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OFCOM FACTUAL PROGRAMME REGULATIONS


MEDIA LAW GOVERNING FACTUAL PROGRAMMING OFCOM

What is it?

How has it been broken in the past? Give example

How will it specifically affect your work?

Reconstructions

Re-construction is when you reenact an event that has happened previously (crime watch) This must also be fair and accurate.

As crime watch re-enact scenes from a true event, they could have mislead the audience and not being accurate or fair.

If I re-enact a scene from the riots, I must ensure that it will be accurate and truthful otherwise this could put a negative effect on my work and could be looked in to.

Dealing with Contributors

Contributors should take part in programmes on the basis of their informed consent. Consent should normally be in the form of a signed release form, although consent on camera may be satisfactory.

Shows such as X Factor still tell people to vote when it is really closed.

I must ensure that my work has been approved by a programme lawyer and forms have been signed.

Potentially Offensive Material

POM is material that may offend people in ways such as violence, racial and sexual intolerance.

Andy Gray making comments about the lineswomen which many women found offensive and this was used as being sexist which led to the pundit getting sacked

I will make sure I do not use any sort of offensive material such as strong language or racial intolerance .

Criminality

Broadcasting standards commission. Programmes involving criminals or about criminality that require special care and are likely to be sued.

This was broken by Eastenders as they showed a crime take place before the 9 O’clock watershed.

As my documentary will be on the riots, I must ensure that all crime acts will be shown after the 9 O’clock watershed. If shown before, I could be warned.

Media Ofcom  

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