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RATIO Edgewater Resources S.B. Friedman Gewalt Hamilton Associates Applied Ecological Resources

CITY OF WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT

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DRAFT for Review


Table of Contents 1 Introduction

4

2

Waukegan Today

14

3

Land Use & Current Zoning

28

4

Natural Resources & Green Infrastructure

42

5

Transportation & Infrastructure

60

6

Economic Development

76

A Appendices

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97


1 Introduction The City of Waukegan holds a prominent position as the county seat of Lake County, and the largest city on Chicago’s North Shore. This is partly thanks to the City’s robust planning effort, strategic location, and a diverse community. To elevate its success and quality of life for its residents the City has embarked on a 13-month process to unlock the potential of the City. Though the City has conducted multiple planning processes in the recent past, these plans have been district-focused. The Comprehensive Plan is different and signifies a new chapter for the City because it focuses on the City of Waukegan as a whole. It will be the guiding document for multiple City departments and stakeholders and will unify various efforts and objectives into one cohesive vision to move the City forward. This report documents the City’s existing conditions and provides a foundation for future recommendations for improvement.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Introduction


Why Plan? The Purpose of the Comprehensive Plan

The Purpose of the Existing Conditions Report

The Comprehensive Plan is intended to be a document to guide longrange planning efforts. It will be the City’s official guide to land use and development. It will be the City’s roadmap, which details the vision and policy agenda for critical issues, including: land use, redevelopment, housing, economic development, transportation, infrastructure, parks and recreation, natural resources, and more. The Plan also will be a culmination of a unified vision developed through the input of the City residents, businesses, staff, elected and appointed officials, and the consultant team. In the end, the City of Waukegan Comprehensive Plan should answer the question, “What should Waukegan look like in the next 10-20 years and how do we get there?”

The Existing Conditions Report for the City of Waukegan Comprehensive Plan is one of the first milestones in the planning process. The consultant team has conducted a series of outreach events and gathered data to understand the issues and opportunities of the City of Waukegan. This report incorporates and reflects the perspectives and opinions of Waukegan residents, stakeholders, business leaders, and City appointed and elected officials on the issues and opportunities the City faces. This input informs future policy and design recommendations for land use, transportation, infrastructure, economic development, natural resources, community facilities, and urban design.

Introduction | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

The Planning Process The planning process for the City of Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update consists of five phases. The Existing Conditions Report documents the tasks completed in Phase 1 - Evaluate. Phase 1: Evaluate: The “kick-off” for the project involved a series of kickoff meetings and workshops with the City staff, department heads, elected and appoint officials, and the project’s Steering Committee and the public meeting to discuss and review the direction of the Comprehensive Plan. It also defined the outreach component of the planning process. During this phase, the consultant team began collecting data from the field and a variety of data sources to evaluate the City of Waukegan’s characteristics. Phase 2: Investigate: In this phase, input and information will continue to be gathered from residents and stakeholders through in-person interviews. A public meeting will occur in this phase to generate the project vision and desired characteristics for the City. Data gathering from the City, agencies, service providers, and organizations continue in this phase. The data and input will be analyzed to draft the Plan’s Vision, Goals, and Objectives.

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Phase 3: Enhance: In this phase, the input gathered from the community outreach process will be reviewed and synthesized with other gathered data to prepare recommendations and policies that will address: future land use, housing and neighborhoods, transportation and infrastructure, natural resources, and economic development. The recommendations will represent the core of a draft Comprehensive Plan that will be submitted to the City for review. Phase 4: Empower: This phase will involve presenting the draft Comprehensive Plan to the City and the public for review. The input received from them will be used to create the final draft of the Comprehensive Plan. Phase 5: Integrate: This phase will involve a final round of revisions to create the final draft plan. The final draft plan will be presented to the City staff and the Steering Committee, then submitted to the Planning and Zoning Commission, then City Council for formal adoption.

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MUSKEGON 41

Regional Context

43

94

The City of Waukegan is a diverse and significant community in the North Shore region of Illinois. It is the county seat of Lake County and is located halfway between Chicago and Milwaukee. Its proximity to regional transportation systems, including: Metra Union Pacific North service, Interstate 94, Skokie Highway (U.S. Highway 41), Green Bay Road (State Route 131), Sheridan Road (State Route 137), and the Waukegan National Airport, enables residents to travel north to Wisconsin and south to Chicago, Indiana, Michigan, and beyond.

MILWAUKEE WAUKESHA 43

WI

HIGAN

HOLLAND RACINE

BURLINGTON

MIC

KENOSHA

KE

ZION

WAUKEGAN

GURNEE

SOUTH HAVEN

LA

94

196

MI

NORTH CHICAGO

MUNDELEIN CARY

HIGHLAND PARK GLENCOE BENTON HARBOR

SCHAUMBURG 90

EVANSTON

ELGIN

94

O’HARE

DEKALB

90 355

IL 6

290

ST. CHARLES

NEW BUFFALO

88 MIDWAY 55

MICHIGAN CITY

AURORA BOLINGBROOK

YORKVILLE

CHICAGO

CALUMET PARK DRAFT for Review 57

GARY

IN

SOUTH BEND

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Introduction 90


Local Context

VILLAGE OF WADSWORTH

VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

Sedge Meadow Forest Preserve

W YORKHOUSE RD

N SH ERI DA

E GREENWOOD AVE KEITH AVE

137

NORTH AVE

GRAND AVE

RIDGELAND AVE

21

N SHERIDAN RD

GRANDVILLE AVE

POPLAR ST

N JACKSON ST

132

WEST ST

MONROE ST

9TH ST

S MCALISTER AVE

8TH ST

137 S SHERID AN RD

S JACKSON ST

BUFF ST

DU GD AL ER D

10TH ST

W

S WAUKEGAN RD

HANLON RD

S RIVER RD

MIL WA UKE EA VE

BAY RD

MCGAW RD

North Beach Park

14TH ST

HWY SKOKIE

AY LLW TO TE TA IS TR

Greenbelt Forest Preserve

S GREEN

94

Trails Waukegan National Airport Parks/Open Space Forest Preserve

S LEWIS AVE

CEDAR AVE

131

CATALPA ST MELROSE AVE

FULTON AVE

BELVIDERE RD

120

Legend

ORCHARD AVE

CITY OF PARK CITY

KELLER AVE

DILGER AVE

OPLAINE RD

WASHINGTON AVE

COUNTY ST

BROOKSIDE AVE

MICHIGAN

W GLEN FLORA AVE

PERSHING RD

Larsen Nature Preserve

WESTERN AVE

DELAWARE RD

Glen Flora Country Club

GO LF RD

N LEWIS AVE

VILLAGE OF GURNEE

N MCAREE RD

N DELANY RD

SUNSET AVE

N RD

BLANCHARD RD

AMSTUTZ EX PY

WALL AVE

METROPOLITAN AVE

GRA ND A VE

Lyons Woods Forest Preserve

Bonnie Brook Golf Course

CHESTNUT ST

41

N RIVERSIDE DR

VILLAGE OF OLD MILL CREEK

137

VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

NEW YORK ST

Y HW KIE SKO

94

N GRE EN BA Y

RD

Waukegan Savanna Forest Preserve 131

Lake Carina Forest Preserve

Waukegan Municipal Boundary Waukegan Metra Station Interstate Highways Major Roadways

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

LAKE

The City’s east-west thoroughfares, such as Grand Avenue, Washington Street, and Belvidere Road, enable residents to access different parts of the City and the regional transportation network. The City of Waukegan is bordered by Lake Michigan on the east, Village of Beach Park and Wadsworth to the north, Gurnee the west, and North Chicago and Green Oaks to the south. Natural and recreational spaces are spread throughout the City for residents’ use, and the lakefront remains a regional destination and significant redevelopment opportunity.

43

41 Independence Grove Forest Preserve

22ND ST

CITY OF NORTH CHICAGO

21

North

0

0.25

0.5

1

Mile

Introduction | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

VILLAGE OF GREEN OAKS 137

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Review of Past Plans & Studies The City of Waukegan has several adopted policies and plans that provide the framework and strategic guidance for the development and betterment of quality of life in the City. The City’s last Comprehensive Plan was adopted in 1987. Several other plans that were adopted in subsequent years are primarily district-focused. The City’s policies and plans have been reviewed and assessed to understand important objectives, recommendations, and regulations that should be considered in the development of the Comprehensive Plan. The following are summaries of previous plans and reports that the consultant team has reviewed.

The 1987 Waukegan Comprehensive Plan The 1987 Comprehensive Plan has been the City’s guiding document used by the City for land use, transportation and infrastructure, regulatory, and policy decisions since its adoption in 1987. This document established an updated survey of existing land use and a new transportation plan for the City of Waukegan. However, many of the recommendations have been accomplished or superseded by a number of district-focused plans the City has adopted in subsequent years. The 1987 Comprehensive Plan will serve as a reference guide for the new Comprehensive Plan. Each element has been reviewed for its relevancy and applicability to current comprehensive planning methodology. However, it is necessary draft a new Comprehensive Plan to reflect the City’s changing economics and demographics over the past thirty-two years.

Waukegan Downtown Lakefront Master Plan (2003) Following the ULI’s recommendation, the City hired a consultant team in early 2003 to create a master plan for the City’s Downtown and Lakefront area. This master plan envisions the Waukegan Lakefront to be a vibrant destination with easy access between the Downtown and the Lakefront. Key recommendations from this plan include: •• Promoting mixed use and transitoriented developments in the City’s Downtown and Lakefront area •• Creating a strong pedestrian, transit, and roadway connections between the Downtown and the Lakefront •• Protecting and enhancing the City’s ravine and park system

The City has adopted a series of studies, including the Open Space Implementation Strategy (2007) and the Lakefront Active Implementation Plan (2016), that provide more specific and concrete implementation strategies to realize the vision of the Waukegan Downtown Lakefront Master Plan.

Related Plans •• Urban Land Institute’s Advisory Services Panel Report on Waukegan (2002) •• Waukegan Lakefront Downtown Master Plan Design Guidelines (2005) •• Open Space Implementation Strategy (2007) •• Lakefront Active Implementation Plan (2016)

•• Restoring the Lakefront into a regional natural and recreation asset •• Encouraging land uses that complement an environmentallyfocused lakefront. This plan provided the framework for the City to adopt a series of Design Guidelines for its Downtown Lakefront revitalization area.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Introduction


CMAP Waukegan Planning Priorities Report (2012)

CMAP Washington Street Corridor Plan (2014)

South Sheridan Revitalization Plan (2016)

In 2011, the City of Waukegan submitted an application to the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) to request local technical assistance as a part of the agency’s Local Technical Assistance (LTA) program. Through this program, CMAP works with local governments to address issues relating to land use, transportation, housing, the natural environment, and economic and community development. To better understand the City’s planning needs, CMAP worked with the City to understand its priorities and challenges. Over the course of the process, CMAP identified and recommended the Washington Street commercial corridor, between the Waukegan River ravines to Lewis Avenue, to be the focus of future LTA assistance. The report did not recommend the Downtown/Lakefront area, because the City had already committed resources to the improvement of the area. This report established the groundwork for the Washington Street Corridor Plan that was adopted by the City in 2014.

Following the recommendations from CMAP’s Waukegan Planning Priorities Report in 2012, CMAP worked with the City of Waukegan to create a corridor plan for Washington Street. The planning process involved documentation of existing conditions of Washington Street. During this process, the plan identified Washington Street beginning to be perceived as a “Main Street” for the growing Latino population living nearby. Breaking down the cultural and language barriers in the planning process was critical. The goals of the corridor plan include:

This plan used the Waukegan Downtown Lakefront Master Plan as a foundation to create opportunities in the South Sheridan corridor neighborhood. The plan is intended to create an authentic South Sheridan Road by honoring its past through careful planning, design and execution. Its intended purpose is to welcome regional and national market opportunities and create longterm prosperity for existing residents and businesses as well as those that are new to the area. The Plan introduced contemporary and well-designed, affordable, and professionally managed multi-family housing as an additional land use for the Corridor. Several development opportunities are available, including the intersection of Sheridan Road and South Avenue, City-owned land to the southeast, and the 120-unit Barwell Manor. Promoting ownership of the neighborhood’s single-family homes is important to reclaim the single-family housing stock in the South Sheridan neighborhood. The Plan also proposed assisting vulnerable neighborhood residents with mortgage qualification to expand home ownership in neighborhoods adjacent to the corridor.

•• Making the Washington Street Corridor more inviting and easily accessible to all visitors and residents •• Providing a wide variety of amenities •• Providing opportunities for after school activities and career development •• Encouragin businesses to collaborate to strengthen the Corridor. The Comprehensive Plan will examine the relevancy of these goals and objectives and adapt them as needed.

Introduction | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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River Road Corridor Plan (2017) The City of Waukegan adopted the River Road Corridor Plan in 2017 as an amendment to the City’s 1987 Comprehensive Plan. The plan is intended to guide future development in the River Road Corridor and to ensure that instead of conforming with the River Glen cluster development, future development should be compatible with the prior, existing subdivisions. Specifically, the plan recommended that the City define a holistic development strategy for the area and key planning principles, including: land and development patterns, open space and natural systems, access and connectivity relative to traffic, and safety and leisure. It is important to understand the logical areas for potential development and advance environmental objectives for a high quality of life and conservation of open space. The guidance provided by this recent plan will be adapted into the new Comprehensive Plan.

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Public Process Summary A public engagement process was created for the Comprehensive Plan to gather input from residents, stakeholders, business leaders, City leadership and staff, and community organizations. Meeting summaries are included in the appendices.

Project Kick-Off

The following is an overview of the community engagement process that has taken place to date.

Meeting with the City’s Public Relations Team

10

The planning process kicked off on August 29, 2018, with a series of meetings with various stakeholders and City departments. The following are the meetings/activities that took place:

The consultant team met with the City’s Public Relations team to discuss challenges and lessons learned from previous planning processes. The City staff also shared strategies to engage stakeholders with the process. The consultant team and the City staff discussed meeting logistics, coordination, and identified groups and organizations to engage.

Meeting with the City’s Planning and Zoning Department, Building Department, and Engineering Department The consultant team met with members of the staff from the City’s Planning and Zoning Department as well as the Building and Engineering Departments. The meeting involved discussion regarding planning issues within and around the City of Waukegan.

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Meeting with Mayor and Department Heads The consultant team facilitated a meeting with the Mayor and Department Heads. The meeting included an overview of the project’s planning process and schedule, public engagement plan, and project logistics. There was a discussion about the City’s past planning efforts and their effectiveness and lessons learned. The meeting also included a mapping exercise where meeting participants spatially identified issues and opportunities in the City of Waukegan.

City Tour The consultant team and City staff toured the City of Waukegan to document existing conditions, assets, constraints, and opportunities.

Meeting with the Project’s Steering Committee The format of this meeting was similar to the meeting with the Mayor and Department Heads. The project’s Steering Committee members discussed the implications of the City’s past planning processes and participated in the mapping exercise to identify issues and opportunities in and around the City of Waukegan.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Introduction


Public Workshop 1 On November 15, 2018, the consultant team, along with City staff, hosted a public workshop to gather input on the comprehensive planning process. The workshop was held at the Waukegan City Hall in the Council Chambers. There were about 110 participants, consisting of residents, business leaders, stakeholders, steering committee members, City staff, and leadership. There were approximately 40 additional people who participated in the workshop but did not sign in. The workshop was organized into five stations in which participants could share their vision, issues, and opportunities, personal history in relation to Waukegan, opinions of the City’s past planning efforts, and experience in living and working in the City of Waukegan. Most materials in the workshop were bilingual (English and Spanish).

Introduction | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Project Website

Online Survey

A project website was created for the project to extend the in-person public engagement and enable project stakeholders to participate in the planning process at their convenience. The website is bilingual (English and Spanish). It also provides information on upcoming and past project events, communicates the goals and objectives of the Plan, and updates visitors on progress towards completion of the Comprehensive Plan.

An online survey was provided for Waukegan residents and stakeholders who could not attend the first Public Workshop. The online survey asked participants similar questions to those discussed in the in-person Public Workshop.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Introduction


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2 Waukegan Today The City of Waukegan is in the northern portion of the Chicago region along Lake Michigan. It is the county seat of Lake County, Illinois, which is one of the most affluent counties in the United States. Unlike much of the rest of Lake County, Waukegan has a significant manufacturing history and has had a major shipping harbor on Lake Michigan since its formation in the 1800s. In recent years, Waukegan’s economy has diversified and become less manufacturing-based.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Waukegan Today


CENSUS TRACTS

8660 VILLAGE OF WADSWORTH

8606

8604 VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

Sedge Meadow Forest Preserve

W YORKHOUSE RD

Lyons Woods Forest Preserve

Larsen Nature Preserve

E GREENWOOD AVE KEITH AVE

137

8621

8624.01

BROOKSIDE AVE

WEST ST

MONROE ST

41

22ND ST

S JACKSON ST

S LEWIS AVE

W

8628

43

8636.01

DU GD AL ER D

S WAUKEGAN RD

HANLON RD

BAY RD

MCGAW RD

North Beach Park

BUFF ST

10TH ST 8625.02

HWY SKOKIE

S RIVER RD

Greenbelt Forest Preserve

S GREEN

8615.04

8625.01

8622

8624.02

14TH ST

8627 8TH ST

9TH ST

S MCALISTER AVE

131

AY LLW TO TE TA IS TR

MIL WA UKE EA VE

8626.05

120

94

Independence Grove Forest Preserve

KELLER AVE

BELVIDERE RD

CATALPA ST MELROSE AVE

FULTON AVE

8616.03

CITY OF PARK CITY

CEDAR AVE

Lake Carina Forest Preserve

DILGER AVE

OPLAINE RD

8626.04

ORCHARD AVE

WASHINGTON AVE

PERSHING RD

NORTH AVE

8626.03

8615.10

N SHERIDAN RD

21

8620

137 S GENESE E ST

GRAND AVE

RIDGELAND AVE

COUNTY ST

GRANDVILLE AVE

POPLAR ST

N JACKSON ST

132

AMSTUTZ EX PY

W GLEN FLORA AVE

MICHIGAN

8618.04

8617.02

WESTERN AVE

N LEWIS AVE

DELAWARE RD

N DELANY RD

8619.02

8661

GO LF RD

N RD

Glen Flora Country Club

SUNSET AVE

VILLAGE OF GURNEE

8617.01

BLANCHARD RD CHESTNUT ST

WALL AVE

METROPOLITAN AVE

GRA ND A VE

8615.07

41

N RIVERSIDE DR

VILLAGE OF OLD MILL CREEK

The following sections will explore the demographic, housing, economy, and education attainment within the City of Waukegan. Some analysis will involve comparing a specific dataset among census tracts. This map shows the Census Tracts’ boundaries and numbers that are within and around the City of Waukegan.

137

8618.03 Bonnie Brook Golf Course

NEW YORK ST

Y HW KIE SKO

94

N GRE EN BA Y

RD

8619.01

VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

N SH ERI DA

Waukegan Savanna Forest Preserve 131

8615.06

N MCAREE RD

Waukegan Municipal Boundary Waukegan Metra Station Census Tract Boundary

8623

LAKE

Legend

8629.01

8629.02 8632.01

CITY OF NORTH CHICAGO

21

North

0

0.25

0.5

1

Mile

Waukegan Today | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

VILLAGE OF GREEN OAKS 137

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Population The importance of the population analysis is to understand the similarities and differences between Waukegan, Lake County, and the larger Chicago region as different population subsets that have different needs and therefore require a different service response from the public and private sectors.

Ethnicity USA

Chicago Region

Lake County

Waukegan

80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0%

Ethnicity Most other municipalities in Lake County have evolved by becoming bedroom communities to Chicago and Cook County to the south. This has always led Waukegan to be socio-economically more diversified and dissimilar from most of the other communities found in Lake County. This has also led Waukegan to be more distinct in its residential income mix and ethnicity than the rest of the county. ESRI business analyst calculates diversity range with an index of 1 to 100 (100 being most diverse). Waukegan’s diversity index score is 87.9 while Lake County is 65.3 and the Chicago region is 71.6.

Hispanic/Latino Population Waukegan has a very significant Hispanic/Latino population that makes up 56% of its population. 55% of households in Waukegan speak another language at home besides English. Waukegan’s rich and vibrant culture, due to its ethnic make-up, makes Waukegan an interesting place to live, work, and recreate. The chart at the right provides the population distribution using Waukegan’s census tracts for reference.

40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

White

Black

American Indian

Asian

2+Races

Hispanic Origin

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

% Population Hispanic, 2018 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 56.3%

60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0%

22.2% 22.8%

20.0% 16.3% 10.0% 0.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst 16

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Waukegan Today


Historical Population Growth Trends Waukegan has had several significant growth periods during its history. Most recently, the City has experienced a plateau due to the loss of manufacturing employment. It underwent significant economic losses during the 2008 recession, however, the City still exhibited some population growth from 2010 to 2018 of 862 people. This may be due to its expanding Hispanic population base. While its estimated population in 2018 is 89940, the City is expected to continue to grow slightly over the next five years to reach over 90500 persons by 2023.

Source: U.S. Census

Waukegan Today | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Population Age Distribution The graph at the right illustrates that the City of Waukegan has a higher population share of younger residents than Lake County or the Chicago region. This suggests that educational opportunity will be important as there is a greater need for youth education and early job training programs for those 25-34.

Population Age Distribution, 2018 USA

Chicago Region

Lake County

Waukegan

18.0% 16.0% 14.0% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0%

0-4

5-9

10-14

15-24

25-34

35-44 45-54 Age Group

55-64

65-74

75-84

85+

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Median Age Waukegan’s median age is 31.8. This is lower than the rest of Lake County and the Chicago region, which are both over 35 years of age. Several census tracts including neighborhoods adjacent to Downtown have a lower median age population, which indicates there is a higher proportion of young people in these neighborhoods. The downtown Census Tract 8623, at the southern end of Downtown and the southeast portion of the City, also has a lower median age as well.

Median Age, 2018 50 45 40 35

31.8

30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Source: ESRI Business Analyst 18

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Waukegan Today


Population Growth: 2000-2010

Yearly Growth Rate, 2000-2010 4.00%

Population growth has not occurred evenly across the City. From 2000-2010, neighborhoods in and around downtown lost residents, while outlying areas had positive annual growth rates. Census tracts are used for reference on the charts to the right.

3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00% -1.00% -2.00% -3.00%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Population Growth: 2010-2018

Yearly Growth Rate, 2010-2018 1.00%

Population growth trends have changed in the current decade. Three of the six census tracts near downtown (central neighborhoods) including downtown (8623) have grown over the past eight years. Other neighborhoods such as census tract 8604 that is near the Waukegan Airport on the City’s north side experienced negative growth from 2010-2018.

0.80% 0.60% 0.40% 0.20% 0.00% -0.20% -0.40% -0.60%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst Waukegan Today | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Projected Population Growth: 2018-2023 Waukegan is projected to continue to experience growth through 2020 with an annual growth rate of 0.15% over the next five years. Most neighborhoods near downtown are projected to continue to see growth as well. Census tract 8604 is anticipated to see continued population loss.

Yearly Growth Rate, 2018-2023 1.00% 0.80% 0.60% 0.40% 0.20% 0.00% -0.20% -0.40%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Housing Housing data has been selected at the census tract or neighborhood level to better understand the housing owner and rental pattern across the City as owners and renters often have different service needs such as parks or access to transit for employment, etc.

Owner vs. Rental In 2018, Waukegan had a slightly higher share of owner-occupied housing units than renters (48.4%ownership, 43.3% renter). The downtown and central neighborhoods near the downtown have a much higher share of rental units than the rest of the City.

% Own or Rent, 2018 Own

Rent

100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst 20

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Waukegan Today


Vacancy

Housing Vacancy Rate, 2018

The vacancy rate in 2018 was around 9.2%, which is slightly higher than the Chicago region and Lake County. Waukegan’s downtown has a high vacancy rate of 21.5%. Several near-downtown neighborhoods also have higher vacancy rates.

25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0%

9.2%

5.0% 0.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Housing Value

% Housing Value Distribution, 2018

Housing values are much lower in Waukegan than most of the rest of Lake County or the Chicago region. While this may make it more difficult to finance home improvement loans and mortgages due to the lower value of the housing units; it may also present an opportunity for younger and firsttime home buyers. Millennials carry more debt burden into their early adult life, yet recent Urban Land Institute surveys have discovered that they have a similar interest to buy homes. Therefore, Waukegan’s more affordable housing stock may be appealing to Millennials. Waukegan presents an affordable option to the most of other Lake County residential real estate.

USA

Chi-Region

Lake County

Waukegan

35.0% 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0%

Housing Value Source: ESRI Business Analyst Waukegan Today | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Household Income The household income for Lake County and the Chicago region represents an income divide between lower and higher income households at the $75,000-$99,999 income range. Waukegan illustrates a more consistent household income distribution without as severe an income gap between higher and lower income households. Waukegan has a more normal distribution with one peak income group in the $50,000-S74,999 range rather than two income peaks. The overall distribution indicates generally lower income households relative to Lake County and the Chicago region. Waukegan generally has lower income households relative to Lake County and the Chicago Region.

% Household Income Distribution USA

Chi-Region

Lake County

Waukegan

20.0% 18.0% 16.0% 14.0% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Median Housing Value Generally, most neighborhoods central to the City have lower housing values than Waukegan overall. Census tract 8636.01 is an outlier neighborhood on the very southwest corner of Waukegan (the census tract straddles more than one municipal boundary). The census tracts do not align evenly with the City’s corporate boundary, but the neighborhoods on the City’s far southwest side appear-to-have significantly much higher home values than the rest of the Waukegan community.

Median Housing Value, 2018 800,000 700,000 600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000

$154,494

200,000 100,000 0

Source: ESRI Business Analyst 22

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Waukegan Today


Housing Affordability The housing affordability ratio is a measure of affordability by dividing an area’s median home value by its median household income. Therefore, higher ratios indicate a less affordable housing market for existing households to purchase a home. When the housing affordability ratio is below 3.0, then it illustrates a more affordable housing market. While Waukegan’s overall housing affordability ratio is 3.1, this indicates near affordability across the City. But, within the downtown neighborhoods, housing affordability is difficult for a few census tracts.

Housing Affordability Ratio (Owner-occupied), 2018 6.0

Housing is less affordable above 3.0 and more affordable below 3.0

5.0 4.0 3.1

3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Estimated Housing Growth

Estimated Household Growth, 2018-2023

Estimated household growth over the next five years through 2023, indicates that the central neighborhoods of the City may will grow over the next five years. Also, increases are projected to be 36 and 84 for these two census tracts. On the flipside other Waukegan neighborhoods are projected to lose some residents. Census Tract 8604 is near the airport.

7.0% 6.0% 5.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.0%

0.9%

0.0% -1.0% -2.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst Waukegan Today | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Economy & Education Employment by Occupation Compared to the Chicago region and Lake County, Waukegan has a smaller percentage of its residents employed in white collar occupations and a larger percentage in blue collar occupations. Most residents are employed in white collar jobs in Waukegan.

% Employment by Occupation USA

Chicago Region

Lake County

Waukegan

80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Median Household Income Because the Chicago Region and Lake County have more persons in professional or white-collar occupations, Waukegan has an overall lower median household income. Several neighborhoods in the central area of the City have lower median household incomes.

Estimated Median Household Income, 2018 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000

$49,897

0

Source: ESRI Business Analyst 24

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Waukegan Today


College Degree

College Degree, 2018

Waukegan has historically been a manufacturing and shipping center with many jobs not requiring a post-secondary education. Because much of Waukegan’s population lacks college degrees, it has been attractive to companies offering bluecollar jobs. Today, Waukegan is transitioning and diversifying its economy. In the 21st Century economy many jobs will require college degrees and significant advanced training beyond high school. Neighborhoods that lag the City are in and around central Waukegan. This may indicate that City should continue and expand its educational offerings and programs to residents in these neighborhoods.

80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0%

45.5% 37.8% 31.8%

30.0%

19.8%

20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst

Unemployment

Unemployment Rate, 2018

While Waukegan has a slightly higher unemployment rate than Lake County, it has a significantly lower rate than the Chicago region. Within the City, two neighborhoods stand-out for having high unemployment. One is downtown census tract 8623 and the other on the City’s near southwest side (census tract 8626.05). Both neighborhoods have significantly higher unemployment than the City. This may be an indication of structural unemployment issues such as a significant lack of skills or other socioeconomic challenges. At this time, it appears Waukegan is at or near full employment for everyone who is seeking and able to be employed.

12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0%

5.6% 4.8%

4.3%

3.3%

2.0% 0.0%

Source: ESRI Business Analyst Waukegan Today | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Summary

Population

Housing

Economy & Education

Waukegan suffered significant employment and population fluctuations as manufacturing employment across the United States was being restructured and increasingly automated. Despite these challenges, the City has continued to grow its population due to a significant increase in its Hispanic population that is younger and less skilled in general. But the increased Hispanic population diversity may be Waukegan’s contributor for future economic growth and vitality. The varied population brings a diverse culture and makes Waukegan a much more dynamic and interesting place to live, work, and recreate. This is especially true when compared to the other bedroom communities in Lake County that tend to be more mono-cultured and less vibrant overall.

Waukegan will continue to increase its population, but this growth will be spread unevenly throughout the City with some neighborhoods likely to lose population in the next five years. Downtown Waukegan and its surrounding neighborhoods appear to be in position to experience some population and household growth in the near term. Overall the population changes appear to be more positive than negative, and the increased Hispanic population tends to be very entrepreneurial, which is an advantage in the near and long-term for Waukegan. While there are challenges with a younger population, the economic upside for the City is substantial as this younger generation matures and ages in Waukegan.

Waukegan housing is valued lower than the Chicago region and Lake County overall. There are challenges of affordability especially in and around neighborhoods where there are likely older homes and the housing renovation costs will be higher. With lower housing values, there is an opportunity to bring in additional younger homebuyers and first-time homebuyers that cannot afford the higher priced homes in Lake County. It would be beneficial to determine if the existing housing types are the appropriate type and form for young families and future residents.

Waukegan lags Lake County, the Chicago region, and the nation regarding college degreed adults. This tends to keep incomes lower overall. While the unemployment rate is low, at or near full employment, median household income continues to be well below the rest of Lake County and the Chicago Region. As the City is able to continue and expand its and its educational partners’ efforts to “upskill” working adults with college degrees or advanced training, this will make it more likely that the City is able to attract and retain households with higher skill levels within the City.

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3 Land Use & Current Zoning Land use patterns play a significant role in shaping the physical character of Waukegan. The City is guided by its policy documents, such as the Comprehensive Plan and the Zoning Ordinance. The Planning and Zoning Commission and the City Council enforce and interpret these policies. This chapter will examine the existing land use pattern and how the current Zoning Ordinance impacts land use. This summary will identify issues and opportunities, and organize them in suggested character areas that will structure the Comprehensive Plan contents.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Land Use & Current Zoning


Existing Land Use Existing Land Use Patterns Existing land uses in Waukegan were documented using the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning’s (CMAP’s) 2013 Land Use Inventory data. Spotchecks, involving comparing the data and Google Earth imagery, were conducted to update the data where needed. The accompanying map identifies existing land use for every parcel within the City of Waukegan. Every parcel has been categorized into one of the 16 land use designations that follow.

Existing Land Use Designations

Single-Family Detached

Multi-Family

Regional Commercial

Office

This consists of single-family detached homes. This is currently the predominant land use within the City of Waukegan. Lot sizes and housing characteristics vary across different neighborhoods.

Multi-family residential areas include apartment buildings where units share a common entrance or hallway. This also includes single-family detached that have been divided to house multiple households. There is a concentration of the latter in the neighborhoods in and around the South Sheridan neighborhood. This suggests these homes transitioned from owner-occupied to renter-occupied housing.

Regional commercial uses are larger in scale than commercial uses and tend to serve a larger, regional customer base. They are typically big-box retail developments and are generally located along major transportation corridors.

Office uses typically include professional services, employment, offices, and medical offices. They can accommodate accessory commercial uses, such as restaurant, service, or other convenience services that are geared toward serving the office tenants. They mostly consist of stand alone office and medical office buildings.

Single-Family Attached This land use consists of townhomes and duplexes. The units are horizontally connected but have separate entrances from the public street and sidewalks. This land use is mostly concentrated at the City’s western fringes and east of the Greenbelt Forest Preserve and the Larsen Nature Preserve.

Agriculture Agriculture areas include largersized lots used primarily for raising crops and/or livestock. These properties may include residences and farm-related structures. This land use is concentrated in the City’s southwestern area.

Land Use & Current Zoning | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

Commercial Commercial uses include general retail, dining, and services that are tailored to the local customer base. This land use is spread throughout the City and is concentrated along major commercial corridors/ nodes. Outside of these areas lies limited neighborhood-scaled commercial uses, catering to local residents rather than the citywide customer base.

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Mixed-Use The mixed-use land use involves multiple land uses that coexist within a property. Groundfloor uses typically include retail, offices, restaurants, and services, whereas upperfloors are usually dedicated to apartments and offices. Mixed-use is mostly found in Downtown Waukegan and features traditional architectural forms.

Industrial The industrial land use includes smaller-scale manufacturing and warehousing operations that have a square footage of less than 100,000.

Industrial 100K+SF Includes industrial uses where the total building size exceeds 100,000 SF. Specific industrial uses include the NRG Waukegan Generating Station, Amazon, VisualPak, manufacturing/processing, warehousing/distribution, and establishments with a mix of office space and industrial operations. 29


Institutional

Park/Open Space

Forest Preserve

Transportation/Utilities

Vacant

Institutional uses include a broad range of public and semiprivate facilities. These facilities are community institutions and facilities that define and contribute to Waukegan’s quality of life. These institutions can include schools, government buildings/facilities, and medical facilities. Semi-private Facilities that serve specific populations include non-profits and social service agencies. These facilities can be integrated into other land use categories as they are generally small in scale and serve their surrounding neighborhoods.

This land use category consists of the public parks and open space. They accommodate both active and passive recreation and, like institutional uses, contribute to Waukegan’s quality of life. These spaces also include pedestrian trails, athletic fields, golf courses, playground, neighborhood parks, the beach, as well as natural areas and features, such as the Waukegan ravines, woodlands, prairies, and the Waukegan Dunes.

The existing forest preserves are owned and managed by the Lake County Forest Preserves. They are larger in scale than Park District owned parks, and are considered regional destinations. The Park District’s Sports Complex is also a regional (or beyond) destination. West of the City of Waukegan’s boundaries lies the Des Plaines River Trail, which is a 31.4-mile all-season trail that intersects multiple communities and accommodates a variety of activities throughout the year.

This land use designation includes public transportation and utility facilities. They vary in physical scale and scale of operations, and they are necessary infrastructure components of the City of Waukegan. Examples of transportation/utility uses include the Waukegan Water Plant, Waukegan Metra Station, Waukegan National Airport, North Shore Water Reclamation District’s sewage treatment plant, and power substations and lines. These uses are most likely to remain and continue to serve Waukegan’s residents long-term.

This land use designation includes currently vacant buildings and/or lots within the City of Waukegan. They present opportunities for infill development. Some of the larger-sized vacant lots along Waukegan’s lakefront are designated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as Superfund Sites. The City of Waukegan has been and will continue to work with various agencies at the county, state, and federal level to comply with EPA’s regulation for remediating the Superfund Sites for future redevelopment, though cleanup is nearly completion on the Cityowned sites.

State Park This land use designation only includes the 4,160-acre Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park. This is owned and managed by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources through the Illinois State Parks, Great Parks Initiative. This is a regional destination and accommodates a wide variety of recreational activities and is located outside of Waukegan (though adjacent).

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Parking This land use designation accounts for existing parking facilities, including both parking garages and surface parking lots. They are mostly located within the Downtown-Lakefront area. Parking facilities belonging to an adjacent land use are integrated to that land use.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Land Use & Current Zoning


EXISTING LAND USE PATTERN

VILLAGE OF WADSWORTH

VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

Sedge Meadow Forest Preserve

W YORKHOUSE RD

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

Legend

N SH ERI DA

CHESTNUT ST

E GREENWOOD AVE KEITH AVE

21

WEST ST

MONROE ST JULIAN ST

S MCALISTER AVE

S LEWIS AVE

S JACKSON ST

9TH ST 10TH ST

DU GD AL ER D

S WAUKEGAN RD

HANLON RD

S RIVER RD

MIL WA UKE EA VE

N GENESSE ST

N M.L.K. JR. AVE

BAY RD

MCGAW RD

8TH ST

137

14TH ST

HWY SKOKIE

LAKE ST

AY LLW TO TE TA IS TR

W WATER ST

Greenbelt Forest Preserve

S GREEN

94

North Beach Park

BUFF ST

S GENESE E ST

131

CATALPA ST MELROSE AVE

FULTON AVE

BELVIDERE RD

120

WASHINGTON ST

ORCHARD AVE

CITY OF PARK CITY

W

N WEST ST

N COUNTY ST

N SHERIDAN RD

Lake Carina Forest Preserve

CEDAR AVE

W CLAYTON ST

OPLAINE RD

GRAND AVE

KELLER AVE

DILGER AVE

WASHINGTON AVE

COUNTY ST

BROOKSIDE AVE

MICHIGAN

GRAND AVE

LAKE

DOWNTOWN INSET

RIDGELAND AVE NORTH AVE

GRANDVILLE AVE

N SHERIDAN RD

132

AMSTUTZ EX PY

137

W GLEN FLORA AVE

PERSHING RD

Larsen Nature Preserve

WESTERN AVE

GO LF RD

N LEWIS AVE

N MCAREE RD

VILLAGE OF GURNEE

DELAWARE RD

SUNSET AVE

Glen Flora Country Club

N RD

BLANCHARD RD

NEW YORK ST

WALL AVE

POPLAR ST

Data Source: CMAP 2013 Land Use Inventory

Lyons Woods Forest Preserve

Bonnie Brook Golf Course

N JACKSON ST

GRA ND A VE

41

N DELANY RD

VILLAGE OF OLD MILL CREEK

137

VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

METROPOLITAN AVE

94

N GRE EN BA Y

RD

Waukegan Savanna Forest Preserve 131

N RIVERSIDE DR

Office Industrial Industrial 100K+ S.F. Religious Institutional Park/Open Space Forest Preserve State Park Transportation/Utilities Parking Vacant

Y HW KIE SKO

Waukegan Municipal Boundary Waukegan Metra Station Agriculture Single-Family Detached Single-Family Attached Multi-Family Commercial Regional Commercial Mixed-Use

43

41 RD ERE VID BEL

Independence Grove Forest Preserve

22ND ST

CITY OF NORTH CHICAGO

21

North

0

0.25

0.5

1

Mile

Land Use & Current Zoning | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

VILLAGE OF GREEN OAKS 137

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31


RD

GO LF RD

43

14TH ST

S JACKSON ST

S LEWIS AVE 10TH ST

137

SS HER IDA NR D

131

S WAUKEGAN RD

94

BELVIDERE RD

WASHINGTON AVE

DU GD AL ER D

120

W

Woodland Community Consolidated School District 50

KELLER AVE

BROOKSIDE AVE

NORTH AVE

GRAND AVE

N JACKSON ST

132

MICHIGAN

137

W GLEN FLORA AVE

21

Libertyville School District 70

Waukegan Community Unit School District 60

LAKE

N LEWIS AVE

N MCAREE RD

GRA ND A VE

SUNSET AVE

N DELANY RD

41

137

N SHERIDAN RD

N GRE EN BA Y

94

The southwestern area of Waukegan, between the Independence Grove Forest Preserve and the Fountain Square area, was annexed into Waukegan in the 1970s-80s. This area is within proximity to Interstate 94. Development in this area mostly consists of suburban subdivisions of singlefamily detached homes.

W YORKHOUSE RD

131

D N BAY R S GREE

32

Gurnee School District 56

HWY SKOKIE

Residents living in the western neighborhoods of Waukegan tend to associate themselves with adjacent communities, such as Gurnee and Libertyville. This is because they are within these school districts, and their addresses are in the post office delivery zones for the neighborhoing communities, carrying the associated ZIP codes.These residents, however, receive community and utility services from Waukegan.

Beach Park Community Consolidated School District 3

OPLAINE RD

Western Neighborhoods

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICTS

S RIVER RD

Issues and opportunities are identified, by districts or neighborhoods, within the City of Waukegan. They are based on field reconnaissance around the City, input gathered from the public outreach process, and examination of the City’s existing land use patterns and past plans and studies. This will establish the foundation for policy recommendations, in terms of land use and development, for the Comprehensive Plan.

Additionally, they tend not to visit Waukegan’s downtown often due to their perception that the downtown area is unsafe, and there is a lack of easy transportation access to downtown. Given that there are already convenient east-west thoroughfares established in Waukegan.

MIL WA UKE EA VE

Issues & Opportunities

North Chicago School District 187

41 21

Oak Grove School District 68

137

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Land Use & Current Zoning


Downtown Waukegan

HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICTS

Zion-Benton Township High School District 126

RD

N LEWIS AVE

N MCAREE RD

GO LF RD

10TH ST 14TH ST

LAKE

S JACKSON ST

NORTH AVE

137

SS HER IDA NR D

W

S WAUKEGAN RD

D N BAY R S GREE

43

HWY SKOKIE

S RIVER RD

131

DU GD AL ER D

BELVIDERE RD 120

94

WASHINGTON AVE

S LEWIS AVE

OPLAINE RD

KELLER AVE

BROOKSIDE AVE

N JACKSON ST

132

GRAND AVE

MIL WA UKE EA VE

137

W GLEN FLORA AVE

21

21

Waukegan Community Unit School District 60

MICHIGAN

SUNSET AVE

N DELANY RD

41

137

N SHERIDAN RD

N GRE EN BA Y

94

GRA ND A VE

W YORKHOUSE RD

131

Warren Township High School District 121

Downtown Waukegan mostly consists of low- and mid-rise commercial and mixed-use buildings, in addition to City and Lake County government offices. The City has worked with various organizations to host community-wide events, such as the monthly ArtWauk, in downtown Waukegan to encourage people to experience more time in Downtown Waukegan. Downtown Waukegan still has opportunities to promote a consistent daytime and nighttime population in the downtown area.

Vacant lots are prevalent in certain parts of Downtown Waukegan and are opportunities for infill development. Though surface parking lots are necessary development features to enable people to drive into Downtown Waukegan from other parts of the community, they present opportunities for infill developments. Given Waukegan’s proximity to large scale companies, such as United Converyor, VisualPak, Peer Bearing, AbbVie Pharmaceuticals, and Abbott Laboratories, there is potential for additionall development that would attract visiting employees to stay in downtown Waukegan.

North Chicago 41 School District 187

Community High School District 128

137

Land Use & Current Zoning | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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137 94

S WAUKEGAN RD

S RIVER RD

94

43

10TH ST 14TH ST

5

137

4

MICHIGAN

North Shore Gas South Plant

3

LAKE

NORTH AVE

N SHERIDAN RD

137

WASHINGTON AVE

S JACKSON ST

OPLAINE RD

BELVIDERE RD 131

North Shore Gas North Plant

BROOKSIDE AVE KELLER AVE

Outboard Marine Corp

2

SS HER IDA NR D

21

GO LF RD

N JACKSON ST

W GLEN FLORA AVE GRAND AVE

120

1

S LEWIS AVE

132

N LEWIS AVE

N MCAREE RD

SUNSET AVE

N DELANY RD

GRA ND A VE

Johns-Manville Corporation Site

Yeoman Creek Landfill

41

D N BAY R S GREE

34

W YORKHOUSE RD

131

HWY SKOKIE

The City’s Metra Station is located within the lakefront area, where Washington Street passes over the Amstutz Expressway. Though removing the all or part of Amstutz Expressway is warranted, it would require substantial investment.

Wayfinding signage can be useful to direct travelers to the Metra Station and the Waukegan Harbor. Surface parking lots are present surrounding the Waukegan Harbor, and there is an opportunity to conduct a parking analysis to determine whether there is appropriate capacity for parking. Underutilized parking lots can accommodate temporary festival spaces with views to the lakefront and its close proximity to downtown.

EPA SUPERFUND SITES

Y RD N GREEN BA

Waukegan’s lakefront area used to be home to a significant concentration of industrial and utility establishments. Over the years, the area has begun to transition from industry into a multi-use and recreational destination in the City. A constraint to this transition is the remediation of former industrial sites. The lakefront area is home to four Superfund Sites designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The City has been and will continue to partner with various agencies and stakeholders at the local, county, state, and federal level to achieve rememdiation goals. The process is long-term and the City-owned sites are nearing completion, better ensure the sites are safe for future development. It is important for future redevelopment to be sensitive to the impact on the viewshed towards Lake Michigan from downtown and adjacent neighborhoods.

Building on the recommendations from the 2000 Waukegan Intermodal Transit Facility Study, there are opportunities to work with the Regional Transportation Administration and Illinois Department of Transportation to extend Washington Street over the railroad tracks to connect to the Metra station, which would be rebuilt as an intermodal facility. This would reduce the barrier between downtown Waukegan and the lakefront and to promote easier access to the Metra Station and the harbor.

MIL WA UKE EA VE

Lakefront Area

41 21

137

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Land Use & Current Zoning


Land Use & Current Zoning | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

EAST-WEST CORRIDORS

131 137

Golf Road

94 41

Sunset Avenue 137

Grand Avenue 132

MICHIGAN

The City’s east-west corridors, including Belvidere Road, Washington Street, and Grand Avenue, are vital transportation thoroughfares that provide Waukegan residents and visitors access to the regional transportation network and neighborhoods in Waukegan. Though the corridors efficiently move traffic east-west through the City of Waukegan, there are opportunities to improve the corridors’ aesthetics, are present. Programs to assist businesses along the corridor to improve their façades and signage would be beneficial. Past planning efforts indicate that it is useful to brand each corridor as a unique place through wayfinding, gateway signage, and façade improvement. Roadway reconfiguration, pedestrian amenities, and bicycle infrastructure may be possible ways to differentiate one corridor from another. Doing so provides a more positive experience for those who are entering Waukegan from the regional transportation network, encouraging more investment into the City.

Depending on the regional and national market trends, there may be an opportunity to concentrate commercial and office uses at specific nodes rather than along the whole corridor. This would require the City to conduct a comprehensive study of its commercial business market to see if there is an appropriate land supply for commercial and office uses.

21

Washington Street 137

120

131

LAKE

East-West Corridors

Belvidere Road

94

43 41 21

137

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Fountain Square

Research / Light Industrial District

South Sheridan Neighborhood

Fountain Square is located at the southwest of the intersection of Skokie Highway (U.S. Highway 41) and Belvidere Road. This area consists of national chain retailers, including Walmart, several hotels, and numerous restaurants, as well as multi-family apartments. If a gaming license was awarded by the State of Illinois, it is expected that the casino development would be built at Fountain Square, which may have significant implications for local and regional traffic volume and economic development. Some existing buildings in Fountain Square are vacant, and they present opportunities for economic development.

To the south lies a substantial light industrial park. Various warehouses, corporate offices, and distribution centers are located here. This area is partially built out, with a small number of vacant lots that are ready for additional commercial development. The area is within proximity of multiple highways and Interstate 94 and generates a significant amount of freight traffic.

The South Sheridan neighborhood is located south of downtown Waukegan and is concentrated along South Sheridan Road and Genesee Street. This neighborhood has transitioned from predominately owner-occupied to mostly renter-occupied housing (about 2/3 of the neighborhood’s housing stock). The Barwell Manor public housing complex is located within the South Sheridan neighborhood, and the Waukegan Housing Authority is working with the U.S. Housing and Urban Developed (USHUD) to plan and create a replacement strategy for this complex to upgrade the housing stock (refer to page 128 in the Appendices for WHA’s memo regarding the Barwell Manor).

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The City adopted the South Sheridan Revitalization Plan in 2016. This plan envisioned the South Sheridan neighborhood as a mixed-use community that addresses the need for affordable housing. It also plans for a connection from the neighborhood to the lakefront. The City currently owns land southeast of the intersection of South Avenue and Sheridan Road and would entertain the property to implement the plan’s vision. The neighborhood, including the catalyst area as identified in the plan, contains a significant number of vacant buildings and lots. This presents opportunities to design and create a largerscale and comprehensive infill development that would better address community needs, such as creating a greater supply of quality and affordable housing units.

Waukegan National Airport The Waukegan National Airport accommodates general aviation and serves as a reliever airport for O’Hare International Airport. As a hub for corporate aviation, the Waukegan National Airport has a substantial number of international arrivals. The airport is currently undergoing a master planning process under the Waukegan National Airport Master Plan to analyze the airport’s capacity and needs. The process has thus far resulted a preferred alternative, of the original ten design alternatives. This alternative plans to convert and extend the existing Runway 5-23 into a parallel taxiway segment, constructing a new primary runway (7,000 feet long), and into a tunnel under Green Bay Road. This design will necessitate purchasing adjacent properties to make room for the runway expansion and relocation of Green Bay Road. The City has working with the Waukegan National Airport and other stakeholders in implementing this vision. Land use impacts are anticipated to be minimal.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Land Use & Current Zoning


A diagram showing the Preferred Alternative design in the Waukegan National Airport Master Plan documents.

Land Use & Current Zoning | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Current Zoning Regulatory controls are municipal ordinances that dictate the use and appearance of properties within the municipal limits. The City’s Zoning Ordinance represents such controls. It is intended to ensure the safety, health, and welfare of the public by reducing land use incompatibilities, reducing hazards, mitigating nuisances, protecting natural resources and features, and promoting a visually attractive environment and positive experience within the City of Waukegan. When used effectively, it can be an instrument to attract new investment and growth.

B2 & B3 Commercial Districts

promote more motorist-oriented development, such as big-box retailers, than B2 does. Building scale and area guidelines for B2 and B3 remain largely the same. Similarities include: •• Dwelling units above the ground floor •• Drive-thru establishments •• 15-feet front yard setback •• Height restriction of 100 feet. Despite their similarities, many commercial buildings were designed to have zero front yard setback. They can be found in various areas, including the Washington Street corridor. Also, B2 includes residential buildings along and near the Washington Street Corridor with some of them being converted to serve commercial or office use.

Western Gateway Redevelopment Overlay District This Overlay District includes the existing Fountain Square area (southwest of the intersection of State Routes 120 and 43). This area is considered as the City’s western gateway, so it is vital for this area to give visitors and residents a positive experience and impression of Waukegan. Fountain Square has opportunities for infill development and economic development, and the Overlay District will be useful to ensure future developments complement the character of Fountain Square.

The predominant commercial zoning districts in Waukegan are B2 – Community Shopping and B3 – General Commercial. Both zoning districts are intended to foster commercial uses that serve the local and regional customer base. The difference is that the latter tends to 38

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This Overlay District complements and supersedes the provisions of the underlying B2 District and, where specified, specific regulations of the City’s Subdivision Ordinance, Sign Ordinance, and Landscape Ordinance. Doing so creates a regulatory environment that would promote comprehensive and quality redevelopment in an underutilized area. In essence, potential purchases or tenants of properties within this district can customize their project’s size and dimensions without incurring delays in the redevelopment review process. The Overlay District has seen some successes with newer developments, such as restaurants and hotels, being constructed and, if a gaming license was award by the State of Illinois, it is expected that the casino development would be built at Fountain Square.

Lakefront Area The lakefront area is primarily zoned as I2 – General Industrial. This zoning district is intended to accommodate industrial uses/activities that would pose minimal nuisances to nearby residential neighborhoods and business districts. This district generally would not allow mixeduse developments, such as buildings with ground-floor retail and upper-floor apartments. Several large parcels along the lakefront present opportunities for redevelopment. As these sites are fully remediate­­d in the future, the City may consider rezoning these parcels into other zoning districts that would be more conducive to the community’s vision of redevelopment type. Authorizing Planned Development can also be an option to enable and incentivize a developer to comprehensively redevelop a larger-sized property while addressing the community’s needs and vision.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Land Use & Current Zoning


South Sheridan The South Sheridan neighborhood has seen some zoning changes over the years. The area east of South Sheridan Road and south of South Avenue was originally zoned as I2 General Industrial but is gradually being rezoned as R6 - General Residential >6,000SF. The rezoning would allow multi-family development and reflects the City’s efforts to implement the vision from the South Sheridan Revitalization Plan. It is likely that remaining parcels that are zoned as I2 - General Industrial in this area would be rezoned to R6 General Residential >6,000SF. in the future.

Other Zoning Districts The following table is from the Existing Conditions Report of CMAP’s Washington Street Corridor Plan. The table describes major zoning districts in Waukegan in terms of: purpose, examples of permitted uses, height restrictions, area regulations, and setbacks.

Table 4.3. Key characteristics of major zoning districts Zoning classification

Purpose

Conservation and Residence Districts Encourage the development of land for "open-space" recreation, preservation of land for agriculture, or preservation of CR Conservation/ natural resources. A secondary Recreation/Agriculture purpose is restricting the use of those areas in Waukegan which are in a flood plain or serve as water retention/re-charge.

R2 Single-Family Residence

Accommodate those single-family developments with moderatesized lots.

R3 Single-Family Residence

Primarily designed to accommodate existing singlefamily neighborhoods in the core of the City, which are characterized by smaller recorded lots than required in the R1 and R2 Districts.

R4 Two-Family Residence

Allow for limited concentrations of duplex (two-family) dwellings in a neighborhood marked by a mixture of one and two-family houses in the areas near the Waukegan central business district.

Page 41 of 77

Height restrictions

Agriculture; Botanical and zoological gardens and arboretums; Forest preserves, wildlife preservations, and ecological sanctuaries; Hiking and bicycle trails; Parks and playgrounds; and Public beaches.

No height limitation

Single-family detached dwellings; Educational institutions; Parks and playgrounds; Religious institutions, including associated residences; Family Community Residences

45 feet maximum

All R2 uses

45 feet maximum

All R2 and R3 uses; Two-family detached dwellings

45 feet maximum

Washington Street Corridor Existing Conditions Report

R6 General Residence

Land Use & Current Zoning | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

Examples of permitted uses

Protect and enhance the character and value of residential areas primarily occupied by varied dwelling types of moderate density (approximately 30 dwelling units per acre), and to accommodate areas planned for new residential development of moderate density.

DRAFT Designed to be mapped only in for Review areas within and immediately

surrounding the Central Business

All R8 uses; Convalescent and nursing homes; Public aquariums; Art galleries; Libraries & museums; Day Care Centers

Single-, two- and multi-family dwellings, attached and detached; Educational institutions; Parks and playgrounds; Recreational/ community centers, non-

45 feet maximum for single-family dwelling or accessory structure

45 feet for

Area regulations**

Setbacks**

Five (5) acres minimum area for agricultural farmsteads

50 feet minimum from any property lines

Single-family detached: 7,200 s.f. minimum area, 60 ft. minimum width

Single-family detached: 25' front, 6' interior side, 20' corner side, 30' rear

Single-family detached: 6,000 s.f. minimum area, 50 ft. minimum width Single-family detached: 6,000 s.f. minimum area, 60 ft. minimum width Two-family detached: 7,200 s.f. minimum area, 60 ft. minimum width Single-family detached, twofamily detached, two-family attached and multi-family: 6,000 s.f. minimum area, 50 ft. minimum width

Single-family detached, twofamily detached,

Single-family detached: 20' front, 6' interior side, 15' corner side, 25' rear

Single- and twofamily detached: 20' front, 6' interior side, 15' corner side, 25' rear

Single- and twofamily detached: 25' front, 6' interior side, 20' corner side, 25' rear Two-family attached and multi-family: 25' front, 10' interior side, 20' corner side, 25' rear Single- and two39 family detached: 25' front, 6' interior side, 20' corner side, 25'


Commercial Business Districts

B1 Neighborhood Convenience

Provide convenience shopping for persons residing in adjacent residential areas, and to permit only such uses as are necessary to satisfy those basic shopping needs which occur daily or frequently and so require shopping facilities in relative proximity to places of residence

Multi-family dwellings, above the ground floor; Retail stores, galleries and studios; Drug stores; Barber shops and beauty supply; Offices, business and professional; Restaurants, not including entertainment or dancing; Medical services and health stores; Small service/ repair; Dry cleaning (offsite), tailor

45 feet maximum

B2 Community Shopping

Serve larger population than Neighborhood Convenience District. Thus, a wider range of uses and structure sizes is permitted for both daily and occasional shopping. This district is generally located astride major commercial arterials.

All B1 uses; Also Automobile accessory stores; Department stores; Drive-thru establishments; Furniture and carpet stores; Garden supply; Libraries, museums; Liquor stores; Medical and dental clinics and laboratories; Schools, Non-vocational; Sporting goods; Taverns; Theatres

100 feet maximum, except by variation procedures

B3 General Commercial

Accommodate those motoristoriented commercial activities, which may be incompatible with the uses encouraged in other business districts; and whose service area is not confined to any one neighborhood or community. The district is generally located within commercial corridors.

All B1 and B2 uses; Also Larger sales showrooms and repairs; Greenhouses; Public storage; Recording and sound studios; Wholesale establishments; Vehicle sales

100 feet maximum, except by variation procedures

Four (4) acres minimum area for planned developments;

Designed primarily accommodate office buildings, civic and governmental structures, and educational and institutional buildings in a mutually compatible environment.

Cultural and civic institutions; Offices, business, professional, and governmental; Recreational and social facilities; Accessory commercial uses

No height limitation

15,000 s.f. minimum area, 100 ft. minimum width

Provides a setting where compatible research, light industrial, business and corporate, and professional offices can be developed in a unified manner; intended for large, "park-like" tracts that are accessible to the interstate system.

Washington CorridorLight Existing Conditions Report Assembly andStreet fabricating; manufacturing /production/finishing; hotel/motel; laundries; medical 60 feet clinics and facilities; offices, maximum, business and professional; Parking except by lots; printing; Laboratories, conditional research and testing; Radio and use permit television stations; Restaurants; procedures Trade schools; Warehousing, storage and distribution; Accessory commercial uses

20,000 s.f. minimum area for planned developments

Four (4) acres minimum area for planned developments;

Front Yard: 15' Corner Side Yard: 15' Side Yard: None required Rear Yard: None required

Front Yard: 15' Corner Side Yard: 15' Side Yard: None required Rear Yard: None required

Front Yard 15' Corner Side Yard 15' Side Yard None required Rear Yard None required

Office Districts

O/I-2 Office/Institutional

Industrial Districts Page 43 of 77

RLI Research and Light Industrial

40,000 s.f. minimum area

Front Yard: 15 ft. Corner Side Yard: 15 ft. Interior Side Yard: 0 ft. Rear Yard: 0 ft.

Front Yard: 30 ft. Corner Side Yard: 30 ft. Interior Side Yard: 10 ft. Rear Yard: 20 ft. Transitional Yards: See ordinance

** See the zoning ordinance for setback and area requirements for transition yards, storage and garage facilities, and other non-primary, permitted uses. In almost all zoning districts, requirements for these uses differ from the primary permitted use.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Land Use & Current Zoning


CURRENT ZONING

VILLAGE OF WADSWORTH

VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

Sedge Meadow Forest Preserve

W YORKHOUSE RD

Lyons Woods Forest Preserve

Bonnie Brook Golf Course

N SH ERI DA

CHESTNUT ST

E GREENWOOD AVE KEITH AVE

21

WEST ST

MONROE ST

S MCALISTER AVE

S JACKSON ST

9TH ST

DU GD AL ER D

10TH ST

W

S WAUKEGAN RD

BAY RD

HANLON RD

S GREEN

MCGAW RD

8TH ST

137

14TH ST

HWY SKOKIE

AY LLW TO TE TA IS TR

Greenbelt Forest Preserve

North Beach Park

BUFF ST

S GENESE E ST

CEDAR AVE

120

94

S RIVER RD

S LEWIS AVE

BELVIDERE RD

131

MIL WA UKE EA VE

ORCHARD AVE

KELLER AVE

CITY OF PARK CITY

CATALPA ST MELROSE AVE

FULTON AVE

Lake Carina Forest Preserve

DILGER AVE

OPLAINE RD

WASHINGTON AVE

COUNTY ST

BROOKSIDE AVE

MICHIGAN

NORTH AVE

GRAND AVE

RIDGELAND AVE N SHERIDAN RD

GRANDVILLE AVE

POPLAR ST

132

AMSTUTZ EX PY

137

W GLEN FLORA AVE

PERSHING RD

Larsen Nature Preserve

WESTERN AVE

GO LF RD

N LEWIS AVE

N MCAREE RD

VILLAGE OF GURNEE

DELAWARE RD

SUNSET AVE

Glen Flora Country Club

N RD

BLANCHARD RD

NEW YORK ST

WALL AVE

N JACKSON ST

GRA ND A VE

41

N DELANY RD

VILLAGE OF OLD MILL CREEK

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park 137

VILLAGE OF BEACH PARK

METROPOLITAN AVE

94

N GRE EN BA Y

RD

Waukegan Savanna Forest Preserve 131

N RIVERSIDE DR

O/I-1 Office / Institutional O/I-2 Office / Institutional R/LI Research / Light Industrial R1 Single-Family Residential >10,000 SF R2 Single-Family Residential >7,200 SF R3 Single-Family Residential >6,000 SF R4 One- and Two-Family Residential >6,000 SF R5 Limited General Residential >6,000 SF R6 General Residential >6,000 SF R7 General Residential >6,000 SF R8 General Residential >6,000 SF

Y HW KIE SKO

Waukegan Municipal Boundary Waukegan Metra Station B1 Neighborhood Convenience B2 Community Shopping B3 General Commercial B4 Central Business B5 Central Service CR Conservation / Recreation ER-1 Estate Residence ER-2 Estate Residence I1 Restricted Industrial I2 General Industrial L1 South Lakefront M-CR Marine-Commercial Recreation

LAKE

Legend

43

41 Independence Grove Forest Preserve

22ND ST

CITY OF NORTH CHICAGO

21

North

0

0.25

0.5

1

Mile

Land Use & Current Zoning | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

VILLAGE OF GREEN OAKS 137

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41


4 Natural Resources & Green Infrastructure This section provides information on the existing natural resources within the City of Waukegan and noteworthy parcels that lie adjacent. This section references existing green space planning that has been completed, coupled with field visits at many representative sites. These areas are often referred to as green infrastructure, land that provides many important functions including water flow regulation/flood control, water purification, groundwater recharge, carbon storage, native flora and fauna, and recreation and ecotourism. Green infrastructure can be broken down into values called ecosystem service values. Recent iterations of a broader effort, the Chicago Wilderness Green Infrastructure Vision (GIV) – Version 2.3 now includes an extensive review and visualization of ecosystem service values for six services within the CMAP 7-county region, including Waukegan and adjacent areas.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


The Chicago Wilderness Green Infrastructure Vision (GIV - refer to page 133 in the appendices for a glossary of abbreviations used in this chapter) is used by planners and decision makers at the local, state, regional, and federal levels to guide existing planning efforts and evaluate conservation and restoration opportunities that support preserving and managing the GIV network. CMAP GIV data layers for land use were used via Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for different parameters and representative samples. Photographs and documentation of specific conditions were conducted by on-the-ground site visits and input to the interactive map. The following is a summary of existing conditions for natural resources and green infrastructure. The five groupings of land types and uses starting with “Water: The Waukegan River, Ravines and Lakefront Harbor”, correlate to Figures 1-5 and build into a sixth map that ties it all together, called “Connections”.

Key Findings •• The City of Waukegan has an elaborate network of ravines that function as critical drainage during heavy storm events, but also have connections to adjacent parks and open space. Ravines drain east to Lake Michigan. The ravine systems could serve as a much-needed east-west pedestrian and bicycle connections. •• Waukegan Park District is a nationally-recognized, awardwinning Park District with an impressive array of regional, state and national awards (waukeganparks.org/awards). The District has demonstrated leadership in finance, management, recreational park projects and restoration and native landscaping. •• While the ravine systems appear to be functioning well for stormwater conveyance, their ecological status is highly degraded. Invasive species dominate the riparian canopy, and the native herbaceous layer has been eliminated as well, due to lack of management. While a more thorough inventory of vegetation and ecology of the ravine systems would provide a

Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

base-condition, this is a universal condition for many of this region’s ravines. Most projects require several seasons of intense management of brushing, herbicide and prescribed fire followed by ongoing annual maintenance. This coupled with equipment access and long-term budget constraints can be challenging. •• Natural areas in and around the City of Waukegan are key assets that the community stands to benefit from an increased emphasis and focus on. By taking on the “working lands” mindset in which open space parcels are viewed as having multiple benefits, including habitat, parks, human connections to nature, storm water, aesthetics, water quality and flood abatement. •• Roosevelt Park is a model example of restoration of the creek, native landscaping, excellent public access and outdoor classroom concepts and signage that could be expanded and replicated elsewhere.

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Existing Conditions A 2018 geographic information systems spatial analysis of 18 categories of Land Use-Land Cover (LULC) for the study area with 6 of sub-types of Open Space categories (CMAP 2014). This table provides the raw data that was used to pare down to the sequential categories:

Land Cover Agriculture Airport Non-Parcel Non-Parcel Open Space Open Space - Construction

Area (Acres)

Percent of total area

1,010

5.64%

530

2.96%

2,463

13.76%

3

0.02%

3,000

16.76%

Open Space - Golf

469

2.62%

Open Space - Recreation

486

2.71%

Open Space - Residential

170

0.95%

3

0.02%

149

0.83%

4,411

24.64%

87

0.49%

Open Space - Trail Rail Residential Stormwater Transportation

38

0.21%

2,996

16.74%

432

2.41%

Vacant

1,577

8.81%

Water

77

0.43%

Urban Utilities

43


Water: The Waukegan River, Ravines & Harbor The Waukegan River watershed is nearly 12 square miles and runs along Lake Michigan until it drains east into it. The Waukegan River was once characterized by marshes, ravines and forests, and is now highly urbanized and subsequently reflects pollutant loading and flooding. The system is hydrologically flashy, meaning runoff occurs rapidly and ravines and creeks go from limited flow or dry to very high flow rates in a short period of time. The Waukegan River is also listed on IEPA’s 303(d) list of impaired waters and does not meet current water quality standards. As land around the Waukegan River became increasingly developed, the river has been channelized and controlled and directed into a large ravine complex. The ravines and bluffs are a nature feature unique to Waukegan, offering a dramatic shift in topography that runs generally east-west from the ancient lake plane dune and swale features that can be seen at Waukegan Beach by viewing Google Earth maps. Ironically, it was these natural features and aesthetic vistas that originally attracted explosive suburban growth around newly created park systems. “Generally, ravines are defined as steep-sided or V-shaped 44

valleys that are larger than gullies but smaller than canyons. They may contain perennial or intermittent streams but are typically formed when moving water incises and erodes a channel into the underlying material. (Illinois Coastal Management Program 2011)”. Ravines currently have hard armoring, retaining walls and stormwater outflows reflect a heavy reliance on gray infrastructure of pipes and concrete to move water away as fast as possible. As this infrastructure ages, erosion is common as are water quality issues, likely phosphorus, nitrogen, high turbidity, chlorides and extreme temperature fluctuations, resulting in non-supportive biological status for habitat. Ravines were identified using GIS and are labelled (Fig 1). Field verification visits documented and photographed existing conditions using Arc Collector and data points were georeferenced (dataset available for more detailed review).

Ravine and stream with exposed pipe infrastructure that runs under Amstutz Expressway

Degraded ravine near George and Archer Avenues, dumping of children’s toys, auto parts and garbage

Signage warning dumpers at a degraded ravine near George and Archer Avenues

Degraded ravine near George and Archer Avenues with illegal dumping

Key Findings •• The Waukegan River once had high quality natural areas and is now highly urbanized with high pollutant loading and flooding, it is also listed on IEPA’s 303(d) list of impaired waters and does not meet current water quality standards.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Figure 1. Water: The Waukegan River, Ravines, Harbor, and Lakefront

Bull Creek

Legend City of Waukegan Ravines Rivers and Water Bodies

Dead River

Harbor Lakefront

Lakefront

Waukegan River Des Plaines River

Harbor

Project Location: Waukegan, IL AES Project #: 18-0049 Mapped by: BCM Last modified: Feb 15, 2019

0 0.25 0.5

Miles 1

17921 W Smith Rd Brodhead, WI 53520

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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45


UN N D A G UKE A W

SOUTH B E AC H

ES

BEA H T R NO

Lakefront & Harbor The City has undertaken a number of planning efforts on the lakefront, highlighting the opportunities that exist there. Redevelopment and revitalization efforts can benefit from Waukegan Harbor being the only deep-water port between Chicago and Milwaukee. There are unique opportunities to kayak, picnic, and fish on the north part of the Lakefront and Harbor and opportunities for recreational boating and pier fishing on the south side of the Harbor. The Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern (AOC) cleanup is multi-faceted with most of the efforts completed and are currently in monitoring phases. In 2013 and 2014, several Beneficial Use Impairments 46

(BUIs) were removed (EPA Online 2018). This dredging of 125,000 yards of sediment, primarily in and around the Sea Horse Drive parcel and the south end of Waukegan Beach was substantial from a cleanup standpoint. Lakefront and Harbor at Waukegan are unique assets to the City and though it has been altered ecologically, a high-quality natural area (and previously mentioned INAI site), is situated immediately to the north, Illinois Beach State Park. Illinois Beach has ecological features and aesthetics could be replicated to the deep-water port at the Harbor to the south.

CH

Key Findings •• Waterfront areas and access to water are unique assets to the community at Waukegan. Tremendous opportunities exist in the future for community water-centric investments. •• Illinois Beach State Park to the north is a key natural area and open space asset. Its landforms, access and use are echoed at Waukegan Dunes.

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Overlooking Lake Michigan at Illinois Beach St Park just north of the Visitor Center.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


Waukegan Harbor Light | Source: Flickr/Christopher Binning

Beach Area Current activities in the project area include beach-related recreation such as swimming, kitesurfing, wind surfing, and sunbathing. There are sand volleyball courts on South Beach. The Stiner Pavilion, located along the northern edge of the harbor channel, provides opportunities for picnicking and cultural activities such as outdoor concerts. There is currently no permanent restroom structure. Porta-potties are in place near South Beach. The beaches are not staffed with lifeguards. Passive recreation such as hiking and biking take place along Sea Horse Drive. Birdwatching and hiking are popular activities in the dune areas between Sea Horse Drive and Lake Michigan. Public parking borders both South and North Beach to the west, supplying approximately several hundred spaces. During summer months, events such as outdoor concerts are held near South Beach. While these areas attract visitors year-round, both South Beach

and North Beach are extremely popular recreation destinations in the months between June and September, with thousands of visitors on some weekends. The three distinct zones within the beach area are Waukegan Dunes (50 acres), North Beach (15 acres) and South Beach (11 acres). According to the USEPA’s Lake Michigan Beaches Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load (TDML) and Implementation Plan of 2013, these areas provide a drainage catchment for Waukegan North Beach and Waukegan Dunes of about 3.5 square miles, containing mostly residential land, roadways, utility/ waste facilities, and parks, with smaller areas of wetlands, golf courses, forest/grassland, and land in commercial/industrial use. The drainage area around South Beach is slightly more than 0.5 square miles and contains vacant land, parks, grassland, wetlands, and utility/waste facilities. This half squaremile area does not drain directly to South Beach, but west to Waukegan Harbor.

Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

South Beach is a southeast-facing embayment flanked by 2 jetties: one facing south called the ‘harbor channel pier’, and the other facing northeast, called Johnson Pier. Johnson Pier was built as a breakwater for wave attenuation and was not intended for pedestrian access.

overtops the seawall into the channel. These natural processes decrease the channel depth, which then requires regular dredging to maintain shipping draft needs.

The beaches are part of a sediment transport cell that moves sediment from the Illinois/Wisconsin border south to Waukegan Harbor. Both beaches are located in the portion of the cell that has conditions favorable for the accumulation of sand, but because South Beach is embayed, it does not receive sand from littoral drift. Sand accretes on the north side of Johnson Pier creating significant sand shoaling, and leaving south beach sand starved. These shoals continue into the federal channel, resulting in the need for continuous maintenance dredging. Another presumed source of sand accretion in the federal channel is wind-blown sand from South Beach’s southern-most section of beach, which

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Inner Harbor To the south and west of the beach areas, on the west side of the Harbor is Siver Park, which is used for a variety of park activities, including a series of festivals each summer that expand on to surrounding vacant properties owned by the Waukegan Port District. The Waukegan Port District is a separate governmental entity from the City of Waukegan, which actively collaborates with the City and community organizations to provide opportunities for the community to utilize the waterfront. The Waukegan Port District Master Plan calls for a greatly enhanced waterfront promenade, linkages to broader trail networks within the City, and to adjacent trail networks to the north and south. In addition, the Waukegan Port District Master Plan proposes to greatly expand Siver Park into a flexible waterfront park capable of supporting much larger festivals and events.

48

Aside from these areas, the remainder of the area between the waterfront and Amstutz Expressway is currently underutilized, manufacturing space, active marine commercial, Akzo Nobel coatings plant, and rail lines. The Waukegan Port District proposes to transform this area into a vibrant waterfront walkable neighborhood that is complementary to the goals of the City’s 2003 Master Plan and the Active Implementation Plan. The goal of the plan is to activate the waterfront with a mix of appropriate commercial, residential, and transitoriented businesses to link downtown Waukegan to the waterfront. The primary barriers between the waterfront and downtown are the Amstutz Expressway and rail lines, as well as the steep grade of the bluff. The Active Implementation Plan proposed removal of the southern portion of the Amstutz Expressway between Grand Avenue and Belvidere Road to greatly create a new linear green space and provide pedestrian overpass connections to bridge the rail barrier.

Waukegan Harbor Waukegan Harbor is an active recreational and working waterfront with occasional commercial shipping. Recent planning efforts on the Waukegan waterfront recognize the value of maintaining commercial shipping and water dependent light industrial uses in Waukegan Harbor. Potential conflicts between commercial shipping and recreational boating are minor and manageable, and have been explored at length in previous planning studies. Great Lakes harbors with a mix of commercial and recreational uses tend to be more vibrant and economically viable, with the commercial traffic supporting job creation, broader support for dredging grant funds, and providing visual interest for the harbor. Visiting large ships are an additional attraction for ship watchers.

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The Waukegan Port District operates a large and successful marina that occupies the south half of the harbor. Major renovations to the southern portion of the marina were very successful, and the renovated areas are 100% occupied. The northern half is slated for renovation in phases based on demand, and the recent introduction of Bay Marine provides an additional boat lift, service, sales, and storage with a focus on large powerboats, which complements Larsen Marine at the north end of the harbor, which has a greater focus on sailboats. In summary, recreational boating activities in Waukegan Harbor are very strong, and the Port District Master Plan and City of Waukegan’s Active Implementation Plan propose a range of improvements to attract more boaters, and make the harbor accessible to everyone regardless of age, income, or physical ability.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Natural Areas While highly urbanized, the City of Waukegan does also have noteworthy natural areas including sites that made the Illinois Natural Areas Inventory (INAI) list. The INAI was a 2007 comprehensive statewide survey that updated 2007 documented unique species and ecosystems at nearly 1100 sites, six of which are in or adjacent to the City, including: Lyons Woods, Oak Grove Botanical Area, Illinois Beach, Waukegan Beach and Ascension Sedge Meadow. The INAI sites highlight a strong regional identity for the City of Waukegan, and considerable exploration in ways to protect, connect, enhance and potentially replicate these natural areas is strongly recommended to the City of Waukegan. Because of access and location, the City stands to gain by enhancements and connections to Waukegan Beach, Waukegan River/Ravine, Bowen Park and Lyons Woods - in coordination with neighboring communities. In addition to the INAI sites, the Waukegan Park District maintains a robust network of parks, some of which feature natural areas (such as Larsen Nature Preserve and Roosevelt Park). Lake County Forest Preserve District (LCFPD) owns and maintains several natural areas for green space, water management, habitat and recreation. INAI sites and LCFPD natural areas are identified and labeled, some of which intersect the City of Waukegan including Independence Grove, Des Plaines River Trail, Waukegan Savanna and Greenbelt Forest Preserve (Fig. 2). The Greenbelt Forest Preserve is described as an “urban oasis” (LCFPD website) and hosts events and activities including a seasonal Farmer’s Market.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


Waukegan Comprehensive Plan

Wadsworth Savanna

Figure 2. Natural Areas and INAI Bull Creek

Legend City of Waukegan

Illinois Beach Dead River

Waukegan Savanna

Rivers and Water Bodies INAI Waukegan Beach Major LCFPD Natural Areas

Lyons Woods Glen Flora Country Club Bowen Park

Waukegan Beach and Dunes

Des Plaines River

Waukegan Municipal Beach Waukegan River

Greenbelt Almond Marsh Project Location: Waukegan, IL AES Project #: 18-0049 Mapped by: BCM Last modified: Feb 15, 2019

Independence Grove

Oak Grove Botanical Area 0 0.2750.55

Miles 1.1

Ascension Sedge Meadow Oak Grove Botanical Area 17921 W Smith Rd Brodhead, WI 53520

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Parks & Open Space The Waukegan Park District maintains 36 parks, primarily for recreation (turf, baseball diamonds, soccer fields, picnic areas, and gardens). Parks are identified and colored separately to distinguish them from the other data layers aggregated as “Open Space” (Fig 3). As many of these parks are small and the map resolution for the study area large, only two of the larger and more prominent ones were individually labelled (Larsen Nature Preserve and Roosevelt Park). These Open Space parcels include Open Space (OS)– Primarily Recreation (>50% combined impervious surface, turf, gardens), OS – Golf Course, OS – Primarily Conservation (“natural state” <50% impervious surface, turf), OS – Non-Public (hunt clubs, private campgrounds), and OS – Trail (trails or greenways). The Parks and Open Space map identifies Waukegan Park District’s parks, INAI sites, water 52

connections, and Open Space with a sub-aggregate category called Potential Open Space. These areas range in use from vacant land, industrial areas and parcels that did not fit well into other categories, making them good prospective options to consider conversion into parks and stormwater via the Green Infrastructure system. Roosevelt Park is a good example of a well-connected park, that is an asset of the adjacent school. The trails, creek, interpretive signage is a perfect outdoor classroom to foster children’s connection to nature. The adjacent Ravine restoration could further support trail connection to the south Lakefront/South Sheridan Rd. via Belvidere or Washington Rd. Connection of underserved neighborhoods (for parks and trails) in the heart of Waukegan to the water to the east should be further explored.

Woodard Park soccer field and mown turf may offer stormwater benefits if retrofitted properly

Mini-Park

Interpretive sign at Roosevelt Park.

NPRA Guidelines & Parks Neighborhood Park

• 0.2 acre per 1,000 population • Serves 1/4-mile radius • Under 5 acres

• 2 acres per 1,000 population • Serves 1/4-mile radius • 5-10 acres in size

• Linked to neighborhood trails and walks • No parking or restroom facilities

• Linked to neighborhood trails and walks • No permanent restrooms

• Area served should be uninterrupted by non-residential roads or physical barriers, easily walkable

• Area served should be uninterrupted by non-residential roads or physical barriers as much as possible

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Boardwalk thru wetlands at Roosevelt Park.

Community Park • 5-8 acres per 1,000 population • Serves up to 3-mile radius, 2 or more neighborhoods • 30-50 acres in size • Linked to regional trails • Permanent restroom facilities and concessions where appropriate • Served by arterials and collectors • Area served may be interrupted by arterial and collector streets

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Figure 3. Parks and Open Space Bull Creek

Legend City of Waukegan Illinois Beach

Rivers and Water Bodies INAI

Dead River

Parks Open Space Potential Open Space

Lyons Woods Bonnie Brook Golf Course Glen Flora Country Club Bowen Park

Larsen Nature Preserve

Des Plaines River Waukegan River Roosevelt Park

Project Location: Waukegan, IL AES Project #: 18-0049 Mapped by: BCM Last modified: Feb 15, 2019

Oak Grove Botanical Area

0 0.25 0.5

Miles 1

Ascension Sedge Meadow Oak Grove Botanical Area 17921 W Smith Rd Brodhead, WI 53520

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Brownfields Brownfields are lands with real or perceived environmental contamination, typically persistent in the soil or water. EPA data layers were reviewed and identified on the map (Fig 4). Some brownfields have been designated Superfund sites, which means hazardous waste contamination identified by EPA as a candidate for cleanup. These sites are placed on a National Priorities List (NPL). Waukegan currently has several Superfund sites: Johns-Manville Corp, North Plant MGP, NSG – North Shore Gas South Plant, OMC – Outboard Marine Corp and Yeoman Creek Landfill (Fig 4). A comprehensive summary of cleanup and timeline is detailed in the Beach Management Plan (Edgewater 2016). For the status on Superfund sites, refer to the USEPA that maintains a website of ownership and status. The City of Waukegan has partnership mechanisms that it can engage in related to brownfields. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) has a dedicated Office of Brownfields Assistance for detection and cleanup in the form of workshops, low interest loans and guidance on cleanup options, regulatory liability and private funding assistance. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) “Mud to Parks” program is another approach. This ~$10M fund is an effort to provide win-win outcomes of government assistance by removing sedimentation from the Illinois River and applying this clean fill to cap identified brownfields so contaminants are not mobilized and 54

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pose a risk to humans or wildlife. All local units of government are eligible. Project outcomes strive to create end uses as habitat and recreational opportunities. Concept plans to renew these sites for open space and development should be explored. A companion data listing of all known brownfield locations for the area including name, latitude/longitude, address, unique parcel ID number is available for additional detail (EPA GIS data layer Online 2018).

Key Findings •• The City of Waukegan has worked hard with the community, industry and EPA on remediation, and cleanup efforts, as it reshapes its narrative from industrial past, revitalization opportunities exist to connect adjacent open space and natural areas.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Figure 4. Brownfields

Legend YEOMAN CREEK LANDFILL

City of Waukegan

JOHNS-MANVILLE CORP.

Rivers and Water Bodies Superfund Sites Brownfields

NORTH PLANT MGP

OUTBOARD MARINE CORP. WAUKEGAN GAS STATION

Des Plaines River

DIAMOND

Waukegan River

FORMER DIAMOND SCRAP YARD

EJ & E PROPERTY WAUKEGAN FORMER FANSTEEL

Project Location: Waukegan, IL AES Project #: 18-0049 Mapped by: BCM Last modified: Feb 15, 2019

LAVIN & SONS VACANT LOT PETERSEN SAND & GRAVEL

FORMER NORTH CHICAGO INN 0

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

17921 W Smith Rd Brodhead, WI 53520

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Stormwater & Green Infrastructure The City of Waukegan gets around 35” of annual average precipitation (Sperling’s Best, Online Nov 2018). Waukegan is highly urbanized and with so much impervious surface in the area, flooding and water quality during substantial storm events is a concern. The previously mentioned Green Infrastructure Vision (GIV) dataset reflects parcels inventoried by CMAP with some potential to tie in to existing stormwater and drainage patterns in Waukegan. This includes the ravines and Advanced Identification Wetlands (ADID), the latter of which are areas identified for suitability to discharge of dredge or fill. ADID wetlands areas are not regulatory in nature, they are part of a planning layer that can help communities with stormwater planning. The 100-year floodplain maps, surface water and ADID wetlands are portrayed on Figure 5. The approach to stormwater 56

management in Waukegan should consider upstream best management practices (BMPs) that promote infiltration coupled with “forebay” type features that can precipitate and settle out pollutants along with potential connections for Stormwater Treatment Trains (STTs) that use uplands for phosphorus treatment and wetlands or biocells for denitrification. A substantive report was developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers recently to model stormwater specific to Waukegan, IL and further limit soil erosion, sedimentation and pollutant loadings (USACE Chicago District 2011). Forward thinking stormwater approaches should review the priority sections in this document for infrastructure outfall retrofits and specific best management practices that would promote infiltration and dampen flood impacts by connecting green infrastructure (parks and open space) with existing gray infrastructure. Waukegan may have to get creative as so much of the community is

developed, exploring retrofit options for a variety of BMPs should be on the table. Starting with FEMA flood maps, looking at perennially flood prone areas via Department of Public Works (DPW) and Engineered Stormwater modeling are also sensible starting points. A good example to Green Infrastructure/ stormwater management with good pedestrian flow and access and native landscaping aesthetics can be found at the Lake County Health Department building located at 3010 Grand Ave, Waukegan, IL.

Green infrastructure at the Lake County Health Department.

Key Findings •• The City of Waukegan has enough open space and underutilized parcels, that there is potential to look at flood storage and water quality impacts by considering Green Infrastructure retrofit projects that promote water infiltration, storage capacity and native landscaping.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Natural Resources


Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Figure 5. Stormwater and Green Infrastructure

Bull Creek

Legend City of Waukegan Rivers and Water Bodies ADID Wetlands Dead River

Stormwater Floodplain100yr

Des Plaines River Waukegan River

Project Location: Waukegan, IL AES Project #: 18-0049 Mapped by: BCM Last modified: Feb 15, 2019

0 0.25 0.5

Miles 1

17921 W Smith Rd Brodhead, WI 53520

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

Natural Resources | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Figure 6. Connections (Summary Map)

Bull Creek

Legend City of Waukegan Illinois Beach

Dead River

Rivers and Water Bodies Ravines Stormwater Floodplain100yr INAI

Lyons Woods

ADID Wetlands Glen Flora Country Club

Parks Open Space

Bowen Park

Des Plaines River Waukegan River

Project Location: Waukegan, IL AES Project #: 18-0049 Mapped by: BCM Last modified: Feb 15, 2019

Oak Grove Botanical Area

0 0.25 0.5

Miles 1

Ascension Sedge Meadow Oak Grove Botanical Area 17921 W Smith Rd Brodhead, WI 53520

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

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5 Transportation & Infrastructure Evaluating the adequacy of Waukeganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation network relies on understanding overall mobility. This section will discuss several key components and analyze the current conditions throughout the community regarding ease of travel, barriers, safety, gaps, linkage to other modes of travel, and connections to land uses. These categories are intended to give an overall picture of the issues and opportunities facing the City of Waukegan and enhancing the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation network that safely and efficiently accommodates all modes of travel.

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


Multi-Modal Network •• The Pace regional bus system provides connections throughout Waukegan and to other suburbs throughout northeastern Illinois. The City currently has 12 Pace bus routes operating within City limits, which provide mobility to a multitude of residents. •• Infrastructure improvements, such as traffic signal, queue jumps, bus shoulder lanes, and intersection improvements along major arterials, such as Green Bay Road or Belvidere Road, would support increased transit access and efficiency. •• Metra provides commuter rail access along the Union Pacific North (UP-N) line that runs along Lake Michigan on the east side of the City with the station located just east of downtown. Waukegan is the third most-northern station with the end of the line in Kenosha Wisconsin.

•• Multiple plans, including the Downtown Lakefront Master Plan and the Waukegan Port District Master Plan, explore opportunities to transform the City’s harbor area into a destination. The supporting transportation network must adequately facilitate these visions. Early resident and stakeholder feedback have shown that there are barriers to accessing the lakefront. •• The City has an average walkability score, with most people viewing the City as car-dependent. Most streets have pedestrian infrastructure, however, many arterial roadways with high traffic volumes can act as barriers with access between them often being difficult due to the expansive roadway network. However, it is of note that most streets within Waukegan have sidewalk on at least one side of the roadway. This is explored more in the “Non-Motorized Travel” section.

Transportation & Infrastructure | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

Connectivity & Access •• The City of Waukegan has many arterial roadways, such as Skokie Highway (US 41), Green Bay Road (IL 131), Belvidere Road (IL 120), Grand Avenue (IL 132), Sheridan Road (IL 137), Washington Street, Sunset Avenue, and Lewis Avenue. Together these provide a foundation for moving automobiles and trucks. Generally, these are roadways with posted speed limits 30 miles per hour or higher and the roadway is designed to move the greatest number of vehicles in the most efficient way possible. •• Most arterials roadways connect to Skokie Highway and I-94, which provide excellent regional access. However, the high number of arterial roadways may lead to limited pedestrian and bicycle access among residential, recreational, and commercial areas.

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•• The Robert McClory Bike Path provides a critical north-south bicycle/pedestrian spine throughout the City with connections to the Lyon Woods Forest Preserve, the Washington High School Campus, and multiple neighborhoods. There is current construction of another path that extends west from the Robert McClory Bike path to Waukegan Savanna. •• There are many parks and recreation areas throughout Waukegan, with access between them often being difficult due to the expansive roadway network. •• Most of the City is accessible through its connected sidewalk network. In some residential neighborhoods, connectivity will be reviewed for pedestrian improvements.

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571

561

Transit Service At its core, a transit system is meant to connect groups of people to things they need to travel to, such as work, recreation, school, and entertainment. Transit services in Waukegan are planned, programmed, implemented, and/or operated by both Pace and Metra. This section summarizes existing services and planned initiatives.

Existing Pace Service

569

573

Multiple routes provide key north-south and east-west transit service to the City of Waukegan. Pace service is summarized in the table on the following page, with average daily ridership numbers from August of 2018.

561 566

562 562

562

569

565

571

573 561 569 565

571

562

572 569

572

563

566 564 568 568

573 564 564 564 564

563

569

Sources: MapBase/Metra:

563

METRASTATIONS METRALINES

PACE BUS ROUTE 561 562 563

Public Transportation

564 565

Comprehensive Plan City of Waukegan, Illinois

566 568

o

569 571 572

1 inch =

573

5,700 Feet Date: 12/18/2018

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572

Drawn By: gnewton

A combination of Pace bus routes and a Metra commuter rail line provides the backbone of transit services throughout the City of Waukegan, as described in the exhibit depicted to the right.

565

As can be seen, average boardings are the highest on Routes 565 (Grand Avenue), 568 (Belvidere), 571 (Zion), and Route 572 (Washington). Generally, the most ridership is seen along the major corridors within the community. The above-mentioned routes also all connect to the Waukegan Metra Station. LCDOT completed the Lake County Transportation Market Analysis in 2012. The study administered a rider survey that reached a total 1,209 riders. According to the analysis, some key findings from the rider survey in Waukegan are as follows: â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ Nearly 70% of respondents were transit dependent riders without ready access to an automobile for their travel.

Project: 5426.900

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


•• Pace riders made frequent transfers. 48% of all respondents transferred at least once to reach their destinations. •• The spatial distribution of origins showed that the need for transfer became more prevalent when origins were located further to the north or south from the east-west axis along Washington Street. •• 56% of transit trips were for homebased other purposes, 32% for home-based work travel, and 12% for non-home based purposes. •• Respondents were satisfied with the existing Pace services. However, they asked for weekend services, improved on-time performance, and higher quality amenities. •• 89% of respondents said they would definitely or likely recommend transit to friends and family. The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) develops a Transit Access Score (http:// arcg.is/1DTLrX) that, “weighs the value of opportunities by the time it takes to access them on transit. It is based on a travel-time weighted opportunity value from each origin to each destination”. According to the RTA, the average Transit Access Score in the City of Waukegan falls somewhere between 5-10, out of 100. The regional average for all seven counties comprising Chicagoland is 38 out of 100. It is important to note that while 5-10 seems low, it is on par with other municipalities within Lake County. One factor that may be driving the score down is the distance between

Existing Pace Service NO. 565 561 562 563 564 568 569 571 572 566 573

ROUTE NAME

AVERAGE RIDERSHIP

Wkday 1059 Sat 840 Sun 374 Wkday 218 Castlecrest via Sat 122 McAree Sun N/A Wkday 236 Gurnee via Sat N/A Sunset Sun N/A Wkday 153 Great Lakes Sat N/A Naval Station Sun N/A Wkday 178 Jackson/14th Sat 125 Sun N/A Wkday 689 Belvidere Sat 369 Sun 296 Wkday 370 Lewis Sat N/A Sun N/A Wkday 549 Zion Sat 338 Sun 266 Wkday 608 Washington Sat 163 Sun N/A Wkday 109 McAree-Keller Sat N/A Sun N/A Wkday 11 Green Bay Sat N/A Road Sun N/A Grand Avenue

SERVICE PROVIDED WEEKDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY X

X

X

X

X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

Source: Pace, Regional Transportation Authority Mapping and Statistics (RTAMS)

Transportation & Infrastructure | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

X

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people, jobs, and transit stop/routes. Moving forward, the planning process should seek to establish the cause of hte low transit access score and prioritize policies that seek to bring people, jobs, and transit closer together. One method of achieving this is Transit Oriented Development (TOD), which incentivizes development near transit hubs. Pace is considering the transformation of the currently underutilized Route 573 (Green Bay Road) into a demand-responsive deviating bus service that incorporates parts of Route 562 (Gurnee via Sunset Avenue). Route 573 would no longer travel east of McAree Road in its northeast section, but instead would travel west along Sunset Avenue and loop down Delany Road, effectively relieving Route 562 from running that portion of its route. It is important to note that this deviating route is also present in LCDOT’s 2040 Transportation Plan. Alternative to traditional fixed-route transit, on-demand transit such as Dial-A-Ride (DAR) services and ADA Paratransit are both options that residents in Waukegan can take advantage of. Generally, these services are geared toward senior and disabled populations. There is a myriad of DAR service destinations within Waukegan, as well as the entire community area being covered by ADA Paratransit service. It important to continue to offer these inclusive transit options so that everyone can access the host of amenities Waukegan has to offer. Moving into the future, option should be explored to increase awareness and marketing surrounding thse services. 63


Existing Metra Commuter Rail Service Metra service in Waukegan is provided via its station located on the east side of downtown along Washington Street. Usage characteristics are presented at the right.

Transit Supportive Infrastructure First mile/last mile connections linking transit service with origins or destinations are key to facilitating easy use of transit, as some transit riders begin and end their trips as a pedestrian or bicyclist. Five of the ten most utilized Pace bus stops in the system are located in the City of Waukegan, with the Sheridan Road/Washington Street stop at the top with average daily boardings and alightings of 2,513 passengers. Both high school routes (Washington Campus and Brookside Campus), along with the Washington Street stops at Victory and County see an appreciable number of passengers, as well. The quality and efficiency of the pedestrian environment is critical to determining mode of travel. To enhance access to transit, 64

Non-Motorized Travel

Existing Metra Service AVG WEEKDAY BOARDING STATION Waukegan

RAIL LINE Union Pacific North (UP-N)

FARE ZONE

2014

2016

H

910

911

PARKING USAGE CAPACITY (% e-use) 438

42%

Source: Metra, Commuter Rail System Boarding/Alighting Counts, 2014, 2016

Metra, Station Parking Capacity/Utilization

STATION Waukegan

RAIL LINE Union Pacific North (UP-N)

DRIVE ALONE

WALK

44%

11%

MODE OF ACCESS % DROP CARPOOL OFF (Driver+Pass) 26%

6%

BUS (Pace)

BIKE

8%

1%

Source: Metra, Modes of Station Access, 2016

transportation projects should support both pedestrians and bicyclists, and as a result, will support the transit customer. The pedestrian system includes sidewalks, street crossings, pedestrian signals, and multiuse trails. On-street bike lanes or off-street bike paths allow bicyclists safer access to the transit stop. Improving the connectivity of these elements with transit services and the varying land uses is critical to improving overall mobility and ease of travel, while decreasing auto dependency. Linking transit, housing, and land use, a focus of CMAP’s

GO TO 2040 is carried forward in the newly approved ON TO 2050. ON TO 2050 continues support of compact, walkable communities that supports transit, improves the health of residents, and promotes a high quality of life. Planning for transit-supportive land uses involves enhancing pedestrian and bike connections to transit, making it easier and safer for employees and residents near transit corridors to walk or bike to rail or bus stations. Pace has published transitsupportive guidelines to foster reliable, efficient, convenient, and accessible transit. The guidelines

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present planning principles and design standards that may be implemented by municipalities, designers, engineers, and others responsible for public rights-of-way and developments served by these rights-of-way. The guidelines are intended to promote a built environment that supports all modes of movement related to transit to create a more effective regional transit service. Furthermore, the RTA’S Access to Transit program is a tool that provides funding for small-scale capital projects to improve access to the regional transit system for pedestrians and bicyclists.

As a mostly established suburban area, the majority of the City’s arterial and collector streets have sidewalks, at least on one side. However, some residential streets do not provide sidewalks on either side of the street. There were several locations that have sidewalk disconnects between neighborhoods and recreational areas. This can be seen as both an opportunity and an issue, as connecting the sidewalks will provide residents with increased multi-modal ability. There are a few designated bike paths in Waukegan, with the Robert McClory Bike Path being the most prominent. This path intersects Waukegan in the north-south direction and runs parallel with Lewis Avenue about a half-mile to the east. The Robert McClory Bike Path links up with the Lyons Woods Forest Preserve Trail about a quarter-mile south of York House Road. The Lyons Woods Trail extends east into the forest preserve and west to Green Bay Road, with plans to continue into Wadsworth.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


•• Lakefront Path: Connects to the Robert McClory Path through 8th Street on the south and runs northeast along Lake Michigan to end up connecting to the Commonwealth Edison ROW that runs parallel to Greenwood Avenue. •• Extended Skokie Valley Bike Path: Extension starts from Rockland Road (IL 176) in Lake Bluff to the south and extends north until about a half-mile south of Sunset Avenue in Waukegan.

•• North Branch Trail Extension: Extension starts from Rockland Road (IL 176) in Lake Bluff to the south and extends north along I-94 to eventually link with the Des Plaines River Trail. It is worth noting the Des Plaines River Trail runs along the Des Plaines River west of the City of Waukegan. This 56 mile long regionally significant trail provides access to communities throughout Lake and Cook counties. There is opportunity to implement new on-street bike routes and more off-street bike routes throughout the City of Waukegan to make connections to this trail. Moving forward, stakeholders and community residents should be discussing how to improve bicycle access to and from neighborhoods and recreational areas.

Grand Illinois Trail

LCDOT Bike Path

Forest Preserve Bike Path

Unpaved

IDNR Bike Path

Paved

Other Bike Path

On Road Bike Lane

Bikeways Comprehensive Plan City of Waukegan, Illinois

1 inch =

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5,700 Feet MapCode:

File: P:\5400-5449\5426.900 Waukegan Comp Plan\GIS\Mapping\5426_900_WaukeganCompPlan\5426_900_WaukeganCompPlan.aprx

•• 14th Street: between the Robert McClory Path and the north-south proposed extended Skokie Valley Bike Path just west of the Green Bay Road & 14th Street intersection.

Drawn By: gnewton

•• Washington Street: West of Green Bay Road to link with the path beginning just east of I-94.

•• East-West Extensions from northern terminus of Proposed Extended Skokie Valley Bike Path: East to Lake Michigan to link with the lakefront path and west to the rail line that runs parallel to Green Bay Road.

Sources: DOT/BikeLakeCounty: LCDOT GIS

According to LCDOT’s 2040 Transportation Plan, the following routes are proposed to provide bike paths:

Date: 12/17/2018

Project:

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Northeastern Illinois Regional Greenways and Trails Plan The officially adopted Northeastern Illinois Greenways and Trails Plan (RGTP) is a long-range, multi-jurisdictional plan which envisions a network of continuous greenway and trail corridors, linked across jurisdictions, providing recreational and transportation opportunities. CMAP coordinates planning for trails and greenways and uses the RGTP to guide funding decisions for the Transportation Alternatives (TAP) program. As it pertains to the City of Waukegan, the highest priorities include the regional trails mentioned above in LCDOT’s 2040 Transportation Plan.

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Existing Roadway Network There are many key travel corridors within the City that are essential to the function and mobility of residents. The eastwest and north-south arterial routes and the supporting collector streets provide access to and from virtually every part of the community. The roadway system is laid out in a grid-like manner with most east-west arterial routes providing access to each north-south arterial route. Speed limits are generally 25 miles per hour (mph) within most residential portions of the community, while most arterials and collectors have speed limits of 30-45 mph.

The Tri-State (I-94) and the Skokie Highway (US 41) are routed along or just outside the western borders of Waukegan which provides regional mobility between the City of Chicago, the North/Northwest Suburbs of Chicago and beyond. Waukegan’s connected roadway system should be seen as an opportunity for growth, however, as current and projected traffic volume numbers are explained in the following sections, the system may run into capacity issues.

Functional Classification

Most major representative streets include:

The roadways within the City are classified according to the character of service they are based on. This functional classification process recognizes a hierarchy of roadways and the fact that they do not function independently, but as a systemwide supportive network. Functional classification is often used as a measuring tool for roadway maintenance and snow plowing.

Interstate

A hierarchy classifications as defined by the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT).

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•• I-94

Expressway •• Amstutz Expressway

Other Principal Arterial •• Skokie Highway (US 41) •• Grand Avenue (IL 132) •• Sheridan Road (IL 137) – North of Garwood Avenue and South of Genesee Street •• Belvidere Road (IL 120) – West of Skokie Highway

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


Functional Class Interstate Freeway or Expressway Other Principal Arterial

Roadway Functional Classification Comprehensive Plan City of Waukegan, Illinois

o

Minor Arterial Major Collector Minor Collector Local Road or Street

1 inch =

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•• Keller Avenue / McAree Road •• York House Road •• Jackson Street – North of Glen Flora Avenue •• Glen Flora Avenue – West of Lewis Avenue •• Northwestern Avenue •• North Avenue / West Street •• County Street •• Genesee Street – North of Belvidere Road and South of Grand Avenue •• Pershing Road •• Dugdale Road •• 10th Street •• McAlister Avenue •• Greenleaf Avenue / Northpoint Boulevard / Lakehurst Road

Drawn By: gnewton

•• Belvidere Road (IL 120) – East of Skokie Highway •• Green Bay Road (IL 131) •• Waukegan Road (IL 43) •• Washington Street •• Lewis Avenue •• Sunset Avenue / Golf Road •• Wadsworth Road (limited) •• Jackson Street – South of Glen Flora Avenue •• Glen Flora Avenue – East of Lewis Avenue •• Beach Road (limited) •• Delany Road •• 14th Street / Casimer Pulaski Drive (limited)

Major and Minor Collectors

Sources: AdministrativeData/FunctionalClass:

Minor Arterial

Project: 5426.900

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•• I-94 (Edens Expressway) Class 2 Route: This is a major roadway, and it is approved for load widths of 8’6 or less. Trucks may be longer on Class 2 routes, but they may not have a base greater than 55 feet. •• Skokie Highway •• Green Bay Road: North of Belvidere Road and South of Grand Avenue •• Belvidere Road: West of Green Bay Road •• Grand Avenue: West of Green Bay Road •• Washington Street: West of Green Bay Road and East of Skokie Highway 68

Class 3 Route: This is a local road, and the maximum allowable load width is 8’0. Also, the wheel base may not be greater than 55 feet. •• No roadways within Waukegan As can be seen, the major Class 1 truck route is along the Edens Expressway (I-94). I-94 has about 22,950 trucks daily around its interchange with Belvidere Road. The Skokie Highway, which is a Class 2 truck route, serves as the City’s main north/ south truck access route. Belvidere Road, Washington Street, and Grand Avenue all connect with both the Skokie Highway and Green Bay Road, providing flexible access for freight traffic.

SM Posted Structures

Designated Truck Routes

LM Posted Structures

Comprehensive Plan City of Waukegan, Illinois

Class I

o

Class II Class III

1 inch =

Non-Designated Local Preferred

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Class 1 Route: This is an interstate type of route, and it is approved for load widths of 8’6 or less.

Drawn By: gnewton

The City of Waukegan is part of a well-defined truck route plan that tends to direct heavy vehicles along roads outside of most downtowns and the many residential neighborhoods throughout Chicagoland and the state. Illinois has three classes of routes, and truck drivers should be aware of how speed and weight limits may vary on these roads.

•• Sheridan Road: North of Golf Road •• Sunset Avenue: West of Northwestern Avenue •• Delany Road •• Northwestern Avenue •• York House Road: East of Green Bay Road and West of McAree Road •• Casimer Pulaski Drive: West of Green Bay Road and East of Waukegan Road

Sources: GAI/gai_designatedtruckroutes:

Truck Routes

Project: 5426.900

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


Traffic Volumes Traffic volume is a key factor that helps define roadway operations. Volume measurements are taken in a number of ways, one standard being Average Daily Traffic (ADT) Counts. Available IDOT published volume data was obtained for roads and streets throughout the City. The table depicted on page 68 summarizes the ADT data. The highest ADT volumes are found on I-94 at about 121,000 vehicles per day (vpd) and along Green Bay Road, Grand Avenue, Washington Street, and Belvidere Road.

In order to assist in examining the future traffic impacts on Waukegan’s roadway network, the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) has been contacted to provide 2050 traffic projections throughout the community. As can be seen on the table, most roadways are expected to experience appreciable growth. Average growth for all the roadways analyzed is roughly 30%. The following planned improvements by LCDOT, IDOT, and the City of Waukegan will help address the projected growth.

Transportation & Infrastructure | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

IDOT (FY 2019-2024) •• Sheridan Road – Resurfacing south of Belvidere Road and north of Golf Road and Greenwood Avenue •• Amstutz Expressway – Resurfacing •• Grand Avenue – Resurfacing from Green Bay Road east to the Amstutz Expressway •• Green Bay Road – Resurfacing from Grand Avenue south into North Chicago •• Belvidere Road – Resurfacing from Knight Ave east to Market Street/ Pershing Road

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•• Waukegan Road – Resurfacing from US 41 south to Casimer Pulaski Drive •• Skokie Highway – Resurfacing from Belvidere Road north to Dorchester Avenue •• Washington Street Bridge - New Bridge Deck over Union Pacific Railroad Tracks about 0.1 miles east of US 41 •• Belvidere Road & O’Plaine Road Traffic Signal modifications and improvements

LCDOT (FY 2018-2023) •• Belvidere Road – Widening east of US 41 to Green Bay Road •• 14th Street – Reconstruction and signal interconnect from Sheridan road west to Green Bay Road •• Lewis Avenue – Reconstruction south of Belvidere Road to 14th Street (Preliminary) •• York House Road – Resurfacing east of Lewis Avenue to Sheridan Road •• Wadsworth Road – Resurfacing from Sheridan Road west into Wadsworth •• Lewis Avenue & Wadsworth Road intersection improvements

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Traffic Count Summary & Projections Waukegan, IL

LCDOT & IDOT (Planned 2040) •• Green Bay Road – Widening north from Sunset Avenue into Wadsworth •• Grand Avenue – Widening from Skokie Highway to Green Bay Road •• Skokie Highway – Widening from Buckley Road in North Chicago to the Riverside Drive signal •• Skokie Highway – Intersection/Interchange improvements with Grand Avenue and Delany Road •• Casimer Pulaski Drive – Widening from Waukegan Road east to Green Bay Road •• Casimer Pulaski Drive – Extension from Waukegan Road west to O’Plaine Road

City of Waukegan (CIP FY2019-2023) •• Pavement – $35 Million •• Alleys - $7.5 Million •• Sidewalks - $10 Million •• Street Lights, Signs, & Signals - $7.5 Million

Road & Location 1. Green Bay Road (IL 131) a) North of Belvidere Road b) North of Grand Avenue c) North of Sunset Avenue d) North of York House Road

Existing Average Daily Traffic (ADT) All Vehicles Trucks

% Increase All Vehicles

Year 2050 ADT All Vehicles Trucks

23,800 27,400 20,800 16,300

1,625 1,700 2,125 1,750

30,100 33,000 37,000 27,500

1,975 2,465 3,500 3,080

26% 20% 78% 69%

2. Lewis Avenue a) North of Belvidere Road b) North of Grand Avenue c) North of Sunset Avenue/Golf Road d) North of York House Road

10,500 15,000 18,300 17,000

‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

13,200 19,000 24,000 23,500

‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

26% 27% 31% 38%

3. Sheridan Road (IL 137) a) South of Belvidere Road b) North of Belvidere Road c) Amstutz Expressway d) North of Golf Road

15,800 12,000 11,800 18,500

650 ‐ 520 1,000

21,900 13,800 15,100 23,300

850 ‐ 690 1,240

39% 15% 28% 26%

4. York House Road a) West of Green Bay Road b) West of Lewis Avenue c) West of Sheridan Road

3,650 12,200 7,550

‐ ‐ ‐

5,300 15,300 10,800

‐ ‐ ‐

45% 25% 43%

5. Sunset Avenue / Golf Road a) West of Green Bay Road b) West of Lewis Avenue c) West of Sheridan Road

14,800 14,000 12,000

‐ ‐ ‐

22,800 16,100 15,100

‐ ‐ ‐

54% 15% 26%

6. Grand Avenue  a) West of Green Bay Road b) West of Lewis Avenue c) West of Sheridan Road

28,500 20,400 12,700

695 ‐ ‐

31,400 25,500 16,800

700 ‐ ‐

10% 25% 32%

7. Washington Street a) West of Green Bay Road b) Near Lewis Avenue c) Near Downtown

27,900 21,400 5,150

‐ ‐ ‐

36,500 23,600 4,400

‐ ‐ ‐

31% 10% ‐15%

8. Belvidere Road a) West of Skokie Highway (US 41) b) West of Green Bay Road c) West of Lewis Avenue d) West of Sheridan Road

38,800 27,900 22,600 7,950

3,800 2,200 ‐ ‐

47,600 33,000 31,800 11,400

5,135 2,710 ‐ ‐

23% 18% 41% 43%

121,400

22,950

148,000

37,930

22%

9. I‐94 a) South of Belvidere Road Sources: 1. IDOT ADT 2. CMAP 2050 Projections

70

DRAFT for Review

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


Crash History Safety is a key transportation component that should be addressed within the Comprehensive Plan for all modes of travel. The IDOT database was obtained for accident history over the latest three available years, from 2014-2016. The IDOT Crash Data Exhibit summarizes the crash incident density throughout Waukegan. As anticipated, the most crashes tended to occur along the roads that have the higher ADT volumes, such as Grand Avenue, Washington Street, and Belvidere Road.

The reason these roadways experience higher incidents of crashes compared to the rest of the roadway network is due to the higher volume of vehicles coupled with the amount of intersecting roadways. With traffic turning onto and off the road constantly, this leads to a higher potential for crashes. Similar features are found on Green Bay Road, Lewis Avenue, and Sheridan Road which also have many entrance driveways along the road, leading to a higher amount of turning traffic. The exhibit also separates out the crashes involving pedestrians, cyclists, and fatalities. This is an indicator that current conditions may be unsafe in those areas and enhancements to safety should be examined moving forward.

Transportation & Infrastructure | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

DRAFT for Review

71


Roadway Jurisdiction Roadway jurisdiction is an important factor with regard to roadway function and maintenance. Some of the major roadways serving the City are under the jurisdiction of IDOT and LCDOT. The primary routes under IDOT jurisdiction are the Tri-State Tollway (I94), Waukegan Road, Skokie Highway (US-41), Green Bay Road, Belvidere Road, Amstutz Expressway, and Sheridan Road south of Belvidere Road and north of Greenwood Avenue.

Parks & Recreation Facilities There are over 50 parks and recreation facilities located throughout Waukegan. The Waukegan Park District provides an interactive map on their website detailing the location and name of each facility. They are also displayed on the Public Facilities Exhibit. Promoting safe and efficient access to and from each facility should be a priority for stakeholders and the community.

Additionally, York House Road, Wadsworth Road, Washington Street (west of Green Bay Road and east of Skokie Highway), and Lewis Avenue (excluding between Glen Flora Avenue and Sunset Avenue) are under LCDOT jurisdiction. The rest of the roadways are under the jurisdiction of the City of Waukegan. With major roads outside of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jurisdiction, its ability to make improvements, control access, or unify roadway character is a challenge and requires cooperation and coordination between agencies.

72

DRAFT for Review

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


Village Hall

•• Waukegan High School Washington Campus •• Robert Abbott Middle School •• Miguel Juarez Middle School •• Hyde Park Elementary School •• Daniel Webster Middle School •• Whittier Elementary School •• Glen Flora Elementary School •• Learn Charter School •• Jack Benny Middle School •• Lake County Baptist School.

The assessement details which areas of each building/ structure need addressing by ranking the area between A (Urgent) and D (5-10 years), also including R (Recommended). In total, if the City were to carry out rennovations across all its facilities, the assessement estimates the cost to be approximately $16.2 Million. Incremental steps toward allocating resources to rennovating exitsing facilities and potentially providing new facilities is important as it allows the City to better serve its residents.

City Yard Waukegan Armory

Library

Weiss Field 19th JC Branch Court

Police City Hall

Genesee Theater

Water Plant

Metra CLC Train Station Building

Public Facilities College of Lake County

Police

Genesee Theater

Government Buildings

Library

Other

Parks Metra Train Station

Comprehensive Plan City of Waukegan, Illinois

o

Parks/Open Space 1 inch =

5,700 Feet Date: 12/18/2018

Transportation & Infrastructure | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

Midwest Generation

DRAFT for Review

File: P:\5400-5449\5426.900 Waukegan Comp Plan\GIS\Mapping\5426_900_WaukeganCompPlan\5426_900_WaukeganCompPlan.aprx

It is of note that multiple public and private schools are located about a quarter-mile east or west of the Robert McClory Bike Path including:

Lilac Cottage (Wauk Hist)

Drawn By: gnewton

As can be seen, the primary municipal buildings are generally clustered around downtown Waukegan, especially Washington Street. There are multiple Pace bus routes that service this area, as well as the Metra station. This is important as it provides access to public services to residents who may not own a personal vehicle.

Recently, the City of Waukegan commissioned a facilities assessement of the existing 23 buildings or structures that serve its residents. This assessement was completed by RRP. Inc. in January of 2018 and in general, stated that, “buildings constructed or renovated within the past 20 years are in good shape barring any typical maintenance”. However, “the City owns a number of buildings that are 30 years or older which are in need of maintenance and repairs.”. According to the team at RRP. Inc., the buildings they felt required the most attention are the Public Works Facility and the Police Station, as those facilities are essential to City functions.

Sources:

Public Facilities

Project: 5426.900

73


Stormwater Management and Sewer Service Currently, the City maintains the stormwater and sewer service, as they are a registered community under the Lake County Watershed Development Ordinance (WDO). The FEMA Flood Hazards Exhibit provides the FEMA flood hazard map. As can be seen, minimal flood zones are found within the City and they tend to generally focused along the western edge of the community with the Des Plaines River.

74

Lake County originally adopted the Countywide WDO in 1992. The ordinance was most recently updated in October of 2015 and regulates flood plain management and governs the location, width, course, and release rate of all stormwater runoff channels, streams, and basins within the County. Furthermore, the WDO is enforced by the afffected municipalities and the County.

In addition to managing and mitigating the effects of development on stormwater runoff, the ordinance incorporates the Illinois Department of Natural Resources Office of Water Reources (IDNR-OWR) floodway permitting requirements (615 ILCS5/18g) and complies with the rules and regulations of the National Flood Insurance Program codified in Title 44 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The floodplain regulations help to reduce or eliminate flood losses and conserve and protect the natural and beneficial functions of each communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water resources.

DRAFT for Review

Flooding not only occurs within the FEMA mapped floodplain along the Des Plaines River and near the shores of Lake Michigan, but can also occur within the residential neighborhoods and streets of Waukegan. The installation of impervious surfaces throughout the Chicagoland region predates most modern stormwater management and infrastructure standards. The stormwater runoff from these areas can overwhelm local drainage systems and lead to urban flooding, such as ponding water in streets and yards, basement seepage, and sewer backups.

In June 2015, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) published the report for the Urban Flooding Awareness Act. This comprehensive document seeks to increase awareness and provide avenues to addressing and mitigating urban flooding that otherwise is not always designated on FEMA floodplain maps.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Transportation & Infrastructure


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File: P:\5400-5449\5426.900 Waukegan Comp Plan\GIS\Mapping\5426_900_WaukeganCompPlan\5426_900_WaukeganCompPlan.aprx

Taking the steps toward upgrading stormwater management systems and providing residents with the greatest mitigation to flooding will prove beneficial. As it stands, the City has identified $45 million in needs between FY2019-2023 to improve both stormwater and wastewater systems and plants.

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! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

CMAPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GO TO 2050 Plan includes a Regional Urban Flood Susceptibility Index map to help prioritize areas for planning and mitigation investment. The City has areas of high susceptibility identified for urban flooding. It is important to consider the FEMA floodplain maps, the Urban Flooding Awareness Act Report, and the Regional Urban Flood Susceptibility Index in the infrastructure planning.

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Zone A Zone AE

FEMA Flood Hazards Comprehensive Plan City of Waukegan, Illinois

o

Zone X Floodway Areas in Zone AE

1 inch =

5,700 Feet Date: 12/17/2018

Transportation & Infrastructure | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

DRAFT for Review

Drawn By: gnewton

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Project: 5426.900

75


6 Economic Development Economic development is one of the critical factors in fostering vibrant and successful communities. This chapter examines the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past and current trends of residential, commercial, industrial, and office markets. These observations provide the foundation for economic development strategies for the Waukegan Comprehensive Plan.

76

DRAFT for Review

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Economic Development


Residential Market Overall Housing Stock The City of Waukegan is a community with a diverse housing stock comprised of 31,914 units. Approximately 42% of Waukeganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s housing mix is multifamily apartments and about half is singlefamily detached. A relatively small percentage of units are single-family attached. Many multifamily units are clustered in the downtown area and southeast portion of the City with some large complexes in other parts of town. Compared to Lake County, Waukegan has a substantially higher concentration of multifamily structures and lower proportion of single-family attached.

Economic Development | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

DRAFT for Review

77


Tenure Waukegan is split in terms of tenure, with approximately 49% of units owner-occupied and 51% of units renter-occupied. Almost 89% of the owneroccupied housing stock in the City are single-family detached units while nearly 72% of the renter-occupied housing are multifamily units.

78

DRAFT for Review

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Economic Development


Single-Family Detached Homes SB Friedman has reviewed single-family trend data on resale home pricing and volume. Based on data available from MLS, resale prices and volumes for existing single-family detached homes are recovering from post-2009. Recession lows. Three key indicators of housing performance are average resale price, volume of transactions and average days on market. Average resale prices are approaching pre-Recession levels. Even so, the average resale price of single-family detached resales in Waukegan remains low. In 2018, the average sales price was approximately $134,000, which is less than half the average price of resales occurring in the rest of Lake County. Lower value resales are primarily clustered downtown and the southeast portion of the City. However, there are several subdivisions commanding resale prices in the highest percentile, including the Country Lane and Oak Crest subdivisions in the northwest area of the City and the Bayberry and Pleasant Hill

subdivisions in the southwest portion of the City. These subdivisions were primarily constructed in the 1990s and are reselling for $224,000 on average. Sales volume and days on market are key indicators of available housing inventory. In 2018, approximately 5% of transactions for this product

Economic Development | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

type in Lake County occurred in Waukegan. However, sales volumes have yet to surpass 2007 levels. On average, between 2007 and 2018, approximately 527 units closed according to MLS data. However, in 2018, 1192 closing letters were issued for single family and multi-family housing units - representing a variance of almost 700 units. In 2018, on

DRAFT for Review

average, listed for-sale detached housing units in Waukegan stayed on the market just over three months before being sold. In 2018, the average days on market for Waukegan was 105 days, fairly consistent with Lake County as a whole.

reflected in the limited number of resale closings of product built since 2007 compared to Lake County.

In the past 10 years, there has been limited new single-family detached construction. This is 79


Single Family Attached Homes Based on data available from MLS, resale prices and volumes for all existing single-family attached homes have yet to recover to pre-Recession (2008-2010) levels. Single-family attached sales in 2007 totaled 92 transactions and averaged at approximately $145,200 per sale, while sales in 2018 totaled 50 transactions and averaged at approximately $105,900 per sale, approximately 75% of preRecession levels. The City has seen limited singlefamily attached home resale transactions in recent years, just over half of pre-recession levels. However, transactions that have occurred have typically taken less than two months, spending an average of approximately 59 days on the market compared to 64 for Lake County. During the Great Recession, average sales prices of singlefamily attached product declined by nearly two-thirds value from approximately $150,000 in 2007 to approximately $50,000 per unit in 2013. Since 2013, average resale pricing has more than doubled to approximately $106,000 but has had limited growth in recent years. Higher 80

value resales have primarily clustered in four subdivisions: Bayberry, Continental Village, Fields of Cambridge, and Pleasant Hills. These subdivisions were constructed in the 1990s have recently sold for $113,000 to $167,000.

There appears to have been limited new single-family construction during this time period based on Census permit data for the City.

DRAFT for Review

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Economic Development


New Construction Multi-Family Products According to data from CoStar, there were three apartment projects completed postrecession in 2011 and 2012, including Karcher ArtSpace Lofts, The Residence at Fountain Square, and Village Park Apartments. All three of these buildings are rent-restricted; the Residence at Fountain Square is an age-restricted senior housing development..

Economic Development | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

DRAFT for Review

81


82

DRAFT for Review

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Economic Development


Retail Market Retail Typologies Retail development is typically built as one of several typologies listed, ranging from regional-serving power and community centers to neighborhood-serving convenience and freestanding retail.

Economic Development | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

DRAFT for Review

83


Competitive Clusters Retail in Waukegan competes within a larger competitive retail environment in nearby communities. The largest retail clusters near Waukegan are Kenosha and Pleasant Prairie to the north, Vernon Hills to the southwest and Gurnee to the west. Since the recession, new regional scale/big box retail has tended to prefer to collocate adjacent to already established retail destinations. The Mellody Farms development in Vernon Hills, a 270,000 square feet lifestyle retail center, is an example of such development. The competition from these larger agglomerations has constrained big box development in the relatively smaller big box clusters in Waukegan that function as community centers. The three regional-serving clusters located within Waukegan are: Yorkhouse Commons, Belvidere Road, and Fountain Square.

84

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Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Economic Development


Waukegan Market SB Friedman analyzed data on existing retail space in Waukegan based on data from CoStar. There are roughly 10 distinct retail clusters in Waukegan, together comprising nearly 4.3 million square feet of retail space. There are several retail typologies present including older neighborhood centers, strip centers, and freestanding retail, primarily located along Green Bay Road, Grand Avenue, N. Lewis Avenue and Washington Street. In addition, there are some regional-serving retail centers including four community centers, home to numerous restaurants and retail establishments. The community also has one large autodealership cluster located along Green Bay Road. There has been limited new construction in the last 10 years since 2008, only approximately 128,000 square feet (roughly 3% of total supply). Since 2008, new retail construction has primarily occurred in Fountain Square.

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Regional Retail Clusters These centers are typically located along major thoroughfares and are anchored around at least one freestanding anchor including general merchandise, home improvement and/or grocery. Fountain Square, Yorkhouse Commons, Waukegan Plaza and Belvidere Road are the primary regionalserving convenience retail nodes in Waukegan. There are approximately 1.8 million square feet of retail along these four centers with an overall vacancy of 10.1%. Overall, these regionalserving clusters are the healthiest retail clusters in the City. •• Fountain Square is the strongest performing community center, comprising approximately 600,000 square feet anchored by the Walmart. Fountain Square was constructed in 2006 and has added approximately 87,000 square feet (14.5%) of space in the past 10 years and have proposed an additional 30,000 square feet of retail spaces. Various outlots, such as Chipotle and Panda Express, have located in 86

Fountain Square within the past five years. Additionally, a 50,000 square foot strip retail structure was constructed in 2008 and is almost fully leased with tenants such as Buffalo Wild Wings and Rainbow. •• Yorkhouse Commons Area comprises approximately 300,000 square feet anchored by a Target, Jewel

and Ace Hardware store. There has been no new construction in the center in the last 10 years. •• Waukegan Plaza Area comprises approximately 400,000 square feet and is anchored by multiple grocery stores including Aldi, Lewis Fresh Market and Super Fresh Market. The center also has numerous apparel

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and value-focused stores including Marshalls, Rue 21 and Ross. There has been no new construction in the center in the last 10 years. •• The Belvidere Road Cluster is the largest cluster, comprising approximately 900,000 square feet. The cluster contains the Belvidere Discount Mall, which is anchored by Home

Depot but contains a tenant mix of predominately family-owned and Hispanicoriented retailers. In 2015, a 9,000-square-foot Dollar General was constructed within the cluster. In December 2018, Home Owners Bargain Outlet (HOBO) shut down its store in the Belvidere Road Cluster in 2018.

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update | Economic Development


Neighborhood Centers Grand Avenue, Green Bay & Grand, and the Timberlake Shopping Center are the primary neighborhoodserving convenience retail nodes in Waukegan. There are approximately 1.6 million square feet of retail along these three centers with an overall vacancy of 7.1%. These centers are typically located along auto-oriented corridors and are anchored around either a grocery store or pharmacy. •• Grand Avenue is the strongest performing neighborhood serving retail cluster, comprising approximately 500,000 square feet anchored by Lewis Fresh Market. Approximately 11,000 square feet (2%) of space is new since 2008. •• The Green Bay and Grand Avenue node is a relatively strong neighborhood serving retail cluster, comprising roughly 600,000 square feet anchored by a Jewel-Osco, Walgreens and Starbucks.

•• The Timberlake Shopping Center Area is the lowest performing neighborhood center in the City. Comprising only 100,000 square feet, this center suffers from high vacancies. Although the center is anchored by Planet Fitness, Walgreens and Dollar General, approximately one-third

Economic Development | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

of retail space within this cluster is vacant, including a 32,000 square foot box within the plaza.

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Downtown/ Experiential Downtown is a key part of the City and the heart of the community. Currently, the Downtown vibrancy is centered along Genesee Street. Genesee is a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly shopping corridor comprising approximately 300,000 square feet with relatively few vacancies (4%). An express highway separates the Downtown from the Waukegan Metra station and Lake Michigan. There is limited visibility from the Metra Station to Downtown due to grading near the Station. Additional residential development within proximity to the core of downtown will help support existing and future businesses.

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Other Retail Centers The Washington Street Corridor is comprised primarily of freestanding retail serving convenience uses. The cluster is anchored on one end by a CVS at Washington and Green Bay Road. The cluster has a few vacancies and an average rent per square foot of approximately $15.00. The auto-cluster located at Green Bay Road consists of 210,000 square feet of retail space which includes car dealerships such as Toyota Kia and Elite Motors, a used car dealership. Other auto-related uses such as carwash and auto repair facilities, are also present in this cluster. Gas stations, such as Thorntons and the newly developed Circle K, are also present within the cluster.

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Industrial Market Competitive Supply Map Industrial real estate location decisions are typically driven by accessibility to transportation, an appropriate labor force, clustering of similar companies, location of major manufacturers, relatively inexpensive land, and low property taxes. Large warehouse and distribution facilities greater than 300,000 square feet that serve a national distribution market are generally located at or near intermodal hubs, at the confluence of Class I railroads, major highways, and/or air or water ports. In the Chicagoland region, Will County, South Suburbs, the Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hare area, and Kenosha County are the national freight and distribution hubs. Lake County has a strong industrial presence in the region. Within the County, industrial has primarily concentrated along major transportation corridors including IL-83 and I-94. While there has been some new construction within Lake County, there has been substantial new construction in Kenosha County located across the state border 90

in Wisconsin. This location offers interstate adjacencies and lower property taxes. The proposed Foxconn facility would continue to boost Wisconsinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industrial prominence in the region. Consideration for Waukeganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

240-acre Bridge Point North development on Waukegan Road (IL-43) is also a great opportunity to fulfill demand and create opportunities for additional industry and employment in the City.

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Waukegan Market Waukegan has a strong industrial presence, comprising of 15.9million square feet of industrial space. Waukegan industrial rents have been mostly $4.84 per square foot over the past 10 years and currently average approximately $5.75 per square foot. Vacancies have decreased significantly since high points in 2012 and are currently at a low of 5%. Approximately 1.6 million square feet (10% of total industrial inventory) in Waukegan has been built since 2008. Waukegan has four main industrial clusters: •• The South Waukegan industrial cluster is the largest in the City, comprising approximately 8.4 million square feet. Various industrial parks exist within the cluster, but the largest business park is the Amhurst Lake Industrial Center. This industrial park totals 2.3 million square feet and houses tenants such as the Brown Paper Goods Company, who currently occupy a 400,000 square foot building in the park. The Bridgepoint North Business Park, which occupies the former McGaw Business Park site, is the most recent industrial delivery in the South Waukegan industrial cluster, opening in 2016. This industrial park currently

consists of over 1 million square feet of industrial space with an anticipated 0.9 million additional square feet of development to be completed by early 2019. The primary industrial tenants for this cluster are warehouse and distribution facilities.Tenants such as Amazon, VisualPak, and Medline have facilities within the business park. The cluster has a 6.5% vacancy rate and average rents per square foot of approximately $6.56. •• The North Waukegan industrial cluster cohabitates with industrial properties in neighboring Gurnee and is located adjacent to the Waukegan Regional Airport. Within the City of Waukegan’s municipal boundaries, there are 1.7 million square feet of industrial space in the cluster. From this, the Delany Commerce Center consists with 218,000 square feet of industrial space. The industrial center currently houses the Trifinity Distribution Center and has tentative plans to add a second 218,500 square foot building on their site. The Oak Grove Business Park, which was built out between 2005 and 2007, holds a total of 409,000 square feet of industrial space. Industrial tenants such as Kinter, Fischer Paper Products, and Polymax TPE occupy the business park.

Economic Development | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

•• The West Waukegan industrial cluster is located west of Green Bay Road between Grand Avenue and Belvidere Road. . The cluster consists of 1.4 million square feet of industrial space with average rents per square foot of approximately $4.05 and a vacancy rate of 3.2%. Small, single use tenants with under 10,000 square feet predominate the area. The largest tenant in the cluster is the Arcoa Group, which occupies 93,000 square feet of industrial space, or 6.6% of the West Waukegan industrial cluster.

mixed-use residential and retail uses with a clean, working harbor.

•• The Lakefront cluster is comprised of 200,000 square feet of active industrial space. Many of the properties in this cluster are remnants of the City’s former industrial activity on the lakefront. The primary anchors for the cluster are public uses such as the Waukegan Water Filtration Plant and the NRG Waukegan Generating Station, as well as smaller scale industrial operators surrounding the Waukegan Harbor which include National Gypsum and Akzo Nobel Aerospace Coatings. In 2003 the City published the Downtown Lakefront Master Plan which envisions a transformation of the legacy industrial uses on the lakefront to

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New Development in Waukegan New industrial deliveries in Waukegan have consisted primarily of single tenant, mid-sized warehouse and distribution facilities. These deliveries have occurred in Bridge Point North and existing industrial parks such as the Delany Commerce Center. New developments in Waukegan have averaged 270,000 square feet with a typical floor area ratios (FAR) ranging between 0.3 and 0.4. This is approximately twice the size of new industrial development occurring elsewhere in Lake County, which averages closer to 130,000 square feet. The access from I-94 and availability of industrially zoned land makes Waukegan attractive for industrial development.

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Office Market SB Friedman gathered data on existing office space from CoStar. Generally, CoStar tracks higher quality office space (Class A or B). Class A office space refers to products constructed or renovated within the last 10 years consisting of the highest quality of construction materials, architectural features, and finishes. In addition, Class A offices contain abundant amenities, are highly accessible, and are sought after by national and international tenants willing to pay a premium for office spaces. Such space is generally developed as multi-tenant space anchored by significant office tenants, or a build-to-suit corporate space developed on a standalone basis for specific tenants. Class B office spaces consist of ordinary architectural design and features and lack the abundance of amenities that Class A products possess. These office spaces depend on lower rent rates to attract tenants and investors and are often speculative developments, Class A corporate office is generally concentrated in downtown Chicago and along major interstates and interchanges, with locations accessible to corporate executives, as illustrated in the regional office market map to the right.

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Waukegan Market Waukeganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office space accounts for 6.0% of overall Lake County office market. There are three Class A office buildings in Waukegan. Two of these buildings are located in the Amhurst Lake Business Park in the Lakeside Pointe complex and is home to the pharmaceutical company AbbVie. The third class A office development, Academy Square, is located in Downtown Waukegan and contains 40,000 square feet of professional office and retail spaces. Class B office spaces are prevalent throughout the City in the form of smaller scale professional offices. Waukegan office rents have fluctuated since 2006, currently averaging approximately $13.00 per square foot. However, vacancy has remained steady at approximately 15% to 17% postrecession, except for 2014. In 2014, vacancy rates saw a significant jump due to the annexation of land in 2014 that included a previously vacant 2.8 million square foot office park formerly known as the McGaw Business Park. This site

was demolished in the following year and was redeveloped into Bridgepoint North beginning in 2016. Approximately 130,000 square feet, or 6%, of all office inventory in Waukegan has been built since

Economic Development | Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update

2007. This new office square footage is comprised of two projects, the Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center (85,000 square feet) and the Academy Square development (45,000 square feet).

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A Appendices 96

Kick-Off Meeting Summary

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Public Workshop 1 Summary

130 Waukegan Housing Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s News Release (September 8, 2018) on Barwell Manor 133

Glossary for abbreviations in Chapter 4 - Natural Resources & Green Infrastructure:

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Explanation of Queue Jumps

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Noelle Kischer-Lepper, Director of Planning and Development, City of Waukegan Steve Sabourin, Senior Planner, City of Waukegan Russ Tomlin, Senior Planner, City of Waukegan David Motley, Director of Marketing & Public Relations, City of Waukegan Jane Ferry, Public Relations Specialist, City of Waukegan

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30 West Monroe Street, Suite 500 Chicago, Illinois 60603 312.465.2359

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The RATIO team and City staff agreed that hosting a project website will be beneficial to the planning process. The RATIO team will review with the City’s PR team on the website’s structure before launch. The website should exist outside of the City’s Facebook page, but it can link with the City’s resources, including the City’s calendar of events. The website could also host a parallel social media platform and rely on the City to disseminate the information. Regarding media inquiries, the RATIO team can directly answer them to avoid the City’s “imprint” on these responses and can directly reach out to local media outlets when needed. The RATIO team will use Eventbrite and other social media platforms to send invites for upcoming outreach events and to gauge the level of public interest. Contact information for these events will be RATIO.

Hosting workshops will be necessary, and Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays are the better days in the week to do so. Social media, mostly Facebook, will be the most effective and genuine method of gathering data and intelligence. Traditional media outlets, such as local newspaper, tend to be reactionary and acquire many stories and leads from Facebook.

The outreach plan needs to focus on “going to where people are,” rather only hosting than traditional workshops. This means hosting pop-up stations at City’s popular events, such as ZombieWalk in October, punk rock concerts at the Burgundy Room, and festivals at Downtown Waukegan. Also, survey works better when done face-to-face rather online. The best way to engage with business owners is to go door-to-door and hand them a survey to complete.

It is important to emphasize to the public that the Comprehensive Plan Update is unique from other City plans, in which the former focuses on the City rather than a district. The RATIO team and the City staff should focus on branding the planning process to keep City residents excited and engaged. This means avoiding labelling the deliverable as a “plan,” selling more of the experience and motivation of the community, and creating more organic deliverables, rather than only composing a booklet.

Strategies

The meeting began with a discussion about challenges to the planning process. One of them is to address skepticisms from City residents, as they would question the necessity and financial implications of the City conducting another “Plan.” Also, the PR team recognized that there would always be a group of people who will not engage in the process, because they cannot dedicate their time and talents into the process. The discussion then focused on strategies to address these challenges.

Challenges

In this meeting, RATIO and the City staff discussed challenges and lessons learned from previous planning processes. The City staff also shared strategies to have people become more engaged with the process.

• • • • •

RATIO facilitated a meeting with the City’s Public Relations (PR) Team. Participants in this meeting were:

9:00am Meeting with the City’s Public Relations Team

On August 29, 2018, the RATIO team, including Borderless Studio, Gewalt-Hamilton Associates, SB Friedman, Applied Ecological Serices, and Edgewater Resources consultant staff, engaged in meetings with City staff and the project’s Steering Committee to kick off the Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update planning process.

To: Project Team, City of Waukegan RATIO Project No.: 18069 Date: September 4, 2018 Subject: Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update – Kick-Off Meeting Outreach Summary

Kick-Off Meeting Summary

MEETING SUMMARY


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Waukegan Historical Society Waukegan Main Street Waukegan Chamber of Commerce Lake County Chamber of Commerce Waukegan Township Waukegan Port District Soccer clubs Faith-based groups Business owners Waukegan Community Unit School District 60 Park Place Lake County Forest Preserve Lake County Partners – public-private partnership on economic development College of Lake County Greater Waukegan Development Coalition Local homeowners’ associations, including those along River Road. Neighborhood watch groups Waukegan Park District Groups of sports coaches (professional and recreational)

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The main commercial corridors of the City are Washington St., Belvidere Rd., and Grand Ave. Dan Persky has worked with the City of Waukegan to implement the recommendations from the Washington Street Corridor Plan, but the momentum has waned. What largely remains in these corridors are pockets of small parcels that are unattractive to potential businesses. The parcels along the corridors are privately-owned and partially consist of non-conforming residential properties that need façade improvements. The

Commercial Corridors

Southwest Waukegan includes neighborhoods west of U.S. Highway 41 and south of Route 120. This area is home to Fountain Square, which was developed by Shaw Developers, and is home to a 31-acre site. Notable development and destinations include: Marriott hotel and Big Ed’s Barbeque. A Walmart is located in this area as well. There is a perceived assumption that the City has a restrictive covenant that other big-box retailers cannot be located in Fountain Square. There is no evidence of such agreement in the City’s legal documents. There is a 10-acre site adjacent to Fountain Square that may be home to a new Marshall’s.

Southwest Area

Although this area, with few developable parcels, is within the Waukegan’s municipal limits, residents in this area tend to perceive that they are part of the Village of Wadsworth or Gurnee. This perception is reinforced by homes with Wadsworth and Gurnee addresses and school district assignments. Residents from these areas rarely access the lakefront. The City’s planning staff would like to see residents in this area associate themselves more with Waukegan than with the communities to the west. Improving the area’s access to the lakefront will be an important issue to address in the planning process.

Northwest Area

The meeting between RATIO team and the City’s planning staff, included Russ Tomlin, Senior Planner, and Steve Sabourin, Senior Planner. This discussion centered on planning issues within and around the City of Waukegan.

10:00am Meeting with the City’s Planning and Zoning Department

The City staff stated that there are secondary groups in the City that can provide valuable input into the planning process. They include commuters to Chicago and boaters by the harbor. The best way to engage them is to meet with them in their respective locations, such as the Waukegan Metra Station and the City’s marina.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The RATIO team and the City staff discussed which groups and organizations to engage. Below is a list of these potential organizations:

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The 100-acre Outboard Marine Corporation site, which is an EPA Superfund site, is located at the northern section of the Waukegan Harbor. This presents a long-term development opportunity for the City. The Greater Waukegan Development Corporation hosts events at Harbor’s Edge during the summer. This includes weekend music festivals. The City is running out of office and light-industrial space and job growth is stagnant. The 10-acre site at the mouth of the Waukegan River is an opportunity for development and requires further study. The City is home to one of two Boeing manufacturing training facilities. Strategies to encourage companies to remain in Waukegan include: providing easy access to executive housing, located throughout the northern suburbs, leveraging staff and executives’ loyalty to Waukegan given that they grew up in this community, and maintaining a solid school district. The Waukegan Community Unit School District 60 is perceived as average locally but well-regarded regionally. The Cristo Rey St. Martin College Prep is relatively a new private Catholic school within a former Kmart building. Households who live by River Road (southwest part of the City) tend to send their children to school districts in Libertyville.

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Tina Smigielski, Finance Director, City of Waukegan Janet Kilkelly, City Clerk, City of Waukegan Sam Cunningham, Mayor, City of Waukegan Levy Cordero, IT/GIS, City of Waukegan Thomas Maillard, Mayor’s Office, City of Waukegan Mike Purtell, Building Commissioner, City of Waukegan George Bridges Jr., Fire Chief, City of Waukegan William Valko, 8th Ward Alderman, City of Waukegan Pamela Jeffries, Compliance Coordinator, City of Waukegan Laraesa Garland, CDBG Director, City of Waukegan Tameika Jones, Director of Human Resources, City of Waukegan Avenue of the Cities Corridor Plan

The meeting began with general introduction of RATIO team to the City’s Department Heads and the Mayor. This group included:

Welcome & Introductions

11:00am Meeting with City Mayor and Department Heads

• • • •

Below is a list of other issues and opportunities the RATIO team and the City’s Planning Staff have discussed:

Other Issues

The City’s Planning Staff stated that more businesses are coming into Downtown Waukegan. They include: art galleries, Three Brothers Theater, cigar lounge, and Horse Feathers. The Downtown hosts an ArtWalk every month, attracting art and restaurants to the downtown. Accessibility to downtown has been a challenge in the past as some private events in Downtown Waukegan have restricted access to the area without prior communication with Downtown property owners. Downtown Waukegan business owners would like to capture more visitors in the greater Waukegan region. Many people come to Downtown Waukegan only to attend the festivals. Resolving transportation access issues in Downtown and connectivity to the City would alleviate some of the attendance challenges.

Downtown Waukegan

There are neighborhood-serving commercial development nodes within the City, such as the intersection of North Ave. and Ridgeland Ave. and North Ave. and Franklin St. The City recognized these developments provide residents convenient access to services, but these developments tend to serve a regional market rather than the neighborhood. This highlights an issue regarding permitted land uses in the City’s commercial zoning districts.

Neighborhood Commercial

City desires to see a greater number of mid-rise buildings (three or more stories high) or mixed use development concentrated at specific nodes along the corridors. It is also critical to decide and establish an identity for each of the commercial corridors.

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Susana Tigueroa, Special Projects Analyst to the Mayor’s Office, City of Waukegan Bob Long, Corporation Counsel, City of Waukegan Mike Hewitt, Director of Public Works, City of Waukegan Noelle Kischer-Lepper, Director of Planning & Development, City of Waukegan John Schwab, Treasurer, City of Waukegan

The City has grown significantly in the 1980s/90s, through annexation of the southwest area to obtain higher EAV for the City. This area, however, has poor transportation access and the City’s public services are stressed. The City is long overdue for an update to its Comprehensive Plan. The City between I-94 and the lakefront need better planning and have multiple major corridors without a cohesive identity. It is critical for the Plan to assist the City in searching for a unifying identity and vision.

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After the tour, the RATIO team met with Tom Vick, a Steering Committee member, to discuss about his perceptions of issues and opportunities in the City of Waukegan. See the following scanned document for a summary of his six-point discussion:

1:30pm Meeting with Tom Vick

After the meeting with the City’s Mayor and Department Heads, the RATIO team and City’s Planning staff toured the City of Waukegan. They began from Downtown Waukegan and drove mostly throughout the south and southwestern parts of the City. In the tour, the RATIO team documented existing conditions, assets, constraints, and opportunities. The RATIO team plans to tour other parts of the City during the next visit.

12:00pm City Tour

The RATIO team facilitated a mapping exercise with the participants to spatially identify issues and opportunities in the City of Waukegan. Participants can place stickers and write comments on the map. The results are shown at the end of this memo.

Mapping Exercise

• •

Part of the meeting involved a discussion about previous planning efforts of the City and how they are relevant to Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Update. The consultant team will review past plans for reference and incorporate relevant pieces into the Comprehensive Plan Update. Below are some points from the discussion:

Previous Planning Efforts

Lesley Roth, RATIO Project Director, facilitated this portion of the meeting. A five-phase planning process was explained that will take thirteen (13) months to complete with an expected adoption date at the end of September 2019. Phase 1 of the planning process includes the kick-off meeting, data collection, detailing the public process and create a deliverable (Existing Conditions Report) that will synthesize the input and data gathered so far. The consultant team with work with the City staff and the Steering Committee members to gather all necessary data during this phase.

• • • • •

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Marcus Pitchford, Special Projects Analyst, City of Waukegan Mayor’s Office Diane Tecic, Coastal Program Director, Illinois Department of Natural Resources Chuck Rukstales, Resident, C3iTSM LLC Greg Petry Diane Verratti David McDowell, Resident Steve Sabourin, Senior Planner, City of Waukegan Russ Tomlin, Senior Planner, City of Waukegan Mike Purtell, Building Commissioner, City of Waukegan Marilyn Sommer Annie Lynn Tom Vick Lisa May, Alderman, City of Waukegan Greg Thempson Daney Bjerstedt

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The comprehensive plan is unique because previous plans were district-focused. The Steering Committee members recognized that implementation would be difficult. Some past plans had thoughtful recommendations but were hard for the City to implement. Residents may be frustrated at the City’s lack of action, despite many results not being as tangible as residents would want to see. Limited capital resources are an impediment to successful implementation of a plan. Even when there are resources, the City staff seems to be stretched too thin. A strategic staffing strategy may be needed to ensure resources are administered appropriately. Some attendees pointed out that there are a lack of leaders/champions and organizational capacity within the City government. The City does not need to do everything; organizations with appropriate expertise can help implement the Plan’s recommendations.

The meeting began with a general introduction of the RATIO team, City’s Planning Staff, consisting of Noelle Kischer-Lepper, Russ Tomlin, Steve Sabourin, and the Steering Committee members. Similar to the meeting with the Mayor and City’s Department Heads, the RATIO team provided an overview of the project’s schedule and planning process. There was a discussion of lessons learned from the City’s past plans and processes. Below are the key points from the discussion:

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The RATIO team facilitated a meeting with the City’s Planning staff and the Steering Committee members. The format of this meeting was similar to that of the meeting with the Mayor and Department Head meetings. The meeting participants were:

2:00pm Steering Committee Meeting

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After the discussion, a mapping exercise was facilitated with the Steering Committee members. Results from the exercise are show at the end of the memo. Afterwards, the RATIO team and the meeting participants discussed roles and expectations of the Steering Committee in the planning process.

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Architecture

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MEMORANDUM

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Station 2 – Mapping Assets A large map of the city was placed on a table for participants to share input related to their perceptions, strengths, opportunities, and weaknesses of the community. Participants were asked to map specific topics on the map including: • Redevelopment/vacant land • Public realm improvement • Park, trail and open space • Needs new investment • Transportation/access issues Most of the input received on the maps was focused in the downtown and lakefront.

Station 1 – Welcome The first station included a staffed sign-in and welcome table. A brief presentation was given that explained the planning process and purpose of the Comprehensive Plan, including how the plan should be used. The presentation also oriented participants to each station.

The results and input gathered from the public pertaining to each station are summarized in the following sections.

On November 15, 2018, the RATIO team with the City of Waukegan, hosted a public workshop to solicit public input on the comprehensive planning process. The workshop was held at the Waukegan City Hall in the Council Chambers. Approximately 110 participants, consisting of residents, stakeholders, business leaders, steering committee members, City staff, and elected and appointed City officials, signed in for the workshop. However, over 40 additional people participated in the workshop but did not sign in. The workshop consisted of five stations that residents would cycle through during the scheduled 1.5-hour workshop. Many participants chose to stay beyond the allotted timeframe. These stations were designed to optimize input from the public in an informal fashion, and participants were welcomed to join at any time. The five stations included: • Station 1 – Welcome • Station 2 – Mapping Assets • Station 3 – Visioning • Station 4 – Past Plans and Reports • Station 5 – Survey

Subject: City of Waukegan - Public Workshop

Date: November 15, 2018

RATIO Project No.: 18069

To: Project Team, City of Waukegan

Public Workshop Meeting Summary


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City of Waukegan Workshop Summary Page 2 November 15, 2018

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Station 3 – Visioning The third station was a topical visioning exercise that was designed to create a vision statement for the Comprehensive Plan. Participants were engaged in an activity where a series of cards with various images were available at the station for review. Participants picked a card that symbolizes their vision for the City. After selecting the card, each participant spoke with the facilitator and other participants about their vision for the City. The consultant staff facilitated this exercise and recorded the results on a flipchart. The bullet points below are the participant’s vision for Waukegan that were recorded on the flipchart: • More things to do for families • Progress through education • Community centers • High performance buildings and infrastructure • Better cooperation between businesses, city agencies, non-profits, schools • More entertainment uses (restaurant/amenities) • Incorporate STEAM into school programs • Welcome diversity • Attract more talent • An attraction/events • Improve perception of Waukegan • Public access to the beach • Remove the coal plant • Achievements in one year • Remediate the lakefront • Community service opportunities for youth • Avoid gentrification • Create community pride and civic • Strong public input for development mindedness • Create identity for neighborhoods • Make Waukegan the cleanest city in Illinois • Attract technology based companies and the world • Open train station (extend hours) • Sense of pride • Being the ‘big’ middle point between • Less liquor stores Chicago and Milwaukee • More productive businesses • Water transportation (ferry) to the north • Environmentally responsible beach • Variety of restaurants/coffee shop/bistro • Direct access to waterfront • Walkability with places/destinations to walk • Connect downtown to harbor • Broad base community coming together to • Clean the lakefront make a beautiful piece of art • Demolish cement silos • Connecting local community organizations to • Smart/shared parking assets the larger Waukegan community • More public amenities (pools, parks with • Change public perception of downtown water features) • Model town for renewable energy • Beach revitalization • Transform/reinvest in brownfields • Family friendly • Bike lanes throughout the city • Better roads/navigation • Strong vision instead of one focus on access • Business development in downtown point • Attract more businesses • Comprehensive efforts to leverage/investing • Incubation center (Hub non-profit) access corridors • Direct assistance to small businesses • Affordability • Support paring for businesses • Model of clean energy • Attract major anchor company • Potential for transformation • Services in neighborhoods

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What does the future of Waukegan look like? What is your personal history with Waukegan?

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Station 5 – Survey In the final station, participants were asked to complete a survey about their vision for Waukegan. In addition, participants were asked to share information on those who should be involved with the process, challenges and opportunities in the City. The results follow:

Participants commented on the previous plans and added their own commentary to the plans and timeline.

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Station 4 – Past Plans and Reports The City of Waukegan has completed several plans in the last 10 years. This station included boards with each plan’s key recommendations and objectives for participants to understand the City’s past decisions. A timeline with Waukegan’s history was also present at the station. Participants were able to read through the major milestones in the City’s history and answer the questions:

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Get rid of the concrete silos at the lakefront and piles of gypsum. No one would want to live at the lakefront and look at these. 1 Grow into a Harbor Town 1 A City under recovery with a possible great future 1 Active - so much to do 1 A phoenix that needs to be awakened 1 Well positioned 1 Underdeveloped 1 To become the go to place for tourists 1 Disjointed/Disconnected 1 Sad 1 At a crossroads 1 Underappreciated 1 Mixed uses with more cultural and recreational activity 1 Active and exciting place that attracts people to live, 1 work and play Stuck 1 Growing 1 Progressive 1 Crappy 1 Historic, Destination, Oceanfront 1 Environmental justice community 1 Up and coming lakefront community 1

Potential/opportunity/Possibility/Improving Tired/Worn/Fatigued/Old/Run down Hometown Diverse Diamond in the rough Vibrant/Beautiful Stagnant Boring Dirty

Q1: What word would you use to describe the City of Waukegan?

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Lakefront Diverse population Parks Love the history People Potential, the people Library Fine Arts Ethnic food Neighborhoods Hometown - diversity Three Brothers Theater Culture Beach Friendly neighbors Small, close, caring and friendly I grew up here Love the location Harbor and the Lake Genesee Street Safety Great birding area Range of socio-economics People and low cost of living Room to grow as a big place UP train station Small community feel Passion of residents Entertainment options No condos on the beach Preserve lakefront like Chicago Accessible, good streets

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15 11 8 7 Homes, parks, trees, lakes 6 6 3 meets the needs of the residents of all cultures 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Q2: What do you love about the City of Waukegan?

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Seems difficult at best to progress, Lack of clear path forward Many have a focus on just sunning Not enough interest in culture and arts Fiscal burden Dead zone on weekends, empty We always seem to get in our own way of moving forward Services are sparse - nothing survives, restaurants close, no shops There are few stores or coffee shops or movie theaters to walk to. Walkability is so limited. Would love to go out to dinner or breakfast in Waukegan but the choices are so limited.

So many plans and competing interests need to put foot down and go Lack of communication and focus, too many groups pulling in different directions instead of collaborating and coordinating together Not enough job opportunities, economic opportunity While diversity is wonderful, do we really need a Hispanic restaurant/store on every corner? Most common comment heard from non-Waukeganites coming into city via Grand, Washington and Belvidere streets Money is not coming into the city We need code enforcement of properties not being maintained. We need better enforcement of bad habits and arrests of criminals. - Out of town landlords who do not care what happens to their property Run down looking - crime, drugs, poor public schools, high taxes Railroad tracks off Genesee street from the lake - no lakefront condos Vacant buildings Lack of restaurants Reputation/Negative perception, Image, negative attitude Access issues - transportation, education opportunities Racial and cultural division in the city, Lack of support for people of color Our sense of weariness. We keep hearing new plans, and then nothing changes. Reputation of horrible, toxic environment - coal plant, brownfields, superfund sites Reputation of an unsafe city Reputation of a poor schools, carreer training needed

Q3: What do you dislike about the City of Waukegan?

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Aldermen are not equipped to lead the city. Lake of leadership has led to lack o vision - we need a professional, certified, non-partisan city manager and mayor should be a part-time face of the city. A city of our size should not be run by coaches, retired policement and others with absolutely no credentials for dealing with develoment issues. Plans stagnate becuase our leaders have no vision and no ability to follow through. RATIO - please tell them. • Streets need repair, Unused impervious surface • Unsupportive business climate. Litter. Lack of progress on previous plans. Public perception outside of Waukegan and our own citizens talk down about the city. Positive things about Waukegan starts arguments with many people. I hear that people would never support Waukegan improvement • Inertia • Embracing past • Old boys network, lack of leadership • High property taxes • 75% hispanic population • Lack of $200-300k homes • Lack of development • Contempt from police • The way we've always done it' thinking, egos • Lack of diversity on City Council • Lack of accessibility to lakefront • Lack of interagency collaboration and communication • Low income voucher people standing around downtown asking for money

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Economic Development 34 Community Development 20 Parks/open space 18 Safety/Quality of life 17 Land Use 14 Housing 13 Natural Resources 13 Traffic Transportation 8 • Education/carreer training Other • Environmental health 2 • Preservation • A walkable community • Tourism • Clean Energy Project • Better schools and education

Q4: Which of the following topics is most interesting to you?

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Arts and culture Family events Food and drink Farmer's market Other • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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33 include hispanic culture 32 31 28 Blues Fest Downtown Harbor Growth (like Kenosha) All of the above Events and Entertainment Shopping Anything at the beach Better programming at Genesee Guided nature walks Walking groups Grow local small busienss Attract anchor businesses and local employers Recreational activities Music events Festival space is needed not in downtown Water activities Urban Agriculture Retail, big box Attractions

Q5A: What kinds of programming would you participate in?

Yes No

Q5: Would you like to see more programming in Downtown Waukegan?

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Additional Businesses New Uses for Vacant Lots Streetscape Design Gateway/Wayfinding Signage Art Installations Additional Public Transit Service Other

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29 24 21 17 16 8 Advertising and support for what exists Take back parking lot from CLC. They should never have been allowed to fence it off. I used this lot to go to businesses in the first block of Geness street north of Washington street but can't use it anymore. This has hurt businesses in the Downtown area. Rehab what is there Beach boardwalk Bike and commuter friendly Community centers for meetings and services outreach New anchor business Land planning and infrastructure to support Restaurants New tourist businesses Major commercial investment New restaurants, shopping Greeway across town - make a corridor Encourage invetors to develop the lakefront properly Widen main arteries - Grand, Washington, Belvedere Solar projects

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Q6: How could Waukegan's commercial districts and corridors be improved?

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Church Restaurants Parks Gurnee Genesee Street Green Town Beach/Lakefront/Harbor Libertyville Family house Louies Downtown Waukegan Kenosha Waukegan Beach Park Papa Marcos Casa de Samuel Cultural events Entertainment venues Festivals Highland Park Chicago Genesee Theater Bowen Park Outside of Waukegan Artwalk Vernon Hills Zion Family Piano (Greentown) three Brothers Library Fieldhouse Jack Benny Center Ace Hardware Washington Street Quonset 17th North Starbucks

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Q7: Where do you usually go to meet your friends or family?

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60083 60085 60087 60048 60044 60099 53143 60031

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Love the lake -downsized to 2 bedroom townhouse on midlane

Zip Code

Less than 1 year 1-5 Years 6-10 years 11-15 years Longer than 15 years

How long have you lived in Waukegan?

Yes No

Q8: Are you a resident of Waukegan?

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Q9C: What community did you move to?

Navy brat. Went to college and then moved back to Waukegan as soon as we could Gurnee schools School system, closer to elderly family Better housing - larger lot Ability to purchase a home in Beach Park from a friend, less property taxes, better school district, close to work Schools/retail Work in Waukegan as an educator College and then returned 6 years ago Affordable, close to work, on the lake, lovely neighborhood Many cities, longest time in St. Louis.

Q9B: Why did you move?

Less than 1 year 1-5 Years 6-10 years 11-15 years Longer than 15 years

Q9A: How long have you lived in a different community?

Yes No

Q9: Are you a former resident of Waukegan?

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17 and under 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ 2 4 6 4 13 16

Q10: What is your age?

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Less than 1 year 1-5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years longer than 15 years 2 5 3 5 5

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How long have you owned your business?

Yes No

Q11: Do you own a business in Waukegan?

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Community churches 13 Waukegan Main Street 7 Josh Bead Most Blessed Trinity 4 Waukegan Park District 3 Waukegan Chamber of Commerce 3 PTOs 3 College of Lake County 2 Schools with emphasis on teens 2 Waukegan CAG 2 Openlands 2 Waukegan Arts Council 1 Three Brothers Theater 1 Genessee Theater 1 Puerto Rican Society 1 North Shore Baptist Ministers Alliance (Walstone E. Francis) Civic clubs 1 The Naval Base 1 Dowtown Economic Development 1 Waukegan Harbor Citizens Advisory Group 1 Lake County 1 Lake County Forest Preserve 1 DNR 1 Women's organizations (AAUW, LWV) 1 Salvation Army 1 School District 1 Developers 1 Fishing/Tourist 1 Realtors 1 Celebrities/Athletes 1 Habitat for Humanity Lake County 1 Eldercare 1 Catholic Charities 1 Exchange Club 1 Lake County Audobon 1 Waukegan 2 College 1 HACES 1 Waukegan Yacht Club 1 Glen Flora Country Club members 1 Latino Coalition 1 Charity organizations 1 Involved community leaders 1 Lake County jail 1 Employment services 1 Faith in Place 1 Clean Power Lake County 1 Bro Blanks - BAMM 1

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Q12: What groups/organizations should we contact to gather their input?

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National Gypsum South Genessee Merchants block Vacant building owners Land Trust Alliance Arts District Boy Scouts

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Let more people kow what your goals are and what you are trying to accomplish Do a better job of circulating information - expand the website and improve navigation Outreach to Latino community, African American community Continue public meetings More open houses

Multiple workshops Promote process is happening Keep doing what youre doing Identify resources available with current information about proposed changes Additional open meetings/Workshop Work through groups such as those listed in #12 Survey - in water bill, in bar, on-line, email Newsletter, newspaper Keep trying with easy access to events Feed them Keep people talking Community meetings held in churches House party gatherings Larger number of small events in community buildings Seek input from younger residents (16-24) New people Online presence and strategic use of print media: posters, mailers Make it for all - not just the political and social elites Smaller groups Lake County Nature Network Faith in Place Facebook, Twitter Exhibits similar to this format You have the same 'do-ers' for more than 50% of tonight's attendees. If others donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care, stop waiting for them to care - they wont. Encourage Latino people to lead the process of informing Looking forward to honest review of where we go from here Public access TV, radio, podcast Ask Aldermen to periodically survey resident in ward through small townhall format gatherings Listen to them, go to people

Q13: How can we do better to gain input form Waukegan residents?

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To raise city resources you need to attract residents/businesses from outside Waukegan with higher incomes • You need to attract a large buisness which will generate jobs and support businesses - preferabley in downtown • Good luck. Here to help. Keep the lakefront and parks beautiful as they are the gems of Waukegan. • Muy Tercos sport fishing is looking to buy land at the lakefront • Waukegan is in a stalemate - just tired and worn-out, crime ridden, out of town landlords owning 50% of properties. No code enforcement and very little police help. • How are we going to implement and not create plans that gather dust? • Get City Council on board with plan • This was a strong vibrant town for many years and has the potential to return • CLC is expanding and needs to be more involved in arts and other things that bring people in • Puzzled by why Waukegan design never seems to approach other communities that are redeveloping like Zion, Racine or Kenosha. It seems a little off.

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Would have like to see all the companies involved present. Meeting for explanations and Q+A. Want to see plan with measurable outcomes This could be a beautiful city, just need to engage community (youth especially) to take pride in it. I am all about the lakefront. Would love to live on the water. Need better restaurants to pair with great theater Keep up the good work trying to make a difference Industry needs to have a place in the city I've worked here for many years and its my second home It is hard to overcome motionless inertia. But if you can get this moving, then you must keep it moving. Don’t stop in your efforts to reach this community. We have a great opportunity to become a model green community We have a long and significant history in the region We have a thriving arts community We have a Green Town of parks We have the asset of diversity in many aspects missing in gated communities

Q14: Additional Comments

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• Get the courthouse t stop telling jurors not to go into downtown because its unsafe. Work on negaive uran legends and public perception. Allow downtown restaurants to give lunch courchers to have a shuttle looping around for free and display in the courthouse or downtown businesses. Showcase the city. Business of the month. • Festivals are better than casinos, but still need something downtown all year every day that engages people going there with community - not a specific destination • Community team building • I'd like to see a city where minorities and American citizens gather without prejudice. The common goal is to improve Waukegan • Get serious with commitment • Get a college to come to town - maybe the old OMC site for a campus • I love Waukegan - 57 year resident • Don’t block the view of the lake with ugly buildings • This process needs to be done for spanish speakers • Hope this isn't just another plan • Waukegan residents ar every skeptical. We have been preseted with plans in the plast with no action, follow through with actual development • Protect the lakeshore natural communities, they are an important asset • Make Waukegan a travel destination • Need to have events and attractions not just businsesses

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Waukegan Housing Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s News Release (September 8, 2018) on Barwell Manor


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USEPA – United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

USACE – United States Army Corps of Engineers

IEPA – Illinois Environmental Protection Agency

ICMP - Illinois Coastal Management Program

GIV – Green Infrastructure Vision

FEMA – Federal Emergency Management Agency

BMP – Best Management Practice

ADID – Advanced Identification Wetlands

Glossary for abbreviations in Chapter 4 - Natural Resources & Green Infrastructure:

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queue jump lane and queue bypass lane, respectively.

Transit Signal Priority Transit signal priority (TSP) gives extra green time or less red time to transit phases at a signalized intersection to reduce transit delay associated with traffic signals [3]. It also reduces the variability in

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as it not only causes overcrowding on buses, but also increases the 90th percentile running time that is

the rest of this paper, “one-sided queue jump lane” and “two-sided queue jump lane” will be used for

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believe that the names are not self-explanatory and cause confusion among practitioners. Therefore, for

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running times by reducing signal delays. Running time variability is a major challenge for transit agencies

Even though queue jump and bypass lanes are the common terms used in the industry, the authors

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Figure 1 – Queue Jump and Queue Bypass Lane [5]

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Explanation of queue jumps (Source: Queue Jump Lane, Transit Signal Priority, and Stop Location: Evaluation of Transit Preferential Treatments using Microsimulation by AECOM)

Profile for RATIO

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Draft 2.26.19  

Waukegan Comprehensive Plan Draft 2.26.19