; it occurs through the small margins accrued on the training pitch. Although hard at times to manage and focus, they have provided memorable moments and I very much look forward to following their progress in the Open 1st XI. WGH

Boys’ Hockey Colts 2nd XI P:8; W:5; D:1; L:2 The predominant words to describe this team are passion and grit. Captained by Mason Hunt and supported by our brick wall of Jack Kirkwood the team were disciplined, winning handsomely at Canford, Abingdon, Eton and Bradfield. The defeats were symbolic of the troubles within the ISHL – playing a superior Pangbourne U18B/C side and a Wellington U16A side who won the league (scoring 22, conceding two). Harry Pantin kept goal magnificently and Freddie Hall had an eye for the right pass. Morgan Pollard controlled the midfield behind Kariem Baldes – often our talisman – Benny Nott with his lethal backhand, Jamie Hodgskin with an eye for the goal and Freddie Moorhead would run a marathon each game. The game ‘that could have been’ was Radley – having been 3–0 up we finished 3–3. A cancelled match against Cheltenham meant that the best the team could finish in the ISHL was third behind Wellington and Radley. But the scores only ever tell half-truths and the way this team came together and worked for each other, will stand these young men in great stead for their future whether in sport or industry. ASP

Boys’ Hockey Colts 3rd XI P:6; W:4; D:2; L:0 Another superlative, unbeaten season. Led admirably by captain Max Foulds they marched through the Lent Term, unwavering in the face of senior teams or 2nd XIs. The defence throughout the season was rock solid with Sam Cederwell stepping into the breach to

John Jackson John joined Marlborough as the Senior Hockey coach in September 2013 and at the time was captain of the Irish national side. Despite being small in stature, ‘Jacko’ is one of the sporting giants in Irish Hockey, being one of only three players to represent the country on more than 200 occasions. Most recently, he was part of the Irish hockey team which competed at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. His enthusiasm for hockey at Marlborough was infectious. With the use of pin-point accurate demonstrations and creativity in his coaching sessions, he inspired boys and girls to play without fear; the ‘John Jackson’ type of player with skilful stick skills and the ability to play on both the left and right hand side with ease was and is still very much apparent when watching Marlborough grace the turf of Maples and Milford. This has ultimately led to more Marlburians being part of the England Hockey single system and Marlborough now being perceived as one of the stronger hockey playing schools in the West of England.

BOYS’ HOCKEY

this in mind, Marlborough set down a marker with a 4–0 win over Millfield, followed by wins against Cheltenham and Bristol Grammar School.

John was so much more than a hockey professional. He was an inspiration to the boys and girls in Preshute House as a tutor. He was also a popular member of the Common Room, regularly playing staff football and badminton despite trying to remain injury free in the months leading up to Rio! His introduction of staff hockey, however, has been a revelation, with more than 20 staff members turning out each week. He simply loves the game of hockey and his passion for the sport was there for all to see in his short time at the college. John now leads up the hockey programme at Prior Park school. We wish him every success in the future and hope to see him fulfil his dream of coaching the Irish team at an Olympic Games. WGH

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keep excellently, with huge thanks to Harry Pantin. There are too many highlights to mention but the defending of Henry Newman, Foulds and Sam Farndale, or Ben Ryder’s goal of the century (which was obviously on purpose), but the fact that we had the best scoring record of any boys’ team this year with 22 goals in six matches means that the attacking super-duo of Rob Smith and Emile Willmott win the accolades of men of the season. Well done all! JPS

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 1st XI

BOYS’ HOCKEY

P:9; W:3; D:0; L:6 Canford

L

1:8

Bromsgrove

L

2:6

Cheltenham

L

1:3

Radley

L

1:3

Canford

L

1:8

St Edward’s

W

3:1

Abingdon

L

2:4

Wellington

W

6:0

Bradfield

W

4:3

SQUAD: F Hazlitt (Vice-Captain), J Fry (Vice-Captain), H Brooks, H Hennage, P Horlock, T Hargrove, J Krens, A Stocker, N Rusinov, O Bashall, O Powell, W Millar, O Fillingham, G Nicholson The Junior Colts 1s endured a slow start with a few heavy losses but certainly gathered momentum as the term progressed. With it being a tough start it showed that the boys had a great deal of character and determination as they really started to click towards the end of term and this reflected in their performances on the pitch and subsequent results. They were an incredibly enjoyable bunch of lads and very coachable. The team was joint captained by Jude Fry and Freddie Hazlitt who did a faultless job and were both outstanding with their leadership qualities and performances. Other stand out displays were from our top goalscorer Harry Hennage, who at one point had back-toback hat-tricks to his name, and Harry Brooks whose strength in the midfield was always on show. Ben Mackey

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 2nd XI P:8; W:5; D:1; L:2 The JC2s were a vibrant, diverse and ultimately very successful side led with maturity and energy by Will Cook. We raided the 3rd XI squad early in the season for Harry Powell and Harry Foster, the latter finishing the term as our most effective goalscorer. ’Keeper Henry Clark gave the side application

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and intensity and Fred Peppiatt gave the side much humour. We had some genuine hockey talent in Freddy Cornish and Lytton Bayley who will both fly when stature catches up with ability and Oscar Powell and George Nicholson should be setting their sights on Colts 1 next year. Oli Plaistowe was the enforcer whilst Toby Hargrove and Oscar Waters brought composure and ability back four. Goal poacher Nico Fletcher and natural ball player Pier Tabor started slowly but became key cogs in the latter half of term. We were beaten only for the second time in the season at Bradfield in the final game that cost us the ISHL title. Our highlight was the 6–0 dismantling of Wellington. This side were vintage Marlborough: much honest endeavour, a sprinkling of understated talent and oodles of fun. R Pembroke

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 3rd XI

Boys’ Hockey Junior Colts 4th XI P:4; W:4; D:0; L:0 A cracking season for the side who ended the campaign with an unbeaten record. The boys began with high optimism and duly dispatched a visiting Cheltenham side by four goals to none. The boys were stretched in their second outing by Radley who went three goals up by half-time. However, the character of the team shone through as Finn Taylor scored two goals in the dying minutes to level a dramatic game at three all – an unyielding spirit! A further 7–2 win against a higher Abingdon team (with an excellent hat-trick from Hugo Yaxley) preceded a final 3–2 victory away to a strong Bradfield side to finish a memorable season. Every boy played their heart out and I could not have asked any more. WJM

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 1st XI P:10; W:2; D:0; L:8

P:7; W:2; D:2; L:3 It is hard to lose matches when a side concedes very few goals; it is, however, extremely hard to win if it rarely scores them. The JC3 defence was admirably stingy, allowing its foes only 1.5 goals on average per match – only three College 1st to 3rd teams were more miserly. Alas, the team did not exploit this by excelling in attack: we scored 17 times, but nine of them came against Teddies! A return of only eight goals in the other seven matches was the problem. The overall record does not look pleasing, but there was much to celebrate. The ‘spine’ of Alistair Sheldon, David Poole, captain Zack Chambers and William Macpherson was rock solid, and Jack Waters was indefatigable in midfield. Players moved seamlessly between JC2, 3 and 4, showing the depth of talent in the Remove. If these young men keep honing their skills, they will enjoy great success in coming years. RAS

Bromsgrove

L

2:3

Cheltenham

L

0:3

Radley

L

0:1

Dauntsey’s

W

3:0

Canford

L

1:3

Eton

L

1:3

St Edward’s

W

1:0

Abingdon

L

1:2

Wellington

L

0:1

Bradfield

L

0:1

SQUAD: A Hardwick (Captain), B Spink (Vice-Captain), E Pears (GK), B Baker, B Place, A Stamp, M Brousse, J White, L D’ Oelsnitz, P Vivash, N Corfield, C Madden, M Meyrick, H Norman, J Cleverly Despite victories against Dauntsey’s (3–0) and St Edward’s (1–0) it was a disappointing season in terms of results for this small and inexperienced group of players. A


Of the eight defeats suffered five were by a one goal margin (Bromsgrove, Radley, Abingdon, Wellington & Bradfield) and two more were extremely creditable performances against talented Canford and Eton opposition. The team possessed a strong and disciplined defensive unit and played with commendable spirit and desire often against physically stronger and more athletic opponents. Although a notable weakness was the absence of a genuine goal scorer. The team lacked precision in front of goal and the short corner routine yielded little success. The paltry total of nine goals in 10 matches reflected this inadequacy. Looking forward this side needs to grow both in size and maturity. They possess plenty of technical skill, but need to overcome naivety. The endeavour shown during matches needs to be emulated in training in order to maximise progression. It will be interesting to watch their development as they move up the College. All those who played are to be congratulated for their perseverance. Special mentions go to Arthur Hardwick who captained admirably and Ben Spink who showed touches of class in centre midfield. Many thanks, as always, to the fantastic coaching team of Mr Lauze, Mr Jackson, Miss Blackwood and Miss Lawes, who’s expertise and commitment were invaluable. MPLB

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 2nd XI

in the nets, whilst the back line of Hugh Norman, Josh Warner, Ben Hatrick, and for the latter part of the season Grisha Belotserkovsky showed defensive determination. Oscar Beattie and Arthur Hewitt gave excellent midfield distribution, whilst Felix Henderson and Archie Palengat dominated the flanks with pace. In the forwards, Ed Robinson, captain Domingo Powell, and Charlie Purves displayed cool heads and clinical finishes. The team wouldn’t be complete without flair hockey, produced by Max Meyrick and Jack Cleverly, carving through the opposition. Highlights came from the final match against Cheltenham, resulting in a draw, and a win against Eton. A thoroughly enjoyable season, with lots of promising hockey to follow. AOJS

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 3rd XI P:9; W:5; D:2; L:2 The team made a good start to the term with a 5–1 win against Cheltenham College. There was good play from the midfield and forwards with Alberto Amati taking 2 goals. The defence were not hard pressed but stepped up when needed. There followed a run of close matches with a win, loss and draw. Billy White had some great games in midfield, Todd Benney more than proved his worth in goal and Freddie Hall played well up front. After half-term the team was captained by newly promoted Alex Sevenyuk who led the team to 2 wins and a draw. There was strong play by Chris Freeman and Javier Laiseca in midfield with Henry Bagshaw proving solid in defence. Overall the team showed great passion and commitment against some tough opposition to get good results.

P:9; W:2; D:5; L:2 The Yearlings 2nd XI had a challenging season, facing many teams that held great strength and depth on the field. The challenge was to iron out prep school hockey tactics, and become more aware of what is required at senior school level in awareness, structure, physicality and intelligence on the pitch. Dylan Murray demonstrated great development and potential

A memorable victory against Eton proved to be the high-point, with Jasper Lloyd-Hughes plundering a superb goal. More wins seemed certain to follow against Wellington and Bradfield, but somehow the boys contrived to let their opposition off the hook. They have been a pleasure to work with; a spirited bunch who put in 100% every game. JTWL

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 5th XI P:6; W:4; D:2; L:0 This has been a fantastic season for the Yearlings 5th XI. Their attitude has been first rate during training and this has been reflected by a great set of results.

BOYS’ HOCKEY

disproportionate number of away fixtures made the challenge even tougher; however, they showed plenty of promise and, in time, have potential to be successful.

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Edward Abbott was rock-solid and Theo Dixon, Zu MacDermott and Max Dyer formed a combative defensive unit – bolstered by the skilful Mathias Ten Nijenhuis. In midfield the excellent Archie Probert (captain) and Marcus Wimbush formed the axis upon which much of the team’s attacking play was built, feeding the dangerous Harry Keenan and Algie LysterBinns on the flanks. Up front Jasper LloydHughes was a revelation and Robert Milne, Hugo Beckwith-Moore and Kit Speirs provided plenty of menace. Able backup was provided by James Ruddell (perhaps the find of the season), Marcus Hudson, who caused opponents no end of problems, and Henry Di Monaco – an enthusiastic deputy.

Few teams were able to handle our quick passing game with Ivan Morozov spearheading our attack and picking up two hat-tricks during the season. Arthur Davies at centre half acted as the heartbeat of the team and was able to work the ball to players such as Tom Williams, Ptolemy Chichester and Hugo Thompson to devastating effect. The defence was also a very tough proposition to breach. Benedict Low and Casper Barker regularly denied the opposition attack. If they did get through them then Freddie Booth in goal could be relied upon to deal with any shots that came his way. The team was brilliantly led by Sam Henriques throughout the season. Well done to all involved. TAB

James Lane

Boys’ Hockey Yearlings 4th XI P:7; W:2; D:2; L:3 The season promised much, but the group was unable to deliver the wins much of their outstanding interplay deserved. Goalkeeper

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GIRLS’ HOCKEY

draw against Wellington which saw the girls show great determination. All credit to Livi Hazlitt who rounded off almost five years of 1st XI hockey with a tremendous season, showing excellent leadership and a perfect role model off the field for younger members of the Hockey Club. JJ

Girls’ Hockey Open 2nd XI P:9; W:6; D:2; L:1 The final day defeat to Wellington shouldn’t mask what was otherwise a superb season. Our 2–1 win at Canford and 1–1 draw with Millfield were the highlights.

Girls’ Hockey Open 1st XI P:16; W:8; D:3; L:7 Bloxham

L

1:3

Bromsgrove

L

1:2

Clifton College

D

1:1

Wiltshire County Championships:

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

Warminster 3:0, Dauntsey’s 0:1, St John’s, Marlborough 5:0 Dean Close

L

1:2

Cheltenham College

W

1:0

St Edward’s

W

5:3

West Hockey Regional Preliminaries Hereford Cathedral 3:0, Kingswood 4:0, Dean Close 1:2

West Hockey Regional Finals Queen’s College 0:3, Clifton College 2:3, Exeter School 3:0 Millfield

D

1:1

Bradfield College

W

5:4

Canford

L

1:3

Wellington

D

2:2

SQUAD: O Hazlitt (Capt), L Bradby, H Cameron, K Carleton-Smith, M Dibden, A D’Oelsnitz, G Gibson, A Hampel, A Knight, H Koe, C LysterBinns, V Nott (Vice-Capt), S Shakespeare, C Spink, N Weir (GK, Vice-Capt)

Performances were built around a defence that conceded four goals all season. Keeper Sophia Hamilton-Russell exuded a zen-like calm and repeatedly thwarted the opposition. Sophie Thomas and Annie O’Grady delivered mature performances while Matilda Beckett was a formidable defender. Mimi Manning covered both left back and left midfield with a hint of menace and in midfield we possessed Honor Koe, a gutsy steeplechaser, and Hannah Olver, the skittish sprinter.

again later in the season. Goal-scoring wasn’t proving to be a problem, with the goals shared across the board early on and after the 1–1 home draw with Clifton on Maples, the wins soon followed in the County Championships. A 1–0 triumph over Cheltenham came before an entertaining 5–3 win over Teddies. Up next were the West Hockey regional prelims and the girls again found their scoring touch in shortened matches, with stout defence securing 3–0 and 4–0 wins before Dean Close again proved to be our Achilles heel. Thankfully, the defeat didn’t affect qualification to the Regional Finals that were held at Clifton mid-November. The tournament atmosphere provided added pressure and with shortened games, a slow start in the Queen’s game meant that the girls were on the back foot for qualification. A tight match against Clifton in the second fixture saw the hosts edge the game 3–2, when a draw would have been enough to seal progress. The girls showed great resolve to finish the day with a 3–0 win over Exeter, even though they knew their interest in the National Finals was over.

Nell McCaire led the line admirably as top goalscorer with her perpetual movement ensured channels were opened inside. Becky Addison’s wicked reverse shot accounted for our goal of the season and Martha Franks picked up passes with the faintest flick of the stick. Playing in the hole behind the top two, Gee Millar demonstrated a natural ball-player’s awareness and Henriette Bos made telling contributions with howitzer shots.

The final four games of the season saw a testing sequence and after a 1–1 draw with Millfield at home, the girls then got the better of a ninegoal thriller at Bradfield. The penultimate fixture ended in defeat to a solid Canford outfit before the season came to a close with a 2–2

Our two captains Imogen Redpath and Jammy Jones encapsulated the spirit of the side. Having played in the 1st XI two years previously, Jones approached every match with her trademark gusto and was deservedly voted our players’ player of the season. Redpath delivered

On the flanks Georgie Nicholas offered dynamism and pace whilst Tertia Paterson danced like a spring butterfly and Sophie Dibben progressed from the fringes of the 3rd team to show a highly competitive streak.

The core of the squad from the 2014 season returned for pre-season training ahead of the Michaelmas Term. We were pleased to add Stasi Knight to the squad from Millfield and she added considerable experience to the midfield ranks. Stasi, in addition to England internationals Sophie Shakespeare and Livi Hazlitt and junior development players provided much optimism ahead of the new campaign. The competitive fixture programme offered a range of testing opposition and with an array of challenges ahead. The season began with a tough start and back to back defeats to a strong Bromsgrove side and a narrow defeat to the evercompetitive Dean Close, who we would meet

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@MCol_Hockey Jul 30 Congratulations to recent OM and England U18 player Sophie Shakespeare on winning @ eurohockeyorg Bronze


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whenever and wherever she was asked playing across several positions. Like Jones, she kept her best until last with a stand out performance in her final game for the College. Huge thanks to assistant coach Harriet Cox, an endless supply of good humour and fun and to an outstanding group of girls for an outstanding season. R Pembroke

Girls’ Hockey Open 3rd XI P:8; W:7; D:0; L:1 The open thirds were the All Blacks of the league. Laura Kirkpatrick led the team with flair and determination from the start. Izzie Foster raced up and down the right wing and Willo Corfield popped up with goal after goal.

JW

Girls’ Hockey Open 4th XI P:10; W:8; D:1; L:1

to each and every game as soon as the whistle went... the Ellis Cup was thoroughly deserved!

Girls’ Hockey U16A P:10; W:4; D:2; L:4

WJM

Girls’ Hockey Open 5th XI P:6; W:2; L:3; D:1 Rose Redfern and Char Corfield led the way with a determination to play their best in every game, never stopping until the final second of play. A special mention to Mr Corfield, who could be heard at every game, giving the girls a boost in the cold conditions. Bella Swadling moved up to play for the 3rd XI but Ambra Moore stepped into the goalkeeping kit to finish off her hockey career in style with some excellent defending. The team was co-captained by Char and Rosie Woodhouse, both players made a huge difference to the team. Rosie brought together this group of girls as a team. Molly Macaire moved from defence to attack for her last season of hockey and had some spectacular goals along the way, while Lottie Brousse moved down from the 4th XI midway through the season and brought fresh enthusiasm to the team. I could not have asked for a better team this season and the girls should be proud of their achievements this year. Even when facing some difficult competition, they always responded positively and enjoyed every game. NLA

Bloxham

L

3:8

Clifton College

W

2:1

Godolphin

W

1:0

Dean Close

W

4:0

Cheltenham

D

1:1

St Edward’s

L

0:1

Millfield

W

5:1

King’s Bruton

L

0:1

Lord Wandsworth

L

3:4

Wellington

D

1:1

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

Bea Speelmans ran the right wing with pace and on the left, Matilde Speelmans finished her school career with a superb goal against Wellington. Milly Drewett played with real presence and scored the most spectacular goal. Amelia Ellis, ever dependable in open play, was particularly good in short corners. Islay Stopford-Sackville was versatile and skilful. Steph Evans’s fitness enabled her to ghost past markers. Tatiana Farquhar developed markedly as a player and sweeper Georgia Kearns was one of the critical team members with her intelligent reading of the game. Tilly was the defensive kingpin and her superb stick skills gave the defence the foundation to be so successful. Isla Harper was often the last player back. Time after time she made goal saving tackles. Left-back Imogen Matanle had real pace and she surprised right wings by tanking past them. Matilda Keen made a great start as our ’keeper until a cross-country injury took her out for the season. We were fortunate to get Bella Swadling as such a good replacement. She saved a goal in the hard-fought Wellington match with the grill of her helmet, a fitting end to a magnificent season. A special thanks to Miss Taylor Swift for making our training sessions so enjoyable.

SQUAD: S Atkinson, C Bugel, P Burdett, Z Combe, J Davy, G Dunlop, M Doyne, J Feather, O Good, K Mackaness, M McKelvey, S Smith, E Spark, L Thompson, J Walsh Waring, P Westgate The U16A team fought well and relentlessly throughout, producing spectacular wins and tough defeats, alongside a standard of hockey that went from strength to strength. Their focus and dedication throughout training has been uncompromised and their attitude on game days unremitting. Captain Phoebe Westgate led the team with determination and Scarlett Atkinson and Cosi Bugel showed

A fantastic season for the 4th XI this year as they were the most successful team of any hockey squad. Led by Sarah Mayne, the girls won eight of their 10 fixtures, conceding only five goals all term. Beginning the season with a 7–0 victory over Bromsgrove School (with a hat-trick from Milly Karsten), the girls went on to defeat Clifton, Dauntsey’s 3rd XI, Dean Close, Cheltenham and Lord Wandsworth over the coming weeks to establish themselves as ruthless hockey players. Though the goals came easily, the defensive line – led by Lucy Wilson – was what made things tick. The girls recovered from a defeat to St Edward’s School, Oxford to another victory and sealed the Ellis Cup with a last-minute Nicky Savage goal in the final game at Canford. I couldn’t heap more praise on the girls for the effort they put in

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great vision in the midfield, producing some excellent play. The clinical approach the defence proved to be unstoppable at times, with Phoebe, Martha Doyne, Zoe Combe, and Katty Mackaness (whose buoyant outlook was infectious) calmly finding ways to get the squad out of some tough situations. The tenacity of Olivia Good in the nets towards the end of the season demonstrated that there is yet more excellent hockey to come, and saved her best for when it really mattered. Jemima Feather and Stella Smith were rarely caught off guard and rose exceptionally to produce some intelligent hockey in some of the toughest matches. The wings of the pitch were dominated by the pace and strength of Ellie Spark (whose early departure from the squad was unfortunate), Lara Thompson, Millie McKelvey and Phoebe Burdett, all of whom proved their technical game is as good as their ‘banter’. The ruthless forwards of Jess Davy, Jess Walsh Wearing, and Georgia Dunlop produced some spectacular finishes, and their commitment to an ‘outcome’ unrelenting.

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

The team demonstrated excellent teamwork and unfailing enthusiasm for the sport; they played an intelligent game with skills to match, and their unfailing enthusiasm and determination was exemplary and relentless. It is clear that girls really do love hockey. Well done to all involved. AOJS

Girls’ Hockey U16B P:8; W:2; D:1; L:5 This year’s squad was a talented group and faced strong U16A and Open teams from other schools, a challenge which brought out the very best in our players. Captain Amy Vogel was a standout performer in every match, a talented hockey player and an inspirational role model for her team-mates. Towards the start of the season we secured a 2–0 win against Dauntsey’s followed by a 3–0 victory against Cheltenham. This was extremely pleasing as the hard work the girls put in during in the rainy Michaelmas training sessions was paying off. We then suffered a tough run of results – losing to St Edward’s (0–1) and a 0–0 at Sherborne where,

despite plenty of attacking action, the goals were just not going in. There then followed an amazing finale against Wellington, a very well-contested match of skill and courage. A 3–2 defeat despite a great comeback and tremendous goals from Eliza Cameron and Ottilie Barnes. LB/JMCC

Girls’ Hockey U15A P:10; W:7; D:2; L:1 Bromsgrove

D

3:3

Clifton

W

2:1

Dauntsey’s

W

2:0

Dean Close

W

3:1

Cheltenham

W

5:0

St Edward’s

W

1:0

Millfield

L

2:3

Bradfield

W

3:0

Canford

W

3:2

Wellington

D

3:3

SQUAD: L Beckett, E Burdett, L Constable, P Dixon, R Evans, L Hankinson, E Hargrove, D Head, S Hewitt, M Jeveons, F Jones, L O’Donald, H Place, I Sanderson, I Shakespeare, H Threlfall, L Wollocombe The team enjoyed a successful season accumulating seven wins two draws with just a single loss. Above all have shown improvement game by game and adopted a style of hockey that is attractive on the eye, slick passing mixed with flair. Our defensive line was a key component to success. Lara Beckett controlled proceedings with a steady and consistent Lucy Constable and player of the season Sasha Hewitt. Sasha wasn’t just MVP she was also the players’ player; faultless all year and her intensity in matches and training settings her above the rest. Our midfield was where the development and progression really stood out. The girls bought into a pass and move style of game and played some fantastic hockey. Stand-out

performances from the most improved player of the year Emilia Burdett was apparent, as well as Luz Wollocombe, Harriet Place and Lizzie Hankinson all showing great ability and potential. Maya Jeveons must also be highlighted; she started the year in the B’s and progressed into an established A team player. Our front line was led by India Shakespeare who is a talented individual with quick hands, a ferocious backhand and a penalty corner feared by most. Just beside India was Lucy O’Donald on the left, who has all the makings to be a very good player and a keen eye for goal. While only a few girls have been highlighted it must be said that all have been excellent throughout the year and I must also pay tribute to Mrs Hodgson who has been a fantastic assistant. BMM

Girls’ Hockey U15B P:9; W:7; D:0; L:2 It was a successful and hugely enjoyable season. The girls grew as a group and showed character to come through several tough encounters. A series of early victories boosted confidence levels in the team, which contained a potent combination of fine athleticism and bulldog spirit. Led by the redoubtable Hannah Wilson, the girls developed a passing style which was best displayed in a thumping 4–1 victory over Cheltenham. With Eliza Kearns in midfield to the fore, the team overwhelmed their opponents who were hitherto unbeaten. The best was yet to come: a defiant performance against Millfield saw determined defence for long periods of the game before striking with a classic counter-attack; Scarlett Thompson leading the breakaway and Lucy Burgess showing composure to slot home. The term ended with tough defeats to Bradfield and Wellington but this should not detract from what was a very fine season. Our player of the season award was Mille Lankester who was brilliant all year. JTWL

Girls’ Hockey U15C P:8; W:4; D:0; L:4 The U15C team had a great season, growing in strength as the term progressed. Ana Downing led the team like a true captain, displaying her athletic abilities at all times whilst putting away some great goals and assists each game. A total of 37 goals were scored and we only conceded 15, this shows how relentless the girls worked each game. Our most memorable fixture – against Canford – saw us win 15–1. The team dug deep and didn’t take their feet off the pedal; credit to Amelia sinking five of the goals, Ana for four and Etta for three. The girls progressed throughout the term and were a pleasure to work with. DM/OFG

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Girls’ Hockey U14A Bromsgrove

L

1:2

Cheam

W

5:0

Clifton

D

2:2

St John’s

W

2:0

Dauntsey’s

W

1:1 (3:1 on pens)

Dean Close

W

5:0

Cheltenham

D

1:1

St Edward’s

W

7:0

Millfield

L

0:5

Bradfield

L

5:7

Wellington

D

3:3

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P:19; W:9; D:5; L:5

Wiltshire County Championships:

West Hockey Regional Finals Helston 1:0, Ladies’ College 3:0, Cheltenham 0:0, Canford 0:1, Dean Close 1:2 SQUAD: R Sykes (Capt), H Eyles (Vice-Capt), A Cameron (Vice-Capt), M Aitchison, K Astor, K Bell, P Cripwell, A Dunlop, A Hall, T Oliphant, R Pembroke, L Pilkington, L Quinn, J Stratton The girls got their Marlborough careers under way at Bromsgrove, but despite some great play, ended with a 2–1 loss. They bounced back with a 5–0 win over Cheam and then played out a thrilling 2–2 draw against Clifton, with Tate Oliphant, Rosie Sykes and Lotte Quinn in goal coming the rescue. The County Championships then saw Ali Cameron run the show, creating chances out of nothing, with Marlborough beating Dauntsey’s on penalty shuffles in the final. The side backed this up with convincing wins over Dean Close and St Edwards, with Alex Dunlop netting twice in front of goal. The inaugural ISHL 6-a-side competition completed the first half of term, finishing a commendable 4th out of 10. November brought the arrival of strong opposition in Millfield and Bradfield to Fortress Maples with both results going in favour of the away side, despite the standout performances from Harriet Eyles, who finished with 14 goals in the season and went on to make her Open 1st XI debut a few weeks later. The West regional tournament soon came and went, progressing from their group of five. However, it was a typical Marlburian performance in the quarterfinal, freezing under pressure and succumbing to a 2–1 loss versus Dean Close. With Canford cancelling our fixture due to tiredness (despite playing in the same tournament as us), our last game saw us match up against a very strong Wellington side, playing out an exciting 3–3 draw.

performance, I have no doubt that this side will perform well in future years and I look forward to following their progress. WGH

Girls’ Hockey U14B P:11; W:6; D:2; L:3 The team started the term with a long trip away to Bromsgrove where they gained a 1–0 victory. This was the start of an 8 game unbeaten run the highlights of which were winning at Bradfield College and holding Millfield to a draw. Emily Place had a great term in goal, making fine saves and marshalling the team from the back. Henrietta Mackenzie was Captain for all but one game and she gave great leadership and encouragement to the team. In defence, Talia Neat and Isabella Bullen were solid, also giving good distribution up the pitch. There were a few challengers from Morris House for top goal scorer, with Kirsten Bell just pipping Alice Wood to the title with 5 goals while Jasmine Castleman was also not far behind. The last but one game was against a very strong Canford team and despite their best efforts, the girls were unable to maintain their winning streak. Jessica Reeve’s efforts gained her player of the match in this game. Katherine Aspbury was the most improved player across the term. The team laid a good foundation for future years

of hockey with their good performances and dedication during training. James Lane/HLM

Girls’ Hockey U14C P:11; W:4; L:6; D:1 A very exciting season, comprising of fantastic wins, narrow draws, closely fought defeats and focused and determined training sessions, all carried through with amazing energy and grit. Regardless of the outcome of the matches, the girls displayed fantastic sportsmanship and were a true credit to the College.

GIRLS’ HOCKEY

Godolphin 1:0, Dauntsey’s 0:0, St John’s 1:0, Warminster 3:0

Extremely strong attacking was displayed by Milly Green and Alice Biddulph, great and tactically aware midfield play was made possible by Harmony Allen and Charlotte Bamforth and solid defending was provided by Mimi Perry and Connie Campbell-Gray. Lena Barton has a fantastic term as our ever-dependable Goalkeeper. Our most prolific goalscorers were Charlotte Bamforth and Sophie Kirkwood, and the most-often voted P.O.M. was joint between Sophie Kirkwood and Alice Biddulph. VD

It was a season whereby the results did not reflect the quality that this side has moving forward. With more of a clinical edge to their

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SPORTS

FOOTBALL

Football Open 1st XI P:10; W:1; D:1; L:8 (Michaelmas Term) P:5; W:2; D:2; L:1 (Lent Term)

FOOTBALL

Michaelmas Term Westminster

L

0:2

Swindon Academy

D

6:6

Bedales

W

3:1

King Edward’s Witley

L

2:3

Corinthian Casuals

L

5:0

Eton

L

7:0

Charterhouse

L

2:1

Wellington

L

3:4

Winchester

L

8:0

OMs

L

3:1

Dauntsey’s

W

1:0

Sherborne

L

2:1

Clifton

W

2:1

King’s Worcester

D

3:3

Monmouth

L

5:0

Lent Term

Michaelmas Term SQUAD: M Barnes, S Moore, C Amati, A Pendleton, F Powell, K Larsson, C Wass, A Zammitt, B Evans, F Gordon, J Cattermull, H Vivash, A Demilecamps, J Murphy Our opening fixture with Westminster suffered from a two-hour delayed kick-off due to traffic congestion in Knightsbridge but despite this, the match was lively and keenly contested. Only a penalty in our host’s favour divided the teams at half-time. Charlie Wass, leading the team for the first time, was energetic and aggressive in midfield aided by Ale Zammitt back after a long-term groin injury. Monty Barnes making his debut in goal, was an effective sweeper ’keeper, unlucky to concede a second late on which saw us finish up 2–0 losers. The next match at home to Swindon Academy saw both sides playing attractive attacking football which led to goals flying in at both ends. Kaj Larsson opened his account with two as did Wass. John Cattermull and Hugo Vivash added the other goals in the final 6–6 scoreline! Bedales had a strong 1st XI this year and this match could

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have gone either way but two well-taken goals by Ben Evans and another from Larsson set us up for a well-deserved 3–1 victory. We were delighted to then host Ignatius Park College, a touring side from Townsville, Australia. A combative and fast-paced start to the game was unfortunately cut short by a serious injury to the Aussie ’keeper which meant the game had to be stopped and then relocated to another pitch to allow for that player to receive medical treatment. The disjointed match resulted in a 5–3 victory to Marlborough with Alexis Pendleton and Milo Sweet scoring their first goals for the College. King Edward’s Witley (KEW) always turn out well-organised sides and this year’s was no exception. We were uncharacteristically poor in the first half and despite a late rally, we deserved to lose 3–2. An OM side consisting of our most recent leavers – led by last year’s captain Jack Nithavrianakis (LI 2010-15) – came to Marlborough just before half-term. It was a strong side containing the likes of players like George Cornish (C3 2010-15), Ed Cadbury (BH 2010-15), Matt Sykes (C1 2010-15) and Alex Callender (SU 2010-15). Despite this the XI rose to the occasion and started playing some attractive football especially Vivash who made some scintillating mazey runs from midfield. Two goals against the run of play – the first by Jacob Brandi (C3 2010-15), the second by Henry Alexander (BH 2010-15) took the wind

out of our sails and although Fraser Gordon pulled one back, a third goal from a corner by Mylo Ingoldsby (C2 2010-15) sealed our fate. The second half of term saw no improvement in our results. Poor marking and a lack of concentration at vital moments, mainly set pieces, led us to a 5–0 defeat against a below-par Corinthian Casuals side that was certainly not of the ‘spirit’ they are allegedly renowned for. Having worked hard in training, it was really disappointing to lose 7–0 to Eton in our next fixture. Again this was down to momentary lapses and a lack of fighting spirit rather than deficiencies in skills or tactics. Some personnel changes led to a much better team performance against Charterhouse and we were unlucky not to come away with a draw, losing 2–1. Tom Moody deservedly named MOTM on his debut. Winchester then arrived with a reputation for having crafted an undefendable set piece originating from a mammoth throw in and header combo which we spent most of the week preparing for. Despite this, we found ourselves 7–0 down at half-time with five of those goals coming from the aforementioned set piece! Thankfully only one more goal was conceded after half-time. A much more encouraging performance all round against Wellington, led to a combative and thrilling end-to-end encounter which saw us unlucky to lose 4–3 having staged a fighting comeback and dominated most of the second half. James Barrows, who had been playing in the Open 3rd XI up until a few weeks previously, was Man of the Match. The final game of the term against the OMs finished 3–1 to the visitors but despite the loss, there was plenty to be optimistic about with the team showing more belief, unity and cohesion.

Lent Term SQUAD: J Crossland, M Barnes, S Moore, C Amati, A Pendleton, C Wass (Captain), A Zammitt, H Vivash, J Cooke, J Barrows, W Davies, G Rivett- Carnac, P Spring ford, B Powell Adverse weather wrought havoc on football in the first half of term and severely waterlogged pitches meant that only two fixtures were played before half-term and neither were Mercian


With the poor weather in the first half of term leading to several cancellations of important Mercian League fixtures, it was always unlikely that the league would be completed. Our first match after half-term was against Clifton which is as close to a local derby as we get and this didn’t disappoint. Two well-matched sides vied for early dominance and Marlborough took the lead with a nicely placed penalty by Wass. An equaliser minutes later set up a keenly contested second half and it was only with minutes to go that Springford slotted away the winner. Our next match against King’s Worcester revealed some of our season-long frailties which explained why we were never going to win the league this year. A stunning goal from Powell, drilled in from 25 yards, and two penalties from Wass put us in a seemingly unassailable position. But sloppy marking from two set pieces saw King’s pull level and then we reverted to cartoon defending in the dying minutes to prevent a home defeat. Our last match of the term was away at Monmouth and although we knew this was going to be tough our lack of spirit was disappointing. Poor communication and marking again led to easy goals for the home side and we found ourselves 3–0 down at the break. Another early goal straight after the interval and another minutes from the final whistle led to a 5–0 defeat. Charlie Wass, was awarded player of the season. Huge thanks to Jon Holloway and Clive Maguire for their impeccable professionalism and their loyal support for football at the College. MAG

Football Open 2nd XI SPORTS

P:6; W:3; D:2; L:1 The term opened with a score draw against Winchester College, which saw a cracking second half goal from Alex Green enough to secure a share of the spoils. Left-back Milo Rowse was awarded man of the match for his outstanding defensive work. Next was an away trip to Dauntsey’s and although the Marlburians dominated possession, the hosts scored first through an own goal. In the second period a penalty from Joss Murphy, a brace of own goals and further strikes from Josh Wake and Green secured a comfortable win. A 4–0 win over Sherborne followed with a fantastic team performance. Goalkeeper Ed Hannay impressed with some outstanding display, whilst goals from John Cattermull (2), Tom Mayes and Will Rigby sealed commanding win. Clifton College at home saw another 4–0 victory with another brace from Cattermull and further strikes from Rigby and Henry Dunhill. James Neville was awarded MOTM for his tireless work alongside captain Toby Eldredge. Despite another dominant display, a 1–0 home defeat to King’s Worcester saw the visitors score with a breakaway effort. Plenty of chances came and went for an equaliser with the ball twice cleared off the line with some fine goalkeeping enough to keep the Marlburians at bay. The final match of the campaign saw the players go into the game knowing that a win would secure a place at the top of the table. The game started with Murphy converting a penalty before the hosts drew level early on. The hosts went ahead before the break, before a fine chip from Cattermull levelled the game up once again. After Monmouth had regained the lead five minutes from time, a late penalty award saw Fraser Gordon step up and slot the ball home to secure a 3–3 draw. Well done to all involved. Shane Hewlett

Tour to Prague In the first week of the Easter holidays a development squad flew out to the Czech Republic to play three matches against local opposition in Prague. The first against Sokol Cernosice was a keenly fought contest and our hosts were strong in the tackle, obviously wanting to make an early impression on us. Both sides played exciting attacking football and inevitably goals followed but it was Marlborough who ended up 3–2 winners with Hugo Vivash (penalty), James Barrows and Max McLaughlin all on the scoresheet. Our second fixture v Sokol Lipence was a more one sided affair and having taken an early lead, the goals then flowed with Hugo Horlock scoring twice and Oliver Cutts, John Cattermull also netting goals.

FOOTBALL

League games. The first was against Dauntsey’s with the XI winning 1–0 in a keenly contested derby – Philip Springford scoring his first goal for the Grannies capitalising on a beautifully timed assist from Sam Moore. The day before half-term we hosted Sherborne who are always physical and well organised. The XI took an early lead through Ben Powell and there were passages of play when Marlborough totally dominated largely due to the tireless work of skipper Wass in midfield. Despite this we still managed to leak a goal in the dying minutes and lose what should have been a convincing home victory, 1–2.

The final game against Olympia Seberov played under floodlights, was an even more emphatic win for us with Hugo Vivash ending his Marlborough career by completely dominating the midfield and netting 7 goals underlining in no uncertain terms his semi-professional status. Despite this outstanding performance, the player of the tour was Sebastian Schramm who had three excellent games at full back where his strength and pace on the left often gave us width and the opportunity to stage effective counter-attacks. Off the field we were treated to generous local fare laid on for us after every match and our hosts were exceptionally good at making us feel very welcome. We also went to watch Sparta Prague v Slavia Prague, the atmosphere truly exhilarating it being their equivalent of a premiership derby. We also made excursions to Wenceslas Square and Prague Castle, as well as taking a cruise down the River Vlatava and on our penultimate day, a poignant visit to Lidice Village, scene of the infamous World War Two massacre. Grateful thanks as always to the Swindon coaches Jon Holloway and Clive Maguire who were fundamental to the success of this trip. MAG

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SPORTS

Football Open 3rd XI P:6; W:1; D:3; L:2 Overall this was a good term with six highly competitive matches. The team played well and numerous players made the leap up to the second team. After an early defeat to Winchester at home the boys responded well with a 2–1 win at Radley with goals from Alex de L’Epine and Mark John Cattermull. Hugo MacKichan kept us in the game with some great saves. Sherborne brought a strong team and although we scored three including two from Felix Scrivens we lost out in the end. Next up saw a closely fought 1–1 draw at home to Clifton. Nick Newton scored to level and Milo Smail was exceptional in the midfield. Our last two games both finished with a 1–1 draw, both at home. King’s Worcester and Monmouth played well and we were unlucky not to come away with more. Special mention should go to Rhys Barnes for an excellent solo goal, Charlie Henman who moved up from the 4th XI for these two games and in particular William Heard who was an excellent captain. SGQ

Football Open 4th XI

FOOTBALL

P:3; W:0; D:1; L:2 This was a season punctuated by cancelled matches but filled with plenty of enjoyment and humour in the practice sessions. The team clashed twice with Radley and the early season saw a thrilling 1–1 draw which was to be the highlight of an otherwise defeated season. The defence were busy throughout with memorable bravery being shown by Harry Drew, Milo Osborne-Young, Leo Moorhead and Ali Merzeci. In the next match, the team struggled and soon found themselves 3–0 down. That much of the second half remained at 0–0 was testament to the character of the team. Pietro Bonfiglio ended the season on a high by topping the table of goalscorers with his vicious strike to score against Radley in the home leg. Cosmo Lindsay and Oliver Phelps ran the engine room with several other players having their chance in the 3rd XI. This was a young team of L6 players and no doubt they’ll return next season wiser for the experience. WJM

Football Colts 1st XI P:5; W:1; D:1; L:3 Winchester

W

4:3

Swindon Town XI

L

1:6

Sherborne

D

1:1

Clifton

L

1:2

Monmouth

L

1:2

SQUAD: O Meyrick, S Schramm, V Talwar, B Hall, L Wyatt, R Terry, J Hartley, G Ambrosio, S Callender, O Barker, C Clubb, M Fillingham, F Boase, T Sykes, G Marshall, H Bell The season has come and gone as quickly as a Sebastian Schramm overlap down the left wing! It is always tough for the Colts’ sides when facing opposition in the Open age groups – especially from a physical standpoint. However, this year’s squad has remained steadfast in their approach to playing a passing game, epitomised by midfield exchanges between Sebastian Callender, Freddie Boase, Tom Sykes and Giuseppe Ambrosio. This was coupled with attacking full backs Larry Wyatt, Raoul Terry and Sebastian Schramm; a strong central defensive partnership of Virat Talwar and Ben Hall; the holding midfield play of captain Chesney Clubb and Oliver Barker; firepower of George Marshall and Harry Bell. The allaround player of the season was the ever-reliant

Orlando Meyrick, who produced game saving saves in every match and without his bravery and shot stopping ability the team may have struggled to remain in contention in certain matches. As a result, Colts 1 produced some excellent team performances with a big win against Winchester (overturning an eight goal deficit from the repeat fixture in JCs!), an excellent draw away at Sherborne, and two narrow 1–2 defeats at the hands of Clifton College and Monmouth. The standout moment of the season has to go to George Marshall’s Matt Le Tissier-esque spectacular 35-yard strike away at Clifton. The prolific striker managed five goals in five matches this season, a commendable achievement and attributable to the midfielder’s ability to play through the opposition defence. MJS

Football Colts 2nd XI P:4; W:2; D:0; L:2 The season began at Sherborne and after conceding two early goals the game appeared beyond reach. Finally, we began to play and at 3–2 an equaliser was only thwarted by the final whistle. Clifton was a similar story as early goal meant we were always chasing a game we should have won. Strong home support against Radley helped us play our best football and Harry Bell scored a fabulous late winner to seal victory. The best performance of the season came against Monmouth with almost total domination of the game. With ten minutes remaining a Monmouth equaliser prompted a Marlborough onslaught which became increasingly ambitious but left us almost no defensive cover. We hit the post and bar but they countered and scored to seal the most unlikely of victories. Some great performances this year from Lachlan Graham, Lucas Stratenwerth, Luca Conte, Benedict Hall, Felix Cracknell, Ben Cripwell, George Bowron, Oliver Ordish, Guillaume Anns, Jamie Hartley, Charlie Philips, Matvey Notkin and our captain Adam Dalrymple. KGAS

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SPORTS P:5; W:1; D:1; L:3 Malvern

L

1:12

RGS

L

0:2

Sherborne

D

1:1

Clifton

W

3:2

Monmouth

L

0:7

Wellington

L

1:4

SQUAD: R Piper, J Redmayne, S Spark, J Dowling, B Cooper (Captain), F Coen, P O’Connor, J Hayeem, L Lambert, C Cooke, S De L’Epine, M Hussain, A Goodwin, M Redpath, S Cutts, O Mace After only two days of training, the boys were launched into their first match against a strong Malvern side. Although the squad was not quite complete, there were some notable performances from Sam Spark and the team’s most consistent striker Orlando Mace. Rigorous training and squad changes had the team readied for their match against Sherborne, another formidable side. The game looked far more even in the first half, with excellent leadership from captain Ben Cooper but the team just lost their consistency in the second. A few weeks of intense training and a series of grudge matches against the Colts took pace before the next big game against Clifton. In

this game the JC 1st team finally came into their own, demonstrating a calm and collected defence before launching into a fierce and swift counter attack. This was a great moment in the season for the boys and the team looked at its most complete and competent. Clifton’s forces were unlucky enough to meet with the strong defensive play of Jamie Dowling and the ferocious runs of Freddie Coen. While the rest of the season did not see such success, the match played against King’s Worcester was a tense battle, with Charlie Cooke stepping up to cover for an injured team-mate and Jack Redmayne demonstrating his hidden penalty-taking skills. The final match against Monmouth was their toughest challenge and serious risks in the second half proved to be disastrous for the result. The results do not reflect the season these boys have had, for they have developed so strongly as a team and as football players. Each member of the side will be a real asset to their next squad and I foresee them striking great terror in their opponents in the years to come.

moving up to the firsts, the next result was less stellar with a defeat to RGS Worcester. Despite some excellent play, including the hard-working efforts of captain Luke Clarke, the opposition proved too strong for a much-changed line-up. The boys steeled themselves for a nail-biting showdown against Sherborne. The match was an exhausting duel with notable performances from Bassano Compostella and Lucas Cloves in the midfield. Sherborne just edged it by a single goal but the boys felt good about their finest match yet. Their next match against Clifton saw plenty of goals and also keen defensive work from Sam Phelps and Patrick Pereira.

FOOTBALL

Football Junior Colts 1st XI

While the rest of the season did not hold as much success, there were some notable display from some guest Malaysian players and the consistency of Marlowe Turner on the left wing during matches against King’s Worcester and Monmouth. Despite these defeats, the boys really demonstrated good progress. The boys’ attitudes couldn’t be faulted throughout a challenging and rewarding term of football. MM

SJB

Football Junior Colts 2nd XI P:5; W:2; D:0; L:3 The team produced an excellent first result against Malvern including two goals from leading striker Rory Lynas. With some players

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SPORTS

LACROSSE

Lacrosse 1st XII P:7; W:1; D:1; L:5 (Michaelmas Term) P:4; W:1; D:0; L:3 (Lent Term) P:10; W:4; D:1; L:5 (National Schools) P:3; W:1; D:0; L:2 (MC Invitational)

LACROSSE

SQUAD: E Agnew, L Bracher, A Brignall, L Bromovsky, S Dibben, I Eversfield, O Gaillard, L Goodman, C Grainger, S Lewis, K Newton, A O’Grady, A Smart, A Springett, K Vogel, N Weir, N White The Open 1st team had a challenging two terms competing against some very strong opposition. However, at the annual National Schools tournament the girls really stepped up, played very well and their true colours shone through. A culmination of two terms of hard work resulted in a Division 2 placement on the second day of play. They played extremely well in pool play on the second day – winning two and drawing one before being knocked out by Shrewsbury in the afternoon. The idea of teamwork, dedication and fun were stressed over months of training sessions and matches in all types of weather. Captains Lucy Goodman and Katie Vogel kept the morale high and led by example on the pitch. Lara Bracher and Suzanne Lewis managed the draw controls

well and were instrumental in midfield play. Alice Springett stood strong in goal, saving multiple shots per game. Lettice Bromovsky was a real workhorse all over the pitch and despite a number of knocks, she showed excellent resilience. Claudia Grainger made her debut for the first team appearance as a member of the Shell which is a huge achievement. Six Upper Sixth players – Lettice Bromovsky, Natasha White, Katie Vogel, Lucy Goodman, Kitty Newton, Amy Smart – made a real impact and will be missed next season. In summary, a great two terms filled with plenty of memories both on and off the pitch! JAC

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EME & GJM

Lacrosse 2nd XII

Lacrosse U15 XII

P:9; W:2; D:0; L:7 The team had a strong Lent Term which included some great wins. The girls worked hard to improve their defence and overall communication on the pitch and their work paid off. The intensity of their game and ability to see the space on the field was apparent in midfield as well as in attack as they slowed the ball down and took control of matches. The strongest displays were when they were able to come out on top with two wins against St Helen’s & St Katherine’s and Haileybury. They

@MCol_Lacrosse Team dinner after a great day of lacrosse!

used the momentum of the first win to play an equally strong second match. The teamwork was impeccable with some great plays leading to goals. They were able to utilise the large field space to their advantage, spreading out on the attack as well as cutting into open space on the midfield transition. Congratulations to Milly Drewett for an impressive season of lacrosse and the only member of the U6. Her continued hard work all over the pitch was noticed in every match in addition to an unmistakable improvement of skills. Congratulations also go to Anna Laakkonen and Francesca Hamilton for their continued effort and skills throughout the two terms.

Feb 26

P:14; W:3; D:1; L:10 P:6; W:0; D:0; L:6 (National Schools) P:4; W:2; D:0; L:2 (MC Invitational) SQUAD: O Bailey, H Bromovsky, L Burgess, P Dixon, S Gow, S Hall-Smith, E Hargrove, S Kirkwood, K Lee, V Mackintosh, C Middleton, D MitfordSlade, E Mylne, H Nicholson, I Poulden, L Prideaux, A Powell, P Redfern, A Tchen The side had a very enjoyable season. The level of improvement has been exceptional; every player has worked so hard and should be proud of the level of play they reached. The defence was always a great asset to the team because of their strong formation. Being led by Ella Mylne, the defence communicated well and was able to quickly react to the opposition’s movements. Our only Shell player, Anna Tchen, made a huge impact on the level of defensive play, often leaping like a gazelle to intercept a pass. The midfield showed great determination, making runs and winning ground balls; they worked together so well to take the ball up the pitch. In particular, Sophie Hall-Smith, Hope Nicholson and Camilla Middleton made impressive turnovers and battled for each and every ball. Ellen Hargrove made an exceptional amount of runs down the pitch helping both the attack and the defence, and never gave up when she was marking an opponent and fighting for the


SPORTS JH, KMH & CNP

Lacrosse U14 XII P:6; W:0; D:0; L:6 (Michaelmas Term) P:3; W:1; D:0; L:2 (Lent Term) SQUAD: H Barton, G Cowen, L Cracknell, E Debs, N Egorova, L Fowler, D Goble, A Hannan, L Hunt, S Kirkwood, V Korobkova, L Latif, P Magre, J Newington, A Parker, C Phelps, F Tuckey The squad saw dramatic improvement in the Lent Term after only having played one previous term of lacrosse. Their competitiveness and teamwork increased on the pitch as they began to feel more confident with their skills. This was evident in their matches as they scored more goals and allowed for more even-sided

matches against their opponents. Their weekly play with the U15 team helped the girls prepare for matches, giving them solid competition as well as insight into what a higher level of lacrosse looks like. The team’s best match this term was against Rendcomb College in the last match of the season. They showed strong camaraderie throughout and left the match brimming with new confidence having won 19–0. Sophie Kirkwood and Lydia Hunt stood out this season with their strong play and work ethic. Huge congratulations to all who have competed in their first lacrosse season. Bigger and better things to come as they move up to the U15s. EME

Jen Cohen What an impact Jen had upon the College in such a relatively short space of time. She gave so much enthusiasm, energy and commitment during her 4 years with us. Arriving from Northern California, as a Graphics graduate and a very accomplished College Lacrosse player, the College certainly wasted no time in utilising her vast array of skills to full effect. Lacrosse was her passion and it was wonderful to see the effect she had upon this Sport throughout her time at the College. She introduced ‘Thanksgiving Scrimmages’, Staff and student matches and even parents on some occasions. She led an outstanding tour to USA and inspired so many girls in what was still, when she arrived, a relatively fledgling sport. The Lacrosse Nationals was a good example of Jen’s absolute commitment and how much genuine time and effort she put into leading and supporting the girls. The organisation of each Nationals was so well thought out and managed, with her often hosting a ‘carbo load’ at her flat before the event which took days of cooking and prep. She continuously went above and beyond with the Lacrosse girls – baking cookies, creating a ‘build the best gingerbread house’ competition in the Michaelmas Term and fancy dress Lacrosse on important days of celebration. It was no surprise to Marlborough when she was selected to coach the National Scottish side (luckily alongside her work at the College).

LACROSSE

ball. The attack showed great spatial awareness, losing their defenders and making cuts towards the ball. In attack, there were beautiful assists by Camilla Middleton that were turned into goals by Lara Prideaux and other competent attackers. Great catches were made by Kitty Lee, who always seemed to be in the right place at the right time. Finally, a special mention for our incredible goalie, Daisy Mitford-Slade for making more saves than anyone could imagine possible.

She was a wonderful addition on any trip or tour and her two Lacrosse Tours to Florida, including a day at Disney World, were ground breaking for Marlborough Lacrosse. Jen served the College superbly and she will be sadly missed. We wish her the very best as she embarks on a Masters at Edinburgh and as she continues to coach the Scottish National Lacrosse side. RFH

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Girls’ Tennis U15A SPORTS

P:14; W:10; D:0; L:4

GIRLS’ TENNIS The popularity of girls’ tennis at Marlborough College continues to grow, evident by fielding up to 18 teams on any given match day, and having played 123 matches throughout the Summer Term including traditional fixtures as well as the Aegon National Secondary Schools and Year 10 competitions run by the LTA.

GIRLS’ TENNIS

Out of 123 fixtures overall the girls have won an astounding 102 matches a resounding 83% success rate.

Girls’ Tennis Open 1st P:11; W:8; D:0; L:3 Clifton

W

9:0

Canford

W

7:2

Dauntsey’s

W

6:3

St Mary’s

L

4:5

St Helen & St Katharine

W

6:3

Downe House

W

5:4

Wycombe Abbey

L

4:5

St Mary’s Calne

L

5:7

Bradfield College

W

9:0

Bryanston

W

6:3

National Cup Round 2 Won 10:2 v Bradfield College SQUAD: L Feather (Captain), H Eyles, R Addison, S Vakhonina, O Gaillard, B Pecover, L Kirkpatrick, L Beckett Over 70 senior girls this year have opted for competitive tennis training. This has led to playing against two schools each weekend allowing up to eight teams to play each Saturday, and generally playing up against tougher opposition. The team has been relatively settled with Harriet Eyles – a truly remarkable feat for a Shell player to be in the 1st pair of the Open 1st VI and Rebecca Addison at first pair. Sonya Vakhonina has been a great acquisition and has also played in the first pair on occasion, and these three players have shown both flair and fantastic consistency. Olivia Gaillard and Bea

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Pecover have improved with each game and Captain Lara Feather and Laura Kirkpatrick have caused many problems with their big serves and power play. Harriet has also gone on to play at Number one for Wiltshire in the Aegon County Finals recently which took place in Nottingham. The second half of term showed no let-up in competition with the girls unbeaten in the second half of term, playing attacking serve and volley on the grass courts at Bryanston, and a white wash against Bradfield the highlights. With the onset of the exams have taken the mantle and dominated all in front of them, the future looks very bright for the senior girls’ tennis programme especially with Lara Beckett being promoted from the U15s and Harriet having played in the Open 1st pair of team all season. Harriet was also awarded player of the season and played at number one for Wiltshire in the U14 National Finals. As has become the norm our 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th VIs have had undefeated seasons, often playing up against opposition from other schools. Katerina Mathison and her partner Islay Stopford Sackville have not dropped a set all term. Many other players have stepped up from last year and are now playing much more confidently; serving, approaching and volleying their way to success and it is only right to mention those who have participated each and every week thus far including Millie McKelvey, Olivia Wilson, Maddie Kirkwood, Eleanor Wills, Hannah Cameron and these players have been the backbone of the successful senior teams.

St Helen & St Katharine

L

2:10

Clifton

W

8:1

Canford

W

9:0

Dauntsey’s

L

2:7

Cheltenham Ladies

L

2:7

Downe House

W

6:3

St Mary’s Calne

W

5:4

Wycombe Abbey

W

8:1

Godolphin School

W

8:4

Bradfield College

W

8:1

Bryanston

L

2:7

St Mary’s Calne

W

8:6

Cheltenham

W

6:3

Canford

W

6:3

SQUAD: L Beckett (Captain), H Wilson, M Jeveons, F Jones, A Harris, L Wollocombe, D Head, L Constable Lara Beckett led this successful side to the vast majority of victories over the season. Winning the Wiltshire Aegon Cup was a good achievement, but the girls may be proudest of their performances against schools where they did not win as U14s. For example, the impressive win against Wycombe Abbey will be a highlight, with Hannah Wilson and Maya Jeveons winning in impressive style. Consistent over the term have been Freya Jones and Arabella Harris, stepping into the 1st pair role when Lara Beckett and Luz Wollocombe stepped aside in the second half of term. In a similar way, Daisy Head and Lucy Constable provided energy and enthusiasm on match days, brushing aside opposition and helping to guarantee wins. The team should feel very proud of the 2016 season; they have a tough circuit and have had well-earned wins on a weekly basis. ACL

Girls’ Tennis U15 B/C/D/E P:29; W:27; D:0; L:2

Starting lower down and progressing up the teams each week have been Isabel Perry and Lucy Wilson as well as Isla Harper and Lottie Brousse and these players have demonstrated the qualities of commitment, endeavour and grit that we look to install in our players. Very well done.

Every one of the 40 girls opting for tennis this term made selection to represent the College which is a testament to the depth of talent we have in the U15 age group at Marlborough. To only drop two matches with 29 played is impressive by any standards with the D and E team remaining unbeaten. There were a number of weekends where we needed to pitch our D and E teams against the opposition B and C teams as the quality of our tennis is simply unrivalled. The most satisfying wins were certainly against Downe House, Canford and Cheltenham College although in truth, the matches told just part of the tale.

ASP

The girls trained hard on a weekly basis, listened

@MCol_Tennis June 18 Great tennis for the 1st VI against Bryanston on beautiful grass courts


SPORTS

College and Canford, 8–1 and 7–2 respectively. The win over Canford was all the sweeter after their loss at the beginning of the season. All the girls have responded well to advice throughout the season and made super progress in terms of both their mental and playing game, growing in resilience as the season progressed. Claudie Grainger and Sophie Kirkwood formed an indomitable 3rd pair, and had energy and enthusiasm in abundance. When this was coupled with rapid improvement, they became a real force to be reckoned with. This was a wonderful season and the girls should look forward to next year with great confidence. RFH

Girls’ Tennis U14C P:9; W:8; D:0, L:1

W

6:3

Canford

W

6:3

St Mary’s Calne

W

5:4

Downe House

W

8:1

Cheltenham Ladies College

W

5:4

Wycombe Abbey

W

6:3

RFH

Bradfield College

W

7:2

Bryanston

W

6:3

Cheltenham College

W

8:1

Canford

W

6:3

JM

Girls’ Tennis U14A P:10; W:10; D:0; L:0

SQUAD: A Cameron, H Smith, P Cripwell, B Ransome, M Aitchison, L Greenwood Despite the temperamental weather and some rather rain-soaked fixtures, the team had an outstanding season with a clean sweep of victories. There were some hard-fought battles, where the girls displayed tenacity and determination, culminating in exciting climaxes. St Mary’s Calne and Cheltenham Ladies’ College proved the most challenging, with narrow wins of 5 sets – 4 sets, but there were several other games, such as Clifton College, Canford (home and away), Wycombe Abbey and Bryanston where it was closely contested at 6 sets – 3 sets. The girls adapted particularly well to changes in pairings and training teams as the season progressed and the competition increased, meeting each new fixture with renewed focus and enthusiasm to maintain their unbeaten streak. It was wonderful to see a superb standard of tennis with some serious, hardhitting rallies across the board and significant

Girls’ Tennis U14B P:11; W:9; D:0; L:2 The team excelled in both matches and training throughout the season. They were a delight to coach, both in terms of their enthusiasm and determination to improve. Tate Oliphant and Rosie Sykes led from the front and were outstanding in both attitude and tenacity on the court. All the girls brought wonderful humour and energy to the U14B team. They got off to a rip-roaring start with a 9–0 win over Clifton College and were then very unlucky to lose in a real nail-biter 4–5 to Canford. They then turned the tables and beat St Mary’s Calne 5–4 in an equally tight game. Close fixtures followed against Downe House and Cheltenham Ladies’ College and then a convincing win over Wycombe Abbey. The team then won in fine style against Godolphin and Bradfield, where Eliza Grant and Alex Dunlop won all their sets and only dropped two games during the whole match. A tough fixture against Bryanston saw the girls struggle to get into their normal hard-hitting tennis and they fell 3–6. They rounded off the season however with two super wins against Cheltenham

This was a successful season with some strong and convincing victories across all fixtures. Canford was the opening fixture of the season, with the performance setting the tone for the coming fixtures with a convincing win 8–1. The pairings of Sophie Kirkwood and Jazi Castleman and Eliza Grant and Amelia Green opened with straight sets victories. They remained unbeaten throughout the term apart from a tough fixture away at Wycombe Abbey. Enthusiasm and excellent teamwork have been strong points within the squad over the term. ALA

GIRLS’ TENNIS

Clifton College

progress in net play and tactics in their pairs. This was an area which we focused on in training and their communication, energy and approach on court, and strategic play improved ten-fold. Ali Cameron and Holly Smith led from the front, both in training and matches, and Beth Ransome and Poppy Cripwell excelled at the net, finishing off long rallies with decisive volleys, on several occasions. Lila Greenwood and Miranda Aitchison battled hard for a highly competitive 3rd pair spot and did not disappoint, always performing with great consistency and determination in all areas of the game and never without big smiles! A superb season, very well done. The girls should look forward to next season with great confidence.

well to advice from coaches and thoroughly enjoyed their season. They have been excellent company and I would expect the majority to continue with tennis through their senior years at the College and for life.

Girls’ Tennis U14D P:7; W:6; D:0; L:1 The team showed excellent progression over the course of the term, improving and adding shots to their repertoire. They started the season strongly with a good win over Canford, with the pairing of Olivia James and Pernilla Peacock winning in straight sets. The second half of the term saw some impressive winning margins, as well as some well-fought victories over challenging opponents. Notably, a win over a strong team from Wycombe Abbey. ALA

@MCol_Tennis Apr 28 A hard fought win in the Aegon National Schools Championships v Bradfield College 10-2. Great hosts @BradfieldCol

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win at Radley. Henry Hudson was a pillar of the squad throughout, who could be counted on to compete fiercely. Like Tariq Hudda, he acknowledged his limitations, but often won through anyway, with a combination of skill and determination.

BOYS’ TENNIS

The senior House competition was won by C2, and Nikita Tsyganov (B1 Re) beat the best of the Lower Sixth to lift the Wakely Singles Cup. TAK

Boys’ Tennis Colts 1st VI P:2; W:1; D:0; L:1

Boys’ Tennis 1st VI P:8; W:2; D:0; L:6 Area Cup lost in round 2; ISL 12th/16

BOYS’ TENNIS

SQUAD: H McKelvey (Captain), F Brookes-Smith, S Hunt, L Bell, M Rhodes, C Mates, J Short, J Fryer Bloom, A Demilecamps, J Downie It was a season when resilience was required. Wins were hard to come by, and the opposition seemed to have just that much more quality across their squad than we did. The large proportion of away matches didn’t help, but performing on an unfamiliar surface after a bit of a journey is something any team has to get used to. Only in limp performances against MCS did we really fail to do ourselves justice. At other times, despite the very best efforts of captain Harry McKelvey, and of Sam Hunt & Luke Bell at first pair, we played to our potential but went down to the better team. We were third out of four in the RHWM cup, where Monty Rhodes had a strong day, and fourth in group 3 of the ISL. The latter game featured some remarkable singles from Josh Fryer Bloom, who won all three of his games 7–6. Together with Charlie Mates and James Downie, he succeeded in taking his game up a level from the year before. Perhaps hampered by

the proximity of exams, not enough of the squad achieved this. Radley, Abingdon, Bradfield and the OMs proved too strong for us, but on a sunny day on the verdant turf of Winchester, Freddie Brookes-Smith led us to a well-deserved win, with Alex Demilecamps also finding some form in an uneven season. Like some others in the squad, he had the hitting power to leave the crowd gasping, but the knack of knowing how to actually win, by constructing points, building pressure and coolly accumulating games, remained harder to master. TAK

Boys’ Tennis 2nd VI P:8; W:3; D:0; L:5 The difference between our top two teams was not massive, and the results at 2nd team level were a little better. We closed the game out well to secure a tight victory against Sherborne, with Tom Southgate to the fore, and came back from a slow start to beat Bradfield away, also 5–4, with Tom Moody prominent. Helped by U16s Jack Kirkwood and Max Olivier, we also saw off Winchester. It was also good to see Josh Short play a key role in this victory, in what was an injury-disrupted season. Against the big beasts of the circuit, the 2nd team suffered the same fate as the 1st, despite the good form of Will Catton, who came on significantly over the season, and recorded a particularly fine singles

Sherborne

W

7:2

Magdalen

L

2:7

SQUAD: J Kirkwood, M Olivier, B Ryder, O Cutts, E Willmott, S Callender, O Barker This was a desperately short competitive season for the Colts, with three out of five scheduled matches cancelled. Sherborne were dispatched on a fine April day, 7 sets to 2, boding well for the weeks ahead, but little did we know at that stage that exams and the weather would mean that we’d only play one fixture after that. Magdalen College School played convincingly against us on our final outing in mid-May, winning 7–2. Although they were a good team technically, it was in their mental preparation and ability to edge out a win in the close sets that gave them clear water in the end. Despite the fact that the best four players in the Hundred appeared regularly for the Open, our skill as a team was never in doubt and with Emile Willmott’s aggressive left-handed forehand firing well, Seb Callender’s punchy stroke play, Ben Ryder’s elegant ground strokes and Freddie Boase’s consistency, this is a group of players that should do extremely well in years to come. PNMF

Boys’ Tennis Junior Colts 1st VI P:6; W:4; D:0; L:2 SQUAD: N Tsyganov, T Reid, L Bayley, Z Chambers, T Cadier, M Redpath, A Goodwin Despite some changes to the pairings over the first half of the season, the make-up of the Junior Colts 1st team was relatively stable throughout the summer. Nikita Tsyganov and Theo Reid made a formidable 1st pair, often winning their matches 6–0 against some of the weaker opponents and finishing the season with far more wins than losses. There was some excellent tennis played by all, marked by a shift in tactics as the season progressed: in the early stages, their play was typically made up of lengthy baseline rallies, but gradually more points were played, and won, with both boys at the net and volleying

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their opponents into submission. There were convincing wins against Sherborne, Dauntsey’s and Warminster, and only a narrow loss to Abingdon. There is much potential in these players and hopefully the legacy of the season will be more classic doubles play as they continue to develop their game. AHDT/RW

Boys’ Tennis Junior Colts 2nd VI P:5; W:2; D:0; L:3

AHDT/RW

Boys’ Tennis Junior Colts 3rd VI P:2; W:1; D:0; L:1 There were just two matches for the 3rd team, but both were played with great sportsmanship and enjoyment. Amongst the players there were some excellent individual performances, notably James Hayeem who was asked to play singles against one team due to a lack of numbers; he was somewhat reluctant to agree, but swept past his opponents with great determination and skill, winning all three matches. AHDT/RW

Boys’ Tennis Yearlings 1st VI P:6; W:6; D:0; L:0 SQUAD: M Brousse (Captain), J Childe, B White, Z MacDermot, A Amati, D Powell

competitiveness saw them through some tight matches. The third pair of Alberto Amati and Domingo Powell was first rate in their attitude and effort. All season they chased down every ball and never gave anything but there best. It has been a pleasure to coach this group of boys and I hope next year they aim to keep improving and strive for another great season. TAB

Boys’ Tennis U14B P:6; W:4; D:0; L:2 This has been a great season and term started with a solid 6–3 victory against Sherborne. This was followed by a comprehensive 9–0 win against Dauntsey’s, but Eton proved too strong in our next match and we lost 3–6. This was followed by a fantastic match against Bradfield where Bruno Espinosa De Los Monteros, Algie Lyster-Binns, Ivan Morozov and Chris Reihill won their final sets to secure a 5–4 victory. A narrow loss against Abingdon (4–5) followed before finishing the season with an 8–1 victory over Winchester.

Boys’ Tennis U14C P:5; W:0; D:1; L:4 It has been great to see so many of the Shell tennis players wanting to represent the school in matches and the 3rd team has been no different. We had some difficult fixtures, but the team always made their opponents battle for everything and this was rewarded with a notable draw against Radley. Despite the four losses the 3rd team were never comprehensively beaten and this is testament to the fight they showed during their matches. They were also constantly pressuring players in the team above for places which only helped to improve the squad as a whole. Well done to all involved in a very enjoyable season.

BOYS’ TENNIS

Whilst not a vintage set of results, the top two pairs in the Junior Colts 2nd team developed a thrilling rivalry which saw them jostle for position throughout the season and added spice to every match and most practice sessions. Sam Phelps and Patrick Pereira formed a reliable and even-tempered pair, whilst Ben Mears and Joss Fellowes were perhaps more volatile but, on their day, just as effective. They took turns to play 1st pair and enjoyed the one-upmanship with each other almost more than playing other schools. The team scored good wins against local rivals Dauntsey’s and Bradfield, but were outmuscled by stronger opponents. Nevertheless, their spirit and enjoyment was excellent throughout.

TAB

The attitude and desire of the players has been a standout feature of the season with plenty of competition amongst both individuals and pairs. If they keep up such determination, I have no doubt that even better seasons will follow. TAB

It is fantastic to be able to report that this team secured an unbeaten season; a rare thing indeed! They all played in every match, despite competition from below for places. The season started with a comprehensive victory away at Sherborne. This was followed by wins against Dauntsey’s; Eton; Bradfield – a nail-biting 5–4 win that saw are fist pair of Max Brousse and Julius Childe clinch victory for us; Abingdon and Winchester – despite miserable conditions. The first pair of Brousse and Childe only dropped one set all season and if they keep improving will be competing for places in the open before too long. They were backed up brilliantly by our second pair (Billy White and Zu MacDermot) whose work rate and

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NETBALL

Netball Open 1st VII

also had a great 35–15 win against Dauntsey’s, 38–8 win against Kings Worcester and a 31–31 draw against a strong Wellington side.

P:7; W:3; D:1; L:3

NETBALL

player who dominated the centre court. Matilde Speelmans and Hannah Cameron were stand out centre court players who also represented the Open 1st team. This team went on to have a well-contested fixture against Millfield. We came out on top with a 27–18 win with Louisa Bradby, Corisande Lyster-Binns and Katerina Mathison creating a powerful defensive unit, making it very difficult for Millfield to score. Special mention must also go to Jemima Jones, who is an extremely reliable player, on and off the court. Playing wing defence, she shuts down the options that her opponent tries to create with ease and is fantastic at communicating throughout the court. Also, Izzie Foster who is a very versatile player and brings character and flair to the game.

Canford

L

22:37

King’s Worcester

W

38:8

St Edward’s

L

15:23

Kingswood

L

25:36

Dauntsey’s

W

35:15

Millfield U18B

W

32:19

Wellington

D

31:31

SQUAD: B Speelmans (Captain), G Gibson, O Hazlitt, Z Satchell, B Campbell, G Nicholas, M Manning, H Hussey, S Thomas, L Kirkpatrick The 1st VII had a tough start to the season, facing an experienced Canford side in their opening fixture. This was a disappointment as they had a fantastic week of pre-season preparation, but could not perform on the day and ended with a 37–23 deficit. The girls also fell short to a strong St Edward’s and Kingswood team. Bea Speelmans captained the team well and showed excellent leadership skills throughout the term. She led from the front and put out consistent performances winning ‘Player of the match’ after nearly every game. In the centre court, the game was able to flow with the fantastic pairing of Georgia Gibson and Liv Hazlitt. They had an incredible connection on court which was hard to break down.

By the end of the term, their individual skills had improved tremendously and court play was fluent and tactical. For many this will be their last season of netball at the College, but very exciting to see how the girls will develop and perform next year. DM

Netball Open 2nd VII P:5; W:5; D:0; L:0 SQUAD: B Imi, H Koe, I Stopford Sackville, H Cameron, M Speelmans, I Foster, K Carleton-Smith (Captain), J Jones, L Bradby, K Mathison, C Lyster-Binns This team have had yet another incredible season. With five out of five wins, the results say it all. The season started strongly with a 40–11 victory against King’s Worcester. Our fixture against Dauntsey’s was an extremely close one but we secured a 23–18 win, with fantastic shooting from Bella Imi, Honor Koe and Islay Stopford Sackville. The team was captained by Katja CarletonSmith who was an exemplary role model on the court. Katja is a very strong and influential

This team comprises a very talented group of girls. Those who go on to play netball at university and other clubs will thrive, and those who will be in Upper Sixth next year are definitely ones to watch out for. LB/RFH

Netball Open 3rd VII P:5; W:5; D:0; L:0 The 3rd VII enjoyed another superb season, winning each of their five matches in style. The girls were led with distinction by Georgina Millar, who did well to harmonise the older hands and the fresh faces. The side was blessed to have great strength in depth across the court meaning that our opponents got little respite from our hightempo game. We were anchored by a rock-solid defence consisting of Chloe Hubbard, Jemima Grant and player of the season Charlotte Russell. Charlotte was the heart of the side and her tireless running broke down even the most determined of attacks. The centre court players were small in stature, but made up for it with sublime skills and slick movement that quite literally had Millfield running in circles. The combination of Georgina Millar, Anaïs D’Oelsnitz and Amelia Hampel was particularly strong, although Olivia Grant, Imogen Matanle and Imogen Redpath made superb contributions.

In the shooting end after a rocky start to the term, they came into their own and put out some great performances, credit to Mimi Manning, Captain Bea Speelmans and Breagha Campbell. No more could have been asked of the defensive end and a combination of Laura Kirkpatrick, Sophie Thomas who also received ‘Most Improved Player’, Georgie Nicholas, Zinnia Satchell and Helena Hussey who received Player of the Season. One of the highlights of the term was the fantastic 32–19 victory against Millfield, where the girls were relentless and played some beautiful netball until the very end. The girls

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@MCol_Sport Mar 6 Well done @MCol_Netball players. We were really proud of your efforts at today’s tournament


SPORTS I would like to thank all of the girls for their enthusiasm and commitment. They were great fun to coach and I hope that they continue to enjoy the game wherever they find themselves next year. HEBJ

Christie Robinson all played their part. They saw opportunities quickly and usually took them – there is no doubt that the strongest part of our play was transitioning from midcourt to shooting. Once in the D shooting duties were handled by Rebecca Addison, Lucy Wilson, Charlotte Hart and Victoria Sjodin – who were feisty and, for the most part, accurate. King’s Worcester, Teddies, Dauntsey’s and Wellington were all beaten, usually by very clear margins. The team had just the one loss, to the Ryde 1st VII in the last match of the season. Ryde found it hard to believe a 4th VII could be so good – but they were.

Netball Open 4th VII P:5; W:4; D:0; L:1 The high standards associated with the Open 4th VII were all too evident throughout the side again this year. Matilda Beckett was a late convert to GK, but she excelled. Sharing defensive duties as GD was Lucy Hudson, possibly the politest sportswoman of her age. She was also a very able ball-hawk. WD was well handled by Georgia Kearns and Mimi Green who both repeatedly popped up to make key interceptions. Centre and WA were shared for most of the season – Molly Macaire (the team’s captain), Willow Cunningham, Matilda Keen and

RDW

Netball 5th VII P:4; W:2; D:0; L:2 The Open 5th VII managed to get on court four times in the season and they played encouraging netball throughout. The team was always competitive and played in a positive spirit – even in the face of adversity. Squad selection was quite fluid, owing to injury and other commitments, but there was a hard core of consistent performers. U6th stalwarts Bella Bryan (Capt.), Matilda Streatfield and Georgia Wright were joined by a strong coterie of L6 players, including Lottie Greenwood,

Anna Wall, Martha Franks and Martha Cotterell. There was also a good number of quality players from the Hundred, including Florrie Rhodes, Carla Henderson, Molly Fisher, Lily Freeman and Tahira Chawla. Despite emanating from three different yeargroups the team gelled really well. Good wins against Teddies and Bradfield were followed by disappointing losses to Wellington and Warminster. However, on closer inspection these final matches were not such bad results. The Wellington match was played against an experienced U16 team and the Warminster match was played against Warminster’s 1st VII – an unfortunate mismatch that the girls were not expected to win. However, on both occasions they stuck to their tasks well and played some very creditable netball.

NETBALL

Our attack was deadly throughout the season and I can count on one hand the amount of goals they missed. Hannah Olver and Nell Macaire were the standout performers in several matches, but it was Tatiana Farquhar’s goals from the edge of the D and trademark celebration that will last long in the memory.

RDW

Netball U16A VII P:8; W:8; D:0; L:0 Canford

W

25:23

Bryanston

W

39:15

St Edward’s

W

26:7

Kingswood

W

29:14

St Mary’s Calne

W

41:18

Millfield

W

27:18

Wellington

W

35:25

Bryanston

W

8:6

SQUAD: L Thompson (Captain), M Doyne, T Pusinelli, S Atkinson, J Davy, M McKelvey, Z Combe, P Westgate, E Spark, E Boom, S Smith The U16As had a tough start to the season with a very close game against Canford. This showed early in the season the determination and resilience of the girls, as the game went goal for goal until the final minutes. Here the accurate work of our shooters Lara Thompson and Martha Doyne was highlighted.

@MCol_Netball #TeamMarlborough

Mar 6

The team performed admirably at the Regionals in Truro, narrowly missing out on a place at the National Finals and ending the day in 3rd place. Defenders Ellie Spark, Emily Boom, Phoebe Westgate, Stella Smith and Zoe Combe

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should have Nationals in their sights next year after some hard work in the pre-season phase. KMH

Netball U15B VII P:6; W:5; D:0; L:1 The team had a great season and were very close to being unbeaten, winning five out of six matches. Throughout the term, they have learnt to improve as a team and have developed their netball skills, and they have showed their determination in every single game.

stood out here as a tireless wall of defence, with some spectacular interceptions.

their interceptions, holding off the opposition’s attack admirably.

As the season progressed the team maintained a consistent level of focus and resolve, ending the season with an unbeaten record in the school fixtures. The final game against Wellington demonstrated the smooth transitions from defence to attack, particularly with the strength of Millie McKelvey, Jess Davy and Scarlett Atkinson in the centre court.

All have much of which to be proud, having made marked improvements in both technique and fitness this season.

Well done girls – an impressive season!

NETBALL

HLM

Netball U16 B VII P:4; W:3; D:0; L:1 The U16B Netball Team had a very impressive season, with morale and team spirit remaining high despite two cancelled fixtures. Our captain Sophie Wheeler led by example throughout. Strong wins against Bryanston and St Edward’s were secured early on by shooters, Sarah James and Georgia Beattie, with Ottilie Barnes and Olivia Wilson developing an exceptionally strong partnership over the season. Centre players Madeleine Avery, Amy Vogel and Katerina Mackaness were versatile, combining fitness with good communication to maintain possession in closer matches against St Mary’s Calne and Wellington. Defenders Phoebe Burdett and Jess Walsh Waring were tireless in

VRJ

Netball U15A VII P:8; W:6; D:0; L:2 Canford

W

25:22

King’s Worcester

W

23:20

St Edward’s

W

22:12

Kingswood

W

22:21

St Mary’s Calne

W

15:14

Dauntsey’s

L

20:35

Millfield

W

26:14

Wellington

L

22:29

SQUAD: L Beckett (Capt), H Place, I Casini, S Thompson, L Constable, M Burdett, F Jones, L O’Donald, D Head Having qualified for National Finals as U14s, there was no doubt that the U15A squad had great potential at the start of the 2015/16 season. Early, hard-fought wins against Canford, Bryanston and Teddies proved there was an exciting blend of skill and determination in this group of netballers. Once positional combinations were more settled, the squad quickly found their rhythm and established some good passing patterns. Centre passes improved significantly, with captain Lara Beckett calling the shots from the centre circle. A focus throughout the term was ‘re-defending’ all over the court, and it was very satisfying to achieve a number of turn-overs through hard work and tactical development. A real highlight was the close win against Kingswood; Eliza Kearns and Luz Wollocombe joined the squad for this game and the whole squad showed great composure under pressure all over the court to secure a well-deserved victory. Unfortunately, we lost one match to an excellent Dauntsey’s side, and couldn’t quite find our best form against Wellington. Overall, a successful season statistically and there is no doubt that this talented group

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The first fixture ended in a close win against Canford (27–21), but the team gradually grew in confidence and won comfortably against King’s Worcester, St Edward’s, Dauntsey’s and Millfield. Unfortunately, they lost in their last fixture against Wellington, but nevertheless displayed some excellent netball. Eliza Kearns has had an impressive season as a Goal Shooter and was well supported by our two Goal Attacks Evie McVeigh and Ana Downing. Hannah Wilson has been an excellent Centre as well as captain, giving her absolute best in every quarter and keeping the team’s spirit high. India Shakespeare also played an important part as a Centre / Wing Attack and made a real difference thanks to her athleticism and precision. Luz Wollocombe, Maya Jeveons and Sasha Hewett made a great impact on the team and were ready to step out of their comfort zone and play in different positions, which they did superbly. In defence, our goalkeeper Lottie Mayes made some tremendous progress through the season and seized any opportunity to catch rebounds with great success. Grace Hines and Lizzie Hankinson showed some great interception skills as Goal Defence and Wing Defence and they gave the opposition a hard time. It has been a real pleasure to coach such a dynamic team. VGMD/JLF

Netball U15C VII P:8; W:4; D:0; L:4 The U15C team had a mixed season; they had an incredibly strong start with three consecutive wins of 46–10, 29–9 and 32–11 against Canford, Bryanston and St Edward’s respectively. The strength of the team lay with the attackers, particularly Bella Gavin, Claudia Vyvyan and Lissy Thomas as shooters, as well as Arabella Harris as a defender. Halfway through the season, the U15Cs did take on two players from the U15B team, Tashy Moore and Izzy Sanderson, who played WA/C and WD respectively. The first week these girls joined the team was in the match against Millfield. This match was a particular highlight for the team because, after a loss the previous week against St Mary’s, the girls came back strongly and performed exceptionally well together as a team. The centre players, Issy Mayes, Libby Goodwin, Imo Brook and Pippa Evans, demonstrated high levels of fitness and good netball skills. E Ball


SPORTS P:4; W:3; D:0; L:1 This was a very successful season with the players going from strength to strength. They remained undefeated until their penultimate game, where they put up a good fight but were defeated by a strong Wellington side. The girls worked well as a team throughout the season and each of them had a vital role to play in the team. The highlight of the season was our game against St Mary’s Calne. A tense game, where strong performances from our centres (Bennett and Lankester) and shooter’s (Miles and Bagshaw) were vital and secured a victory in the end. The girls should be proud of how they progressed throughout the season and showed strength and determination in every match we played. OFG

Netball U14A VII

then went on to secure a 10–5 victory against them at the regional round of the National Schools tournament. Our next game against Kings Worcester resulted in a very pleasing 31– 19 win. Our season was then under way with a six-game winning streak, beating the likes of Kingswood, St Mary’s Calne, and Millfield. The team was captained by Amelia Green who was an excellent role model on and off the court. She was tireless in her attack and made fantastic interceptions throughout the court. The team bonded quickly and the attacking play between Ali Cameron, Rosie Pembroke and Amelia Green was superb. Defenders Lily Pilkington, Harriet Eyles, Olivia Gregory, Lila Greenwood and Lotte Quinn were a resilient unit and made countless interceptions. The accurate shooting demonstrated by Tate Oliphant, Poppy Cripwell and Miranda Aitchison took the pressure off our defenders to secure the win in most of our games. This is a very exciting team and I am sure that they will go on to be very successful.

P:11; W:8; D:0; L:3

LB

St Mary’s Calne

W

27:24

Canford

L

15:25

King’s Worcester

W

31:19

St Mary’s Calne

W

37:17

St Edward’s

W

54:9

King’s Taunton

W

10:9

Cheam

W

20:1

Kingswood

W

32:21

Millfield

W

14:12

Wellington

L

21:29

Warminster

L

21:24

SQUAD: T Oliphant, P Cripwell, M Aitchison, A Cameron, R Pembroke, A Green (Captain), L Pilkington, H Eyles, O Gregory, L Greenwood, L Quinn The U14As have had a hugely successful season. First and foremost, representing Marlborough College at the U14 National Schools Finals at Roedean School was a tremendous achievement. They also had a pleasing set of results from our fixture list. Our first fixture against Canford was an unfortunate loss of 15–25, however, we

Netball U14B VII P:7; W:5; D:0; L:2 The season commenced with a nail-biting match against Canford with each team drawing level at quarter times. Timely interceptions down the court and turnovers at the centre pass from Alex Dunlop & Rosie Sykes enabled the side to keep in touch with Canford but some robust goalkeeping kept Connie CampbellGray at bay, denying her access to score and Canford gained victory by four goals. Our most notable performance came against Millfield winning (23–10) with many girls displaying their versatile skills and ability to perform incredibly well in new positions. The centre court linked well, producing great movement to feed our shooters and Hughes, Smith and Mackenzie showed huge determination in defence making timely interceptions denying Millfield the chance to shoot.

of the Match a few times and special mention to Rosie Sykes for her relentless performances during every match. Trish Hignett

Netball U14C VII P:8; W:4; D:1; L:3 This has been a successful season for the U14Cs, every player has contributed to the team and improved their skill levels. It was great to see Quinn moving up the A team at the end of the season and Ransome moving up to the B team. The team was captained by Eliza Grant who showed great leadership and enthusiasm throughout the season. Strong scoring from Bullen and Ransome resulted in some convincing wins. Stewart showed herself to be an excellent wing attack and was vital to our successes.

NETBALL

Netball U15D VII

All the girls played an important role in the team this season, meeting every challenge with positivity and playing their best in every match. The girls were a pleasure to coach and they should be proud of their achievements this year. NLA

Netball U14D VII P:10; W:7; D:3; L:0 Throughout the season, the U14Ds have displayed excellent sportsmanship, played with dedication and implemented skills developed in training effectively. They started exceptionally well, winning convincingly against Canford, Bryanston and St Edwards. Alice Moore and Jessica Reeve were outstanding in the ‘D’ working very hard to achieve some stunning goals. Elysia Rougier was exceptional as goalkeeper, intercepting and overturning a huge number of balls. Over the weeks, the team bonded well to create a fantastic team spirit which was reflected in the rotating captain system and even in their toughest matches towards the end of the season, they didn’t become despondent and kept up their enthusiasm and effort. RLM/AEP

Well done to all girls and to Alex Dunlop in leading the team as Captain and gaining Player

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CRICKET

Wellington – National T20 (A) Wellington 167/5 off 20 overs

Lost by 16 runs

XI 151/6 off 20 overs (Mead 78) Radley – John Harvey Cup (H) Radley 150/6 off 30 overs

Abandoned RAIN

Marlborough Blues (H) Blues 145 all out (Gordon 3/26)

Won by 4 wickets

XI 146/6 (Samuel 58*) St Edward’s – John Harvey Cup (H) St Edward’s 242/7 off 50 overs

Cricket XI

XI 246/9 off 49.4 overs (Read 104)

P:17; W:11; D:1; L:4; A:1

XI 132/4 off 19.5 overs (Coulson 76*)

Won by 6 wickets

CRICKET

XI 201/9 (Read 92, Wilson 45)

Won by 1 wicket

Won by 148 runs

Winchester 125 all out off 32.2 Overs

XI 156/6 off 19.4 overs (Samuel 42*, Mead 39, Davies 37*)

XI 224/8 off 50 overs (Samuel 54, Bunn 52*)

Lost by 5 wickets

Bradfield 105/5 off 25.5 overs Stowe 168 all out (Gordon 5/30) Cheltenham – John Harvey Cup (H)

Bradfield – National T20 (A)

Cheltenham 232 all out off 49.1 overs (Wilson 4/43)

Bradfield 91/9 off 20 overs (Mead 3/16, Bunn 2/10)

XI 277/7 off 50 overs (Mead 86, Coulson 83) Sherborne 184 all out off 40.2 overs (Davies 4/36, West 3/25)

Won by 6 wickets

Won by 5 wickets

Lost by 20 runs

XI 166 all out off 37.2 overs (Mead 39) Haileybury, Melbourne (H) Haileybury 198/8 off 40 overs

Won by 93 runs

XI 200/2 off 35.2 overs (Gordon 68*, Mead 43)

Cricket Professional Mark Alleyne took up his post as Cricket Professional in January 2016. The former Gloucestershire all-rounder won ten ODI caps for England between 1999 and 2000 and captained the record breaking Gloucestershire limited over side of the early 2000s. He became one of Wisden’s Five Cricketers of the Year in 2001 and was awarded an MBE in 2004. Since retiring, 48-year old Alleyne has been Head Coach at both Gloucestershire and then the MCC.

@MCol_Cricket Apr 21 2006 XI captain Ed Kilbee presents debutants Ned Tarlton & Angus Rowan Hamilton with their caps

Won by 8 wickets

Rugby (A) Rugby 185/9 dec (West 4/25) XI 103/8

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Lost by 5 wickets

XI 170/5 (Read 60*)

Eton 228/5 in 47.1 overs

Sherborne (A) Won by 4 wickets

XI 104 all out off 43 overs

Stowe (H)

XI 95/4 off 16.2 overs

Portsmouth GS – National T20 (A) Portsmouth GS 152/4 off 20 overs

Won by 7 wickets

Eton (A)

Winchester – John Harvey Cup (H) XI 273/8 off 50 overs (Mead 98, Samuel 59, Read 54)

Oratory 126/8 off 20 overs (Mead 3/28) XI 127/3 off 16.5 overs (Read 37, Coulson 32)

MCC (H) MCC 200/8 dec (Gordon 3/62)

Bradfield – John Harvey Cup (A)

Oratory – National T20 (A)

Free Foresters T20 (H) Free Foresters 131/7 off 20 overs (Bunn 3/26)

Won by 1 wicket

Match Drawn


A drizzly pre-season meant there was only time for a rearranged T20 against the Free Foresters, and the continuing April rain meant the matches versus Wiltshire Queries and Clifton were both cancelled. A match-changing partnership of 106 between Ben Wilson and Max Read rescued the innings against the MCC, before the last pair of Fraser Gordon and Angus Rowan Hamilton saw us home by the narrowest of margins. A dominant batting display against Winchester two days later saw Billy Mead and Elijah Samuel put on 133 for the second wicket on the way to an emphatic victory. In Marlborough’s HMC Schools National T20 competition debut, Portsmouth GS set a competitive total of 152 including 48 from their last 3 overs. At 91/6 in the 14th over things looked bleak, but an unbeaten 7th wicket stand of 65 from 39 balls between Samuel and Will Davies saw a breath-taking finish with Davies hitting 4 huge sixes. Victory over the Oratory ensured progression through to the regional semi-final at Bradfield where an excellent fielding performance, with Jack Bunn making crucial early breakthroughs, secured a comfortable win. This set up a South Final against Wellington, where we failed to seize the initiative as Surrey’s Sam Curran scored 74, with two crucial chances being dropped. Despite a terrific 78 by Mead in reply we finished 16 runs short in a brave but unsuccessful run chase.

up the platform for Dom Coulson’s scintillating 83 from 78 balls. David West’s 3/25 made early in roads into the Sherborne innings, before 4/36 from Davies’s leg spin finished things off comfortably. 30 overs of on and off rain was managed against Radley before the match was abandoned and Gordon’s 3/26 followed by a responsible 58 n.o. from Samuel was enough to beat the Blues on Prize Day. After half-term a nail-biting encounter followed against a strong St Edward’s team. At 60/4 off 20 overs chasing 242 things looked bleak, but an outstanding 104 from Read swung the pendulum back our way. However, a Teddies fightback saw a collapse from 224/6 to 238/9, and it was left to Archie Wheeler to hit the winning boundary with 2 balls to spare. Two disappointing losses to Bradfield and Cheltenham meant the opportunity to win the John Harvey Cup was squandered, but in between these, Stowe were beaten with Gordon taking 5/30 and another mature knock of 60 n.o. from Read. Haileybury School, on tour from Melbourne, were brushed aside with Gordon making 68 n.o. ahead of the trip to Rugby for the traditional two-day fixture. In keeping with the wet summer, the first day at Rugby was lost to the weather which meant

Overall it was a promising season and the allround strength of the side was evident with everyone making contributions. Wickets were shared among the bowlers with Gordon taking 25 at 18.16, Bunn 19 at 20.73, West 18 at 21.33 and Davies 19 at 23.42. Mead (15) and Wilson (12) also took valuable wickets and Rowan Hamilton bowled impressively without the luck he deserved. On the batting front Mead topped the averages with 569 at 37.93 followed by Read (455 at 35) who contributed crucial match-winning innings and Samuel (409 at 34.08) who looked stylish but was victim to some unlucky dismissals. In the field Read and West were particularly impressive and Wheeler showed glimpses of excellence behind the stumps. Gordon captained the side admirably and managed player expectation well. Particular recognition goes to MWA who has made a considerable impact as the new coach and proved a very shrewd reader of people. Special thanks to the Ground Staff, Caterers, Transport Administrator, Umpires, Scorers and all who helped make the season enjoyable for all.

CRICKET

SQUAD: F Gordon (Captain), B Wilson (Vice Captain), B Mead (T20 Captain), J Bunn, E Samuel, M Read, A Wheeler (wk), A Rowan Hamilton, D West, W Davies, D Coulson APPEARANCES: N Tarlton (2), J Thistlethwayte (2), M Brooks (2), J Crossland, J Hodgskin

SPORTS

a one innings match was rearranged for day two. An exciting topsy-turvy day followed with West’s superb figures of 17-5-25-4 along with some tight bowling and fielding restricted Rugby to 110/9. This before a frustrating unbeaten stand of 75 by Rugby’s last pair meant they declared at tea on 185/9 off 71 overs. With only 36 overs left in reply an ambitious bid for victory meant we lost wickets at too regular a rate before Read and West blocked out the last six overs to draw.

MPLB

Cricket Open 2nd XI P:7; W:3; D:0; L:3; A:1 We started with a new fixture at Dauntsey’s. This would be no gentle warm up; ‘warm’ is particularly inappropriate to describe a threesweater April afternoon against their 1st XI, fresh from its Caribbean tour. Put in on a damp green deck, our openers merged Boycott with Tavare to survive the first spell. Later

In the 50 over matches a middle order wobble at Eton put us under pressure and a flat fielding performance followed where we were not able to stop Eton’s Hector Hardman, who’s classy century won the home side the match. A convincing win at Sherborne followed where, having lost the toss, Mead’s measured 86 set @MCol_Cricket June 14 Max Read flicks off his legs for 6 on his way to 104 v St Edward's, 11/6/16 #intothepavilionwindow

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CRICKET

on, Oli Dundas and Christian Hollingbery cashed in, smiting 47 and 27 respectively. Ned Tarlton then pounced, claiming 4-22, aided by Nicky Bird’s sharp keeping, but they were still favourites. Owen Hargrove led his team astutely, bowling changes and field placements applied pressure and we won at the death. Winchester tried to seize the initiative arriving by minibus as JMB waited for them at the Parade Ground – the closest they got to victory! Heard scored 45 and Tarlton, batting through, brought up his maiden College ton off the final ball of our innings. Defending 227, Jim Crossland, Toby Baines and the centurion all took 3 wickets – victory by 78. The Eton match took place on the XI under ominous skies. Bawden made a scintillating 39; John Cattermull then reduced Eton to a parlous 24 for 3 when the heavens opened. A win for Marlborough? Yes, but only according to Messrs Duckworth and Lewis. Then came a bleak period. We were diabolical at Sherborne, our bowling effort worsened by Hargrove’s capricious shoulder popping out again. Dundas scored 42 in a losing cause. We were even worse at Wellington. There is little one would wish to recall, save for cameos from Henry Kirkman (28), Alfie Farndale (20) and

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Cattermull (3 scalps). We completed a trifecta of trauma at Teddies, losing from a strong position. A win had to be around the corner. Bradfield obliged. Joe Lloyd’s off spin claimed 3; Rory Peppiatt’s got 4. Dunhill smashed a quickfire 51 and we won by 7 wickets, having won our first match by 7 runs. RAS

Cricket Open 3rd XI P:5; W:2; D:0; L:3 A see-saw season for the 3rd XI this year – two highly convincing victories and three disastrous defeats! It all started so well with a 10-wicket victory against Winchester where Archie Clark and Joss Murphy bowled out the Winchester batting order for a mere 36 including seven ducks – a cracking start! Such early exuberance was quickly shattered when Eton knocked off our score of 105 (which included an impressive 58 n.o. from Louis Smith) in a meagre 10 overs a week later. My optimism dwindled further upon seeing Sherborne set us a momentous 239 to win. Alas the game finished with us all out still needing 135 runs (credit to skipper Ed Andrews for his impressive 32 against some menacing bowling). A further defeat to

Wellington followed but the victory against St Edward’s, by eight wickets ended the season in style. Credit has to be given to each and every boy – a fantastic bunch of lads whose humour and unyielding attitude gave for some many memorable moments. WJM

Cricket Open 4th XI P:5; W:1; D:0; L:4 On the face of it a 4–1 loss to win record is a disappointing outcome from a squad that had strength, depth and enthusiasm. Totals of 69, 143-9, 109, 124-7, and 103 (T20) were simply matched with ease by most oppositions, and only twice did batsmen show application enough to score 50s (Ollie Line 53 v Eton and Marcus Miller 70 n.o. v Wellington). The latter was the sole victory by 3 wickets, where no other batsman got into double figures, and also featured outstanding bowling of 5/34 by irrepressible skipper Kit Edgcumbe-Rendle. All round contributions by Leo Moorhead and Marcus Miller formed the nucleus which was rarely built upon. More important was that this side represented the College with grace and sportsmanship, as well as hosting Avebury CC for an inaugural T20 leavers match. To compete with a wily village side with an age


SPORTS RAC

Cricket Colts 1st XI P:7; W:5; D:0; L:1; A:1 Clifton (A)

Won by 83 Runs

Winchester (A)

Won by 9 Wickets

Eton (H)

Abandoned

Sherborne (H)

Won by 95 Runs

Wellington (H)

Lost by 60 Runs

Radley (A)

Cancelled – Rain

St Edward’s (A)

Won by 55 Runs

Bradfield (H)

Won by 2 Wickets

SQUAD: J Hodgskin (Captain), M Brooks, M Sheikh, J Thistlethwayte, J Ellis, T Sykes, B Hall, L Smith, H Gouriet, K Baldes, S Farndale, A Mahony, A Clarke

This was a successful season and reflects the ability of these boys. The majority of the games were won relatively comfortably with Clifton, Winchester, Sherborne and St Edward’s brushed aside and the season ending with an exciting two wicket win over Bradfield. The one defeat came against Wellington in an extraordinary game that saw them recover from 14 for 6 to 121 all out, only for Marlborough to be bowled out for 62. The match against Eton was abandoned for rain. Most Saturdays saw us put out a side with at least nine bowling options with five wicket hauls for Jack Thistlethwayte (5-42 v Sherborne) and Luke Smith (5-24 v St Edward’s). Sam Farndale and Arlie Mahony took regular wickets towards the end of the season with notable support from leg spinner Kariem Baldes and left armer Ben Hall. The batting line-up was heavily dependant on the top order and invariably they performed. Skipper and top run-scorer Jamie Hodgskin (67 v Clifton, 89 v Sherborne) opened with Milo Brooks (47 v Sherborne) and Thistlethwayte fell 10 runs short of a match-wining century against Bradfield. Other highlights included Muhammad Sheikh finally taking his first catch for the College and Isaac Hocking’s ability to take wickets in his first over.

@MCol_Cricket May 18 More brilliant work from our Groundsmen amid heavy deluges today #commitment to the cause

Despite their potential, this group of boys still need to play as a team, support their captain, enjoy one another’s success and become more attuned to the ever-shifting momentum of a game. By the end of the season this was coming together and I hope they go on to enjoy senior cricket. Thanks to CLH, JHB, RP and GBS for their enthusiasm and support with the Colts yeargroup. HLRT

Cricket Colts 2nd XI P:4; W:2; D:0; L:1; A:1 The team was admirably captained by Milo Sweet who pulled off one of the tougher leadership gigs with a mature manner to which both players and staff responded. Sweet produced one of the side’s innings of substance with an impressive 40 in the win against Sherborne sharing a substantial partnership with Tom Sykes (50). Sykes had already batted us to victory at Winchester and proved our most dependable batsman.

CRICKET

span of 14-72 is an education and in many ways what the game is all about.

Henry Gouriet emerged as a highly effective all-rounder making a half-century versus Eton and taking useful wickets including 3/0 against Sherborne. Keeper Edward Cornish made a memorable 60 from 30 balls in a devastating

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SPORTS

display against Wellington, but after his dismissal we crumbled to a 75-run defeat. Mahony, Keenan, Rigg and Jordan spearheaded the bowling attack and were regularly in the wickets – Jordan’s off-breaks, in particular, caught the eye. All in all a frustrating season that never really got going. There is certainly talent in this group and in the absence of rain and GCSEs that ability will have a better opportunity to show itself next year. RP & JHB

CRICKET

Cricket Colts 3rd XI P:2; W:0; D:0; L:2 ‘Another slightly less brief event’ is the best description of the Colts 3rd XI season. We hosted Eton and let them off the hook, having ‘contained’ them to 117 off 17 overs, they made another 83 in 8 more. A number of the boys left to complete Art exams and we succumbed very cheaply losing by 162 runs. Our other fixture was Wellington, against whom we posted 87. We allowed them to plunder 67 of those in the first 10 overs of this 20-over game before Lachlan Graham had something of a breakthrough and we suddenly realised that there was a game to be won. We did lose in the end, but only after making Wellington take 8.3

overs to get the 21 they needed with the loss of all but 1 wicket. In spite of this we had some fun and persevered. I hope that the boys (and girls) will give cricket another chance next year. GBS

Cricket Junior Colts 1st XI P:16; W:7; D:0; L:6 (A:3) Clifton (A)

Won by 7 Wickets

Winchester (A)

Won by 5 Wickets

Eton (H)

Match Abandoned

King Edward’s, Southampton (A)

Lost by 8 Wickets

Sherborne (H)

Won by 5 Wickets

Wellington (A)

Lost by 130 Runs

Radley (A)

Cancelled – Rain

St John’s (H) T20

Won by 78 Runs

St Edward’s (A)

Won by 33 Runs

Bishop Wordsworth’s (A) T20

Match Abandoned

Bradfield (H)

Won by 55 Runs

Bishop Wordsworth’s (H) T20

Won by 7 Wickets

Cheltenham (A) T20

Match Abandoned

Chipping Camden (A) T20

Lost by 27 Runs

Uppingham (H) Festival

Lost by 48 Runs

Shrewsbury (H) Festival

Lost by 7 Wickets

Eton (H) Festival

Lost by 2 Wickets

SQUAD: T Hargrove (Captain), W Cook, H Brooks, O Waters, H Foster, F Hazlitt, O Mace, H Henage, O Powell, F Coen, M Staples, J Fry, H Powell, A Fisher, J Waters, S Spark Convincing victories were achieved against Clifton, Winchester, Sherborne, St Edward’s and Bradfield while there were heavy losses to King Edward’s Southampton and Wellington. The side won the Wiltshire U15 T20 competition before losing to Chipping Camden in the regional knock-out stages. The inclement weather played its part with no fewer than three matches being abandoned; however, the sun eventually came out for the end-of-term festival. After a disappointing defeat to Uppingham and going down to a strong Shrewsbury outfit, the side showed plenty of character and were unlucky to lose to Eton in an enthralling game full of ebbs and flows. Half-centuries were scored by Will Cook (65 v St Edward’s & 53 n.o. v Winchester) and Oscar Waters (57 v both Sherborne & Bishop Wordsworth’s). There were other notable batting contributions from Harry Brooks, Toby Hargrove, Harry Foster, Harry Heneage and Alfie Fisher, although there were too many scores in the twenties and thirties and looking

@MCol_Cricket U14@Wilts Cricket County Champions 2016

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SPORTS

forward they must aim to go bigger next season. Bowling highlights included Max Staples (5– 22 v Bradfield), Freddie Hazlitt (4–1 v Clifton & 4–28 v Sherborne) and Oscar Powell (4–34 v Uppingham). Harry Powell, Freddie Coen, Heneage, Brooks and Hargrove also picked up useful wickets. In a season where competition for places was healthy the boys played well as a team and learnt as the season progressed. Running between the wickets was particularly impressive and they began to adapt to the pressure of different situations. Skipper Hargrove grew in tactical awareness and led by example, making useful contributions, especially his 34 and 4–30 against Eton in the festival. SJE

P:7; W:5; D:0; L:1; A:1 This was a really strong side, who acquitted themselves well. Led by the capable and versatile Jack Redmayne, they managed to control most of their matches, at the crease and in the field. The one disappointment – a 10 wicket defeat to Eton – was caused not so much by poor play, but by a defeatist attitude that is sometimes witnessed at all levels when against larger schools. However, the team did really well to move past the disappointment and to refocus – winning all of their remaining matches. Thanks to injury (and consistently inconsistent team selection in JC1) a wide range of boys played: Ollie Bashall, Freddie Coen, Ben Cooper, Jamie Dowling, Will Farquhar, Alfie Fisher, Jude Fry, Louis de Hennin, George Hentenaar, Piers Horlock, Jamie Krens, Leo Lambert, Orlando Mace, Will Millar, George Nicholson, Fred Peppiatt, Nic Rusinov, Sam Spark, Max Staples, Piers Tabor and Jack Waters. RDW

Cricket Junior Colts 3rd XI P:6; W:4; D:0; L:1; A:1 Despite three cancellations caused by the weather, this was a successful season for the Junior Colts 3rd XI. Clifton, Winchester and Wellington, all of whom provide weak opposition at this level, were beaten ruthlessly. Closer encounters were experienced against Sherborne, where we won after a magnificent partnership between Oliver Bashall (57) and Jamie Dowling (58), and Bradfield where we lost narrowly, our team unfortunately being decimated by injuries. The match against Eton was unfortunately abandoned just at the point when we had put ourselves in a strong position to win it. Oliver Plaistowe’s 58 n.o. was one of the highlights of the season. The team was well captained by Leo Lambert throughout the season. COS

Cricket Junior Colts 4th XI P:3; W:2; D:0; L:1 The Junior Colts 4th XI had a strong season despite having an unlucky run with the weather, injuries and the number of fixtures. We were leading the Turner Cup rankings following strong wins against Eton (71 runs) and Wellington (6 wickets) until in the last match of the season, the wheels fell off and we had a 44-run loss in the rearranged fixture against Radley. The large squad have been consistent trainers, and adapted well with changes of personnel and venues depending on the weather. The spirit and energy of the boys was always fantastic and they were a entertaining group to be a part of. GDB

Cricket Yearlings 1st XI P:11; W:6; D:0; L:4 (A:1) Clifton (H)

Won by 10 Runs

Winchester (H)

Won by 10 Wickets

Eton (A)

Lost by 5 Wickets

Sherborne (A)

Lost by 31 Runs

Wellington (H)

Lost by 13 Runs

St Laurence (H) Cup

Won by 204 Runs

Dauntsey’s (A) Cup

Won by 24 Runs

St Edward’s (H)

Won by 4 Wickets

Bradfield (A)

Lost by 18 Runs

Cheltenham (H)

Match Abandoned

Warminster (H) Cup

Won by 163 Runs

@MCol_Cricket Talking cricket at Yearlings nets

May 16

SQUAD: B Baker, J Cleverly, E Corfield, A Hardwick, F Henderson, H Norman, R Pembroke, B Spink, J White, H Keenhan, C Freeman, J Warner A winning start was achieved against Clifton and Winchester. The former was restricted to 30 overs on a wet April afternoon and the side showed great spirit to defend 86. This encouraging start was followed by a convincing 10-wicket win over Winchester, in which spin duo, Ben Spink and Hugo Norman, took 3 and 4 wickets respectively. Openers Rosie Pembroke and Felix Henderson knocked off the 46 required undefeated.

CRICKET

Cricket Junior Colts 2nd XI

A dip in form against stronger opposition (Eton and Sherborne), meant that we went into the Wellington fixture 2 and 2. The side produced their best fielding display and, with disciplined seam bowling from Ned Corfield and Jack Cleverly, we restricted Wellington to 164/4 off 35 overs. Two wickets in our first over made victory seem highly improbable, though a determined chase gave renewed hope. With Henderson (32) and Cleverly (43) knuckling down the momentum started to shift although we ultimately fell an agonising 10 runs short. An incredible partnership for 254 between Spink (133*) and Pembroke (88) in the first round of the county competition saw us progress to the semi-final against Dauntsey’s. After a scratchy start, our batters reached 166/7 off 30 overs; Corfield (26) and Arthur Hardwick (19) the main instigators of the accelerated run-rate. With the game in the balance it was left to Norman and Christian Freeman (fast becoming our most improved player) to tie them down with some tidy offbreaks and seam-up respectively, and secure a 24-run victory. After two wash-outs the final took place in September against Warminster on the XI. Inserted at the toss, our top order batting nullified a decent opening attack, and Spink played a mature innings of 53 to lay the foundations. Hardwick (66 n.o.) and Freeman (24 n.o.) took the law into their hands with a fine partnership of 83 to post 187/5 off 35 overs. Cleverley (6/10) and Corfield (2/13) used the seamer-friendly conditions – bowling a superb line and length. With the wickets

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tumbling this ensured that the county trophy remained with us for another year – a wonderful finale to a memorable season. GDML & GIM

Cricket Yearlings 2nd XI P:8; W:4; D:0; L:3; A:1 It was a season in which the Yearlings 2nd XI showed much promise yet the batting fragilities were exposed towards the end. The team started off the campaign narrowly losing to Dauntsey’s 1st XI before claiming 3 wins on the bounce. A mature 73 n.o. from Harry Keenan led the side to a rare away win at Eton before he rightly progressed in to the Yearlings 1st XI. Dylan Murray scored quickly all season averaging 31.7 runs with the bat, accumulating half-centuries against Sherborne and St Edward’s in quick time. On the other hand, the mercurial swing bowling of Hector Perry and the probing leftarm spin of Ben Hatrick combined to pick up 21 wickets throughout the season. The boys could not unfortunately replicate these performances later on in the season, going down to Wellington and Bradfield but they remained very coachable all season and will achieve further success in years to come. WGH

Cricket Yearlings 3rd XI CRICKET

P:8; W:6; D:0; L:1; A:1 A fine season for this Turner Cup winning side: they held their catches, fielded like tigers and showed their mettle when put under pressure. Led by the redoubtable George Geach, the squad was blessed with a variety of bowling options including spin twins – the skipper himself and Edward Kirkman – not to mention the wily occasional slow left arm of Arthur Hewett. The team batted down to the tail and one of the most pleasing aspects of the season was that every time wickets tumbled somebody stepped up to ensure a respectable total was posted. Notable contributions with the bat came from Edward Abbott at the top of the order, Max Dyer, the hard-hitting Marcus Wimbush, Aubrey Clark and Harry Philipson-Stow, who also led the

bowling attack with dangerous outswingers. All-rounder Clark was key with the ball in hand, producing some menacing spells. They were a super team to coach and grew together as the season wore on. JTWL

Cricket Yearlings 4th XI P:6; W:4; D:0; L:2 The team was captained by Tom Williams who did a fine job. Stand out bowling performances came from Gus Nathan, Benedict Low and Christopher Spiers. As for batting Jamie Harvie-Watt, Casper Barker and Henry Grant were often among the runs. Other honourable mentions go to Oscar Tosh who’s antics behind the stumps were memorable. Highlight performances were a 10-wicket victory against Wellington, an 8 wicket win over Bradfield and 95 run defeat of Winchester, not to mention a couple of memorable wins against the Yearlings 3 in training! The team picked up a reputation within the Yearlings set up for developing talent; players such as Harvie-Watt, Grant, Jasper LloydHughes and Lucas d’Oelsnitz  among the few that started in the 4s and finished in the 2s or 3s.

I can honestly say that coaching these boys was one of the highlights of my year. A truly fantastic group whose enthusiasm was infectious. BMM

Cricket Yearlings 5th XI P:3; W:0; D:0; L:3 Our season started against Farleigh and some brilliant bowling by Javier Laiseca taking three early wickets. However, from there our bowlers struggled and our batsman were too conservative for a 20-over slog. A gallant effort in the last five overs but ultimately even with plenty of spare wickets the chase became beyond us. Eton and Radley are always tough fixtures and despite some good individual performances including a 49 from Jasper LloydHughes and a great team spirit both teams were just too strong. Players of note this year were Finley Alderton, Todd Benney, Ptolemy Chichester, Freddie Cracknell, Sacha CreweRead, Arthur Davies, Johnny Gondzic, Harry Lack, Benedict Low, Pierce Luthi, Edward Robinson, Ben Ruoss, Felix Sutton and Jack Valentine. KGAS

Girls’ Cricket Following some Lent Term indoor training and a new option led by coaches GDB and MWA, which attracted 29 Remove and Shell girls, Marlborough College Girls Cricket XI played their inaugural fixture against Bradfield at home. Bradfield were restricted to 94 for 8 off their 20 overs with Kitty Lee taking two wickets and one each for India Shakespeare, Lottie Anning, Rhiannon Evans and Beth Ransome. Sasha Hewett was electric in the field as was Peta Dixon who took two run-outs. In reply the home side reached their target with five balls to spare with skipper Rosie Pembroke scoring 46 n.o. It was a successful day and great to get Girls’ Cricket up and running – there are plans to increase the fixture list for 2017. MPLB

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@MCol_Cricket Jan 19 History in the making – inaugural Girls Cricket Training Session @ MarlboroughCol


“After half-term, the Intermediate Girls went on to win all but two of their fixtures – a magnificent achievement. The Boys’ Junior, Intermediate and Senior teams away to Harrow produced some excellent individual displays, notably Harry Alexander in the 80m hurdles and Henry Kirkman in the 400m. The Shell and Remove competed at the County Multi-Events Championships, with most having never multi-evented before. The Remove Girls’ team of Ana Downing, Scarlett Thompson, Millie Burdett and Millie Middleton won the team competition on the day.

Will Ackerley successfully competed at Millfield in the Regional Pentathlon, finishing a highly commendable eighth place. He is also currently four seconds off the 2.07 minutes record set for the 800m in the 1970s! A total of 24 Shell and Remove boys and girls experienced a variety of successes at the Wiltshire County Championships including Olivia Gregory, Alexander James, Nicholas Rusinov, Scarlett Thompson, William Ackerley, Alexander Sevenyuk and Robbie Milne who all became Wiltshire champions or were selected to represent the County in their respective events. The following weekend these seven athletes all travelled to the South West Regional Championships in Exeter to compete for Wiltshire. Nicholas Rusinov went on to win the Javelin with a phenomenal 52.50 metre throw which not only earned him a new school record, but also booked a place to the English Schools’ National Finals in Gateshead. Olivia Gregory also earned a qualification distance in the Discus. Ellie Spark and William Ackerley competed in Exeter at the South West Regional MultiEvents Championships for Wiltshire whilst Millie Middleton and Alexander James were

also invited to compete. William produced personal bests in four out of the five events of the pentathlon and finished in 13th place. Meanwhile Ellie finished in 11th place in the Heptathlon, just 200 points away from National Standard in a highly contested competition. The House Athletics event ran over two days with heats and a finals day. Though the heats were carried out in testing wet conditions the spirit of the event shone through and congratulations to all athletes who took part. MJS

ATHLETICS

Marlborough athletes competed in four home fixtures against 21 of the highest calibre opposition schools in the first half of term. The Intermediate Girls topped the leader board in three out of four fixtures, and the Intermediate Boys won their home fixture against a very strong field of Harrow, Eton, Sherborne and Clifton College. After half-term, the Intermediate Girls went on to win all but two of their fixtures – a magnificent achievement.

SPORTS

ATHLETICS

2016 School Records Robbie Milne for his 44.02m javelin record Olivia Gregory for her 28.32m discus throw Marcus Hudson for his 40.0 seconds 300m time Mason Hunt, Sebastian Schramm, James Eyles and Tom Hunt for equalling the 4x100m relay time of 45.7 seconds. Scarlett Thompson for her 10.23m jump in the Triple Jump. Millie Middleton for her 12.50s 80m Hurdles. Millie now holds the Shell and Remove School Hurdles records.

@MCol_Athletics Great effort by @MCol_Athletics at the Mayor’s Cup this afternoon

June 7

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Julian Iacovone and Jack Kirkwood – our big men around the key, have all improved and developed their games; Pip Bird continues to be his tenacious, enthusiastic and energetic self, whilst Phillip Springford provides good ball handling skills and composure under pressure. For the U16s Morgan Pollard our star ballhandler regularly gets the ‘oohs and aahs’ from the watching spectators, as he creates space and opportunity for his fellow guards, whilst Mathias Ten Nijenhuis, Eliot Pears, Grisha Belotserkovsky, Cameron Cash, Sophie Kirkwood and Harry Si have all improved tremendously over the year. Our big men at U16 level – Theo Reid, Nick Ruddell, Mohammad Sheikh and Jonny Gondzic – are all beginning to master the skills required for ‘boxing out’, rebounding and ‘top of the key’ play-making.

BASKETBALL

OTHER SPORTS

SQUAD: J Barnes, G Belotserkovsky, D Belyaev, P Bird, C Cash, R Chen, J Cleverly, S Cutts, T Finn, R Flatischler, J Gondzic, J Iacovone, J Kirkwood, S Kirkwood, E Pears, R Piper, M Pollard, T Reid, N Ruddell, M Sheikh, H Si, P Spring ford, C Tan, M Ten Nijenhuis The 2015/16 campaign proved to be a period of consolidation and rebuilding. Having lost several high-standard players at the end of the previous academic year, the programme started in earnest with a little more punch and vigour inserted into the training sessions. The Michaelmas Term is traditionally a squadtraining term, with few games against rival schools being organised. However, we were able to dovetail several fixtures and could therefore train with an aim and work on individual skills, team plays (tactics) plus personal athletic capability. Despite not winning any of our pre-Christmas fixtures, the squad did learn a lot. Additionally, we held the annual InterHouse Basketball Competition; with a chance to see more ‘basketball-playing’ potential in the rough and tumble of inter-house fixtures. Turner House took the honours. New challenges came in the Lent Term with fixtures organised against St Augustin, Eton, Bradfield, Dauntsey’s, Pangbourne, Sherborne, Wellington, Bishop Wordsworth’s, Winchester and Magdalen College School. Unfortunately, despite very spirited efforts, we were defeated in all but two fixtures (both U16 and U18s). Despite this, team spirits remained high as we developed a real passion for the game. Both squads have battled against stronger teams, but both have shown glimpses of brilliance as we developed our personal skills, game awareness and team cohesion. Also during the Lent Term, a group of squad members travelled to Bristol to watch a National League Fixture with Bristol Flyers taking on Leeds Force. Notable performances worthy of a mention for the following: Basketball Team Captain Richard Chen who produced solid, but skilful performances – great role-model behaviour for the U16s (and slipping in more than just the occasional 3-point shot); David Belyaev,

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Full Colours this year were awarded to Richard Chen and Pip Bird. GDML

CROSSCOUNTRY With a small squad of runners, we were often unable to compete as a team in matches, but there were some solid individual performances. Conrad Cronin-Webb, Oliver Owen, Robert Smith, Rollo Sutcliffe, Oliver Line and Nicholas Newton all ran for the Seniors. Cronin-Webb was 10th out of 34 runners at Winchester while Smith and Owen finished 14th and 15th out of 41 runners at the Kingswood Trophy. Tamsin Bracher won the Senior Girls race in the home match, with Phoebe Nobes sixth. There were some outstanding performances from William Ackerley for the U15s. He was second in the Kingswood Trophy, second in the home match against Eton, Harrow and Bradfield, and won the race at Winchester. Samuel Henriques, Javier Laiseca, Algernon Lyster-Binns and Robert Milne also ran two races for the U15s. JFL

FENCING

P:13; W:4; D:0; L:7

Michaelmas Term Eton (H)

D

18:18

Wellington (A)

L

24 :12

Bradfield (H)

W

19:17

Winchester (A)

L

4:0

RGS (A)

L

23:12

Clifton (A)

L

32:4

Winchester (H)

L

10:26

RGS (H)

L

16:20

Wellington (A)

W

23:13

Eton (A)

L

3:1

Bradfield (A)

W

12:24

Clifton (H)

L

24:30

Lent Term

Given the total number of wins this year, clearly school matches were tough. However, it was great to see such success in region. Dylan Cameron and Zharif Shahryn being champions in the regions is no mean feat and watching Shahryn’s match was tense. Another great accomplishment that day was Alice Wright coming second in the girls’ U16 epée. She had also trained hard and deserved the success. County successes showed outstanding fencing from the champions in their categories: well done Shahryn, Henry Clark and Eloise Wright. One of our exciting matches was the draw against Eton where every bout really did matter. Theo Feathersone, Shahryn, Clark and Jude Rowlands winning three out of three in epee was so important for us. The Bradfield match was close too and great contributors here were Kit Tod winning four out of six bouts, and Philip Pyke and Rowlands both winning all their epée bouts. What helped achieve a second team draw against RGS was William Brice and Edward Abbott winning five out of six. Tod’s great achievement this year was winning all three epée bouts against a very good Winchester side. Significant improvement in the Lent Term was evident in the all the results


and in particular against RGS where Tuom Laakkonen won five out of six. My thanks go to our coach, Tristan Parris, for his considerable expertise and generosity of spirit. I am also very grateful for a most impressive squad who achieved so much in the region and county in particular. I will also miss Theo who has dedicated so much of his time here to fencing, he has shown a great commitment to the Club and he managed a superb annual dinner.

Throughout the term matches have been contested in excellent camaraderie in the true spirit of golf. Marlborough golfers have shown a willingness to work on improving their games on the practice ground, spending time with Marlborough Golf Club professional Simon Amor. With more pupils than ever signing up to take golf as an option the future of the sport at Marlborough College looks bright.

FIVES

P:19; W:7; D:2; L:10

Captains Archie Wheeler and Rupert Shingleton led the way for the boys. Partnered by James Barrows, Wheeler won the plate doubles at the West of England Schools’, and Shingleton the plate doubles at the Winchester Championships. This left-right combination also worked well at U15, where Oscar Waters, Orlando Gaul or anyone else paired with Harry Powell benefited greatly from his committed and increasingly skilful play. Freddie Hall gave much to the U14 team in the first half of the season, when the Yearlings won away at both Bradfield and Malvern; he was supported notably by Lucas d’Oelsnitz, Archie Probert and Hector Perry. With his Eton Fives expertise honed at prep school, Perry made a valuable contribution across all three codes, as did Christopher Beswick and Luca Conte in the Colts. These two were perhaps the mostimproved players of the season.

One other highlight was the visit of James Toop, multiple national champion in Eton and Rugby Fives – the ideal man to give a master class to our aspiring champions. His tips helped Will Davies and Henry Dunhill perform far better than one might have expected given their lack of time on the practice court. The House competitions were the most competitive in some years, with Elmhurst and B1 taking the senior event, and Morris and C1 the juniors. TAK

GOLF

P:8; W:2; D:2, L:4 It was an excellent term for Golf as both U16 and U18 teams enjoyed a full and challenging fixture list which took in some fine courses. Captain Jamie Amor led from the front going unbeaten throughout. During his time at the school, he has taken on and beaten all-comers, proving himself among the most accomplished golfers on the independent school circuit. In addition, he was victorious in the Wiltshire Foursomes Championships at Bowood Golf Club in May and runner-up in the Wiltshire County Championship in the same month. Amor was ably supported by long-serving team stalwart and vice-captain Charlie Souster who looks a certain single figure handicapper in the making. Meanwhile there were fine contributions from Sam Burdett and Will Beattie – good team men who belatedly enjoyed their chance to represent the school – and Erik Dell, who showed he is ready to play a leading role next season. In the U16 team exciting developments are afoot. A clutch of young players in the Shell and Remove put in some strong performances showing the future of Marlborough Golf is in safe hands. In particular Jasper Lloyd-Hughes, Bruno Espinosa de los Monteros, Ben Spink and Hugh Norman represented the school with distinction. Furthermore, the appearance of several girl golfers on the practice range bodes well for next year.

Many thanks go to Dr David Campbell, Hannah Meehan and Simon Amor for their support this term. JTWL

POLO Lent Term Harrow

L

11:20

Millfield

W

8:7

Marlborough finished third in the intermediate section

SUPA National Schools Tournament at Marlborough Rugby finished second in the combined section

OTHER SPORTS

PNK

At the National Championships, held at Marlborough in April, our girls once again showed enormous skill and battling qualities. U16 Ibby Lee and U14 Kirsten Bell went down fighting in the semi-finals. Rosie Sykes got better and better as the day wore on, but lost in the U14 final. Like Alice Wood, Beth Ransome and Lena Barton, she played to a fantastically high level for a relative newcomer to the game. In the U16 doubles, Lee & Anna Laakkonen played beautifully but came up against an outstanding pair from Rugby.

SPORTS

Highlights included hard-fought draws v Cheltenham College, Radley College and a win at Bradfield College. The boys enjoyed playing at a string of fine venues – in particular the stunning Rolls of Monmouth Golf Club which proved a popular addition to the fixture list.

Marlborough SUPA National winners of the Schools Tournament at intermediate Ascot section Druids Schools Tournament Marlborough combined with Milton Abbey

W

34:21

Eton at Guards

L

1:3

Druids Universities

W

5:4

Cheltenham College Polo Invitation Day at Longdole

Marlborough lost 7.5-9

Summer Term

Marlborough SUPA National Senior White runners up Schools Championships Marlborough Blue at Kirtlington finished fourth SUPA Girls’ National Runner-up Schools Tournament at combined section Black Bears Henley The Lent Term saw some very good Arena Polo played with plenty of emerging talent on show from the Lower School. The fixture programme, across what is a very busy academic year, saw us come up against some very strong opposition with certain players playing well above their team standard, showing determination and bravery. @MCol_Golf May 10 Rain, what rain? @MarlboroughCol golfers brave the elements to tee it up v @DeanCloseSchool

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RACKETS SPORTS

Another successful season for Marlborough College Rackets was inspired in large part by the excellent captaincy of Harry McKelvey who led from the front in school matches, playing in virtually every 1st Pair match for the second season running. He was partnered for the most part by Billy Mead who became ever more impressive with his sharp reflexes and smooth stroke play. Their partnership improved throughout the year and they were unlucky to lose in the 1st round at Queen’s to Malvern, who they had beaten just a few days earlier in a school match.

OTHER SPORTS

An opening fixture against Harrow at Winkfield saw this new team of Nell Macaire, Ben Barnes and Benedict Nott make a fast, competitive start. As the match progressed good hooks were seen with robust backing with Barnes marking Harrow’s best strongest player. Our next school match was back on home turf, at Druids, with the Blues facing up to the Whites with captain Macaire doing well to rally players along with George Hankinson also amongst the line-up. Then came a narrow 8–7 victory over Millfield at Druids with excellent play from some of our less experienced players matching our opposition well. At the SUPA (Schools and Universities Polo Association) Arena National Senior Schools Tournament at Rugby Polo, there was a third place finish in the intermediate section with Harry Alexander and Sebastian Luksic amongst those contributing to second place in the combined section. Next was the SUPA Girls School National Tournament at Ascot with Marlborough winning the intermediate section with Macaire captaining once again to a great overall team effort from Freya Pinkney and Bug Good. A 34–21 win followed at the Druids National Schools Tournament with six College players combining with Milton Abbey across seven busy chukkas.

Sweet led the charge in attack and defence with the commentator describing the contest as ‘top school level polo’. This game was followed by seeing an Old Marlburian team of Patrick Ephson (C1 2003–08), Tilda Woodd (MO 2003–08), James Cooper (PR 2005–10) and Freddie Dear (TU 2006–11) soundly beat the Old Cheltonians. Charles Barclay, as Master of the Company of Worshipful Saddlers, was on hand to present Marlborough White as runner-up at the SUPA National Senior Schools Championships at Kirtlington. The season was rounded off with Macaire being named the best player at the SUPA Girls National Schools Tournament, held at Black Bears, as Marlborough finished the day as runner-up in the combined section. This match was played from field to arena due to the weather. I must round off by thanking Nell and George for their efforts as captains and to all those who have balanced academic and polo commitments so well. A special mention to Ben Barnes for his consistent attendance, effort and determination. Well done also to Harry Alexander who made an excellent start and to Milo Sweet and Oli Fanshawe for their matching efforts. Felicity O’Sullivan

The Summer Term out on the field saw some excellent coaching sessions and two matches before half-term. These came in the shape of a 3–1 defeat against Eton at Guards, which saw plenty of chances created in what was an excellent match and the result could have gone either way. A match against Druids Universities provided a competitive outing and Bug Good making an excellent entrée to higher level polo. A 5–4 win was secured thanks to an effort from Milo Sweet in the dying embers of the game – a moment to remember! At Longdole, the Cheltenham College Polo Invitation Day was our game of the year when every player rose to the occasion. Barnes and @MCol_Sport Mar 14 The girls’ Polo team were Intermediate Section winners at yesterday’s SUPA Arena Nationals

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As well as bidding farewell to our captain we also say fond farewells to several stalwarts of the Club. Jack Bunn has developed from the wildchild of the Lower School into one of our most dependable and successful players. He played mostly in the 2nd Pair – with much success – but stepped up to the 1st Pair and was never out of his depth in doing so. Freddie Brookes-Smith, too, has developed his game enormously in the last year, losing the mantle of being a great retriever by adding pace, power and precision to his attacking game. The ever mercurial Kaj Larsson also leaves us with some extraordinary memories. Last year a fixture in the 1st Pair, injury and work commitments meant that his contributions this year were less grandiose but there can rarely have been a more talented 3rd Pair at the College than him and Freddie. Elijah Samuel, the incoming captain, played with Bunn in the 2nd Pair and has now discovered the one thing that was missing from his game – raw aggression! The sweet smell of silverware from The Queen’s Club has been in evidence at the Club again this year. One of those inspired by the captain was Dom Coulson who went into the singles at Queen’s as the reigning U15 champion having just lost an excellent Lucas Cup (Internal Singles) final to McKelvey. Not one to be fazed by pressure he enjoyed an excellent tournament, reaching the final after winning an epic battle 14/17 15/10 15/7 13/16 15/5 with an excellent Rugbeian (Will Hardman, who had narrowly


beaten Coulson’s doubles partner Isaac Hocking a couple of rounds earlier). The final – a repeat of the previous year’s U15 final – was rather more one-sided and Coulson emerged victorious again. Sadly, he was unable to play in the Doubles with Isaac after sustaining a concussion in a rugby training session so the chance of adding another title to his growing collection. We will also be without the services of Hocking next year as he is moving schools to concentrate on his burgeoning international hockey career. We wish him well.

In the younger age-groups we have plenty of boys (and now girls) competing for places in matches and the future is looking rosy. This is, of course, mostly down to the tireless efforts of surely the most dedicated Rackets Professional of them all, Robert Wakely. So hard has he pushed his body over the last four decades or so in the game that he has recently undergone a full knee reconstruction and we wish him well in his recovery from that. We need him back on court and fully fit as soon as possible. SJE

SHOOTING The Small-bore Target Rifle Shooting team had a successful Michaelmas Term in 25yard shoulder-to-shoulder matches, beating Dauntsey’s, Cheltenham, Bradfield and the OMs, and losing by only 2 points to our archrivals Wellington. Captain Tom Cayford organised the team with great efficiency, and special mention should be made of Schuyler Neuhauser, who scored an impressive average of 98 (on 10 bull cards). In 50m small-bore shooting, we beat Dauntsey’s at Patterdown Ranges, and performed very respectably in two large competitions at the Lord Roberts Centre at Bisley. In the first – the English Schools 50m Challenge – our Junior Pair of Ibby Lee and Finn Kverndal won Bronze in a field of 20 pairs. In the second – the British Schools Winter Open – new recruit Sonya Vakhonina did brilliantly to come 2nd in the 16-year old age category in her first ever 50m match. In September there was also one full-bore match shot at Bisley, at 500 and 600 yards,

against the OMs, Old Wellingtonians, Old Alleynians, Wellington and Bradfield. We were missing some key full-bore shooters, and only managed to come 4th out of the six teams, but Oskar Money-Kyrle shot outstandingly to achieve the highest score of the match gaining 100 with 8 V Bulls (out of a maximum of 100 with 20 V bulls). In other news, Kverndal won the Remove Shooting prize, and Claudie Grainger beat several promising new Shell shooters to win the Shell Shooting prize. Finally, C3 won the House Shooting Competition, fending off stiff competition from B1 and Littlefield.

Nicky Watts has now taken over as Mistress in Charge of Shooting as I head to Marlborough College Malaysia for an exchange. I wish her the best of luck, and thank her and the rest of the coaching staff for all the assistance they have given me over the years. PAF

SQUASH

The following term the Small-bore shooting team had largely the same results against the same opposition in shoulder-to-shoulder matches, although we were sadly beaten for the first time in six years by the Old Marlburians – by 1 point!

Senior Boys: P:28; W:17; D:0; L:11 Junior Boys: P:14; W:10; D:0; L:4 Girls: P:10; W:7; D:0; L:3

In the British Schools Home Countries Match, Neuhauser was selected to shoot for the England ‘A’ team, and Money-Kyrle for the ‘D’ team. These two also reached the finals of the British Schools Individual Championships, together with Vakhonina and Cayford, while Will Farquhar reached the finals of the Junior Championships.

Individual Competition Results: Senior Boys’ Champion: Joash Nelson-Piercy Junior Boys’ Champion: Theo Cadier Girls’ Champion: Henriette Bos

Finally, there was great excitement at the end of term when 12 Marlborough shooters competed alongside Cheltenham, Dean Close, and Wycliffe, at the first ever schools Target Sprint competition organised by British Shooting. The competitors had to complete a 400m run, then knock down 5 targets from 10m with an air rifle, shooting in the standing position, do another run and shoot, then finish with a third run. All the Marlborough competitors made a brilliant effort, but special credit should go to Marcus Wimbush who won the U15 boys competition and Lee who won the U18 girls’ competition. We hope to take part in this event again in the future.

SPORTS

Six members of the team stayed on for the Imperial Meeting in the second week, giving up a total of 11 days of their holiday to shoot! All made great progress, but particular credit should go to Neuhauser and Money-Kyrle for helping the Wiltshire junior team to win the Junior Short Range County Championships.

OTHER SPORTS

Millie McKelvey also returned to Queen’s as a defending champion having won the U16 Cup as an U15 in the previous year. This year the competition was even stiffer – it is great to see the standard of Girls’ Rackets improving so much year on year – but she battled past some tough opponents and showed her class and determination to defend her title successfully. She, too, is proving inspirational and we now have an excellent core of girls keen to follow in her footsteps. Millie had also reached the semifinal of the Senior Girls’ Doubles with Georgia Gibson missing out on a place in the final by the narrowest of margins.

to certify it as safe following an upgrade. As a result, we were unable to train midweek, severely affecting our performances. Although we made significant improvements during the Schools’ Meeting week in July, beating last year’s scores, the VIII had to settle with 13th place out of 38 teams in the Ashburton. There was some success, however: captain Neuhauser came 2nd out of 32 entrants in the Spencer Mellish (a prestigious competition for the best shot from each school) while both he and Toby Charles came in the top 100 shooters of the week. We were also honoured to have the Master visit us at Bisley on Ashburton day, and delighted that he was able to join us at the wonderful OM Rifle Club dinner.

Boys’ House Winners: C2 Girls’ House Winners: Elmhurst

The 2015/16 season has been a busy one for the senior boys, with notable successes along the way, near misses, and a few, ‘the team has

In the Summer Term, we were frustrated to be unable to store any 7.62mm rounds in the CCF armoury while we waited for the MOD @MCol_Rackets Dec 11 Dom collects the U16 Incledon-Webber Cup @TheQueensClub #Champion

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SPORTS

OTHER SPORTS

left their game (along with their iPads) on the coach’ moments. Promotion back into the 1st division of the Roehampton Invitational Tournament was the highlight, with wins over Wellington (semi-final) and Winchester (final) enabling us to clinch the trophy. The team should be commended for their exemplary behaviour and determination on the day, and Joash Nelson-Piercy deserves a special mention for his unbeaten run at number 1 string – not easy with five matches in the space of seven hours. Away from tournament squash, the young team has grown in maturity – it has been encouraging to witness significant levels of improvement over the two terms, with their understanding of the game developing rapidly. Hard work over the summer should stand them in good stead for the 2016/17 season. The two U6 boys, Nelson-Piercy and Josh Fryer Bloom, have been real stalwarts of the side and have given nothing less than their utmost at all times. Already alluded to, Nelson-Piercy has enjoyed a remarkable record as number 1 string for the College, as well as playing for the county throughout the age groups and securing a top-100 England ranking as a junior. Harry McKelvey has also made significant contributions when he has been available to play, and I appreciate his winning efforts in both the SSP and Roehampton tournaments. I wish the U6 boys the very best for the future both on and off the squash court. The junior squad are an exciting bunch. The U14s have won all of their fixtures convincingly and have significantly more depth than in recent years. I look forward to seeing how they progress as U15s in the 2016/17 National Schools Competition. The U16s have really come on since last year as their results clearly indicate, and, if not already playing for them on a regular basis, will be pushing for places in the 2016/17 Senior V squad. Congratulations (again!) to the U15 Theo Cadier on being selected for the latter on a number of occasions throughout this season – it’s tough playing against older boys, but he has shown dogged determination and resilience and has surprised more than a couple in the process! As ever, the girls have been real winners. Their willingness to practise around many other

commitments is testament to their desire for success and a simple enjoyment of the game. I’m glad that we’ve been able to develop their fixture list and we are now in a position where the squad can get stuck into a real season as opposed to the odd fixture here and there. Well done to the whole team for two successful terms, and a special thanks to my fellow African, Georgina Millar, for her help as captain – I wish her and Henriette Bos, every success as they say goodbye to Marlborough at the end of the academic year. In concluding, huge thanks yet again to Mr Baldrey for his continued support and assistance with coaching, transportation and most importantly, chocolate bars on a Wednesday afternoon! JHB

SWIMMING

U18 & U16 Boys P:18; W:10; D:8, L:10 U18 & U16 Girls P:18; W:11; D:0, L:7

The U18 teams competed well in all fixtures with notable contributions from senior girls’ captain Suzanne Lewis, Oliver Hart, Joshua Short and boys’ captain Deniel Yuzhilin. The U16 girls remained unbeaten in nearly all relay races this year, with outstanding contributions from Phoebe Burdett and Lily Freeman and Katya Yan. The Remove and Shell teams developed a strong sense of team spirit.

There were improving fixture performances and personal best times, which is providing much promise for next year with significant contributions from Holly Smith, Zach Place, Ben Place and both Kirsten Bell, Cameron Bell and Lydia Hunt. At the end of the Lent Term, the girls and boys team travelled to the annual Independent Schools Relay Competition at Olympic Pool in Stratford to compete for the 2016 Bath Cup trophies. Both teams put in good performances in both the medley and freestyle relay events, however all teams failed to progress to the finals. Both teams have squad swimmers returning this year and so the prospects for improved results are good. The team bid farewell to Mr Lane during the year; he brought a strong, kind and focused leadership to swimming and water polo during his tenure at the pool. PJOS

WATER POLO

P:7; W:1; D:0; L:6

SQUAD: D Yuzhilin (capt), V Shevelev, A Clement De L’Epine, O Hart, J Short, J Orr, H Mitford-Slade, J Glasmacher, M Nobes, N Trotsenko, R Quick, H Clark, G Trotsenko, J Lam, A Gabestro, C Kitchin, J Davey, P Spring ford, C Kirkwood The water polo team played a total of seven fixtures and the team gave everything in each and every one of them. The matches were played in a fierce and competitive spirit and much the contests were much closer than some of the final scores indicate. Congratulations to Gleb Trotsenko and Henry Clark who were selected and represented Wiltshire County U14 Water Polo team at the South West Inter-County Water Polo championships. This was held at Millfield on Sunday 6th December and Wiltshire finished 4th out of the six participating counties. PJOS

@MarlboroughCol Full-bore Shooting Team retain The Malvern Cup at Bisley

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Apr 18


Faure Requiem To commemorate the 20 OMs who tragically lost their lives alongside thousands of others on the opening day of the Battle of the Somme one hundred years ago, the College honoured them in two performances of Fauré’s stunning Requiem in Chapel. Each of the movements of the Requiem were interspersed with specially selected readings, some as expected were by Siegfried Sassoon (CO 1902–04) alongside other appropriately topical texts. The Chapel Choir were joined by Old Marlburians, Common Room and guests with Helena Mackie (MO) Head Chorister 2016/17, and guest baritone, Christopher Sheldrake (Wells Cathedral Vicars Choral) as the distinguished soloists. This was a beautifully poignant and suitably moving occasion, a fitting closure to the College year. PTD

James Young (B1 1906–08)

Dominick Brown (B2 1901–6)

Geoffrey Sanderson (C1 1903–06)

Percy Bent (B2 1907–12)

Llewellyn Sanger-Davies (C1 1907–12)

Wilfred Kohn (CO 1907–11)

Thomas MarriottDodington (PR 1909–13)

Montague Burge (B3 1888–92)

John Towers-Clark (B2 1910–12)

Frederick Wragg (C1 1894–1900)

Christie Hickman (LI 1901–06)

Charles Prowse (CO 1882–85)

Henry Field (LI 1908–11)

Anniversary Plans 2018 marks the 50th year of girls at Marlborough College and the 175th year since the College was established. Richard Lovett (C2 1883–87)

Hugh Mott (C2 1907–13)

Edward Chambers (C2 1909–13)

Jocelyn Buxton (PR 1910–14)

Cecil Coxe (C2 1911–15)

C ove r photo : C l a ud i a Vy v y a n (MO U6 ) a s R e no Swe ene y, i n C ole Por t e r ’s A ny t h i n g G o e s . P u bl i s he d by M a rl b orou g h C o l le g e , Wi lt s h i re S N 8 1PA E d itor : Ja ne G ow Wit h s p e c i a l t h a n k s f or t he photo g r a ph s of I a n L e on a rd a nd Pe t e D av ie s a nd to C h r i s Ta n ne r f or c ompi l i n g t he s p or t s re p or t s . D e s i g n by S u n Hou s e Cre a t i ve

Charles Edmundson (C3 1905–08)

Clifford Ellis (C3 1911–14)

We would be delighted if you are able to join us for some of the celebratory events which will take place throughout the academic year 2017/2018. Please save the dates. Celebratory School Walk 17 September 2017 Cycle to the Somme 13–15 October 2017 Rugby and Girls’ Hockey Festival 4 November 2017 Celebration Concert 3 December 2017 Commemoration Day Celebration 26 May 2018

Marlborough Marlborough to Amiens Marlborough Marlborough Marlborough


MARLB OROUGH COLLEGE, MARLB OROUGH, W I LT S H I R E S N 8 1 PA

T H E M A R L B U R I A N M AG A Z I N E M I C H A E L M A S , L E N T & S UM M E R 2 015 /16

2015/16 MICHAELMAS, L E N T & S UM M E R

Marlburian 2015-16  
Marlburian 2015-16