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EMILY TAN: Only once-a-year do I allow myself a ten-day holiday in Hawai’i with my darling hubby and soul mate -- Jim Tremayne, editor-in-chief of DJ Times -- and our family. The great thing is, Hawai’i is six hours behind Eastern Time. So, I wake up at 7:00 am on Oahu and do a good five hours of hardcore emails, hit “send all,” shut my computer and head outside to the beach/pool/nature. This means I’m still working five hours a day on vacation, so you’ll never even notice I’m away. I play hard with my adorable little nieces and I love being with my family on holiday. Physical fitness is also crucial to me and I carve out time to exercise every day, even while traveling. My daily workouts are a micro-vacation. I also eat healthy and I love fine dining. I truly love what I do for a living. I savor all the different moments and experiences of each and every day. RaverMag: You have seen the rise of dance music, lived it and experienced its growth. Not many people can say that. In your opinion, where does it all end or does it? How far will this booming industry go and do you feel that some genres of the dance culture will eventually phase out? EMILY TAN: Electronic dance music literally speaks to me. There’s a lot of crap EDM out there now, but I’m referring to electronic dance music from the golden era in 1997 and thereabouts when all dance music was just called “techno” or “house.” This was music made with synthesizers and computers, meaning music that was not rock, hip-hop or country. There are many releases from 1997 that still give me goosebumps and can bring me to tears in the right setting. It’s rare nowadays for music to evoke those emotions in me. It’s not because I’m jaded. I just think software and the overall accessibility of production tools make it infinitely easier for more people to create music...and the majority of it is mediocre. To stand out nowadays, you need to produce in addition to perform. Formal music training and songwriting skills go a long way. This music that we love -- I’ll call it dance music -- will never die. The music itself will keep evolving just as all previous genres of music before it. The industry and business may change, but dance music will always exist in some form. It’s human nature to want to gather in a communal setting and share a transcendent experience. It’s in our DNA. Dance music will end when life itself ceases to exist. RaverMag: What are some of the things that drive you crazy and some of the things you would like to see more of from the media? EMILY TAN: I’d like to see more independent investigative journalism from the media. Don’t just jump on a news story because you think it’ll get clicks or views. Dig into a story you think is relevant or interesting. Don’t tell me something that merely reinforces my perceived biases; show me insight and a side of the story no one thought of shining a light on before. I’m speaking of the media as a whole. RaverMag: It seems everyone has a website or EDM blog these days. Do you feel that more and more artists are shying away from blogs? Are artists looking for a new form of media outlet? EMILY TAN: Some artists may be pulling back from blogs in favor of social media and speaking directly to their audiences, but EDM blogs are essentially what fanzines were to the early punk rock bands. The majority of EDM bloggers are passionate and opinionated about the music of which they write. When you look at artists like my dear friend Armin van Buuren, or Lady Gaga or Taylor Swift, or even people like Kim Kardashian, they have so many followers on their social media accounts that they’ve essentially become their own media outlets. RaverMag: I can only begin to imagine some of the things you have seen on your travels. This is probably a tough question, but I have to know, what is one experience you can remember that made you realize you have finally reached the pinnacle of perfection?

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Raver Magazine - 016 (November)