Issuu on Google+

THE

CHEF’s

Issue #07

JOURNAL

OF

: The Pub Evolution —

AUSTRALIAN

B E E F,

LAMB

&

GOAT


Rare M e diu m #07 L e vel 1 — 4 0 M o un t S t ree t — N or t h Sy dne y — NSW 2 0 6 0 Phone

02 9463 9333

Web

raremedium.com.au

Editor

Em ail

raremedium@mla.com.au

GUEST WRITER s

Melissa Leong

Sue Dyson & Roger McShane Paul Wilson Lauren Murdoch

raremedium@mla.com.au

Subscribe

1800 550 018

raremedium.com.au

M a g a z i n e Enq u i r i e s

MLA Foodservice C o n tac t s

Connaugh Sheehan

csheehan@mla.com.au

Design

MASH

mashdesign.com.au

Printing

National Marketing Manager Foodservice

Southern Colour

Claire Tindale-Penning

southerncolour.com.au

ctindale-penning@mla.com.au

Photographer

John Laurie

Nsw/ Act

John Kruger

mcarmody@mla.com.au

johnlauriephoto.com

Matthew Carmody

johnkruger.com.au

Qld/ Nt

Lighting

Gary McPherson

Tomas Friml

gmcpherson@mla.com.au

tomasfriml.com

Sa

Prop Stylist

Brett Atkinson

Sonia Rentsch

batkinson@mla.com.au

soniarentsch.com

Vic / Tas

Chef/ Gun-For-Hire

Michael Tan

(Melbourne — V ic)

Michael Fox

mtan@mla.com.au

Wa

ILLUSTRATOR

Rafael Ramirez

Jonathan Bartlett

rramirez@mla.com.au

bartlettstudio.com

THE

CHEF’s

JOURNAL

OF

AUSTRALIAN

B E E F,

LAMB

&

GOAT


Paper

sto ck

Grange b y K .W D o gg e t t Elemental chlorine free pulps, sourced with responsible forestry practices.

Copyright

==

M ay = Find us on '_raremedium'

he d = =

= 2014 = =

= = P ub

lis

==

This publication is published by Meat & Livestock Australia Limited ABN 39 081 678 364 (MLA). Care is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in the publication; however, MLA cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information or opinions contained in the publication. Readers should rely on their own enquiries in making decisions concerning their interests. Reproduction in whole or in part of this publication is prohibited without the prior written consent of MLA.


F eature

O ne

MASTER

CLASS

SPECIAL

FEATURE

feature

P A G E

two

R.M

#07

CO N TE N TS

ON

THE

MENU

FEATURE

THREE

ONE

WONDERS

CUT

MOMENTARY

P A G E

BITE SIZED


E d i t o r ' s N o t e Change is something less easy to accept than we think. We ask for it, long for it, and yet when it happens, we’re not sure things would have been better as they were before. As the Australian dining-scape changes, we’ve seen unshakable stalwarts fade and unlikely heroes emerge. Pubs, those neighbourhood boltholes and the source of a pot and a parmie have changed. Over the last few years, we’ve seen this category augment to include all the classic things we know and love... and something else. The new breed of pub operator and chef realises that the food experience matters as much as the atmosphere and the number of beers on offer — and even the latter is stepping up its game, with ‘craft beer’ becoming as eponymous as ‘bistronomy’ in current food terms. These days, it’s just as likely that you can walk into a pub and find boiled crabs, empanadas or Pitcued Brisket on the menu as you will your favourite beer, and ain’t it grand. While there will always be a little bogan in all of us that loves a little deep fried classic, it’s heartening to see the beloved Aussie pub evolve yet remain culturally relevant by keeping up with our changing tastes and habits. This issue celebrates innovative operators in the Australian pub scene, from fine dining chefs undoing their top button like Lauren Murdoch, to new kids on the block flavouring their offerings with their own unique personality like The Winston in Tasmania. Our One Cut Wonder shows off Beef Shin (as seen in Beef Masterpieces #3) and chef Paul Wilson shares an honest view of the industry from his time within it. Tassie food and wine writers Sue Dyson and Roger McShane lift the lid on what a true cider is (and more importantly what you eat with it) and we take a trip overseas to see what pubs are doing around the globe. Just like our cover, which features all the classic elements of a pub (meat, three veg and beer), we’re distilling the essence of what it means to be a pub, and daring you to look at them in a different, and more creative light. Who knows... we may succeed in doing just that. This is the my last issue before I hand the reins back to Connaugh Sheehan, so I’d like to thank you for letting me into your kitchens and alleyway milk crate breaks for the past few issues — it’s been more than a blast. See you down at the pub, Melissa

P.S. We’re on the interwebs, so come and find us! Ask questions, share pics and tell us what you’re working on... who knows, you might find yourselves in our next issue!


0 5 . 0 4

A A fresh start is rarely afforded to farming families. In the case of Nathen and Sophie Wakefield, they saw their opportunity and grabbed hold of it with both hands. The young family moved from farming sheep in Victoria's northwestern Mildura region, to the coastal climes of South Australia's Fleurieu Peninsula and added beef to their farming.

Wakefield Grange represents not only a new start but a new way of looking at what it means to own and run an agricultural business in Australia. From crowd funding to vertical integration, this unassuming pair are representative of the new guard in the Australian farming landscape... and isn't that a wonderful thing.

F

E

A

T

U

R

E

O

N

E

new


F E A T U R E O N E

beginning RM

2013 was a huge year for you. You relocated your young family across state lines and set up a new farm... that’s no mean feat. SW

Yes, it was a pretty action-packed year for us. We are so excited to have finally found a farm we can see ourselves living on and building up and we’ve been so busy just getting on with it. When you’re a small family business, you do everything yourself... and establishing a new farm means there’s always plenty to do!

0 4 . 0 5


0 7

RM

0 6

.

When you decided to leave Mildura, you could have chosen anywhere in the country to pick a new farm. Why the Fleurieu? SW

In our eyes, there was nowhere else. To us, it has the perfect combination of features: it’s close to the coast, the land is fertile and spacious, we’re on the tourist route, which is great for trade, and we’re really close to Adelaide and rural amenities which means our kids can go to school rather than study remotely... plus it’s just really beautiful here.

RM

You have your own butchery and meat cellar door here – that’s pretty handy! Yes, we’re proud of our set up here. With the abattoir only 12kms away, we can have our livestock processed there with as little stress as possible and brought back to us (whole for lambs, in quarters for beef) so we can butcher it to spec. for our restaurant and retail customers.

O

N

E

SW

F

E

A

T

U

R

E

RM SW

So vertical integration is a positive factor for you?

Yes. We hope to extend this further, by building a commercial kitchen so we can make our own pâtés and terrines and eventually smoke our own products, too. It also means we can cater events here with other producers in the region and really maximise the use of the space as a destination for chefs and food lovers.


F

RM

E

That’s a really progressive business strategy. What can you tell me about how you’re planning to fuel these developments?

A T U R

RM

N E

I think that’s a huge indicator for the way forward: blending technology with community for a sustainable result, it’s great to see young farming families at the forefront of this approach. What’s your vision for Wakefield Grange in the medium to long term?

O

We heard about how Jonai Farms (located just outside of Daylesford, VIC) used crowd funding to raise money to build a butchery on their property. Crowd funding is a relatively new initiative in Australia in the arts, let alone in agriculture, but they ended up raising in excess of their target, which is exciting. This inspired us to think about how we could use this approach to help us grow the business. An additional benefit to crowd funding is that it involves the community and deepens relationships, which is essential when you live on the land.

E

SW

SW

We want to aim high, but stay happy. In other words, we want to grow the business and we certainly aren’t afraid of success, but of equal importance is a life balance. We have a young family with 3 small children, and we want to be there to see them grow up and be an active part of their lives. We always want to remain hands-on in the business, and not lose track of why we do what do — that’s really crucial.

RM

Lastly, how do you see your role in the relationship between yourselves and the restaurant industry you supply? SW

0 6 . 0 7

We really see our role as bridging the gap of understanding between chefs and ourselves, the producers. We have chefs call up and ask us for 200 sirloin steaks per week. That’s theoretically fine, but do you know how many carcases it takes to produce that many steaks? If chefs want to source their produce from small and local producers, they need to understand that if they’re asking for a particular quantity of a cut, then the producer needs to think about where the rest of the animal goes. As big believers in respecting the beast, we want to ensure that very little, if anything is wasted. Chefs, who are creative and skilled enough to know what to do with the whole carcase, are really the ones who will be able to benefit from the small and local philosophy — the better everyone understands how the system works, the more productive this relationship can be.


0 9 . 0 8

Shin ⁄ Shank –– O s s o B u c c o It (*)

2 &

3

68

# em 1

#168

Osso Bucco comes from the Hind Shank (item #1683) and

C

L

A

S

S

the Fore Shank (item #1682).

To cut the Osso Bucco,

M

A

S

T

E

R

remove the outer skin...


M A S T E R

...and mark C L

thickness required.

A S S

Finish with a handsaw or bandsaw.

Handbook of Australian Meat

0 8

( *)

. 0 9


S

P

E

C

I

A

L

F

E

A

T

U

R

E

1 0

.

1 1

Global Pub

Crawl


S

P

E

C

I

A

L

F

E

A

T

U

R

E

1 0

.

1 1


1 3 . 1 2

W

ith the world strapping in for a conservative few years, it seems the general mood for food when eating out continues to be less about luxe and more about cheaper and more frequent eats. While there will always be exceptions to that rule (who can resist a bit of indulgence in the face of Armageddon?), it could be argued that pubs really are poised to take advantage of this direction in dining.

S

P

E

C

I

A

L

F

E

A

T

U

R

E

The explosion of craft beers and ciders over the past few years have ensured the humble pub’s renovation to become the new palaces of gastronomy. Far from their humble working class roots, it seems that these days everywhere you look there are beards and beers (and where there are hipsters...). This elevation in our perception of what pubs are about lends itself to a whole host of possibilities. After all, if you’re educating people to drink better beer, surely their propensity for quality also extends to consumables that require mastication?

A

round the world, pubs are evolving to keep up with changing expectations. While plate costs remain a key focus of the publican who wishes to open his or her doors tomorrow (and the next day), the nature of the offering is changing. In the EU, while steaks continue to be a main stayer, the preferred cuts are changing. Oyster Blade, Tri-Tip and round cuts from the hindquarter as well as other cuts like Short Ribs are beginning to grow in popularity. It's easy to see the logic: they represent fantastic flavour and texture, as well as bang for your buck. During times of economic challenge, the world tends to revert to comfort food too. Interestingly, even classics such as steak and Guiness pie in the UK or Flemish stew in Belgium are in many cases reinterpreted, rather than being faithful replications of days past.

I

n other regions of Europe, tartares are gaining popularity in pubs and it’s easy to appreciate the rise of raw. Vehicles for flavour, hand chopped beef can be loaded up with any number of spices, sauces and herbs to give a flavour kick, as well as a textural one. A tartare can take on the flavour profile of Mediterranean, Thai or Chinese flavours, all depending on how you season it.


E C I A L F E A T U R E

W

P

A

hether it’s a reinterpretation of the classics, a cultural clash of flavours and techniques, or a new way forward entirely, it's clear that there's movement at the station when it comes to pubs and the food they’re offering up. And while there will always be a place in the heart of any Australian for a good steak and chips, the scope is widening and that’s quite frankly, an exciting notion.

1 2

sia continues to channel Europe in its own charming interpretation of flavours and techniques, resulting in something truly distinct from either here, there, or anywhere. A burger might be spiced with Korean chilli paste or kimchi, while other pubs simply offer a menu mash up that could allow you to consume both Gaucho grill and shabu shabu in the same sitting. Pubs in the region have also picked up on the quintessential Asian tradition of street food. In pub environs, it’s dubbed ‘pub grub’, but the habit of consuming a variety of small savoury snacks with beer remains the same.

I

n the USA, burgers and Southern BBQ continue to be a finely specialised obsession upon which no two family members will probably ever agree (if shows like Food Wars are anything to go by). Both themes are unique down to a town or even region, proving that it isn’t just the Japanese who are relentless in the pursuit of perfection.

S

S

peaking of textural, the nose-to-tail philosophy is alive and kicking in pubs across Britain. This is hardly surprising given this is the same patch of earth that bred the Lord of the Dark Arts himself, Fergus Henderson. The rise of the gastro pub has ensured the continued elevation of non-prime cuts on the menu, with a confident resurgence of Ox Tongue, Brisket, Lamb’s Brains and other gloriously underrated ingredients in the hands of the capable and on the plates of the enlightened. With this greater breadth of cuisine on offer, food envy needn’t be an issue, with an increase in shared or small plates, meaning diners can experience a wider amount of dishes in one sitting.

. 1 3


R E T W O

milk-fed lamb stuffed with rice and studded with dried spices, fruits and nuts. This sort of cider is also cooling with spicy curries, like beef vindaloo or rendang. They are lower in alcohol than wine plus there are bubbles so it’s perfect for drinking in long, heat-quenching draughts. The French also make semi-sweet and sweet ciders too, which are even lower in alcohol, but these are better saved to match with dessert.

In - C i d e r

hese are both examples of real apple cider, not a simple, fizzy drink made with reconstituted apple juice and water. If a bottle says ‘Cider’ on the front label and ‘made from clear spring water’ on the back label, be nervous. Real apple cider is made by fermenting apple juice and, like wine, depending on the fruit varieties used, where and how they are grown, and the way the cider maker works, comes in many different styles. And real cider is not just a quenching drink. Like wine, it’s compatible with many types of foods including red meat.

M

U

T

T

small revolution is underway in Australia’s pubs and bars. Where the taps were once all connected to kegs of beer, now at least one is often given over to cider, often locally brewed and made in small batches. So, for example, you’ll find Newtown brewer Young Henry’s Cloudy Cider at Mary’s and at the Union Hotel in Sydney’s innerwest, and, on the other side of the country, George d'Fox Cider, made in Margaret River, is on tap at The Apple Daily Bar at Perth’s Print Hall and Settlers Tavern in Margaret River.

A

A

E

From humble beginnings, pubs have taken on a new role as purveyors of hand crafted food and drink, blurring the line between restaurant and watering hole. We’ve seen beer and food matching for a while and now, as cider continues to stake its own claim as drink of the day, it’s worth looking at how cider figures alongside cuisine. Food and wine writers, slash importers Sue Dyson and Roger McShane spend their lives travelling the world seeking out top drops, and here they share their ideas on cider and red meat.

F

Th e

n England and parts of Spain, cider is more typically a still drink and so an even more natural alternative to wine with a meal. Such ciders taste distinctively of apples, usually with some sweetness at the front of the palate, but finish dry. This can mirror many south-east Asian dishes, which balance sweet, salty, and sour flavours. Dishes like Thai beef and basil stir fry or a beef and noodle salad, spicy with chillies and dressed with fish sauce and lime juice work well with cider, as its initial sweetness gives way to a refreshing savoury finish. The same flavour profile can work well with a burger, especially if it’s served with sweet caramelised onions and sharp cheese.

W

hat’s clear though is that there’s no one size fits all and nearly as many options for matching food with cider as there are with wine. It’s an exciting time to be drinking cider in Australia.

. 1 5

Scoo p

1 4

eat dishes cooked with fruit tend to go well with traditional dry French sparkling ciders which are made with apples grown especially for cider making. Such ciders are savoury with plenty of meat-friendly tannins. Think of North African and Middle-Eastern inspired dishes like goat tagine with quinces or whole roasted

I


Leave your preconceptions at the door, Australian pubs are giving restaurants a run for their money with innovative and intelligent offerings at many a turn. Honesty remains at the heart of the dish, but beyond that, anything goes.

0.1

Mom's MeatLoaf > The Aussie Way _

0.2

Kris Miles : The Winston, TAS

Seared Beef Carpaccio with Truffled Beef Tartare _

0.3

Chef

Chef

Harry lilai : Town hall hotel, vic

Grilled Ox Tongue with Green Sauce _

Chef

PHIL WHITMARSH : The daniel o'connell, sa


1 9 . 1 8

A

MOM'S MEATLOAF

t a k e

t h e

o n

c l a s s i c

A m e r i c a n m e a t l o a f

THE AUSSIE WAY

b y

m y

m o t h e r - i n l a w ,

m a d e

A u s t r a l i a n w i t h

l a m b

m i n c e i n s t e a d o f

b e e f .

Mix all of the ingredients except for the extra BBQ sauce and breadcrumbs in a large mixing bowl. Spray 3 large bread loaf tins with olive oil spray and line the bottoms with baking paper. Evenly divide the mixture between the 3 tins and press down firmly. Add a thin layer of extra BBQ sauce to the top of each meatloaf and sprinkle with breadcrumbs. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 180째C for 1 hour. Remove the meat loaves from the oven and allow them to stand for 10-15 minutes prior to portioning.

Serve with creamy mashed potato, green beans with pancetta and homemade tomato relish.

O

N

T

H

E

M

E

N

U

4kg lamb Mince 4 brown onions, peeled and finely diced 1 bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked 4 tbsp dried basil 8 cloves garlic, crushed 5 eggs 1 cup dried cranberries 1 cup harder style feta, diced into 1 cm cubes 1 cup BBQ sauce (homemade) 3 tbsp salt 2 tbsp cracked black pepper extra BBQ sauce 4 slices sourdough bread, blitzed into crumbs

0.1


0.1

CHEF

kris mil e s The winston


2 1 . 2 0

Seared Beef Carpaccio Truffled Beef Tartare Seared Beef Car paccio 500g Eye Fillet (centre cut) 50g porcini powder

Tr u f f le d B e e f Ta r t a r e 70g Eye Fillet, brunoise Seasoning

1 tsp 1 tsp 1/2 1/4 tsp 1/4 tsp 1/4 tsp 1/4 tsp

Combine the tartare seasoning ingredients and then fold in the brunoise Eye Fillet. Dress with 1/4 teaspoon of the truffled dressing and season with salt and pepper.

Tr uf f led Dressing 30g truffle paste 20g seeded mustard 50ml truffle oil 50ml reduced veal jus 50ml chardonnay vinegar 300ml extra virgin olive oil Add all ingredients together slowly and whisk until combined. Set aside.

Tr uf f led But ton Mushrooms (best done a day in advance) 200g whole button mushrooms 50ml olive oil for cooking 80ml extra virgin olive oil 50ml truffle oil 100ml chardonnay vinegar 2 bay leaves 2 sprigs thyme 2 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced salt to season

N

T

H

E

M

E

N

U

Roll the Eye Fillet in porcini powder and sear in a hot pan on all sides. Remove from the pan and allow the fillet to cool enough to handle. Wrap tightly in cling film and place in the freezer to firm up until the dish is ready to serve. Do not allow to freeze completely.

O

black truffle paste truffled mushrooms, brunoise egg yolk Dijon mustard green shallots, brunoise lemon juice chives, chopped

In a large pot on a high heat, add the olive oil, button mushrooms, bay leaves and thyme and cook for 2 minutes. Deglaze the pot with chardonnay vinegar and cover the pot with a lid and let the mushrooms absorb the vinegar. Remove the pot from heat and allow the mushrooms to cool slightly. Add the extra virgin olive oil and truffle oil, season with salt, bring back to the boil and immediately remove from heat. Allow to cool and pickle for at least a day.

wild rocket Parmigiano reggiano shavings Using a meat slicer, slice the beef carpaccio 5 to 7 mm thick, allowing 5 to 6 slices per serve. Arrange on a plate and allow to thaw. Place a quenelle of truffled beef tartare in the middle of the carpaccio and drizzle over some truffle dressing, season with sea salt flakes, and a little extra virgin olive oil. Garnish with wild rocket leaves and shavings of Parmigiano reggiano.

0.2


0.2

CHEF

H ARRY L IL A I TOWN HALL HOTEL


2 3 . 2 2

GRIL LED 0X TONGUE

GREEN SAUCE

2 2 medium 1 2 sticks

Ox Tongues carrots, split lengthways brown onion, peeled and halved celery

Place the Ox Tongues, carrots, onion and celery in a pot, cover with water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and allow it to cook for at least 2.5 hours or until a skewer goes though the tongue easily. Remove the pot from heat and allow the tongues to cool in the water, then remove and peel. Set the tongues aside and allow to cool.

Green Sauce 1 bunch sea parsley 1 bunch chervil 1 bunch dill 1/2 bunch mint 1/4 bunch tarragon 2 tbsp capers, chopped 2 tbsp cornichons, chopped 3 cloves garlic 10 white anchovies extra virgin olive oil juice of 1 lemon salt and pepper

Slice the peeled tongues lengthways into 1 cm thick pieces and char grill them until char lines appear and the meat is heated through. Place the slices on a plate and spoon over a generous amount of the green sauce. Serve with charred bread to mop up the juices.

O

N

T

H

E

M

E

N

U

Place all ingredients in a food processor and pulse to combine. Mix in the lemon juice and enough olive oil to create a saucy consistency. Season to taste and set aside.

0.3


0.3

CHEF

P HIL WHI T M ARSH THE DANIEL O'CONNELL


E

A

T

U

R

E

T

H

R

E

E

Be creative Be c ARE F UL

F

2 4

.

2 5

B C

c B


F E U R E T H

by

T

chef’s f o r ay the Austr ali an pub industrY

A

A into

R E E

Paul Wilson

I started my business consulting career following a fantastic 5 year tenure as Chef Director, transforming Melbourne’s iconic watering hole The Botanical Hotel in the city’s South Yarra district. Working with highly regarded industry operators Chris Lucas and Erez Gordon, we managed to transform the venue into one of Australia’s most successful and critically acclaimed hotels.

T

he media labelled us The Dream Team. We took great delight in taking a venue and reshaping it in order to realise its potential as a relevant, exciting establishment sitting on a robust business foundation. At The Botanical, we knew our strengths as individuals within the team, and seldom interfered with each other’s boundaries. Come to think of it, those boundaries were probably critical to our success! on from that project, I worked M oving on re-establishing 4 hotels as brand-leading

2 4 .

gasto pubs in Melbourne. All in all, the work amounted to 6 distinct food concepts in 14 months. The result was a ground breaker for the city, but while revenue was up, my motivation was not, and I took this as a sign that I needed to take some much needed time out, to rediscover where my passion lives.

2 5


F E

T

E T H R

in creating a successful pub venue. First and foremost, it’s about creating an outstanding and unique experience with a strong concept. Central to this experience is architecture and design which creates a sense of atmosphere and personality. Secondly, service is not to be overlooked. Well trained staff are attentive, retain customers and stay on, so are worth the investment in developing. Thirdly, and probably of most importance, I believe an excellent food and drink offering is the key ingredient to a successful pub venue.

E

people ask me what I believe M any are the most important elements

E

ith this in mind, it’s especially encouraging to see the Australian pub industry turning a positive corner. In places like Sydney, there is an increasing amount of creative, progressive and culturally distinct pub models. Operators such as Merivale, the Van Handels and the Drink'n'Dine group understand that creating a mood and a sense of place through architecture, design and staff is important. As well, high quality food and drink are also key factors in success. It’s not just large operators that are kicking goals though. The small bar revolution has given birth to a new breed of operator and small, casual venues are coming into their own on the fringes of the pub scene.

R

W

U

most likely close their doors in the near future due to complacency in the areas of food, drink and service. This is a really salient point; that even in cities with incredibly dense populations, you can’t hide mediocrity!

T

UK, The Guardian reported I ninthe 2013 that 4,000 British pubs would

A

he pub industry is currently going through a very interesting and challenging period. Unless you are able to prop up your business through channels other than food and beverage, such as gaming or accommodation, times can be tough. Rising employment costs and overheads will continue to challenge even the most robust of business models.

this last point, pubs are still D espite not working hard enough to promote high quality, seasonal produce on the menu. Is it wanting to keep food costs low? Or is it a lack of skill in the kitchen and inspiration that’s blocking the way? Whatever it is, it has become clear that in order for pubs to survive, they’re going to have to work a lot harder than relying on what pubs used to mean to Australians in the past.

A

2 6

s an industry, pub operators need to incite more debate and dialogue over the future of the category, and create positive feedback channels from which to learn. Australia has always been a leader in accessible dining and if we’re smart about learning how consumer habits are evolving, and identifying key trends such as the rise in craft beer and food and drink matching (it’s not just about wine!), pubs have the potential to redefine their cultural relevance for Australians.

. 2 7


* Handbook of Australian Meat


O

N

E

C

U

T

W

O

N

D

E

R

S

3 0

.

3 1


•• Braise the beef at 150°C for 5 – 6 hours or until tender. Remove from heat and allow to cool. When cool enough to handle, remove the beef from the dish. Strain the liquid and reduce it to a sauce.

D

C

• Season the beef with the salt and allspice. In a hot frying pan, heat the oil and brown the meat all over. Transfer the meat to a tight fitting braising dish. Back in the frying pan, sauté the onion and carrot until golden then add the bay leaves, garlic and thyme. Sauté for a further 2 minutes and then add these ingredients to the braising dish with the beef. Bring the red wine to the boil in a pot, and add the beef stock. Bring the liquid to a boil, skim off any impurities and then pour it over the beef and vegetables. Cover with baking paper and cover tightly with foil or a lid.

E U T W O N E R S

6

N

S e r v e s

O

2kg beef Shank, deboned 20g salt 5g allspice 6 cloves garlic, roughly chopped 50g ginger, peeled and sliced 250g onion, diced 250g carrot, diced 2 bay leaves 5 sprigs thyme 250ml red wine 1L beef stock 100ml vegetable oil 1 tsp parsley, chopped 1 tsp chives, chopped 1 tsp tarragon, chopped 200g pork crepinette

••• Divide the meat into 6 portions. Sprinkle each portion with the chopped herbs and wrap each portion with a thin layer of the crepinette to form a parcel. You may have a little crepinette left over.

Beef Shank Parcel with Cumberland Sauce c h e f

Lauren Murdoch  3 Weeds > NSW

Cumberland Sauce 100g eschallot, peeled and diced 1 orange, zest only 1 lemon, blanched and finely julienned 150ml port 75ml orange juice 50ml lemon juice 150g red currant jelly

salt and pepper to taste • Bring all the ingredients to the boil. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.

To Serve

3 0 . 3 1

~ Preheat an oven to 220°C. ~ Place the beef parcels on a tray lined with baking paper for 10 – 15 minutes to heat through. ~ Serve with sweet potato mash, some of the reduced braising liquid and the Cumberland sauce.


O

N

E

C

U

T

W

O

N

D

E

R

S

3 2

.

3 3


7 - 1 0

E C

Cook: 9 hours

S e r v e s

N U T W N D E R S

• Heat the oil in a large, deep baking tray and lightly brown all the vegetables and herbs, deglaze with red wine. Rub mustard and pepper all over the Shin and place on top of sautéed vegetable mix. Cover with beef stock and crushed tomatoes and bring to the boil slowly then turn meat over. Cover with a lid or seal with foil and place in a combi oven for 9 hours (depends on size) on 95°C or in a static oven for 6 hours at 130°C turning the meat after 3 hours. Remove from the oven and rest for an hour.

O

Prep: 30 minutes

O

1 whole beef Shin > Have the top and bottom cut flat with a butcher's saw, revealing the marrow at the top cracked black pepper hot English mustard 1/2 cup olive oil 3 large onions, peeled and diced 1/2 bunch celery, diced 3 bay leaves 1 cup fresh parsley, chopped 1 leek, chopped 5 large carrots, peeled, cut into chunks 4 medium parsnips, peeled, cut into chunks 6 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed 1 bunch fresh thyme leaves 3kg can Italian tomatoes, crushed > Beef stock or Master stock to cover Shin 1 bottle dry red wine

Beef Shin Volcano c h e f

Darren Angelsey  Indian Ocean Brewery > WA

•• Place a couple of sheets of foil on a bench about 1/2 a meter square. Remove the Shin carefully from the braising mix, (a spider is handy) and place in the centre of the foil. Roll the meat tightly back into shape and stand it in an upright position. Refrigerate overnight. Strain the braising liquor and reduce until you have a thick jus. Season to taste.

To Serve

roast potatoes / parsnips / beetroot sweet potato > peeled, sliced finely into thin lengths, deep fried 3 2 . 3 3

~ Place the foil covered Shin in a warm oven (110˚C) for 90 minutes (150˚C for the last 15 minutes). ~ Remove foil and place on a serving tray. ~ Surround the beef with roast vegetables, and place the fried sweet potato chips over the top of the Shin bone. Serve jus in jug and pour over Shin at the table.


O

N

E

C

U

T

W

O

N

D

E

R

S

3 4

.

3 5


E C U T N D E R S

•• Fill the bottom of a steamer with water, along with the 2 cinnamon sticks and the half lemon. Bring the water to a simmer and lay the coriander and parsley stalks on to the bottom of the steamer basket. Next, lay the wrapped Shin pieces on top. Steam for 2 1/2 to 3 hours at a constant simmer. Remove the Shins from the steamer when the meat is soft and tender, and allow it to rest for half an hour.

O

• In a mortar and pestle, grind the ginger, garlic and sea salt into a paste. Add the cumin, paprika, olive oil and ghee and mix to combine. Massage the spice paste into the beef Shin and then wrap securely in muslin cloth.

W

8

N

S e r v e s

O

1.5kg beef Shin, deboned 3 tbsp ghee 2 tbsp ground cumin 2 tbsp paprika 4 cloves garlic, peeled 1 tsp sea salt 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped 1 bunch coriander stalks 1 bunch parsley stalk 1 m muslin cloth 1/2 lemon 2 cinnamon sticks

Steamed Beef Shin with Couscous and Raisins Raisin Couscous c h e f

Pierre Khodja  Flinders Hotel Terminus > VIC

500g couscous 700ml vegetable stock 80ml olive oil 80g butter 100g raisins, soaked in water for 2 hours

salt and pepper • Toast the couscous in a dry pan until golden. Heat the stock in a separate saucepan with the olive oil. Once boiling, pour the liquid over the couscous, cover the pan with plastic wrap for 10 minutes. •• Once cooked, fold the butter and the raisins into the couscous until light and fluffy, and set aside.

coriander leaves / 1 long red chilli, finely chopped / ground cumin

3 4

To Serve

. 3 5

~ Serve carved pieces of steamed Shin, garnished with ground cumin and freshly chopped chilli, along with the steamed raisin couscous.


3 6

.

3 7

B

i

t

e

Source :

Publocation.com.au

Australia is home to over 6,000 pubs with the highest proportion of them being in New South Wales, at (2,052).

Pu b Tr ivia

Which country has the largest pub in the Southern Hemisphere? We do! Brisbane’s Eaton Hills Hotel boasts a capacity of 7,000 patrons, with nine separate bars and 100 beer taps. The venue also boasts a 350 seat restaurant and the largest television in Queensland.

What’s in a name?

B

I

T

E

S

I

Z

E

D

The most popular names for a pub in Australia include ‘Royal’ (242), ‘Commercial’ (137) and ‘Club’ (107).


d

E

e

T

z

I

i

B

S

S I Z E D

Based on James Joyce’s quote from Ulysses “A good puzzle would be to cross Dublin without passing a pub.”, a local radio station offered a prize to the first person to solve the riddle. The winning answer? You can take any route... you just need to stop in at every pub on the way.

Source :

Telegraph.co.uk

Australia’s oldest pub is the Sydney’s Lord Nelson Hotel, which was established in 1841.

Public houses have existed since Roman times.

3 6 . 3 7


M

O

M

E

N

T

A

R

Y

3 8

.

3 9


M O M E T A

CHEF

N Y

M u r d o c h

R

L a u r e n

After many years of creating fine dining experiences, moving to (cooking in) a pub was not something I ever envisaged. I have discovered though, that this move that has allowed me to rediscover the enjoyment of all that I've learnt along the path of my career in the food industry. After working in the very successful and extremely busy French bistro Felix, in the heart of Sydney, I took some time off, working casually with a great friend in her catering company Hatrick Catering. I took the opportunity to do quite a bit of traveling as well — something that I had sorely missed while working 90 hour weeks and rarely seeing the light of day. Around the same time, the 3 Weeds Hotel was looking to replace its departing head chef and as a pub that has always had a great culinary reputation, it seemed like a place I could happily call home. It has a solid pub food menu available from the counter, and in the restaurant, I am able to tap into my fine dining background and present a more polished offering. I was fortunate enough to have worked at the Opera House when Anders Ousback was consulting there, and again we crossed paths when he was working with the Clock Hotel in Surry Hills. I was working next door at MG Garage during its hey day and my boyfriend Ben Fitton was working at The Clock. Anders was credited with directing the Sydney food scene away from nouvelle cuisine towards more honest and uncomplicated ideas back in the 80's. I remember his simple dishes such as grilled calamari with chilli, lemon and aioli, or wonderful silky pâté with cornichons and toast, and of course thick Cumberland-style sausages with onions, mash and jus. Pubs have always been a fun place to hang out with friends, play pool and relax, and Anders made them a place for great food as well. I'd like to think that I am continuing some of that valuable, beautiful legacy in the food I create at the 3 Weeds.

3

W e e d s

R o z e l l e

——

N SW 3 8 . 3 9


N

O

T

E

S


Th a n k Yo u Fo r R e a d i n g


Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) is a service company that invests in marketing and research and development on behalf of its 47,500 beef, lamb and goat producer members. Our role within foodservice is to bridge the gap between farm and kitchen by providing chefs with information and inspiration on red meat. For your Subscr iption

1800 550 018 raremedium.com.au


Rare Medium #7 The Pub Evolution